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Publisher: Springer-Verlag (Total: 2355 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 2355 Journals sorted alphabetically
3D Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.214, h-index: 10)
4OR: A Quarterly J. of Operations Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.073, h-index: 25)
AAPS J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 1.192, h-index: 74)
AAPS PharmSciTech     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.718, h-index: 54)
Abdominal Imaging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.723, h-index: 60)
Abhandlungen aus dem Mathematischen Seminar der Universitat Hamburg     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.447, h-index: 12)
Academic Psychiatry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.492, h-index: 32)
Academic Questions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.135, h-index: 6)
Accreditation and Quality Assurance: J. for Quality, Comparability and Reliability in Chemical Measurement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.378, h-index: 30)
Acoustical Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.355, h-index: 20)
Acoustics Australia     Hybrid Journal  
Acta Analytica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.387, h-index: 6)
Acta Applicandae Mathematicae     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.624, h-index: 34)
Acta Biotheoretica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.419, h-index: 25)
Acta Diabetologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 1.318, h-index: 46)
Acta Endoscopica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.113, h-index: 8)
acta ethologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.465, h-index: 23)
Acta Geochimica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Acta Geodaetica et Geophysica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.294, h-index: 13)
Acta Geotechnica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 1.818, h-index: 22)
Acta Informatica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.524, h-index: 32)
Acta Mathematica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 8.021, h-index: 47)
Acta Mathematica Hungarica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.53, h-index: 29)
Acta Mathematica Sinica, English Series     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.406, h-index: 30)
Acta Mathematica Vietnamica     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.451, h-index: 5)
Acta Mathematicae Applicatae Sinica, English Series     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.22, h-index: 20)
Acta Mechanica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.898, h-index: 52)
Acta Mechanica Sinica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.426, h-index: 29)
Acta Metallurgica Sinica (English Letters)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.525, h-index: 18)
Acta Meteorologica Sinica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.524, h-index: 14)
Acta Neurochirurgica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.833, h-index: 73)
Acta Neurologica Belgica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.348, h-index: 27)
Acta Neuropathologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 6.61, h-index: 117)
Acta Oceanologica Sinica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.295, h-index: 17)
Acta Parasitologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.581, h-index: 28)
Acta Physiologiae Plantarum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.551, h-index: 39)
Acta Politica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.658, h-index: 20)
Activitas Nervosa Superior     Hybrid Journal  
adhäsion KLEBEN & DICHTEN     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.103, h-index: 4)
ADHD Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.871, h-index: 15)
Adhesion Adhesives & Sealants     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Administration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Services Research     Partially Free   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.795, h-index: 40)
Adsorption     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.774, h-index: 52)
Advances in Applied Clifford Algebras     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.319, h-index: 15)
Advances in Atmospheric Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 0.959, h-index: 44)
Advances in Computational Mathematics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.255, h-index: 44)
Advances in Contraception     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Data Analysis and Classification     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52, SJR: 1.113, h-index: 14)
Advances in Gerontology     Partially Free   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.141, h-index: 3)
Advances in Health Sciences Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 1.397, h-index: 42)
Advances in Manufacturing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.2, h-index: 4)
Advances in Polymer Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41, SJR: 0.637, h-index: 89)
Advances in Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.79, h-index: 44)
Aegean Review of the Law of the Sea and Maritime Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Aequationes Mathematicae     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.882, h-index: 23)
Aerobiologia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.511, h-index: 36)
Aesthetic Plastic Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.821, h-index: 49)
African Archaeological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.612, h-index: 24)
Afrika Matematika     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.248, h-index: 6)
AGE     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 1.358, h-index: 33)
Ageing Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.337, h-index: 10)
Aggiornamenti CIO     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Aging Clinical and Experimental Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.529, h-index: 55)
Agricultural Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Agriculture and Human Values     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 1.197, h-index: 49)
Agroforestry Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.64, h-index: 56)
Agronomy for Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.732, h-index: 59)
AI & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.171, h-index: 19)
AIDS and Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 2.006, h-index: 71)
Air Quality, Atmosphere & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.706, h-index: 19)
Akupunktur & Aurikulomedizin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Algebra and Logic     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.566, h-index: 18)
Algebra Universalis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.388, h-index: 22)
Algebras and Representation Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.868, h-index: 20)
Algorithmica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.898, h-index: 56)
Allergo J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.183, h-index: 20)
Allergo J. Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Alpine Botany     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.729, h-index: 20)
ALTEX : Alternatives to Animal Experimentation     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.392, h-index: 32)
AMBIO     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.094, h-index: 87)
American J. of Cardiovascular Drugs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.864, h-index: 39)
American J. of Community Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 1.237, h-index: 83)
American J. of Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.634, h-index: 13)
American J. of Cultural Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.283, h-index: 3)
American J. of Dance Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.175, h-index: 13)
American J. of Potato Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.558, h-index: 35)
American J. of Psychoanalysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.293, h-index: 13)
American Sociologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.18, h-index: 13)
Amino Acids     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.362, h-index: 83)
AMS Review     Partially Free   (Followers: 4)
Analog Integrated Circuits and Signal Processing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.21, h-index: 37)
Analysis and Mathematical Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.665, h-index: 7)
Analysis in Theory and Applications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Analysis of Verbal Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 1.096, h-index: 123)
Anatomical Science Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.301, h-index: 26)
Angewandte Schmerztherapie und Palliativmedizin     Hybrid Journal  
Angiogenesis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 2.212, h-index: 69)
Animal Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.122, h-index: 55)
Annales françaises de médecine d'urgence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.156, h-index: 4)
Annales Henri Poincaré     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.377, h-index: 32)
Annales mathématiques du Québec     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Annali dell'Universita di Ferrara     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.504, h-index: 14)
Annali di Matematica Pura ed Applicata     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.167, h-index: 26)
Annals of Behavioral Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 2.112, h-index: 98)
Annals of Biomedical Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 1.182, h-index: 94)
Annals of Combinatorics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.849, h-index: 15)
Annals of Data Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Annals of Dyslexia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.857, h-index: 40)
Annals of Finance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.686, h-index: 14)
Annals of Forest Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.929, h-index: 57)
Annals of Global Analysis and Geometry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.136, h-index: 23)
Annals of Hematology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.117, h-index: 62)
Annals of Mathematics and Artificial Intelligence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.593, h-index: 42)
Annals of Microbiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.402, h-index: 26)
Annals of Nuclear Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.68, h-index: 45)
Annals of Operations Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.186, h-index: 78)
Annals of Ophthalmology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Annals of Regional Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.405, h-index: 42)
Annals of Software Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Annals of Solid and Structural Mechanics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.553, h-index: 8)
Annals of Surgical Oncology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.902, h-index: 127)
Annals of Telecommunications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.315, h-index: 25)
Annals of the Institute of Statistical Mathematics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.931, h-index: 31)
Antonie van Leeuwenhoek     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.992, h-index: 87)
Apidologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.14, h-index: 57)
APOPTOSIS     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.554, h-index: 87)
Applicable Algebra in Engineering, Communication and Computing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.354, h-index: 27)
Applications of Mathematics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.274, h-index: 20)
Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42, SJR: 0.575, h-index: 80)
Applied Biochemistry and Microbiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.267, h-index: 26)
Applied Cancer Research     Open Access  
Applied Categorical Structures     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.361, h-index: 21)
Applied Composite Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48, SJR: 0.705, h-index: 35)
Applied Entomology and Zoology     Partially Free   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.554, h-index: 34)
Applied Geomatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.323, h-index: 9)
Applied Geophysics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.541, h-index: 13)
Applied Intelligence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.777, h-index: 43)
Applied Magnetic Resonance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.358, h-index: 34)
Applied Mathematics & Optimization     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.955, h-index: 33)
Applied Mathematics - A J. of Chinese Universities     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.275, h-index: 8)
Applied Mathematics and Mechanics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.37, h-index: 26)
Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 61, SJR: 1.262, h-index: 161)
Applied Physics A     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.535, h-index: 121)
Applied Physics B: Lasers and Optics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.983, h-index: 104)
Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.677, h-index: 47)
Applied Research in Quality of Life     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.288, h-index: 15)
Applied Solar Energy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.251, h-index: 6)
Applied Spatial Analysis and Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.351, h-index: 9)
Aquaculture Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.613, h-index: 40)
Aquarium Sciences and Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Aquatic Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32, SJR: 0.646, h-index: 44)
Aquatic Geochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.764, h-index: 39)
Aquatic Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 1.172, h-index: 53)
Arabian J. for Science and Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.345, h-index: 20)
Arabian J. of Geosciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.417, h-index: 16)
Archaeological and Anthropological Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 1.056, h-index: 15)
Archaeologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.397, h-index: 13)
Archiv der Mathematik     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.597, h-index: 29)
Archival Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56, SJR: 0.804, h-index: 22)
Archive for History of Exact Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.28, h-index: 15)
Archive for Mathematical Logic     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.946, h-index: 23)
Archive for Rational Mechanics and Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 4.091, h-index: 66)
Archive of Applied Mechanics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.865, h-index: 40)
Archives and Museum Informatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 132)
Archives of Computational Methods in Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 2.841, h-index: 40)
Archives of Dermatological Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.9, h-index: 65)
Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.846, h-index: 84)
Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.695, h-index: 47)
Archives of Microbiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.702, h-index: 85)
Archives of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.039, h-index: 56)
Archives of Osteoporosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.092, h-index: 13)
Archives of Sexual Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.198, h-index: 74)
Archives of Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 1.595, h-index: 76)
Archives of Virology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.086, h-index: 90)
Archives of Women's Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.264, h-index: 50)
Archivio di Ortopedia e Reumatologia     Hybrid Journal  
Archivum Immunologiae et Therapiae Experimentalis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.2, h-index: 42)
ArgoSpine News & J.     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.102, h-index: 3)
Argumentation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.295, h-index: 18)
Arid Ecosystems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Arkiv för Matematik     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.948, h-index: 22)
Arnold Mathematical J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Arthropod-Plant Interactions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.797, h-index: 17)
Arthroskopie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.145, h-index: 8)
Artificial Intelligence and Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.288, h-index: 25)
Artificial Intelligence Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.948, h-index: 48)
Artificial Life and Robotics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.231, h-index: 14)
Asia Europe J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.247, h-index: 9)
Asia Pacific Education Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.371, h-index: 17)
Asia Pacific J. of Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.676, h-index: 50)
Asia-Pacific Education Researcher     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.353, h-index: 13)
Asia-Pacific Financial Markets     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.19, h-index: 15)
Asia-Pacific J. of Atmospheric Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 1.006, h-index: 14)
Asian Business & Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.41, h-index: 10)
Asian J. of Business Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Asian J. of Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.263, h-index: 8)
AStA Advances in Statistical Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.681, h-index: 15)
AStA Wirtschafts- und Sozialstatistisches Archiv     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.195, h-index: 5)
ästhetische dermatologie & kosmetologie     Full-text available via subscription  

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Journal Cover Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback
  [SJR: 0.677]   [H-I: 47]   [8 followers]  Follow
    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 1573-3270 - ISSN (Online) 1090-0586
   Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2355 journals]
  • Time is of the Essence: A Review of Electroencephalography (EEG) and
           Event-Related Brain Potentials (ERPs) in Language Research
    • Authors: Anna M. Beres
      Pages: 247 - 255
      Abstract: Abstract The discovery of electroencephalography (EEG) over a century ago has changed the way we understand brain structure and function, in terms of both clinical and research applications. This paper starts with a short description of EEG and then focuses on the event-related brain potentials (ERPs), and their use in experimental settings. It describes the typical set-up of an ERP experiment. A description of a number of ERP components typically involved in language research is presented. Finally, the advantages and disadvantages of using ERPs in language research are discussed. EEG has an extensive use in today’s world, including medical, psychology, or linguistic research. The excellent temporal resolution of EEG information allows one to track a brain response in milliseconds and therefore makes it uniquely suited to research concerning language processing.
      PubDate: 2017-12-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10484-017-9371-3
      Issue No: Vol. 42, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Characterization of the Sensorimotor Rhythm in 4-Month-Old Infants Born at
           Term and Premature
    • Authors: Milene Roca-Stappung; Minerva Moguel-González; Thalía Fernández; Thalía Harmony; Omar Mendoza-Montoya; José Luis Marroquín; Salvador Ruiz-Correa; Lourdes Díaz-Comas; Gloria Otero-Ojeda
      Pages: 257 - 267
      Abstract: Abstract The sensorimotor rhythm (SMR) is an electroencephalographic rhythm associated with motor and cognitive development observed in the central brain regions during wakefulness in the absence of movement, and it reacts contralaterally to generalized and hemibody movements. The purpose of this work was to characterize the SMR of 4-month-old infants, born either healthy at term or prematurely with periventricular leukomalacia (PVL). Two groups of infants were formed: healthy and premature with PVL. Their electroencephalograms (EEGs) were recorded in four conditions: rest, free movement, right-hand grasping and left-hand grasping, in order to explore general reactivity to free movement and contralateral reactivity in hand-grasping conditions. Associations between SMR, and cognitive and motor performance were analyzed. The healthy infants showed a SMR between 5.47 and 7.03 Hz, with clear contralateral reactivity to free movement and right-hand grasping. However, the premature infants with PVL did not show enough electroencephalographic characteristics to evidence the presence of SMR. Poor performance, characteristic of children with PVL, was related to low-frequency SMR, while good performance was associated with a higher frequency rhythm in the left hemisphere. The presence of SMR in the group of healthy infants could be considered a sign of health at this age. Thus, poor SMR evidence in the EEG of infants with PVL is probably a sign of brain immaturity or brain dysfunction. Our results provide data on infant SMR development that is needed to design neurofeedback protocols for infants with PVL.
      PubDate: 2017-12-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10484-017-9370-4
      Issue No: Vol. 42, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Analysis of Subjects’ Vulnerability in a Touch Screen Game Using
           Behavioral Metrics
    • Authors: Payam Parsinejad; Rifat Sipahi
      Pages: 269 - 282
      Abstract: Abstract In this article, we report results on an experimental study conducted with volunteer subjects playing a touch-screen game with two unique difficulty levels. Subjects have knowledge about the rules of both game levels, but only sufficient playing experience with the easy level of the game, making them vulnerable with the difficult level. Several behavioral metrics associated with subjects’ playing the game are studied in order to assess subjects’ mental-workload changes induced by their vulnerability. Specifically, these metrics are calculated based on subjects’ finger kinematics and decision making times, which are then compared with baseline metrics, namely, performance metrics pertaining to how well the game is played and a physiological metric called pnn50 extracted from heart rate measurements. In balanced experiments and supported by comparisons with baseline metrics, it is found that some of the studied behavioral metrics have the potential to be used to infer subjects’ mental workload changes through different levels of the game. These metrics, which are decoupled from task specifics, relate to subjects’ ability to develop strategies to play the game, and hence have the advantage of offering insight into subjects’ task-load and vulnerability assessment across various experimental settings.
      PubDate: 2017-12-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10484-017-9374-0
      Issue No: Vol. 42, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • The More Vivid the Imagination the Better: The Role of the Vividness of
           Imagination in Vasoconstriction Training and Vasodilatation Training
    • Authors: Julia E. Graef; Winfried Rief; Yvonne Nestoriuc; Cornelia Weise
      Pages: 283 - 298
      Abstract: Abstract Blood volume pulse biofeedback represents an effective non-pharmacological treatment for migraine. However, the underlying mechanisms of blood volume pulse biofeedback are still unclear. This study investigated the influence of vividness of imagination, private body consciousness, perfectionism, and general self-efficacy on physiological (blood volume pulse amplitude) and psychological (session performance rated by participants and by trainers) success. Changes in skin conductance and skin temperature indicating habituation to training context were examined. Forty-five healthy male participants were randomized to four sessions of vasoconstriction training or vasodilatation training. Hierarchical linear models were estimated. Results showed significant changes of session performance rated by participants (UC = 0.62, p < .05), by trainers (UC = 0.52, p < .001), and skin temperature (UC = 0.01, p < .001) over time. A change of blood volume pulse amplitude could not be observed (UC = −0.01, p = .65). Vividness of imagination was highly important for both psychological achievement ratings (UC participants  = 1.3, p < .001; UC trainers  = 0.29, p < .01). Relations between skin temperature and general self-efficacy or personal standards were small (UC self-efficacy  = 0.002, p < .10; UC personal standards  = 0.002, p < .05). A time × group interaction regarding trainers’ achievement ratings indicated a specific judgement effect. In conclusion, biofeedback trainers should pay attention to their beliefs and participants’ vividness of imagination.
      PubDate: 2017-12-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10484-017-9373-1
      Issue No: Vol. 42, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Brief Biofeedback Intervention on Anxious Freshman University Students
    • Authors: Paulo Chaló; Anabela Pereira; Patrícia Batista; Luis Sancho
      Pages: 163 - 168
      Abstract: Abstract The increasing number of mental health disorders on university students represents a growing problem with negative impact on this population. Stress and anxiety issues are two of most predominant problems in this population and most campus health services have limited resources to face them. Research has provided evidence about biofeedback effectiveness. This study aims to verify the impact of a short duration biofeedback programme on freshmen university students with high levels of anxiety. A sample of 50 first-year students, with scores above percentile of 75 on STAI Y-2 were randomly selected and divided into two groups. Biofeedback Group took a 15 min session per week, over 8 weeks. No intervention was made on Control Group. Both groups were assessed before and after the biofeedback programme, and the results of the Trait Anxiety Scale and the Inventory of Stress for College Students were compared. The Biofeedback Group presented significant decreases in anxiety and stress values. Control Group presented slight and non-significant changes in scores. These results are consistent with previous studies and reinforce the evidence of biofeedback’s programmes as a valid solution to help students to manage their anxiety and stress.
      PubDate: 2017-09-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10484-017-9361-5
      Issue No: Vol. 42, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Increased HPA Axis Activity and Serum Tryptophan in Naswar (Dipping
           Tobacco) Users: A Case–Control Study
    • Authors: Faiza Sajid; Samina Bano
      Pages: 169 - 178
      Abstract: Abstract Nicotine is the principal addictive agent present in Naswar, a smokeless dipping tobacco product. 5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) has been implicated in the reinforcement properties of nicotine. Also, the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis is of vital importance in evaluating the response to stress and nicotine addiction. The study aimed to evaluate serum tryptophan and cortisol levels in Naswar users in relation to addiction. Additionally, serum cotinine levels were also determined to assess daily nicotine exposure. The study comprised 90 healthy Naswar users and 68 non-tobacco users. Estimation of serum cortisol, tryptophan and albumin was carried out. From the Naswar user group, 20 were selected for the estimation of serum cotinine for which blood was drawn twice first in the morning and then in the evening. Serum tryptophan and cortisol levels in Naswar users were significantly raised compared to the control group. However, no difference in the levels of albumin between Naswar users and the control group were found. The mean cotinine values rose from the morning value of 366.0 ± 40.69 ng/ml (mean ± SEM) to an evening value of 503.1 ± 42.96 ng/ml that in turn is equivalent to consumption of 40 cigarettes. Elevated cortisol levels might constitute an important aspect of Naswar addiction. Additionally, raised levels of serum tryptophan in Naswar users could lead to raised concentration of 5-HT which also might be a significant factor contributing to Naswar addiction. Also, serum cotinine concentrations equivalent to an intake of about 40 cigarettes per day is quite alarming.
      PubDate: 2017-09-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10484-017-9363-3
      Issue No: Vol. 42, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Cerebrovascular Hemodynamics During the Practice of Bhramari Pranayama,
           Kapalbhati and Bahir-Kumbhaka: An Exploratory Study
    • Authors: L. Nivethitha; A. Mooventhan; N. K. Manjunath; Lokesh Bathala; Vijay K. Sharma
      Abstract: Abstract Various pranayama techniques are known to produce different physiological effects. We evaluated the effect of three-different pranayama techniques on cerebrovascular hemodynamics. Eighteen healthy volunteers with the mean ± standard deviation age of 23.78 ± 2.96 years were performed three-different pranayama techniques: (1) Bhramari, (2) Kapalbhati and (3) Bahir-Kumbhaka in three-different orders. Continuous transcranial Doppler (TCD) monitoring was performed before, during and after the pranayama techniques. TCD parameters such as peak systolic velocity, end diastolic velocity (EDV), mean flow velocity (MFV) and pulsatility index (PI) of right middle cerebral artery were recorded. Practice of Kapalbhati showed significant reductions in EDV and MFV with significant increase in PI while, Bahir-Kumbhaka showed significant increase in EDV and MFV with significant reduction in PI. However, no such significant changes were observed in Bhramari pranayama. Various types of pranayama techniques produce different cerebrovascular hemodynamic changes in healthy volunteers.
      PubDate: 2017-11-29
      DOI: 10.1007/s10484-017-9387-8
       
  • Pre-performance Physiological State: Heart Rate Variability as a Predictor
           of Shooting Performance
    • Authors: E. Ortega; C. J. K. Wang
      Abstract: Abstract Heart rate variability (HRV) is commonly used in sport science for monitoring the physiology of athletes but not as an indicator of physiological state from a psychological perspective. Since HRV is established to be an indicator of emotional responding, it could be an objective means of quantifying an athlete’s subjective physiological state before competition. A total of 61 sport shooters participated in this study, of which 21 were novice shooters, 19 were intermediate shooters, and 21 were advanced level shooters. HRV, self-efficacy, and use of mental skills were assessed before they completed a standard shooting performance task of 40 shots, as in a competition qualifying round. The results showed that HRV was significantly positively correlated with self-efficacy and performance and was a significant predictor of shooting performance. In addition, advanced shooters were found to have significantly lower average heart rate before shooting and used more self-talk, relaxation, imagery, and automaticity compared to novice and intermediate shooters. HRV was found to be useful in identifying the physiological state of an athlete before competing, and as such, coaches and athletes can adopt practical strategies to improve the pre-performance physiological state as a means to optimize performance.
      PubDate: 2017-11-10
      DOI: 10.1007/s10484-017-9386-9
       
  • Heart Rate Variability Biofeedback Does Not Substitute for Asthma Steroid
           Controller Medication
    • Authors: Paul M. Lehrer; Charles G. Irvin; Shou-En Lu; Anthony Scardella; Beatrix Roehmheld-Hamm; Milisyaris Aviles-Velez; Jessica Graves; Evgeny G. Vaschillo; Bronya Vaschillo; Flavia Hoyte; Harold Nelson; Frederick S. Wamboldt
      Abstract: Abstract Despite previous findings of therapeutic effects for heart rate variability biofeedback (HRVB) on asthma, it is not known whether HRVB can substitute either for controller or rescue medication, or whether it affects airway inflammation. Sixty-eight paid volunteer steroid naïve study participants with mild or moderate asthma were given 3 months of HRVB or a comparison condition consisting of EEG alpha biofeedback with relaxing music and relaxed paced breathing (EEG+), in a two-center trial. All participants received a month of intensive asthma education prior to randomization. Both treatment conditions produced similar significant improvements on the methacholine challenge test (MCT), asthma symptoms, and asthma quality of life (AQOL). MCT effects were of similar size to those of enhanced placebo procedures reported elsewhere, and were 65% of those of a course of a high-potency inhaled steroid budesonide given to a sub-group of participants following biofeedback training. Exhaled nitric oxide decreased significantly only in the HRVB group, 81% of the budesonide effect, but with no significant differences between groups. Participants reported becoming more relaxed during practice of both techniques. Administration of albuterol after biofeedback sessions produced a large improvement in pulmonary function test results, indicating that neither treatment normalized pulmonary function as a potent controller medication would have done. Impulse oscillometry showed increased upper airway (vocal cord) resistance during biofeedback periods in both groups. These data suggest that HRVB should not be considered an alternative to asthma controller medications (e.g., inhaled steroids), although both biofeedback conditions produced some beneficial effects, warranting further research, and suggesting potential complementary effects. Various hypotheses are presented to explain why HRVB effects on asthma appeared smaller in this study than in earlier studies. Clinical Trial Registration NCT02766374.
      PubDate: 2017-11-09
      DOI: 10.1007/s10484-017-9382-0
       
  • Could White Coat Ocular Hypertension Affect to the Accuracy of the
           Diagnosis of Glaucoma' Relationships Between Anxiety and Intraocular
           Pressure in a Simulated Clinical Setting
    • Authors: Jorge Luis Méndez-Ulrich; Antoni Sanz; Albert Feliu-Soler; María Álvarez; Xavier Borràs
      Abstract: Abstract Sixty-one healthy subjects participated in a laboratory study carried out in a simulated clinical setting. Anticipatory anxiety-state was assessed at the arrival and immediately after, with no brief phase of adaptation, measurements of intraocular pressure, heart rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressure were collected. At the end of the procedure, anxiety-trait was also assessed. Results suggest that high levels of both anxiety-state and anxiety-trait significantly predicted a clinically relevant increase of intraocular pressure. Anxiety-state mediated the relationship between anxiety-trait and intraocular pressure, which also was found to be related with heart rate but not related to both systolic and diastolic blood pressure. These results suggest a common mechanism of regulation underlying anxiogenic variability found on both intraocular pressure and heart rate. A reduction in parasympathetic activity appears as a possible mechanism underlying to this phenomenon. This anxiety-enhanced intraocular pressure could be considered a phenomenon analogous to white coat hypertension found in the measurement of blood pressure; therefore, it probably should be taken into account in the clinical context to prevent errors in the diagnosis of glaucoma. Further research on cognitive and emotional regulation of intraocular pressure is needed to best characterize this hypothetical phenomenon.
      PubDate: 2017-11-08
      DOI: 10.1007/s10484-017-9385-x
       
  • No Effects of Successful Bidirectional SMR Feedback Training on Objective
           and Subjective Sleep in Healthy Subjects
    • Authors: Olaf Binsch; Ellen S. Wilschut; Martijn Arns; Charelle Bottenheft; Pierre J. L. Valk; Eric H. G. J. M. Vermetten
      Abstract: Abstract There is a growing interest in the application of psychophysiological signals in more applied settings. Unidirectional sensory motor rhythm-training (SMR) has demonstrated consistent effects on sleep. In this study the main aim was to analyze to what extent participants could gain voluntary control over sleep-related parameters and secondarily to assess possible influences of this training on sleep metrics. Bidirectional training of SMR as well as heart rate variability (HRV) was used to assess the feasibility of training these parameters as possible brain computer interfaces (BCI) signals, and assess effects normally associated with unidirectional SMR training such as the influence on objective and subjective sleep parameters. Participants (n = 26) received between 11 and 21 training sessions during 7 weeks in which they received feedback on their personalized threshold for either SMR or HRV activity, for both up- and down regulation. During a pre- and post-test a sleep log was kept and participants used a wrist actigraph. Participants were asked to take an afternoon nap on the first day at the testing facility. During napping, sleep spindles were assessed as well as self-reported sleep measures of the nap. Although the training demonstrated successful learning to increase and decrease SMR and HRV activity, no effects were found of bidirectional training on sleep spindles, actigraphy, sleep diaries, and self-reported sleep quality. As such it is concluded that bidirectional SMR and HRV training can be safely used as a BCI and participants were able to improve their control over physiological signals with bidirectional training, whereas the application of bidirectional SMR and HRV training did not lead to significant changes of sleep quality in this healthy population.
      PubDate: 2017-10-31
      DOI: 10.1007/s10484-017-9384-y
       
  • The Impact of Different Visual Feedbacks in User Training on Motor Imagery
           Control in BCI
    • Authors: Dariusz Zapała; Piotr Francuz; Ewelina Zapała; Natalia Kopiś; Piotr Wierzgała; Paweł Augustynowicz; Andrzej Majkowski; Marcin Kołodziej
      Abstract: Abstract The challenges of research into brain–computer interfaces (BCI) include significant individual differences in learning pace and in the effective operation of BCI devices. The use of neurofeedback training is a popular method of improving the effectiveness BCI operation. The purpose of the present study was to determine to what extent it is possible to improve the effectiveness of operation of sensorimotor rhythm-based brain–computer interfaces (SMR-BCI) by supplementing user training with elements modifying the characteristics of visual feedback. Four experimental groups had training designed to reinforce BCI control by: visual feedback in the form of dummy faces expressing emotions (Group 1); flashing the principal elements of visual feedback (Group 2) and giving both visual feedbacks in one condition (Group 3). The fourth group participated in training with no modifications (Group 4). Training consisted of a series of trials where the subjects directed a ball into a basket located to the right or left side of the screen. In Group 1 a schematic image a face, placed on the controlled object, showed various emotions, depending on the accuracy of control. In Group 2, the cue and targets were flashed with different frequency (4 Hz) than the remaining elements visible on the monitor. Both modifications were also used simultaneously in Group 3. SMR activity during the task was recorded before and after the training. In Group 3 there was a significant improvement in SMR control, compared to subjects in Group 2 and 4 (control). Differences between subjects in Groups 1, 2 and 4 (control) were insignificant. This means that relatively small changes in the training procedure may significantly impact the effectiveness of BCI control. Analysis of behavioural data acquired from all participants at training showed greater effectiveness in directing the object towards the right side of the screen. Subjects with the greatest improvement in SMR control showed a significantly lower difference in the accuracy of rightward and leftward movement than others.
      PubDate: 2017-10-26
      DOI: 10.1007/s10484-017-9383-z
       
  • Feeling the Insight: Uncovering Somatic Markers of the “aha”
           Experience
    • Authors: Wangbing Shen; Yu Tong; Yuan Yuan; Huijia Zhan; Chang Liu; Jing Luo; Houde Cai
      Abstract: Abstract Whether internal insight can be recognized by experiencing (somatic feeling) remains an unexplored problem. This study investigated the issue by examining potential somatic markers of the “aha” experience occurring at the moment of sudden insight. Participants were required to solve a set of compound remote associates (CRA) problems and were simultaneously monitored via electrodermal and cardiovascular recordings. The “aha”-related psychological components and somatic markers were determined by contrasting insightful solutions with non-insightful solutions. Results showed that the “aha” experience was an amalgam entailing positive affects and approached cognition accompanied by a greater mean skin conductance response (mSCR) amplitude and a marginally accelerated heart rate than the “no-aha” one. These results confirm and extend findings of the multidimensionality of the “aha” feeling and offer the first direct evidence of somatic markers, particularly an electrodermal signature of an “aha” feeling, which suggests a sudden insight could likely be experienced by individuals’ external soma.
      PubDate: 2017-10-26
      DOI: 10.1007/s10484-017-9381-1
       
  • Abstracts of Scientific Oral and Poster Presentations at the 19th Meeting
           of the Biofeedback Federation of Europe
    • PubDate: 2017-09-06
      DOI: 10.1007/s10484-017-9376-y
       
  • Using EEG Frontal Asymmetry to Predict IT User’s Perceptions Regarding
           Usefulness, Ease of Use and Playfulness
    • Authors: Christos N. Moridis; Vasileios Terzis; Anastasios A. Economides; Anna Karlovasitou; Vasileios E. Karabatakis
      Abstract: Abstract Information systems (IS) community is increasingly interested in employing neuroscience tools and methods in order to develop new theories concerning Human–computer interaction (HCI) and further understand IS acceptance models. The new field of NeuroIS has been introduced to address these issues. NeuroIS researchers have proposed encephalography (EEG), among other neuroscience instruments, as a valuable usability metric, when used effectively in appropriately designed experiments. Moreover, numerous researchers have suggested that EEG frontal asymmetry may serve as an important metric of user experience. Based on the aforementioned evidence, this study aims to integrate frontal asymmetry with Technology acceptance model (TAM). Particularly, we assumed that frontal asymmetry might predict users’ perceptions regarding Usefulness and Ease of Use. Furthermore, we hypothesized that frontal asymmetry might also affect (influence) users’ Perceived Playfulness. Specifically, 82 (43 females and 39 males) undergraduate students were chosen to use a Computer-Based Assessment (while being connected to the EEG) in the context of an introductory informatics course. Results confirmed our hypothesis as well as points of theory about Information technology (IT) acceptance variables. This is one of the first studies to suggest that frontal asymmetry could serve as a valuable tool for examining IT acceptance constructs and better understanding HCI.
      PubDate: 2017-09-04
      DOI: 10.1007/s10484-017-9379-8
       
  • Psychophysiological Reactivity in Couples During a Marital Interaction
           Task
    • Authors: J. Coutinho; P. Oliveira-Silva; A. R. Mesquita; M. Barbosa; K. M. Perrone-McGovern; O. F. Gonçalves
      Abstract: Abstract The ability to regulate our own physiological arousal when dealing with the emotional expression of our partner is crucial for satisfactory and stable intimate relationships. In previous physiological studies of marital interactions, researchers have found greater levels of psychophysiological arousal for members of the couple in conflictual interactions in comparison with positive interactions. Past researchers have established that intense and prolonged autonomic and neuroendocrine arousal during marital conflict can have negative consequences for mental and physical health. In this study we examined the physiological reactivity, as measured by skin conductance level, heart rate and cortisol levels, from both partners during a couple's interaction task consisting of a structured conversation about positive and negative aspects of their relationship. Participants were thirty-two heterosexual couples (N = 64) in a committed monogamous relationship with a minimum duration of one year. We found higher heart rate and cortisol levels during negative interaction condition when compared with the positive condition. Skin conductance was higher in the positive interaction condition, when compared with the negative interaction condition. In addition, we found a significant negative association between heart rate variability and autonomic arousal evoked by the interaction task. The implications of these findings for the effects of marital strain on health as well as for the design of risk-reducing interventions, namely biofeedback are discussed.
      PubDate: 2017-09-02
      DOI: 10.1007/s10484-017-9380-2
       
  • Auditory Event-Related Potentials in the Interictal Phase of Migraine
           Indicate Alterations in Automatic Attention
    • Authors: Jeffrey J. Sable; Toni A. Patrick; Patrick L. Woody; Katelyn R. Baker; Stephanie Allen-Winters; Frank Andrasik
      Abstract: Abstract Migraine has been characterized by interictal cortical hyperresponsivity. We compared event-related brain potentials (ERPs) to unattended tone pairs in migraineurs (interictal) versus non-headache controls, with particular interest in attention-related activity (i.e., the N1 component). Electroencephalograms were recorded from 11 interictal migraineurs and 14 headache-free controls while they watched a silent video. Pairs of 50-ms tones with 500-ms inter-tone intervals were presented with inter-pair intervals of 1 or 5 s. P1, N1, P2, and N2 components were analyzed. N1 peak amplitudes were larger in migraineurs than in controls, especially after the 5-s inter-pair interval. However, there was no difference between groups in the attenuation of the N1 (i.e., no interaction). P2 peak amplitudes were larger in migraineurs, but only after the first tone in the pair. The three migraineurs without aura had larger N1s than the eight with aura. Our findings are consistent with interictal hyperresponsivity of cortical generators of these ERPs in migraineurs. However, areas that inhibit the responses with stimulus repetition do not seem to be affected.
      PubDate: 2017-09-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10484-017-9378-9
       
  • Respiratory Sinus Arrhythmia in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for
           Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms in Children: Preliminary Treatment and
           Gender Effects
    • Authors: Rebecca S. Lipschutz; Sarah A. O. Gray; Carl F. Weems; Michael S. Scheeringa
      Abstract: Abstract Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is an efficacious treatment for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, but the effect of CBT on physiological indicators is largely unknown. Respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) is an established parasympathetic marker of self-regulatory capacity and stress responsivity. The present study tested if and how resting RSA and RSA reactivity changed following treatment among a sample of children (n = 48) who experienced at least one traumatic event and presented with PTSD symptoms. RSA reactivity was measured in response to personalized trauma-related scripts. Results indicated that changes in RSA after treatment were dependent on pretreatment resting levels of RSA, with individuals with high and low pretreatment resting RSA levels appearing to converge over time in both resting RSA and RSA reactivity by the 3-month follow up. Specific to RSA reactivity, a sex difference was evident, as following treatment, females showed less RSA withdrawal whereas males showed more RSA withdrawal. PTSD symptoms were significantly reduced after CBT but symptom change was not associated with pretreatment resting RSA levels. Overall, these results suggest that there may be multiple physiological patterns within children with PTSD and the direction of the physiological changes after CBT may depend on initial differences in resting RSA levels.
      PubDate: 2017-08-24
      DOI: 10.1007/s10484-017-9377-x
       
  • Biofeedback-Aided Relaxation Training Helps Emotional Disturbances in
           Undergraduate Students Before Examination
    • Authors: Zahra Gholami Tahsini; Shahrokh Makvand Hosseini; Farahnaz Kianersi; Shahrzad Rashn; Elahe Majdara
      Abstract: Abstract The main aim of the present research was to determine the effectiveness of biofeedback-aided relaxation training (BFRT) for alleviating symptoms of depression, anxiety, and stress for undergraduate students as they prepared for their final examinations. In a randomized controlled trial design, 29 male and female students, with heightened levels of depression, anxiety and stress scores on the Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale, were chosen and randomly assigned to BFRT or a no-treatment control condition. Subjects assigned to BFRT received eight sessions of BFRT spaced over 4 weeks, during which they were trained to decrease electromyography (EMG) and respiration rate (RESP) and to increase skin temperature (TEMP). Data were extracted and analyzed by GLM statistical analysis. Students receiving BFRT revealed significant reductions in symptoms when compared to the untreated controls. Those receiving BFRT also showed significant changes for the three targeted psychophysiological modalities (EMG, RESP, and TEMP). It was concluded that BFRT can be useful for reducing symptoms of emotional disturbance in undergraduate students during a particularly stressful period and that this may, in turn, help promote overall psychological health.
      PubDate: 2017-07-31
      DOI: 10.1007/s10484-017-9375-z
       
  • Relevance of the Clinical and Psychophysiological Variables in the
           Dyssynergic Defecation: A Comparative Study in Elderly Subjects
    • Authors: Miguel A. Simón; Ana M. Bueno
      Abstract: Abstract The relevance of several clinical and psychophysiological variables in the dyssynergic defecation in elderly subjects was investigated in this study. To accomplish this, 30 elderly subjects (10 without anorectal disorders, 10 with chronic constipation and 10 with dyssynergic defecation) were repeatedly assessed once per week for 4 weeks, with the following measures being collected at each session: EMG-activity (µV) of the external anal sphincter (at rest, during squeezing, and during straining to defecate), stool frequency, difficulty defecation level, pain grade during defecation, and satisfaction level after evacuation. A 3 (group) × 4 (sessions) mixed-measures MANOVA revealed a significant main effect for group (Wilks’s lambda = 0.006; F = 28.45; p < 0.01), but not for sessions (Wilks’s lambda = 0.874; F = 0.94; p > 0.05) or for the group x sessions interaction (Wilks’s lambda = 0.811; F = 1.45; p > 0.05). One-way ANOVA and Scheffé’s posthoc tests were used to isolate the differences between the groups with respect to the seven different measures. These analysis showed significant differences between the groups on all four clinical variables but only for one psychophysiological variable, EMG-activity during straining to defecate. Significant differences were evidenced between all pairs examined for the difficulty defecation level and pain grade. The complete results of these analysis are presented and the conclusions drawn from them are discussed.
      PubDate: 2017-06-21
      DOI: 10.1007/s10484-017-9368-y
       
 
 
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