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Publisher: Sabinet Online Ltd   (Total: 187 journals)

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Showing 1 - 187 of 187 Journals sorted alphabetically
ACCORD Occasional Paper     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Acta Academica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.13, h-index: 4)
Acta Classica : Proceedings of the Classical Association of South Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.102, h-index: 2)
Acta Criminologica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Acta Germanica : German Studies in Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Acta Juridica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Acta Patristica et Byzantina     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
AFFRIKA J. of Politics, Economics and Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Africa Conflict Monitor     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Africa Insight     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Africa Institute Occasional Paper     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Africa J. of Nursing and Midwifery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.128, h-index: 4)
AfricaGrowth Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
African Entomology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.295, h-index: 21)
African Finance J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.168, h-index: 2)
African J. for Physical, Health Education, Recreation and Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
African J. of Business and Economic Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
African J. of Democracy and Governance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
African J. of Herpetology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.327, h-index: 10)
African J. of Research in Mathematics, Science and Technology Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
African J. of Rhetoric     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
African J. of Wildlife Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
African Plant Protection     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
African Renaissance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
African Safety Promotion     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
African Yearbook of Rhetoric     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Africanus     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Agriprobe     Open Access  
Akroterion     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Annals of the Ditsong National Museum of Natural History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Annual Survey of South African Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Ars Nova     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Article 40     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
BER : Architects and Quantity Surveyors' Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
BER : Building and Construction : Full Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
BER : Building Contractors' Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
BER : Building Sub-Contractors' Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
BER : Capital Goods Industries Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
BER : Consumer Confidence Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
BER : Consumer Goods Industries Survey     Full-text available via subscription  
BER : Economic Prospects : An Executive Summary     Full-text available via subscription  
BER : Economic Prospects : Full Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
BER : Intermediate Goods Industries Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
BER : Manufacturing Survey : Full Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
BER : Motor Trade Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
BER : Retail Sector Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
BER : Retail Survey : Full Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
BER : Survey of Business Conditions in Building and Construction : An Executive Summary     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
BER : Survey of Business Conditions in Manufacturing : An Executive Summary     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
BER : Survey of Business Conditions in Retail : An Executive Summary     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
BER : Trends : Full Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
BER : Wholesale Sector Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Building Women     Full-text available via subscription  
Bulletin of Statistics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Business Tax and Company Law Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Cabo     Full-text available via subscription  
Cardiovascular J. of Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.414, h-index: 22)
Cardiovascular J. of South Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Child Abuse Research in South Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Civil Engineering = Siviele Ingenieurswese     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Clean Air J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Clean Air J. = Tydskrif vir Skoon Lug     Full-text available via subscription  
Climate Summary of South Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Commonwealth Youth and Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Communicare : J. for Communication Sciences in Southern Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Comparative and Intl. Law J. of Southern Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Conflict Trends     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Conspectus : The J. of the South African Theological Seminary     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Current Allergy & Clinical Immunology     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.127, h-index: 6)
De Arte     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
De Rebus     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Die Kerkblad     Full-text available via subscription  
Educare     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Emergency Services SA     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
English in Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Ergonomics SA : J. of the Ergonomics Society of South Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
ESR Review : Economic and Social Rights in South Africa     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Evidence Based Summaries in Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
FarmBiz     Full-text available via subscription  
Farmer’s Weekly     Full-text available via subscription  
Farmlink Africa     Full-text available via subscription  
Food Manufacturing Africa     Full-text available via subscription  
French Studies in Southern Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Fundamina : A J. of Legal History     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Gender and Behaviour     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Gender Questions     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Ghanaian J. of Economics     Full-text available via subscription  
HR Future     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
IFE Psychologia : An Intl. J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Image & Text : a J. for Design     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
IMFO : Official J. of the Institute of Municipal Finance Officers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
IMIESA     Full-text available via subscription  
Indilinga African J. of Indigenous Knowledge Systems     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Inside Mining     Full-text available via subscription  
Institute for Security Studies Papers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Interim : Interdisciplinary J.     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. for Religious Freedom     Full-text available via subscription  
J. for Christian Scholarship = Tydskrif vir Christelike Wetenskap     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
J. for Contemporary History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
J. for Islamic Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
J. for Juridical Science     Full-text available via subscription  
J. for Language Teaching = Tydskrif vir Taalonderrig     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
J. for New Generation Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. for Semitics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
J. of African Elections     Full-text available via subscription  
J. of African Foreign Affairs     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
J. of African Union Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
J. of Contemporary Management     Full-text available via subscription  
J. of Gender, Information and Development in Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
J. of Minimum Intervention in Dentistry     Full-text available via subscription  
J. of Public Administration     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
J. of Somali Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
J. of Strategic Studies : A J. of the Southern Bureau of Strategic Studies Trust     Full-text available via subscription  
Kleio     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Learning and Teaching Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Litnet Akademies : 'n Joernaal vir die Geesteswetenskappe, Natuurwetenskappe, Regte en Godsdienswetenskappe     Open Access  
Management Dynamics : J. of the Southern African Institute for Management Scientists     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Medical Technology SA     Full-text available via subscription  
Meditari : Research J. of the School of Accounting Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
MNASSA : Monthly Notes of the Astronomical Society of South Africa     Full-text available via subscription  
Monographs of the Transvaal Museum     Full-text available via subscription  
Musicus     Full-text available via subscription  
Neotestamentica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.212, h-index: 6)
New Coin Poetry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
New Voices in Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Obiter     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Obstetrics and Gynaecology Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.106, h-index: 2)
Occupational Health Southern Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Old Testament Essays     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Personal Finance Newsletter     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Perspectives in Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.228, h-index: 13)
Politeia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Professional Accountant     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Professional Nursing Today     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Progressio     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Psycho-analytic Psychotherapy in South Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Quest     Open Access  
ReSource     Full-text available via subscription  
Retail and Marketing Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Rostrum : Newsletter of the Entomological Society of Southern Africa     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
SA Irrigation = SA Besproeiing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
SA Mercantile Law J. = SA Tydskrif vir Handelsreg     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
SABI Magazine - Tydskrif     Full-text available via subscription  
Scriptura : Intl. J. of Bible, Religion and Theology in Southern Africa     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Scrutiny2     Full-text available via subscription  
Servamus Community-based Safety and Security Magazine     Full-text available via subscription  
Shakespeare in Southern Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
South African Actuarial J.     Full-text available via subscription  
South African Computer J.     Full-text available via subscription  
South African Food Review     Full-text available via subscription  
South African Gastroenterology Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.102, h-index: 1)
South African Health Review     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
South African J. for Research in Sport, Physical Education and Recreation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.186, h-index: 7)
South African J. of Art History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
South African J. of Business Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.194, h-index: 8)
South African J. of Chemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.193, h-index: 14)
South African J. of Criminal Justice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
South African J. of Cultural History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
South African J. of Diabetes and Vascular Disease     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
South African J. of Economic History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
South African J. of Education     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.335, h-index: 14)
South African J. of Higher Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
South African J. of Labour Relations     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
South African J. of Sports Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
South African J. of Wildlife Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.583, h-index: 24)
South African J. on Human Rights     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.19, h-index: 7)
South African Music Studies : SAMUS     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
South African Ophthalmology J.     Full-text available via subscription  
South African Pharmaceutical and Cosmetic Review     Full-text available via subscription  
South African Radiographer     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Southern African Business Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Southern African Forestry J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Southern African Humanities     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.409, h-index: 11)
Southern African J. of Accountability and Auditing Research     Full-text available via subscription  
Southern African Review of Education with Education with Production     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Stilet : Tydskrif van die Afrikaanse Letterkundevereniging     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Studies in Economics and Econometrics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 6)
Suid-Afrikaanse Tydskrif vir Natuurwetenskap en Tegnologie     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Tax Breaks Newsletter     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
TAXtalk     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
The Dairy Mail     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Transport World Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Unisa Latin American Report     Full-text available via subscription  
Veld & Flora     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Water & Sanitation Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Without Prejudice     Full-text available via subscription  
Word and Action = Woord en Daad     Full-text available via subscription  

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Journal Cover Acta Criminologica
  [1 followers]  Follow
    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 1012-8093
   Published by Sabinet Online Ltd Homepage  [187 journals]
  • Conservation crime research : taking a step back in order to move forward
           : editorial
    • Authors: Friedo J.W. Herbig
      Abstract: Criminological research, like most other research, is predicated on and characterised by a focus on specific concepts/phenomena - phenomena that are clearly identifiable and, for the most part, universally recognised. With few exceptions these phenomena are similarly defined and understood, facilitating research endeavours and serving to broaden the horizons and precincts of a particular line of enquiry. Even those with, as yet, unresolved definitions, such as terrorism and white-collar crime, inherently base their research thrust on analogous issues which only deviate subtly from other semantical renditions. If research is directed at ambiguous and amorphous criminal issues/concepts it would, for all intents and purposes, defeat the objective of such scientific enquiry. Think of research directed at crimes such as murder, arson, domestic violence, child abuse, drug abuse, to name but a few. All these concepts are clear-cut and appreciated in the same way. Research into such areas of interest is well demarcated and results collectively add to the body of knowledge being generated within that criminological remit. What would happen if researchers understood or contextualised similar (identical) crime types in different ways - if murder meant arson to one, while drug abuse meant domestic violence to another? Without research focus parity, efforts to study criminological phenomena would, at most, be tangential and peripheral at best and results vexatious, to say the least. In essence researchers ostensibly studying similar phenomena would be bypassing and stymieing each other, and, ergo, be pursuing their own agendas.
      PubDate: 2016-01-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • Psychopathy and its association with demographic variables in a South
           African female offender context
    • Authors: Ryan Botha; Dap Louw Sonja Loots
      Abstract: A number of past studies have identified an association between psychopathy and specific demographic variables. However, these studies have predominantly been conducted on male offenders in the Western world. The following research responds to this gap in the psychopathy literature base by providing a description of the demographic variables of three groups of female South African offenders (N = 108). Specifically, the analysis aims to isolate demographic variables that discriminate between non-psychopathic, medium psychopathic and advanced psychopathic traits. Demographic data was obtained by means of a self-compiled biographical questionnaire, and levels of psychopathy were determined by using the Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (PCL-R). The chi-square test for independence revealed significant associations between the three groups with regard to the demographic variables under study. Distillation of the demographic data provides provisional support for the manifestation of secondary psychopathy in the present sample. The results underline the importance of specific demographic variables in identifying high-risk groups of offenders.
      PubDate: 2016-01-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • Victimisation of illegal migrants in rural communities in South Africa :
           the case of Mafarana village in Limpopo province
    • Authors: Kholofelo A. Mothibi; Kinsley M. Shingange Jacob T. Mofokeng
      Abstract: This study explored the causes and impact of the victimisation of foreign migrants who are residing illegally (i.e. undocumented) in South Africa. The case study captures their victimisation experiences from the Mafarana village situated near the town of Tzaneen in the Limpopo Province of South Africa. To explore the causes and impact of the victimisation of these illegal migrants, qualitative exploratory research was conducted at Mafarana village. Non-probability sampling was applied and snowball sampling was utilised to sample 26 illegal migrants. The research findings indicate that, due to their residential status in the country, illegal migrants are vulnerable to various forms of victimisation. In addition, due mostly to fear or lack of trust towards the South African Police Service (SAPS), the majority of crimes committed against illegal migrants go unreported and unresolved. Furthermore, the findings suggest that illegal migrants' status makes them particularly susceptible to victimisation and accordingly limits the reporting of their victimisation due to a perceived risk of deportation. The study concludes that the Tzaneen Municipality should work with law enforcement agencies to prevent an influx of illegal migrants in the area.
      PubDate: 2016-01-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • Hate crimes : some theoretical considerations and their possible
           application to the South African context
    • Authors: Kamban Naidoo
      Abstract: Criminal conduct motivated by bias or prejudice towards certain personal characteristics of the victim is also referred to as 'hate crime'. Hate crimes were first recognised as a separate category of criminal conduct in the United States of America (US). Most of the present research relating to hate crime is consequently of US origin although there is a growing body of research that is of British origin. This Anglo-Saxon bias is apparent in the theoretical underpinnings of hate crime which have been the subject of academic criticism and disagreement. This article examines the theoretical underpinnings of hate crime and attempts to apply the theory to the South African context where, despite the non-recognition of hate crime as a specific category of criminal conduct in South African law, the term 'hate crime' enjoys some academic and intellectual usage.
      PubDate: 2016-01-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • Perceived effectiveness of anti-graft agencies : economic and financial
           crimes in selected government ministries, Nigeria
    • Authors: Issah Moshood; Amali Sadiq Ewaoda Ismail Kafayat Olanike
      Abstract: Contemporary events point to the fact that economic and financial crimes are ubiquitous in Nigeria and they appear to have defied all solutions. Even the establishment of the Economic and Financial Crimes Commission (EFCC) and the Independent Corrupt Practices Commission (ICPC) under the Obasanjo administration (1999-2007) 'seemed' to have achieved little success in curtailing or stemming the menace of financial and economic crimes in the country. In the face of defiance of all solutions, this study attempts to examine the perceived effectiveness of the anti-graft bodies (ICPC and EFCC) and the propensity to commit economic and financial crimes in some selected state ministries in Kwara state, Nigeria. The study revealed that the respondents perceived these two anti-graft agencies as being considerably effective in reducing the propensity to commit financial and economic crimes in the ministries. However, further analysis showed that the agencies are faced with some daunting challenges, which, if not addressed immediately, will definitely affect the further effectiveness of these two agencies. Based on the results found, the study concluded that financial and economic crimes are real and extensive in Nigeria and that the two anti-graft agencies (EFCC and ICPC) are doing their best to stem and reduce them to their barest minimum. However, there are some systemic 'bottlenecks' that require closer attention in order to rekindle the functionality and efficient service delivery of the two Nigerian anti-graft agencies.
      PubDate: 2016-01-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • Factors contributing to police corruptive practices : the case of selected
           Metropolitan Police Departments in the Gauteng Province
    • Authors: Dee Shikwambana; Jacob Mofokeng
      Abstract: The main objective of the article is to discuss officers' perception regarding factors contributing to corruption within the selected Metropolitan Police Departments (MPDs) in the Gauteng Province. This study did not aim to measure the extent of police corruption in the selected departments, but tried to shed light on some of the factors that might, if not adequately attended to by the administrators, would contribute to police corruption. Data were obtained through the administration of questionnaire to 500 respondents utilising a stratified random sampling. The result found that most of the respondents not only blamed individual police officers for having low moral values, but they also stated that organisational and societal factors can also cause police officer to become corrupt. This article provides with recommendations to address the challenges highlighted by the respondents in order to effectively combat corruption in the Metropolitan Police Departments.
      PubDate: 2016-01-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • Viewing integrity in the South African Police Service among
           non-commissioned officers in Gauteng Province
    • Authors: Salome Reyneke-Cloete; Michael E. Meyer
      Abstract: This study evaluates integrity in a sample of South African Police Service (SAPS) non-commissioned officers in Gauteng Province employing Klockars and Kutnjak-Ivković's "Organisational Theory of Police Integrity" scale. The article empirically measures the extent of integrity among a sample of 160 non-commissioned SAPS police officials from Gauteng Province after 20 years of transformation from the former South African Police. Participants were asked to share their opinions regarding the seriousness of eleven examples of acts that would constitute violations of the South African Police Service Discipline Regulations of 2005, Regulation 20, the appropriate and expected punishment such misconduct deserves and their willingness to report such misconduct as well as their perception of willingness of other officers to report such misconduct. Although the results are not generalisable to the larger organisation, the results strongly suggest the SAPS to be an organisation facing significant integrity challenges, but with potential for meaningful reform.
      PubDate: 2016-01-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • Operational strategies for public order policing : a South African case
           study
    • Authors: Doraval Govender
      Abstract: In policing circles, 1994 will be remembered as the time when great changes occurred in the South African Police (SAP) (newly renamed the South African Police Service). A paradigm shift was made towards policing within a human rights culture. This period was a political watershed for South Africa. At the time an almost 'seismic' shift can be said was being made from a repressive police state to a democracy, which required the application of democratic policing principles and values. Since policing is and remains one of the most important mechanisms in social control, a meaningful balance needed to be found between persuasive and enforced control in the new South Africa. From 1976 to 2015 the conduct of the Public Order Police (POP) has been questioned by the public and four Commissions of Inquiry. The aim of this article was to examine the policy and legislative framework, the recommendations of the four Commissions of Inquiry, and to conceptually analyse operational strategies for public order policing. It was found that the policy and legislative framework, together with the recommendations of the Commissions of Inquiry, provided details regarding structure and functioning within the constraints of the Constitution and the law. This article recommends operational strategies to strengthen public order policing.
      PubDate: 2016-01-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • Organised crime and the 'new more sophisticated' criminals within the
           cybercrime environment : how 'organised' are they in the traditional
           sense?
    • Authors: Anthony Minnaar
      Abstract: Are the 'new, more sophisticated' cybercriminals merely an extension of traditional organised crime groupings (i.e. the Mafia) that some observers state have 'taken over' and 'control' the internet as an extension of their structured syndicate/gang criminal activities? Alternately is cybercrime not a new form of organised crime in that the perpetrators have merely become 'more' organised as an online network or group of criminals that co-operate in the illegal underground black market by 'selling' stolen information, hiring out 'crime-ware' and even providing technical backup services for the purposes of online crime. There is no doubt that online criminals within the cybercrime environment have become more sophisticated in making use of malicious software (so-called 'malware') in their attacks in cyberspace for the primary motive of personal financial gain. Cybercriminals have developed and utilised 'stronger' malware that has evolved and changed into providing more stealthy and hidden malware, such as 'malvertisement', 'iFrame script injection' and 'ransomware', all of which have become more difficult to detect and therefore to combat. Of particular concern to cybersecurity specialists is the addition of encryption to this updated malicious software now being used in cyberattacks on unsuspecting internet users and the specific targeting of cyber-vulnerable organisations that have either neglected or are unable to afford to update their cybersecurity protection measures. In more recent times malware cyberattacks have also targeted users of mobile devices. Overall it concludes that cybercriminals have become a well-planned, organised and global online criminal enterprise whose operations are highly lucrative and profitable but essentially low risk.
      PubDate: 2016-01-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • Maritime criminality : unheard voices
    • Authors: Nirmala Gopal; Bonita Marimuthu
      Abstract: It has been argued that the key trends in African maritime security can be summarised as sea-related threats (such as inter alia, human and drug trafficking, piracy and other criminal activities). The South African Maritime Safety Authority (SAMSA) promotes, amongst others, the safety of life and property at sea. Against this backdrop this article seeks to critically highlight maritime criminality as reported through the eyes of six participants with first-hand experience of maritime criminal activities. Through face-to-face interviews with these participants the data generated experiences around piracy, human smuggling, drug trafficking and stowaways. The data speaks specifically to corrupt employees who facilitate these criminal activities (often violently) in various ways. This article makes recommendations for future large-scale research on these challenges for prevention purposes.
      PubDate: 2016-01-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • Four hubs of maritime insecurity off Africa : from anti-piracy to
           anti-crime?
    • Authors: Francois Vrey; Henri Fouche
      Abstract: Piracy acted as a catalyst to heighten attention to a collapsing security landscape off East Africa. While piracy off Somalia became the arena to understand and respond to a dangerous threat at sea, the international community also came to terms with the reality that Somalia is but one maritime threat landscape off Africa. The longer term outlook gradually turned to good maritime governance of Africa's oceans to prevent and contain crime at sea. Maritime governance had to be uncovered and affirmed along Africa's coast and four maritime hubs off North, West, Southern and East Africa became focal points where good order at sea had to be maintained, or re-established. North Africa demonstrates how rapidly the sea becomes an arena for human tragedy through criminal practices. West Africa shows dangerous criminal cooperation to threaten important energy resources at sea, while Southern Africa reflects that good order at sea off Africa is possible. East Africa, in turn conveys the message that international cooperation of multiple actors goes some way in restoring order and driving back criminality at sea. The central argument remains that cooperation by multiple actors promotes maritime security through maritime security governance to maintain or restore good order at sea in Africa's littoral regions. Here the security focus must shift to fighting crime at sea, rather than anti-piracy.
      PubDate: 2016-01-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • A wake-up call for Navies in the SADC region : towards more effective
           maritime law enforcement
    • Authors: Pieter Brits; Michelle Nel
      Abstract: This article investigates whether the South African National Defence Force (SANDF) can, within the current legal framework, ensure effective law enforcement at sea. The article uses the South African Navy's anti-piracy operations as example to identify critical gaps in future law enforcement training and operations. The threat posed by pirates on the East Coast of Africa and the global response to it, highlights the importance of maritime security. Although law enforcement is traditionally regarded as a police function, many police services lack the capacity to enforce the law at sea, necessitating naval involvement and consequently blurring the lines between law enforcement and military operations. In a bid to provide maritime security and prevent piracy in the Mozambique Channel, South Africa entered into a multinational agreement with Mozambique and Tanzania. Operation Copper has been operating since 2011 and with the marked decline of piracy on the East Coast the argument has been made that the expense of the operation can no longer justify the long term commitment of limited resources. Should the focus not be shifted to the West Coast where South Africa has recently entered into the first large marine ecosystem convention with Namibia and Angola? Although the threat to maritime security in the Benguela Current is mainly limited to illegal fishing and drug trafficking, the looming threat of piracy further up the West Coast may soon necessitate anti-piracy operations in this area as well. Even if the SA Navy is adequately resourced, in order to enable it to meet its obligations, the question of governance remains pertinent. Regional maritime security strategies may be supported by the domestic legislative and strategic framework, but the same cannot be said for the SANDF's operational policy framework. There is a glaring lacuna in the Department of Defence's (DoD) policy and standard operating procedures. Effective law enforcement generally concludes with prosecution and punishment, yet South Africa neglects to take responsibility for this final step in its operations at sea, a fact exacerbated by the lack of appropriate training of its soldiers in the law enforcement arena.
      PubDate: 2016-01-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • Advocacy for integrated criminal justice forums
    • Authors: Cornelis Roelofse; Charles Oliver
      Abstract: Systems are integrated components (sub-systems) where the collective energy is greater than the total of the individual ones. This is termed: 'synergy' and is the creation of a whole that is greater than the simple sum of its parts and that the parts of a system can be best understood in the context of the whole. This article argues from the perspective of the General Systems Theory (GST) and calls for the introduction of Integrated Criminal Justice Forums (ICJFs) at the level of magisterial districts. A forum should consist of a structure where the subsystems of the Criminal Justice System, together with delegates from the community, meet regularly to ensure better co-ordination between the police, the courts (including the National Prosecuting Authority) and corrections. These forums should also serve as a body of co-ordination between the components of the Criminal Justice System and communities. The Criminal Justice System needs a community liaison forum and Integrated Criminal Justice Forums are proposed as suitable for this function. Their main role will be that of liaison between the Criminal Justice Departments, acting as a 'watchdog' of the unbiased, fair and judicious implementation of policies and to involve the community in terms of information sharing and problem solving. Its pivotal role within the co-ordinating and watchdog roles requires that chairpersons and secretaries, as well as departmental representatives from the three departments are represented on such a forum. The co-ordinating role will mean that ICJFs will need to have limited access to the police's Crime Administration System, court's Case Management System and offender and individual correctional centre statistics from the Department of Correctional Services. This information can, inter alia, be used to assist victims and community members, in order to ensure that crime is accurately reported, that witnesses are assisted to attend court and to assist with the reintegration of offenders.
      PubDate: 2016-01-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • Research, theory and a developing criminology for rural crime : editorial
    • Authors: Anthony Minnaar
      Abstract: Traditionally research and the development and building of a distinct theory of crime in rural areas has been the 'poor [rural] cousin' of mainstream criminology and largely ignored or neglected. Most often researchers, scholars and academics have merely 'borrowed' from the research designs and criminological theory bank of the research approach to crime, victimology and policing of densely populated urban settings - the cities - without examining the different and unique circumstances, not only in terms of population densities but also in types of crime, victimisation variations and policing responses as applicable to the rural environment.
      PubDate: 2016-01-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • Identifying barriers in the South African Criminal Justice System :
           implications for individuals with severe communication disability
    • Authors: Juan Bornman; Robyn White, Ensa Johnson Diane Nelson Bryen
      Abstract: Individuals with severe communication disabilities and who are victims of crime, experience many access and opportunity barriers in the criminal justice system. The aim of this research was to identify the barriers experienced by this population in the South African Criminal Justice System as perceived by experts in the field. A qualitative research method, with 56 expert professionals in the criminal justice system divided into two different sequential data sources, was employed. The first data source included in-depth, semi-structured interviews (n=3), and these results informed the second data source, which was in the form of four focus groups (n=53). The results from both data sources (N=56) identified numerous barriers for individuals with a severe communication disability who had been victims of crime and needed access to the criminal justice system. The findings suggest that more support and resources need to be provided to individuals with severe communication disability. Additionally, disability training for all professionals working in the criminal justice system needs to be a top priority. Recommendations were made to develop an augmentative and alternative communication resource toolkit to assist these professionals, to ensure equal justice for one of the most vulnerable groups in society - those individuals with a severe communication disability who have been victims of crime.
      PubDate: 2016-01-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • Who do you believe? Effects of English, Cape Coloured and gay accents on
           perceived witness credibility
    • Authors: Melissa I. Meyer; Colin G. Tredoux
      Abstract: Group and race-based discrimination remains present in South Africa, in part as an Apartheid by-product, and can result in biased treatment. The study investigated whether and how accents influence perceptions of credibility, focussing on English, Cape-Coloured, and Gay accents. Results from an online questionnaire (N=295) showed that race significantly influenced which accent was deemed most believable (X2 (4) = 9.88, p ≤ .043). Focus group interviews (N=18) suggested that perceived education level was the biggest factor in determining credibility. The Gay accent was deemed most believable and rated highest on intelligence, although qualitative findings suggested that a witness with this accent might not be believed in criminal justice settings, due to homophobia and assumed likelihood to exaggerate. The Cape-Coloured accent was deemed less believable due to associations with lack of education, crime, and dangerousness'. The English accent was rated highest on reliability, likeability, confidence, and honesty, and perceived as being educated, professional and important. Additionally, findings suggested that 'white guilt' may be a significant factor in how white students shared perceptions of black and coloured accents.
      PubDate: 2016-01-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • Perceptions of justice : a South African youth perspective
    • Authors: Marelize Schoeman
      Abstract: This article argues that it is important to explore public perceptions of justice in order to enhance the delivery of justice. South Africa has a dichotomous judicial system with strong punitive elements, as principally seen in the extent of criminal law, but also culturally engrained restorative elements found in restorative and traditional justice practices. As a country with a high crime rate South African citizens are, if not directly, indirectly affected by crime. South Africa's predominant retributive justice system is characterised by a general exclusion of the people who are the primary and secondary victims of crime. This exclusion is also evident in research where emphasis tends to focus on the perceptions of justice from the perspective of criminal justice practitioners. In contrast, limited research has been done to explore public perspectives about justice and the understanding thereof. In addition, limited studies have been done to determine if, and to what extent, members from society are: firstly, open to a more restorative approach in adjudication; and secondly, whether they are willing to become involved in the judicial process. In this article findings are presented from a study that explored the perceptions of 100 youths on crime, criminality and the administration of justice. Findings indicated that even though respondents favoured a more retributive system in which offenders are punished, they also acknowledged the value of restorative elements in addressing the harm caused by crime.
      PubDate: 2016-01-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • Understanding the true meaning of the concept Community Policing : a final
           comment?
    • Authors: Phillip J. Potgieter; Michael D. Wiatrowski Cornelis J. Roelofse
      Abstract: Solutions to the complexities surrounding the police role, since ancient times, have not yet come full circle. The birth of modern policing started with Sir Robert Peel, who laid the foundation for what is known today as 'partnership policing'. Police reform in the United States also led to adopting community-oriented policing (COP) and problem-oriented policing (POP) approaches in the late 1980s to the early 1990s. With the advent of democracy in 1994, the South African Police Service (SAPS) replaced authoritarian policing with community policing (a service orientation closely resembling 'democratic policing values'). However, since 2010 the SAPS has reverted from a service to a force with a typical reactive kind of posture and a re-militarised rank structure similar to that of 'apartheid-policing' prior to 1994. Apparently, all these 'manoeuvres' eventually contributed to endless uncertainties regarding the appropriate policing model to apply. The present study provides useful empirical grist for the 'police manager's mill', administrative planners and academics to address concerns about the strengths, weaknesses and eventual viability of community policing, calculated to serve a diverse democratic-oriented society. The present study is poised to unravel uncertainties that may be present among police officers such as: do they understand the concept community policing in terms of its operational impact on people's expectations, and how do they react to working with diverse communities given the political history of the country, and the apparent low level of public trust in policing? Bivariate data analysis reveals good support for utilitarian-variables by gender and good to mild support for operational variables, cross-correlated with rank. Complete transformation of the SAPS and improved leadership explaining the dynamics and proper management of community policing in a close network with the public are indispensable to maintain law and order in South Africa.
      PubDate: 2016-01-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • Towards a public participation strategy for community policing forums :
           the case of Tlokwe Local Municipality
    • Authors: T.J. Morebodi; Gerrit Van der Waldt
      Abstract: In any democratic dispensation, public participation is a widespread concern and highly topical to guide a discourse on openness, transparency and inclusiveness in governance. The South African Constitution (Section 215) and the South African Police Service Act 68 of 1995 (Section 19 to 21) stipulate that the notion of public participation in the South African Police Service (SAPS) are embedded in an approach focusing on community policing. This type of policing is generally more community centred and aim to encourage the active involvement of community members in the affairs of the police. The principle mechanism established for this purpose is community policing forums in all municipal areas in the country. The purpose of this article is to report on findings of an empirical investigation conducted in police stations within the Tlokwe Local Municipality. The aim of the survey was to assess the challenges for public participation within community policing forums. Based on these findings, a framework is proposed that outlines a public participation strategy for community policing forums in order to facilitate and improve the involvement of community members.
      PubDate: 2016-01-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • Intelligence-led policing : a grand narrative
    • Authors: Trevor Budhram
      Abstract: The high crime rate in South Africa has become a focal point for private and public stakeholders. Many stakeholders note that the use of conventional policing models needs to be combined with smart policing models. One such model is intelligence-led policing (ILP). Intelligence-led policing is premised on the collection of information and the analysis thereof into actionable crime intelligence. The actionable intelligence emanating from fusion centres can help decision makers to develop strategies to detect, disrupt and prevent crime before it happens. Intelligence-led policing lends itself to the use of sophisticated technology and software which allows analyst who understand crime patterns to perform in-depth analyses, identify solutions, communicate effectively with clients and evaluate the outcomes of attempts to solve the problem. These primary characteristics supplemented with methods such as the use of sophisticated information technologies and tools that support innovation, data collection and evidence based practices may be the best model of addressing crime in South Africa. This paper outlines the history of crime intelligence, the crime intelligence process, intelligence-led policing and a South African perspective of intelligence-led policing.
      PubDate: 2016-01-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • Measuring the ability of the police to prevent crime : could this assist
           in stressing the importance of crime prevention?
    • Authors: Phil (P.R.) Vuma
      Abstract: Police effectiveness has traditionally been measured by the reactive capabilities of the police in dealing with the crime that has already been committed. Although crime prevention has been regarded as a critical function of the police, not much research has been done on the way the police should be measured on this function. Even though police crime statistics indicate the overall success largely of crime prevention capabilities of the police, at operational level, police effectiveness is mostly measured by factors such as reaction time, clearance rate and arrest. These well-established traditional methods of measuring police performance, are important factors for crime prevention through general deterrence, and will be indicated in this article. This article proposes the inclusion of actionable intelligence and community indicators to ensure the comprehensive measurement of both the proactive and reactive activities of the police.
      PubDate: 2016-01-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • The Khayelitsha commission of inquiry : perceptions and experiences among
           senior police personnel
    • Authors: Elrena Van der Spuy
      Abstract: Public enquiries into aspects of police and policing are no stranger to twentieth century South Africa. This paper focuses on the Khayelitsha Commission, which was mandated to investigate allegations of 'police inefficiency' and a 'breakdown of relations' between the police and the community. It is particularly concerned with the views and experiences of a sample of police who testified before the Commission. Little in fact is known about the experiences of police as the primary subjects involved in official inquiries. The paper attempts to fill this gap by exploring how police personnel experienced the process itself. Data collection relied on both field observations of the public deliberations of the inquiry and interviews with sixteen members of the South African Police Service who testified. The data reported on here provide insight into the perceptions and experiences of the raison d'être, terms of reference, operational procedures, findings and recommendations of the Khayelitsha inquiry. Understanding police experiences of public inquiries may yield insight into the willingness of the organisation to engage or dismiss recommendations forthcoming from public inquiries.
      PubDate: 2016-01-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • Conservation crime and rhinoceros poaching : from ancient custom to modern
           dilemma
    • Authors: Friedo J.W. Herbig; Megan L. Griffiths
      Abstract: It is common cause that the poaching of South Africa's natural resources, particularly high profile species, such as rhino, is inexorably lubricated by the demand ebb and flow for the yield to be derived from these organisms. The appetite for rhino horn, specifically by Asian countries, fuels and perpetuates the illegal trade in this commodity despite rhinos being in jeopardy worldwide. The use of rhino horn for cultural and traditional reasons, as well as medicinal purposes present as significant factors contributing to the exigency for such products. Since conservation crime/criminology takes the damage to nature as its core focus it appears to ignore, partly, the ontological relations between some cultural groupings and nature that do not necessarily view nature as a natural resource per se. In other words, some cultural identities might view flora and fauna as totemic/ethnic symbols of a particular group of avatars or ancestors. Can the natural resource(s) being harvested to serve these cultural, traditional and/or medicinal purposes be deemed criminal or criminogenic because the natural resource being utilised is in some way vulnerable? Is the conservation crime/criminology logic viable in a context where nature is regarded as more of an object than a subject of social justice? It is equally important to ask the question whether these beliefs, customs and/or practices are still valid in a post-modern society, and whether trying to modify them amounts to conservation praxis or disrespect. This article critically examines, from a metaphysical standpoint, some of the cultural, traditional and medicinal tensions that exist in relation to the rhino poaching phenomenon. It, furthermore, seeks to determine whether judiciously marginalising alternate views regarding the use of natural resource products is not merely reproducing injustices by proposing solutions presented within the same logocentric paragon of traditional philosophical thought?
      PubDate: 2016-01-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • Working in fear? Managers' and petrol attendants' experiences of
           public-initiated violence at selected petrol stations in Johannesburg
    • Authors: David Du Toit
      Abstract: A general consensus generated from various news articles, is that violence in the workplace is on the rise and that the workplace is no longer considered safe for many employees. Although some employees such as police officers and prison guards might encounter violence at work to some degree, more and more employees are experiencing the effects of public-initiated violence at work. This includes petrol attendants working on the forecourts of petrol stations. Recently, Kole (2010) conducted research on the security measures to reduce workplace violence at petrol stations in Gauteng and highlighted issues and challenges that petrol stations face on a daily basis regarding workplace violence. Kole (2010) recommended several prevention strategies to reduce violent crimes at petrol stations. The aim of this study is to add knowledge to this phenomenon by focusing on selected petrol stations in Johannesburg, in order to understand whether they experience similar issues and challenges regarding workplace violence and what strategies they use to prevent these issues and challenges. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with five managers and fifteen petrol attendants working at these selected petrol stations in Johannesburg in 2015. These interviews focused on violent Type I and non-violent Type II workplace violence that occur at their petrol stations.
      PubDate: 2016-01-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • Africa's rising maritime agenda : public goods at sea
    • Authors: Michelle Nel; Francois Vrey
      Abstract: The ambit of public goods that governments are obliged to extend to their societies resides on horizontal and vertical planes. The horizontal plane houses sectors of public goods that have become generally accepted as those conditions, services and benefits that governments and parallel agencies are obliged to extend to their citizens. On the vertical plane the provision of national public goods is a generally accepted phenomenon, but regional and global public goods that add value from beyond the national level, also entered the debate. One catalyst for a greater concern with regional and global public goods one finds in the rise of the maritime province. Justice, jurisdiction and the law of the sea reinforce the security first imperative to ensure favourable conditions for maritime goods directed towards the benefit of humanity. Africa is an inextricable actor in this growing turn towards the oceans to bring public goods from the sea into play. Important maritime matters now featuring on the predominant landward African security agenda accentuate the delivery of security, jurisdiction and justice in African waters. Leadership has the responsibility to make possible the interface of the maritime and traditional landward basis of quality public goods.
      PubDate: 2016-01-01T00:00:00Z
       
 
 
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