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Journal Cover AfricaGrowth Agenda
  [1 followers]  Follow
    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 1811-5187
   Published by Sabinet Online Ltd Homepage  [223 journals]
  • AfricaGrowth Agenda: Editor's note
    • Abstract: The first article by Musina, Ngala and Okaka examines the relative effect of firm, industry and country level on capital structure of listed non-financial firms on the Nairobi Stock Exchange from 2007 ton 2012. From the results of the multivariate regression analysis, the authors conclude that industry level factors account for greater variations in debt ratios. The authors recommend for more investments in non-current assets to act as collateral for debt capital.
      PubDate: 2015-12-11T11:30:08Z
       
  • AfricaGrowth Agenda: Firm characteristics and capital structure of firms
           listed on Nairobi Securities Exchange, Kenya
    • Authors: Musina; Nobert, Ngala, Consolata, Okaka, Damianus
      Abstract: This study used explanatory research design where all non-financial firms listed on NSE for the period 2007-2012 were purposively selected. Multivariate regressions analysis was used to assess the relative importance of firm, industry and country level factors on capital structure. The results show that firm characteristics significantly influence capital structure and account for 9.9% of variations in total debt ratios highlighting the fact that the use of total debt among non-financial firms are generally low. However, industry level factor account for the greatest variations in debt ratios. The study recommends that in order for non-financial firms to increase their level of debt capital, they should invest more of their resources on non-current assets that can be pledged as collateral for debt capital.
      PubDate: 2015-12-11T11:30:07Z
       
  • AfricaGrowth Agenda: Half a decade of credit reference bureaus activities
           in Ghana : a reflection
    • Authors: Kusi; Baah, Agbloyor, Elikplimi, Fiador, Vera, Osei, Kofi
      Abstract: The study explores bank performance before and after Credit Reference Bureaus (CRB) introduction in Ghana. Using trend analyses, it is observed that patronage of CRB products increased immensely after CRB introduction. Again, it is observed that bank performance indicators (credit risk and profitability) improved after the introduction of CRBs. Consistent with earlier studies, this study partly trace the improvement in these bank performance indicators to the introduction of CRBs. Given the effect of CRB, it is recommended that banks patronize CRB products while government enact policies that deepen patronage and publicity of CRBs in Ghana to ensure financial stability.
      PubDate: 2015-12-11T11:30:06Z
       
  • AfricaGrowth Agenda: Harnessing digital marketing to access markets :
           opportunities for Africa's SMEs
    • Authors: Chinje; Nathalie Beatrice
      Abstract: Several public and private sector-led initiatives have been implemented to help unleash SMEs' potential as the engine of Africa's socio-economic prosperity and sustainability. Notwithstanding the potential benefits of these initiatives, SMEs failure rates, in most parts of sub-Saharan Africa, remain unacceptably high as evidenced by prior studies that reveal that 70% to 90% of SMEs fail within their first year of operations, primarily due to lack of finance and market access. Technological advancements and their swift diffusion amongst companies in Africa have created several business opportunities for SMEs to access markets at a low cost and, hence, to increase their competitiveness as well as generate enduring profits for themselves. This paper explores how digital marketing channels can be harnessed by Africa's SMEs in order for them to access local, national, regional and global market opportunities.
      PubDate: 2015-12-11T11:30:05Z
       
  • AfricaGrowth Agenda: Access to financial services and poverty :
           perspectives from South African household data
    • Authors: Simatele; Munacinga
      Abstract: The paper uses the South African case to examine the effect of access to financial services on income poverty. The results indicate that access to formal financial services is positively correlated with lower levels of poverty. Access to credit has a greater effect on poverty reduction than access to savings and payment services, suggesting that policy design should focus on the reduction of information, enforcement, and transactions costs. Access to financial services has a greater effect on poverty reduction in female headed households.
      PubDate: 2015-12-11T11:30:04Z
       
  • AfricaGrowth Agenda: Editors note
    • Abstract: The first article in this issue by Okafor examines the relationship between financial development and economic growth in Nigeria during the 2008/2009. Using a time series data from 2004 to 2012, the results from OLS estimations confirms prior theory that the developments in the financial services sector promotes economic growth. The author however finds that the global financial crises reduced the positive effect on economic growth.
      PubDate: 2015-09-08T13:26:29Z
       
  • AfricaGrowth Agenda: Impact of financial sector development one economic
           growth of Nigeria
    • Authors: Godwin; Okafor
      Abstract: This paper investigates the impact of Nigeria's financial sector development on economic growth. In addition, an analysis is carried to ascertain the extent to which the 2008/2009 financial crisis affected the relationship between financial sector development and economic growth in Nigeria. Ordinary Least Square (OLS) technique, with time series data for the period 2004-2012, is employed. Results show that financial sector development has positive and significant impact on economic growth of Nigeria. However, the 2008/2009 financial crisis slightly reduced the positive impact of Nigeria's financial sector development on economic growth. The study concludes with some important policy implications.
      PubDate: 2015-09-08T13:26:28Z
       
  • AfricaGrowth Agenda: Save today, safe tomorrow : the Lesotho case
    • Authors: Makhetha; Leseko Simon, Taolana, Setheha Mary
      Abstract: Th is paper attempts to define the concept of "save today, safe tomorrow" and its relevance in the context of Lesotho economy. One fundamental finding is that the causality between saving, investment and growth can run in both directions. Therefore, savings and investment provide a foundation for sustained growth. However, there has been persistent domestic dis-saving in Lesotho from 2002 to 2013 implying that investment has not been growing. Savings are thought to be relatively low in Lesotho because of poor access to safe, flexible, convenient and affordable savings products. Thus, for Lesotho to realize growth she needs to stimulate savings.
      PubDate: 2015-09-08T13:26:28Z
       
  • AfricaGrowth Agenda: Urbanization and housing finance development matter :
           fresh empirical based lessons for African and Asian countries
    • Authors: Nguena; Christian Lambert
      Abstract: Africa followed by Asia has the highest urbanization rate and additionally, constitute the least developed housing finance market in the world. Investigations in this paper have mainly highlighted that : Housing demand is continuously higher, absolutely and in comparison with other regions in the world. Urbanization rate is moving to the same positive way with housing demand. The housing finance market in Africa as in Asia is nascent and only burgeoning. There is a negative relation between mortgage access and mortgage interest rate in Africa and Asia; thus mortgage policy indexed by higher interest rates tends to complicate this accessibility.
      PubDate: 2015-09-08T13:26:27Z
       
  • AfricaGrowth Agenda: Challenges and strategies to survive in Zimbabwe's
           hostile business environment. The case of manufacturing firms in Harare
    • Authors: Sandada; Maxwell
      Abstract: The quantitative study sought to ascertain the strategies that manufacturing firms adopted in order to survive in Zimbabwe's hostile business environment. The survival of a firm in such an environment depends on its capacity to deal with a number of challenges that threaten its survival. Through factor analysis the main challenges being faced by the 192 manufacturing firms that were identified through stratified random sampling are cheap imports, liquidity crunch, corruption, political instability, inadequate infrastructure and restrictive labor regulations. The underlying strategies that are being used to survive include downsizing, partnerships, offshore financing, alternative sources of water and power, and retrenchments. The results of the study can serve as a guide to policy makers in their endeavour to formulate policies of formalising the informal sector.
      PubDate: 2015-09-08T13:26:27Z
       
  • AfricaGrowth Agenda: Editors note
    • Abstract: In the first paper of this issue, Strydom and Viviers discuss the rising Global value chains (GVCs) as a means of improving the growth prospects of South Africa. The authors identify the reliance on locally-sourced resources, a low value-added fabrication industrial policy and an export-reliant trade policy to limit South Africa's participation in the GVCs.
      PubDate: 2015-06-24T13:53:51Z
       
  • AfricaGrowth Agenda: Global value chains : a new era for South Africa's
           foreign trade
    • Authors: Strydom; P.D.F., Viviers, Wilma
      Abstract: Global value chains (GVCs) are giving rise to new trade patterns and are helping to improve many countries' growth prospects - particularly in the developing world. Yet South Africa is finding it difficult to participate in GVCs because of the country's heavy reliance on locally-sourced resources, an industrial policy that tends to emphasise low value-added fabrication, and a trade policy that strongly favours exports over imports. While GVCs are usually spawned from regional trade relationships, the GVC phenomenon has not taken off in Africa due to weak trade liberalisation and regional integration attempts. If South Africa is to take advantage of the opportunities presented by GVCs, and in the process enhance its growth and development prospects, a new trade policy framework and a change of mind set are urgently needed.
      PubDate: 2015-06-24T13:53:51Z
       
  • AfricaGrowth Agenda: South Africa's export diversification options : the
           end of the road for traditional export markets?
    • Authors: Matthee; Marianne
      Abstract: In the face of waning export opportunities for South Africa in its traditional markets in the developed world, this paper examines South Africa's evolving export relationships with countries in the South. Drawing on the concepts of the intensive and extensive margin, a quantitative analysis reveals that the SADC region in particular has become a significant export destination for South Africa over the past two decades, with many new export products attracting a strong following. This points to the need for South Africa's trade policies and strategies to have a strong regional orientation and for export diversification to become a cornerstone of the country's economic growth and development plans into the future.
      PubDate: 2015-06-24T13:53:50Z
       
  • AfricaGrowth Agenda: China's presence in Africa : saviour or
           annihilator?
    • Authors: Jordaan; Andre C.
      Abstract: The rise of China and its presence on the African continent poses both opportunities and challenges. China's approach is primarily state centric, driven by large development projects with relatively cheap capital, with very little impact in terms of job creation, through a policy of no interference in domestic affairs and the absence of lending conditions. African countries gain by receiving infrastructure and soft loans to grow their economies. Although this creates potential growth opportunities, it also raises concern for the relatively poor, lower income countries in Africa.
      PubDate: 2015-06-24T13:53:50Z
       
  • AfricaGrowth Agenda: To "spot" and "point" : managing
           waste pickers' access to landfill waste in the North-West Province
    • Authors: Blaauw; P.F., Viljoen, J.M.M., Schenck, C.J., Swart, E.C.
      Abstract: Informal recycling has the potential to contribute to the generation and redistribution of income and hence poverty reduction. However, municipal waste management systems in South Africa do not appear to be ready to formally accommodate informal waste pickers; this has made their activities and waste-picking income vulnerable to the negative effects of policies and strategies. This paper described successful approaches followed on two landfill sites in the North-West Province of South Africa to facilitate the successful integration of informal waste pickers: the key elements in the success of the approach is controlled access to the landfill site, proper management of waste picking activities on the landfill site as well as cooperation, proper collection and support from local Buy Back Centres. Involving waste pickers themselves in policy planning is essential for long term success in informal recycling.
      PubDate: 2015-06-24T13:53:49Z
       
  • AfricaGrowth Agenda: Editors note
    • Abstract: This issue of the Africagrowth Agenda covers articles on export promotion, household welfare and entrepreneurial ideology and start-ups. The first paper by J. Munemo examines the effect of FDI on entrepreneurship under conditions of Good Business Start-up regulations in a sample of 26 African countries. Using a longitudinal data analysis, the author concludes that FDI crowds-in entrepreneurial activities in countries with less-stringent start-up regulations.
      PubDate: 2015-03-20T13:31:48Z
       
  • AfricaGrowth Agenda: How a focused approach to export promotion can
           accelerate Zimbabwe's post-conflict reconstruction
    • Authors: Mzumara; Macleans, Matthee, Marianne, Steenkamp, Ermie
      Abstract: Zimbabwe, like many countries that have emerged from a protracted period of conflict, is slowly putting the pieces in place to turn its economy around. But many challenges are presenting themselves, not least of which is how to devise a workable strategy to boost Zimbabwe's exports in the face of ever-shifting market conditions and competitive forces. This paper explains the rationale for and methodology used in the application of a Decision Support Model (DSM) for Zimbabwe, a market selection tool that uses a sequential filtering system to identify high-potential export opportunities. The results of this application - which reveal the most promising export opportunities for Zimbabwe should form the basis of a new strategy to re-focus and fast-track Zimbabwe's export promotion effort, and once again make exports one of the central pillars of the Zimbabwean economy.
      PubDate: 2015-03-20T13:31:46Z
       
  • AfricaGrowth Agenda: Household welfare effects of economic community of
           West African states' custom external tariffs in Nigeria
    • Authors: Kareem; Olayinka Idowu
      Abstract: The importance of Nigeria's economic integration with the rest of the world cannot be overemphasized. Trade, a veritable channel of this integration, and in particular its policies, often have a different impact on economic agents due to the transmission mechanism through which they operate. This paper uses micro- and macro-economic data to investigate the household welfare effects in Nigeria of the Common External Tariff (CET) of the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS). The welfare effects are examined from the perspective of households as producer, consumers, and factor owners. The empirical strategies proceeded in three steps: first by determining the extent of tariff pass-through to domestic prices; second, investigating the linkages between prices and wages, and finally examine the impact of both prices and wages on household welfare. The paper finds that the trade policy has had a net positive effect on households in Nigeria, largely due to the gains from expenditure on agricultural goods. The expenditure gains from the policy through lower prices outweigh household losses incurred in their purchasing power through lower income. The paper recommends social safety net measures, particularly for vulnerable subsistence agricultural households in rural areas.
      PubDate: 2015-03-20T13:31:44Z
       
  • AfricaGrowth Agenda: Does FDI facilitate entrepreneurship in African
           countries with good business start-up regulations?
    • Authors: Munemo; Jonathan
      Abstract: This paper investigates whether foreign direct investment (FDI) crowds-in entrepreneurship in a sample of 26 African countries. Results obtained using longitudinal data analysis indicate that the existing regulatory environment for business start-ups plays a significant role in facilitating the crowding-in effect of FDI. More specifically, the results show that FDI significantly crowds-in entrepreneurial activity of new domestic firms when business start-up regulations are lower. This implies that excessive startup regulations are inefficient, and thus dissuade new firm creation by increasing the costs of doing business and impeding the crowding-in effect from FDI. The policy conclusions are quite clear: reforms to establish the level of regulation that is most beneficial for the successful entry of new local firms play a critical role in enhancing the complementarity between foreign and domestic enterprises. These reforms will not only increase the entry of new domestic firms, but will also generate positive externalities from FDI which arise from transmission of new ideas, entrepreneurial skills, and other knowledge transfers and lead to higher productivity and growth.
      PubDate: 2015-03-20T13:31:43Z
       
  • AfricaGrowth Agenda: Entrepreneurial ideology : a discourse so paradoxical
    • Authors: Musara; Mazanai
      Abstract: Entrepreneurship has become an ideology of the 'new capitalist spirit' that needs to be questioned. In questioning this ideology, this paper attempts to identify the emerging trends in literature advancing the discourse to promote entrepreneurship. This rises from the conceptions that allude to the fact that entrepreneurship is the only tool to address the socio-economic problems rampant in many developing countries as well as the only means to promote economic equality, justice and freedom. The paper argues that the interdisciplinary discourse on entrepreneurship, capitalism, social and economic freedom and justice ideologically contribute to the construction of the contemporary capitalist enterprise as the only possible model for the generation of wealth in society. It further argues that the current research agenda on entrepreneurship in Africa in general, and South Africa in particular, serves as a tapestry for the established status quo and has limited potential for the reconstruction of reality to an extent of being reflective of the specific social context in which entrepreneurship occurs. Of particular note is that the existing approaches to identify, investigate and analyse entrepreneurship problems in the African context are subjected to Western Ideologies that are engrossed in genderism, ethnocentrism, capitalism as well as individualism. As such, these instruments of power only serve to concentrate power and control in the hands of the minority working class at the expense of the oppressed majority. Consequently, the conclusions problematize the hegemonic discourses on entrepreneurship and point out that entrepreneurship has been less of a human emancipation tool and more of an instrument of power and a capitalism reproduction mechanism. Thus, robust methods of problem identification, investigation and analysis in entrepreneurship discourse are called for.
      PubDate: 2015-03-20T13:31:41Z
       
 
 
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