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Publisher: Springer-Verlag   (Total: 2345 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 2345 Journals sorted alphabetically
3D Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.214, h-index: 10)
4OR: A Quarterly J. of Operations Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.073, h-index: 25)
AAPS J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 1.192, h-index: 74)
AAPS PharmSciTech     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.718, h-index: 54)
Abdominal Imaging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.723, h-index: 60)
Abhandlungen aus dem Mathematischen Seminar der Universitat Hamburg     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.447, h-index: 12)
Academic Psychiatry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.492, h-index: 32)
Academic Questions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.135, h-index: 6)
Accreditation and Quality Assurance: J. for Quality, Comparability and Reliability in Chemical Measurement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.378, h-index: 30)
Acoustical Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.355, h-index: 20)
Acoustics Australia     Hybrid Journal  
Acta Analytica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.387, h-index: 6)
Acta Applicandae Mathematicae     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.624, h-index: 34)
Acta Biotheoretica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.419, h-index: 25)
Acta Diabetologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.318, h-index: 46)
Acta Endoscopica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.113, h-index: 8)
acta ethologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.465, h-index: 23)
Acta Geochimica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Acta Geodaetica et Geophysica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.294, h-index: 13)
Acta Geotechnica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 1.818, h-index: 22)
Acta Informatica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.524, h-index: 32)
Acta Mathematica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 8.021, h-index: 47)
Acta Mathematica Hungarica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.53, h-index: 29)
Acta Mathematica Sinica, English Series     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.406, h-index: 30)
Acta Mathematica Vietnamica     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.451, h-index: 5)
Acta Mathematicae Applicatae Sinica, English Series     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.22, h-index: 20)
Acta Mechanica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.898, h-index: 52)
Acta Mechanica Sinica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.426, h-index: 29)
Acta Metallurgica Sinica (English Letters)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.525, h-index: 18)
Acta Meteorologica Sinica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.524, h-index: 14)
Acta Neurochirurgica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.833, h-index: 73)
Acta Neurologica Belgica     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.348, h-index: 27)
Acta Neuropathologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 6.61, h-index: 117)
Acta Oceanologica Sinica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.295, h-index: 17)
Acta Parasitologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.581, h-index: 28)
Acta Physiologiae Plantarum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.551, h-index: 39)
Acta Politica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.658, h-index: 20)
adhäsion KLEBEN & DICHTEN     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.103, h-index: 4)
ADHD Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.871, h-index: 15)
Adhesion Adhesives & Sealants     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Administration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Services Research     Partially Free   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.795, h-index: 40)
Adsorption     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.774, h-index: 52)
Advances in Applied Clifford Algebras     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.319, h-index: 15)
Advances in Atmospheric Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 0.959, h-index: 44)
Advances in Computational Mathematics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.255, h-index: 44)
Advances in Contraception     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Data Analysis and Classification     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53, SJR: 1.113, h-index: 14)
Advances in Gerontology     Partially Free   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.141, h-index: 3)
Advances in Health Sciences Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 1.397, h-index: 42)
Advances in Manufacturing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.2, h-index: 4)
Advances in Polymer Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40, SJR: 0.637, h-index: 89)
Advances in Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.79, h-index: 44)
Aegean Review of the Law of the Sea and Maritime Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Aequationes Mathematicae     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.882, h-index: 23)
Aerobiologia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.511, h-index: 36)
Aesthetic Plastic Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.821, h-index: 49)
African Archaeological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.612, h-index: 24)
Afrika Matematika     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.248, h-index: 6)
AGE     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 1.358, h-index: 33)
Ageing Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.337, h-index: 10)
Aggiornamenti CIO     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Aging Clinical and Experimental Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.529, h-index: 55)
Agricultural Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Agriculture and Human Values     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.197, h-index: 49)
Agroforestry Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.64, h-index: 56)
Agronomy for Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.732, h-index: 59)
AI & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.171, h-index: 19)
AIDS and Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 2.006, h-index: 71)
Air Quality, Atmosphere & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.706, h-index: 19)
Akupunktur & Aurikulomedizin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Algebra and Logic     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.566, h-index: 18)
Algebra Universalis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.388, h-index: 22)
Algebras and Representation Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.868, h-index: 20)
Algorithmica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.898, h-index: 56)
Allergo J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.183, h-index: 20)
Allergo J. Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Alpine Botany     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.729, h-index: 20)
ALTEX : Alternatives to Animal Experimentation     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.392, h-index: 32)
AMBIO     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.094, h-index: 87)
American J. of Cardiovascular Drugs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.864, h-index: 39)
American J. of Community Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 1.237, h-index: 83)
American J. of Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.634, h-index: 13)
American J. of Cultural Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.283, h-index: 3)
American J. of Dance Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.175, h-index: 13)
American J. of Potato Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.558, h-index: 35)
American J. of Psychoanalysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.293, h-index: 13)
American Sociologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.18, h-index: 13)
Amino Acids     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 1.362, h-index: 83)
AMS Review     Partially Free   (Followers: 4)
Analog Integrated Circuits and Signal Processing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.21, h-index: 37)
Analysis and Mathematical Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.665, h-index: 7)
Analysis in Theory and Applications     Hybrid Journal  
Analysis of Verbal Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 1.096, h-index: 123)
Anatomical Science Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.301, h-index: 26)
Angewandte Schmerztherapie und Palliativmedizin     Hybrid Journal  
Angiogenesis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 2.212, h-index: 69)
Animal Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.122, h-index: 55)
Annales françaises de médecine d'urgence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.156, h-index: 4)
Annales Henri Poincaré     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.377, h-index: 32)
Annales mathématiques du Québec     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Annali dell'Universita di Ferrara     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.504, h-index: 14)
Annali di Matematica Pura ed Applicata     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.167, h-index: 26)
Annals of Behavioral Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 2.112, h-index: 98)
Annals of Biomedical Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 1.182, h-index: 94)
Annals of Combinatorics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.849, h-index: 15)
Annals of Data Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Annals of Dyslexia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.857, h-index: 40)
Annals of Finance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.686, h-index: 14)
Annals of Forest Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.929, h-index: 57)
Annals of Global Analysis and Geometry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.136, h-index: 23)
Annals of Hematology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.117, h-index: 62)
Annals of Mathematics and Artificial Intelligence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.593, h-index: 42)
Annals of Microbiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.402, h-index: 26)
Annals of Nuclear Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.68, h-index: 45)
Annals of Operations Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.186, h-index: 78)
Annals of Ophthalmology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Annals of Regional Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.405, h-index: 42)
Annals of Software Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Annals of Solid and Structural Mechanics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.553, h-index: 8)
Annals of Surgical Oncology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.902, h-index: 127)
Annals of Telecommunications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.315, h-index: 25)
Annals of the Institute of Statistical Mathematics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.931, h-index: 31)
Antonie van Leeuwenhoek     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.992, h-index: 87)
Apidologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.14, h-index: 57)
APOPTOSIS     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.554, h-index: 87)
Applicable Algebra in Engineering, Communication and Computing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.354, h-index: 27)
Applications of Mathematics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.274, h-index: 20)
Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44, SJR: 0.575, h-index: 80)
Applied Biochemistry and Microbiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.267, h-index: 26)
Applied Categorical Structures     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.361, h-index: 21)
Applied Composite Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47, SJR: 0.705, h-index: 35)
Applied Entomology and Zoology     Partially Free   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.554, h-index: 34)
Applied Geomatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.323, h-index: 9)
Applied Geophysics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.541, h-index: 13)
Applied Intelligence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.777, h-index: 43)
Applied Magnetic Resonance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.358, h-index: 34)
Applied Mathematics & Optimization     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.955, h-index: 33)
Applied Mathematics - A J. of Chinese Universities     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.275, h-index: 8)
Applied Mathematics and Mechanics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.37, h-index: 26)
Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 61, SJR: 1.262, h-index: 161)
Applied Physics A     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.535, h-index: 121)
Applied Physics B: Lasers and Optics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.983, h-index: 104)
Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.677, h-index: 47)
Applied Research in Quality of Life     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.288, h-index: 15)
Applied Solar Energy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.251, h-index: 6)
Applied Spatial Analysis and Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.351, h-index: 9)
Aquaculture Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.613, h-index: 40)
Aquarium Sciences and Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Aquatic Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 0.646, h-index: 44)
Aquatic Geochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.764, h-index: 39)
Aquatic Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.172, h-index: 53)
Arabian J. for Science and Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.345, h-index: 20)
Arabian J. of Geosciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.417, h-index: 16)
Archaeological and Anthropological Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 1.056, h-index: 15)
Archaeologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.397, h-index: 13)
Archiv der Mathematik     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.597, h-index: 29)
Archival Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52, SJR: 0.804, h-index: 22)
Archive for History of Exact Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.28, h-index: 15)
Archive for Mathematical Logic     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.946, h-index: 23)
Archive for Rational Mechanics and Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 4.091, h-index: 66)
Archive of Applied Mechanics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.865, h-index: 40)
Archives and Museum Informatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 120)
Archives of Computational Methods in Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 2.841, h-index: 40)
Archives of Dermatological Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.9, h-index: 65)
Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.846, h-index: 84)
Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.695, h-index: 47)
Archives of Microbiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.702, h-index: 85)
Archives of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.039, h-index: 56)
Archives of Osteoporosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.092, h-index: 13)
Archives of Sexual Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.198, h-index: 74)
Archives of Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.595, h-index: 76)
Archives of Virology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.086, h-index: 90)
Archives of Women's Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 1.264, h-index: 50)
Archivio di Ortopedia e Reumatologia     Hybrid Journal  
Archivum Immunologiae et Therapiae Experimentalis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.2, h-index: 42)
ArgoSpine News & J.     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.102, h-index: 3)
Argumentation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.295, h-index: 18)
Arid Ecosystems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Arkiv för Matematik     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.948, h-index: 22)
Arnold Mathematical J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Arthropod-Plant Interactions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.797, h-index: 17)
Arthroskopie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.145, h-index: 8)
Artificial Intelligence and Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.288, h-index: 25)
Artificial Intelligence Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.948, h-index: 48)
Artificial Life and Robotics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.231, h-index: 14)
Asia Europe J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.247, h-index: 9)
Asia Pacific Education Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.371, h-index: 17)
Asia Pacific J. of Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.676, h-index: 50)
Asia-Pacific Education Researcher     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.353, h-index: 13)
Asia-Pacific Financial Markets     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.19, h-index: 15)
Asia-Pacific J. of Atmospheric Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 1.006, h-index: 14)
Asian Business & Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.41, h-index: 10)
Asian J. of Business Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Asian J. of Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.263, h-index: 8)
AStA Advances in Statistical Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.681, h-index: 15)
AStA Wirtschafts- und Sozialstatistisches Archiv     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.195, h-index: 5)
ästhetische dermatologie & kosmetologie     Full-text available via subscription  
Astronomy and Astrophysics Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 4.511, h-index: 44)
Astronomy Letters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.58, h-index: 30)

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Journal Cover Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback
  [SJR: 0.677]   [H-I: 47]   [7 followers]  Follow
    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 1573-3270 - ISSN (Online) 1090-0586
   Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2345 journals]
  • Effects of Mental Stress Induction on Heart Rate Variability in Patients
           with Panic Disorder
    • Authors: Katja Petrowski; Susann Wichmann; Timo Siepmann; Gloria-Beatrice Wintermann; Stefan R. Bornstein; Martin Siepmann
      Pages: 85 - 94
      Abstract: Reduced heart rate variability (HRV) constitutes a widely used marker of cardiac autonomic inflexibility which has been linked to disorders such as panic disorder (PD). To date, the pathophysiological mechanisms whereby panic leads to attenuated HRV are not fully elucidated. We aimed to investigate the hypothesis that PD patients show pathological reactivity both in response to interoceptive and psychosocial stress in comparison to healthy individuals. We performed a controlled study on 38 patients diagnosed with PD [20 males and 18 females aged 35.55 ± 10.12 years, mean ± standard deviation] and 23 age and gender matched healthy control participants. Distress was induced using the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST) and the dexamethasone–corticotropin-releasing-hormone (DEX–CRH) test. We assessed HRV prior to, during, and post-stress induction using the root mean square successive differences (RMSSD) as well as spectral analysis (high frequency; HF and low frequency; LF). Statistical analyses revealed significant main effects of time for mean heart rate (HR), HF, LF (solely DEX–CRH), LFHF-ratio (solely TSST) and the RMSSD. Significant interaction effects were observed with more pronounced increases in mean HR (TSST) and LFHF-ratio (DEX–CRH) in the healthy control participants. No significant main effects of group were observed. Overall, our results indicate “normal” HRV parameters in patients with PD. The HRV of PD patients is no worse than that of healthy control participants since the HRV profiles were similar between the study groups. The current study is one of rather rarely published studies which was unable to show an influence of PD on HRV. Implications for future studies are under discussion.
      PubDate: 2017-06-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10484-016-9346-9
      Issue No: Vol. 42, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Skin Conductance Reactivity to Standardized Virtual Reality Combat Scenes
           in Veterans with PTSD
    • Abstract: Interest in virtual reality (VR) as a clinical tool to augment posttraumatic stress (PTSD) treatment has grown substantially in recent years due to advances in VR technology. Moreover, its potential assisted use in the PTSD diagnostic process has been recognized. In this study we examined physiological responding, skin conductance, to a standardized presentation of non-personalized combat-related VR events (e.g. encountering enemy fire; explosions) as compared to non-combat classroom VR events in 19 Veterans with and 24 Veterans without combat-related PTSD who had been deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan. Veterans watched a total of 12 VR scenarios—six combat-related and six non-combat-related—with each scenario gradually increasing in emotional intensity by adding more VR events in addition to repeating prior VR events. Results show that Veterans with PTSD displayed larger skin conductance reactivity across VR combat events, but not for non-combat VR events, as compared to combat Veterans without PTSD. Nevertheless, Veterans with and without PTSD showed a similar reduction of emotional arousal to repeated presentation of the same VR combat events. Within the PTSD sample, the elevated level of VR combat-related arousal correlated marginally with severity of hyperarousal symptoms. This study confirms that the use of a non-personalized and standardized VR presentation successfully distinguishes Veterans with PTSD from those without on a measure of psychophysiological arousal to combat-related VR stimuli. The assessment of physiological reactivity during the repeated presentation of standardized, trauma-related VR events highlights its use for PTSD assessment as well as treatment.
      PubDate: 2017-06-23
       
  • Relevance of the Clinical and Psychophysiological Variables in the
           Dyssynergic Defecation: A Comparative Study in Elderly Subjects
    • Abstract: The relevance of several clinical and psychophysiological variables in the dyssynergic defecation in elderly subjects was investigated in this study. To accomplish this, 30 elderly subjects (10 without anorectal disorders, 10 with chronic constipation and 10 with dyssynergic defecation) were repeatedly assessed once per week for 4 weeks, with the following measures being collected at each session: EMG-activity (µV) of the external anal sphincter (at rest, during squeezing, and during straining to defecate), stool frequency, difficulty defecation level, pain grade during defecation, and satisfaction level after evacuation. A 3 (group) × 4 (sessions) mixed-measures MANOVA revealed a significant main effect for group (Wilks’s lambda = 0.006; F = 28.45; p < 0.01), but not for sessions (Wilks’s lambda = 0.874; F = 0.94; p > 0.05) or for the group x sessions interaction (Wilks’s lambda = 0.811; F = 1.45; p > 0.05). One-way ANOVA and Scheffé’s posthoc tests were used to isolate the differences between the groups with respect to the seven different measures. These analysis showed significant differences between the groups on all four clinical variables but only for one psychophysiological variable, EMG-activity during straining to defecate. Significant differences were evidenced between all pairs examined for the difficulty defecation level and pain grade. The complete results of these analysis are presented and the conclusions drawn from them are discussed.
      PubDate: 2017-06-21
       
  • Reducing Anxiety and Improving Academic Performance Through a Biofeedback
           Relaxation Training Program
    • Authors: Aitor Aritzeta; Goretti Soroa; Nekane Balluerka; Alexander Muela; Arantxa Gorostiaga; Jone Aliri
      Abstract: The aim of this study was to analyze the influence of a biofeedback relaxation training program on anxiety and academic performance. The program consisted of five biofeedback sessions coupled with three training activities focused on deep breathing, guided imagery, and muscle relaxation. The participants were second-year psychology undergraduates from the University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU, northern Spain). The experimental group comprised 152 students (M age  = 19.6, SD = 0.74; 74% women) and the control group 81 students (M age   = 19.4, SD = 0.92; 71% women). Results showed that after participating in the program, students in the experimental group had lower levels of anxiety and increased academic performance. Furthermore, they scored lower on anxiety and higher on academic performance in comparison with the control subjects. This suggests that the inclusion of biofeedback training programs in educational contexts could be a way of reducing anxiety and improving academic performance. It may also deepen our understanding of the dynamic interplay between psychophysiological, cognitive, and emotional processes.
      PubDate: 2017-06-16
      DOI: 10.1007/s10484-017-9367-z
       
  • Transitive Versus Intransitive Complex Gesture Representation: A
           Comparison Between Execution, Observation and Imagination by fNIRS
    • Authors: Michela Balconi; Davide Crivelli; Livia Cortesi
      Abstract: The aim of the present study was to examine cortical correlates of motor execution, motor observation and motor imagery of hand complex gestures, in particular by comparing meaningful gestures implying the use of an object (transitive action) or not (intransitive action). Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) was used to verify the presence of partial overlapping between some cortical areas involved in those different tasks. Participants were instructed to observe videos of transitive vs. intransitive gestures and then to execute or imagine them. Gesture execution was associated to greater brain activity (increased oxygenated hemoglobin levels) with respect to observation and imagination in motor areas (premotor cortex, PMC; primary sensorimotor cortex, SM1). In contrast, the posterior parietal cortex (PPC) was more relevantly involved in both execution and observation tasks compared to gesture imagination. Moreover, execution and observation of transitive gestures seemed primarily supported by similar parietal posterior areas when compared with intransitive gestures, which do not imply the presence on a object.
      PubDate: 2017-06-06
      DOI: 10.1007/s10484-017-9365-1
       
  • Effect of Heart Rate Variability Biofeedback on Sport Performance, a
           Systematic Review
    • Authors: Sergio Jiménez Morgan; José Arturo Molina Mora
      Abstract: Aim is to determine if the training with heart rate variability biofeedback allows to improve performance in athletes of different disciplines. Methods such as database search on Web of Science, SpringerLink, EBSCO Academic Search Complete, SPORTDiscus, Pubmed/Medline, and PROQUEST Academic Research Library, as well as manual reference registration. The eligibility criteria were: (a) published scientific articles; (b) experimental studies, quasi-experimental, or case reports; (c) use of HRV BFB as main treatment; (d) sport performance as dependent variable; (e) studies published until October 2016; (f) studies published in English, Spanish, French or Portuguese. The guidelines of the PRISMA statement were followed. Out of the 451 records found, seven items were included. All studies had a small sample size (range from 1 to 30 participants). In 85.71% of the studies (n = 6) the athletes enhanced psychophysiological variables that allowed them to improve their sport performance thanks to training with heart rate variability biofeedback. Despite the limited amount of experimental studies in the field to date, the findings suggest that heart rate variability biofeedback is an effective, safe, and easy-to-learn and apply method for both athletes and coaches in order to improve sport performance.
      PubDate: 2017-06-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10484-017-9364-2
       
  • Abstracts of Posters Presented at the 48th Annual Meeting of the
           Association for Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback
    • PubDate: 2017-05-26
      DOI: 10.1007/s10484-017-9362-4
       
  • Increased HPA Axis Activity and Serum Tryptophan in Naswar (Dipping
           Tobacco) Users: A Case–Control Study
    • Authors: Faiza Sajid; Samina Bano
      Abstract: Nicotine is the principal addictive agent present in Naswar, a smokeless dipping tobacco product. 5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) has been implicated in the reinforcement properties of nicotine. Also, the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis is of vital importance in evaluating the response to stress and nicotine addiction. The study aimed to evaluate serum tryptophan and cortisol levels in Naswar users in relation to addiction. Additionally, serum cotinine levels were also determined to assess daily nicotine exposure. The study comprised 90 healthy Naswar users and 68 non-tobacco users. Estimation of serum cortisol, tryptophan and albumin was carried out. From the Naswar user group, 20 were selected for the estimation of serum cotinine for which blood was drawn twice first in the morning and then in the evening. Serum tryptophan and cortisol levels in Naswar users were significantly raised compared to the control group. However, no difference in the levels of albumin between Naswar users and the control group were found. The mean cotinine values rose from the morning value of 366.0 ± 40.69 ng/ml (mean ± SEM) to an evening value of 503.1 ± 42.96 ng/ml that in turn is equivalent to consumption of 40 cigarettes. Elevated cortisol levels might constitute an important aspect of Naswar addiction. Additionally, raised levels of serum tryptophan in Naswar users could lead to raised concentration of 5-HT which also might be a significant factor contributing to Naswar addiction. Also, serum cotinine concentrations equivalent to an intake of about 40 cigarettes per day is quite alarming.
      PubDate: 2017-05-22
      DOI: 10.1007/s10484-017-9363-3
       
  • Brief Biofeedback Intervention on Anxious Freshman University Students
    • Authors: Paulo Chaló; Anabela Pereira; Patrícia Batista; Luis Sancho
      Abstract: The increasing number of mental health disorders on university students represents a growing problem with negative impact on this population. Stress and anxiety issues are two of most predominant problems in this population and most campus health services have limited resources to face them. Research has provided evidence about biofeedback effectiveness. This study aims to verify the impact of a short duration biofeedback programme on freshmen university students with high levels of anxiety. A sample of 50 first-year students, with scores above percentile of 75 on STAI Y-2 were randomly selected and divided into two groups. Biofeedback Group took a 15 min session per week, over 8 weeks. No intervention was made on Control Group. Both groups were assessed before and after the biofeedback programme, and the results of the Trait Anxiety Scale and the Inventory of Stress for College Students were compared. The Biofeedback Group presented significant decreases in anxiety and stress values. Control Group presented slight and non-significant changes in scores. These results are consistent with previous studies and reinforce the evidence of biofeedback’s programmes as a valid solution to help students to manage their anxiety and stress.
      PubDate: 2017-05-19
      DOI: 10.1007/s10484-017-9361-5
       
  • Erratum to: Effects of Mental Stress Induction on Heart Rate Variability
           in Patients with Panic Disorder
    • Authors: Katja Petrowski; Susann Wichmann; Timo Siepmann; Gloria-Beatrice Wintermann; Stefan R. Bornstein; Martin Siepmann
      PubDate: 2017-03-29
      DOI: 10.1007/s10484-017-9357-1
       
  • Objectively-Measured Free-Living Physical Activity and Heart Rate Recovery
    • Authors: Brittany R. Counts; Jeremy P. Loenneke; Paul D. Loprinzi
      Abstract: The purpose of this study was to examine the association of free-living, objectively-measured physical activity on treadmill-based heart rate recovery (HRR), a parameter known to associate with morbidity and mortality. Data was used from 2003 to 2004 NHANES. Physical activity was assessed via accelerometry, with HRR recovery assessed from a treadmill-based test. Heart rate recovery minute 1 (HRR1) and minute 2 (HRR2) were calculated. After adjustment, light and vigorous-intensity free-living physical activity, respectively, were associated with HRR1 (βadjusted = 0.69, 95% CI 0.22–1.14; βadjusted 1.94, 95% CI 0.01–3.9) and HRR2 (βadjusted = 0.99, 95% CI 0.35–1.62; βadjusted = 5.88, 95% CI 2.63–9.12). Moderate physical activity was not associated with HRR1 (βadjusted = 0.60, 95% CI −0.41 to 1.62), but was with HRR2 (βadjusted = 2.28, 95% CI 1.27–3.28). As free-living physical activity intensity increased, there was a greater association with HRR. This finding may provide mechanistic insight of previous research observations demonstrating intensity-specific effects of physical activity on various health outcomes.
      PubDate: 2017-03-28
      DOI: 10.1007/s10484-017-9359-z
       
  • Biofeedback Training in Crisis Managers: A Randomized Controlled Trial
    • Authors: A. Janka; C. Adler; B. Brunner; S. Oppenrieder; S. Duschek
      Abstract: Working in crisis environments represents a major challenge, especially for executive personnel engaged in directing disaster operations, i.e. crisis managers. Crisis management involves operating under conditions of extreme stress resulting, for instance, from high-level decision-making, principal responsibility for personnel, multitasking or working under conditions of risk and time pressure. The present study aimed to investigate the efficacy of a newly developed biofeedback training procedure based on electrodermal activity, especially designed for the target group of crisis managers. The training comprised exercises promoting acquisition of control over sympathetic arousal under resting conditions and during exposure to visual, acoustic and cognitive stressors resembling situations related to crisis management. In a randomized controlled design, 36 crisis managers were assigned to either a biofeedback training group or waiting list control group. Subjective stress was assessed using the Perceived Stress Scale. In the training group, stress level markedly decreased; the decrease remained stable at follow-up 2 months after the training. The results indicate that biofeedback training in crisis management is an effective method for stress management that may help to reduce vulnerability to stress-related performance decline and stress-related disease.
      PubDate: 2017-03-27
      DOI: 10.1007/s10484-017-9360-6
       
  • Resonance Frequency Breathing Biofeedback to Reduce Symptoms of
           Subthreshold PTSD with an Air Force Special Tactics Operator: A Case Study
           
    • Authors: Lorene M. Petta
      Abstract: The prevalence rates of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have been estimated to be several times higher in military populations compared to the national average. Special Tactics operators are a group that is more likely to avoid seeking psychological care due to the stigma and other consequences the diagnosis may have on their military careers. There is a need for more effective and less stigmatizing interventions to treat this population. Psychophysiological methods have been proven to be efficacious in treating PTSD, yet have received less attention as an adjunctive intervention. Resonance frequency (RF) biofeedback is a form of cardiorespiratory intervention that has shown promise as an effective treatment. The current case study examined the use of RF biofeedback in combination with other physiological and evidence-based methods as part of a comprehensive treatment approach. The client showed a significant drop from his initial scores on a screening assessment by the end of treatment, and demonstrated continued progress despite a 3-month break from the therapy. This author proposed that the synergistic effects of the multi-phased treatment approach contributed to the client’s progress. Furthermore, a case was made for using multiple techniques when treating subthreshold PTSD and related symptoms within a treatment resistant population.
      PubDate: 2017-03-20
      DOI: 10.1007/s10484-017-9356-2
       
  • Effects of Partial Absence of Visual Feedback Information on Gait Symmetry
    • Authors: Seung-Jae Kim; Marie Aimee Kayitesi; Amy Chan; Kimberli Graham
      Abstract: The incorporation of real-time visual feedback during gait rehabilitation can improve the efficacy of training. Our prior work demonstrated that the imposed distortion of simple visual feedback information of step lengths entails an unintentional adaptive process in the subjects’ spatial gait pattern, thereby suggesting the important role of implicit learning in the context of gait rehabilitation that employs visual feedback. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the removal of a portion of visual feedback information—after it had initially been provided—had any impact on gait symmetry. Eighteen healthy subjects walked on a treadmill for 10-min periods at their preferred walking speed and at a slower walking speed (1.3 mph) during the experimental trials, in which two simple vertical bars corresponding to subject’s right and left step length were displayed on a computer screen. Halfway through the trial, one of the bars was removed from the visual feedback via random selection. Subjects were instructed to continually walk normally and also look at the visual feedback until the trials were completed. The changes in step length symmetry ratio were computed and analyzed. We found that displaying only one side of visual feedback influenced subjects to spontaneously modulate gait symmetry away from the baseline, and also that the amount of modulated gait symmetry slightly increased when their walking speed decreased. The changes in gait symmetry occurred by producing either longer right steps produced than left steps or vice versa, but we were unable to find any correlation between side of removal (right or left side) and the different types of trend in response. This warrants further investigation in a study with a larger population. Nonetheless, the results of this study demonstrated the effect of partial absence of visual feedback on changes in step symmetry, and that the perturbation of visual information caused implicit (unintentional) motor processes. A gait training procedure involving a novel way of perturbing visual feedback, such as partial absence of visual feedback tested in this study, may be of value in gait rehabilitation by driving more efficient motor adaptations.
      PubDate: 2017-03-14
      DOI: 10.1007/s10484-017-9358-0
       
  • Patient-Controlled Biofeedback Device for the Treatment of Fecal
           Incontinence: A Pilot Study
    • Authors: Daniel C. Damin; Felipe Hommerding; Delber Schirmer; Paulo R. S. Sanches; Danton P. Silva Junior; André F. Müller; Paulo R. O. Thome
      Abstract: Although biofeedback has been used as a first-line therapy for fecal incontinence, it is known to be time consuming and demands attendance to a hospital during the whole period of treatment. In this study, we describe a new biofeedback device specifically developed for home treatment of fecal incontinence, which consists of a microprocessor controlled unit able to register and store the anal pressure waves corresponding to exercises performed by patients at home. In order to test the new device, a pilot study including ten patients with fecal incontinence was conducted. Evaluation of patients before and after the biofeedback training showed significant improvement in manometric and clinical parameters of anal continence. The new method may improve compliance of patients with the training program and reduce their need to be supervised during the treatment. It might represent a new alternative for the treatment of fecal incontinence.
      PubDate: 2017-03-02
      DOI: 10.1007/s10484-017-9352-6
       
  • Maladaptive Cardiac Autonomic Control during a Stress Reactivity
           Assessment Among Primary Care Patients with Metabolic Syndrome
    • Authors: Jonathan C. Mitchell; Joyce Paulson; Maria Cannarozzi; Sandra M. Neer; Jeffrey E. Cassisi
      Abstract: Metabolic syndrome (MetS) comprises a constellation of metabolic abnormalities that substantially increase risk for chronic illnesses. Autonomic dysregulation is closely linked to MetS, and while pathophysiological models often address chronic stress exposure, none have examined how such physiological contributions operate situationally, in a clinical setting. We used ambulatory impedance cardiography to examine indicators of cardiac autonomic control (CAC) in a sample of 50 adult primary care patients with and without MetS. Indices of independent sympathetic and parasympathetic cardiovascular control in primary care outpatients were measured during a brief stress reactivity assessment. We compared interdependent CAC features, including cardiac autonomic balance (i.e., sympathovagal reciprocity) and cardiac autonomic regulation (i.e., sympathovagal coactivation) and found significant differences among MetS participants as compared to healthy controls. In particular, cardiac autonomic regulation scores were higher among MetS patients when discussing medication concerns, and cardiac autonomic balance scores were lower among MetS patients when discussing daily stressors. These results suggest that patients meeting criteria for MetS demonstrate momentary variations in CAC depending on personally relevant health topics. The potential for future research is discussed with a focus on prospective data collection to enhance diagnostic procedures and treatment monitoring.
      PubDate: 2017-03-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10484-017-9355-3
       
  • Upper Alpha Based Neurofeedback Training in Chronic Stroke: Brain
           Plasticity Processes and Cognitive Effects
    • Authors: Silvia Erika Kober; Daniela Schweiger; Johanna Louise Reichert; Christa Neuper; Guilherme Wood
      Abstract: In the present study, we investigated the effects of upper alpha based neurofeedback (NF) training on electrical brain activity and cognitive functions in stroke survivors. Therefore, two single chronic stroke patients with memory deficits (subject A with a bilateral subarachnoid hemorrhage; subject B with an ischemic stroke in the left arteria cerebri media) and a healthy elderly control group (N = 24) received up to ten NF training sessions. To evaluate NF training effects, all participants performed multichannel electroencephalogram (EEG) resting measurements and a neuropsychological test battery assessing different cognitive functions before and after NF training. Stroke patients showed improvements in memory functions after successful NF training compared to the pre-assessment. Subject B had a pathological delta (0.5–4 Hz) and upper alpha (10–12 Hz) power maximum over the unaffected hemisphere before NF training. After NF training, he showed a more bilateral and “normalized” topographical distribution of these EEG frequencies. Healthy participants as well as subject A did not show any abnormalities in EEG topography before the start of NF training. Consequently, no changes in the topographical distribution of EEG activity were observed in these participants when comparing the pre- and post-assessment. Hence, our results show that upper alpha based NF training had on the one hand positive effects on memory functions, and on the other hand led to cortical “normalization” in a stroke patient with pathological brain activation patterns, which underlines the potential usefulness of NF as neurological rehabilitation tool.
      PubDate: 2017-02-14
      DOI: 10.1007/s10484-017-9353-5
       
  • A Multisite Benchmarking Trial of Capnometry Guided Respiratory
           Intervention for Panic Disorder in Naturalistic Treatment Settings
    • Authors: David F. Tolin; Patrick B. McGrath; Lisa R. Hale; Daniel N. Weiner; Ralitza Gueorguieva
      Abstract: Panic disorder (PD) is associated with hyperventilation. The efficacy of a brief respiratory feedback program for PD has been established. The aim of the present study was to expand these results by testing a similar program with more clinically representative patients and settings. Sixty-nine adults with PD received 4 weeks of Capnometry Guided Respiratory Intervention (CGRI) using Freespira, which provides feedback of end-tidal CO2 (PETCO2) and respiration rate (RR), in four non-academic clinical settings. This intervention is delivered via home use following initial training by a clinician and provides remote monitoring of client adherence and progress by the clinician. Outcomes were assessed post-treatment and at 2- and 12-month follow-up. CGRI was associated with an intent-to-treat response rate of 83% and a remission rate of 54%, and large decreases in panic severity. Similar decreases were found in functional impairment and in global illness severity. Gains were largely sustained at follow-up. PETCO2 moved from the slightly hypocapnic range to the normocapnic range. Benchmarking analyses against a previously-published controlled trial showed very similar outcomes, despite substantial differences in sample composition and treatment settings. The present study confirms prior clinical results and lends further support to the viability of CGRI in the treatment of PD.
      PubDate: 2017-02-13
      DOI: 10.1007/s10484-017-9354-4
       
  • Implicit Learning of a Finger Motor Sequence by Patients with Cerebral
           Palsy After Neurofeedback
    • Authors: Ana Alves-Pinto; Varvara Turova; Tobias Blumenstein; Conny Hantuschke; Renée Lampe
      Abstract: Facilitation of implicit learning of a hand motor sequence after a single session of neurofeedback training of alpha power recorded from the motor cortex has been shown in healthy individuals (Ros et al., Biological Psychology 95:54–58, 2014). This facilitation effect could be potentially applied to improve the outcome of rehabilitation in patients with impaired hand motor function. In the current study a group of ten patients diagnosed with cerebral palsy trained reduction of alpha power derived from brain activity recorded from right and left motor areas. Training was distributed in three periods of 8 min each. In between, participants performed a serial reaction time task with their non-dominant hand, to a total of five runs. A similar procedure was repeated a week or more later but this time training was based on simulated brain activity. Reaction times pooled across participants decreased on each successive run faster after neurofeedback training than after the simulation training. Also recorded were two 3-min baseline conditions, once with the eyes open, another with the eyes closed, at the beginning and end of the experimental session. No significant changes in alpha power with neurofeedback or with simulation training were obtained and no correlation with the reductions in reaction time could be established. Contributions for this are discussed.
      PubDate: 2017-02-07
      DOI: 10.1007/s10484-017-9349-1
       
  • Attempts to Suppress Episodic Memories Fail but do Produce Demand:
           Evidence from the P300-Based Complex Trial Protocol and an Implicit Memory
           Test
    • Authors: Anne C. Ward; J. Peter Rosenfeld
      Abstract: Instructions to voluntarily suppress memories of a mock crime have been reported to result in decreased P300 amplitude during a P300-based concealed information test (CIT) and reduced autobiographical Implicit Association Test (aIAT) D scores, supporting successful suppression. However, one such study, (Hu et al., Psychological science 26(7):1098–1106, 2015) used the P300-based Complex Trial Protocol with a 50–50 target to nontarget ratio, which could impose much response switching and thereby drain cognitive resources, also resulting in reduced P300. The present study replicated Hu et al. (Psychological science 26(7):1098–1106, 2015) with one major variation—a less intrusive 20–80 target to nontarget ratio that required less response switching. Detection rates were high using both the brainwave-based CIT (90% accuracy) and the aIAT (87% accuracy). However we found no significant differences between the suppression and simple guilty groups on the major indices of concealed information detection, which compare probe and irrelevant P300 responses. While we did find that overall P300 amplitude was reduced in the suppression group, this reduction was not specific to probe responses. Additionally, while there were group differences in aIAT hit rates, there were no differences in aIAT D scores. Taken together, these findings suggest that the previously demonstrated reductions in P300 are a reflection of task demand rather than of effective voluntary memory suppression.
      PubDate: 2017-01-30
      DOI: 10.1007/s10484-016-9348-7
       
 
 
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