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Publisher: Springer-Verlag   (Total: 2335 journals)

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Showing 1201 - 1400 of 2335 Journals sorted alphabetically
J. of Communications Technology and Electronics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.267, h-index: 14)
J. of Community Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.699, h-index: 8)
J. of Community Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.676, h-index: 39)
J. of Comparative Physiology A: Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.98, h-index: 63)
J. of Comparative Physiology B : Biochemical, Systemic, and Environmental Physiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.981, h-index: 50)
J. of Compassionate Health Care     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Computational Analysis and Applications     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.284, h-index: 16)
J. of Computational Electronics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.457, h-index: 17)
J. of Computational Neuroscience     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 1.419, h-index: 54)
J. of Computer and Systems Sciences Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.252, h-index: 11)
J. of Computer Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.342, h-index: 26)
J. of Computer Virology and Hacking Techniques     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
J. of Computer-Aided Molecular Design     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.951, h-index: 70)
J. of Computers in Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
J. of Computing in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.725, h-index: 16)
J. of Consumer Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.44, h-index: 23)
J. of Contemporary Mathematical Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.115, h-index: 4)
J. of Contemporary Physics (Armenian Academy of Sciences)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.174, h-index: 4)
J. of Contemporary Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.441, h-index: 16)
J. of Control Theory and Applications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.406, h-index: 13)
J. of Control, Automation and Electrical Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.168, h-index: 8)
J. of Crop Science and Biotechnology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
J. of Cross-Cultural Gerontology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.412, h-index: 23)
J. of Cryptographic Engineering     Partially Free   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.757, h-index: 6)
J. of Cryptology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.598, h-index: 49)
J. of Cultural Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.445, h-index: 24)
J. of Database Marketing & Customer Strategy Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.183, h-index: 5)
J. of Derivatives & Hedge Funds     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.207, h-index: 3)
J. of Developmental and Physical Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.615, h-index: 23)
J. of Digital Imaging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.535, h-index: 29)
J. of Direct Data and Digital Marketing Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.296, h-index: 3)
J. of Dynamical and Control Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.556, h-index: 22)
J. of Dynamics and Differential Equations     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 1.33, h-index: 29)
J. of Earth Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.299, h-index: 11)
J. of Earth System Science     Open Access   (Followers: 39, SJR: 0.466, h-index: 27)
J. of East Asian Linguistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.669, h-index: 15)
J. of Echocardiography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.136, h-index: 3)
J. of Economic Growth     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 5.251, h-index: 54)
J. of Economic Interaction and Coordination     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.231, h-index: 11)
J. of Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.463, h-index: 20)
J. of Economics and Finance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.238, h-index: 15)
J. of Educational Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.694, h-index: 14)
J. of Elasticity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.821, h-index: 38)
J. of Electroceramics     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.566, h-index: 49)
J. of Electronic Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.752, h-index: 68)
J. of Electronic Testing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.241, h-index: 24)
J. of Electronics (China)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.127, h-index: 7)
J. of Elementary Science Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
J. of Engineering Mathematics     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.707, h-index: 32)
J. of Engineering Physics and Thermophysics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.132, h-index: 8)
J. of Engineering Research     Open Access  
J. of Engineering Thermophysics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.294, h-index: 7)
J. of Environmental Studies and Sciences     Partially Free   (Followers: 2)
J. of Ethology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.484, h-index: 21)
J. of Evolution Equations     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 1.312, h-index: 22)
J. of Evolutionary Biochemistry and Physiology     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.127, h-index: 9)
J. of Evolutionary Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.878, h-index: 42)
J. of Experimental and Theoretical Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.565, h-index: 34)
J. of Experimental Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 1.587, h-index: 22)
J. of Failure Analysis and Prevention     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.256, h-index: 12)
J. of Family and Economic Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.532, h-index: 27)
J. of Family Violence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.552, h-index: 45)
J. of Financial Services Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.241, h-index: 6)
J. of Financial Services Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.196, h-index: 29)
J. of Fixed Point Theory and Applications     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.467, h-index: 10)
J. of Fluorescence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.553, h-index: 47)
J. of Food Measurement and Characterization     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.104, h-index: 1)
J. of Food Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.839, h-index: 21)
J. of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.578, h-index: 22)
J. of Forestry Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.271, h-index: 10)
J. of Fourier Analysis and Applications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.248, h-index: 36)
J. of Friction and Wear     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.263, h-index: 6)
J. of Fusion Energy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.389, h-index: 16)
J. of Gambling Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.122, h-index: 50)
J. of Gastroenterology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 1.724, h-index: 73)
J. of Gastrointestinal Cancer     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.371, h-index: 36)
J. of Gastrointestinal Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.632, h-index: 87)
J. of General Internal Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 2.379, h-index: 115)
J. of General Plant Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.357, h-index: 17)
J. of Genetic Counseling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.535, h-index: 32)
J. of Genetics     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.42, h-index: 24)
J. of Geodesy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 4.049, h-index: 48)
J. of Geographical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.58, h-index: 14)
J. of Geographical Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.839, h-index: 32)
J. of Geometric Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 1.496, h-index: 23)
J. of Geometry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.349, h-index: 13)
J. of Global Optimization     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.919, h-index: 51)
J. of Global Policy and Governance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
J. of Grid Computing     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.727, h-index: 32)
J. of Hand and Microsurgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
J. of Happiness Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.785, h-index: 30)
J. of Hematopathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.194, h-index: 11)
J. of Heuristics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.718, h-index: 43)
J. of High Energy Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.027, h-index: 139)
J. of Homotopy and Related Structures     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.102, h-index: 1)
J. of Housing and the Built Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.553, h-index: 21)
J. of Huazhong University of Science and Technology [Medical Sciences]     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.317, h-index: 15)
J. of Ichthyology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.28, h-index: 7)
J. of Immigrant and Minority Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.573, h-index: 29)
J. of Inclusion Phenomena and Macrocyclic Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.459, h-index: 41)
J. of Indian Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.179, h-index: 7)
J. of Indian Prosthodontic Society     Open Access   (SJR: 0.165, h-index: 5)
J. of Industrial Microbiology and Biotechnology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.064, h-index: 68)
J. of Industry, Competition and Trade     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.411, h-index: 11)
J. of Infection and Chemotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.65, h-index: 39)
J. of Information Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48, SJR: 1.659, h-index: 43)
J. of Information Technology Teaching Cases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
J. of Infrared, Millimeter and Terahertz Waves     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.902, h-index: 31)
J. of Inherited Metabolic Disease     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.182, h-index: 66)
J. of Inorganic and Organometallic Polymers and Materials     Partially Free   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.316, h-index: 27)
J. of Insect Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.537, h-index: 36)
J. of Insect Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.775, h-index: 36)
J. of Intelligent and Robotic Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.501, h-index: 36)
J. of Intelligent Information Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.427, h-index: 39)
J. of Intelligent Manufacturing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.095, h-index: 44)
J. of Interventional Cardiac Electrophysiology     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 1.073, h-index: 38)
J. of Intl. Business Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 4.835, h-index: 108)
J. of Intl. Entrepreneurship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.489, h-index: 16)
J. of Intl. Migration and Integration / Revue de l integration et de la migration internationale     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.385, h-index: 9)
J. of Intl. Relations and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.35, h-index: 15)
J. of Labor Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.228, h-index: 21)
J. of Logic, Language and Information     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.63, h-index: 20)
J. of Low Temperature Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.773, h-index: 48)
J. of Machinery Manufacture and Reliability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.194, h-index: 4)
J. of Mammalian Evolution     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.845, h-index: 32)
J. of Mammary Gland Biology and Neoplasia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 3.22, h-index: 73)
J. of Management and Governance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.383, h-index: 26)
J. of Management Control     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.134, h-index: 4)
J. of Marine Science and Application     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.343, h-index: 8)
J. of Marine Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.317, h-index: 22)
J. of Maritime Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.19, h-index: 5)
J. of Market-Focused Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
J. of Marketing Analytics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
J. of Material Cycles and Waste Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.392, h-index: 16)
J. of Materials Engineering and Performance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.666, h-index: 31)
J. of Materials Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 1.006, h-index: 101)
J. of Materials Science : Materials in Electronics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.697, h-index: 48)
J. of Materials Science : Materials in Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.926, h-index: 77)
J. of Mathematical Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.183, h-index: 61)
J. of Mathematical Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.407, h-index: 41)
J. of Mathematical Fluid Mechanics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.709, h-index: 17)
J. of Mathematical Imaging and Vision     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.25, h-index: 44)
J. of Mathematical Modelling and Algorithms     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.358, h-index: 19)
J. of Mathematical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.32, h-index: 20)
J. of Mathematics Teacher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 1.042, h-index: 14)
J. of Maxillofacial and Oral Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
J. of Mechanical Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.589, h-index: 20)
J. of Medical and Biological Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.434, h-index: 13)
J. of Medical Humanities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.251, h-index: 13)
J. of Medical Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.604, h-index: 32)
J. of Medical Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.765, h-index: 21)
J. of Medical Ultrasonics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.209, h-index: 11)
J. of Medicine and the Person     Hybrid Journal  
J. of Membrane Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.971, h-index: 75)
J. of Micro-Bio Robotics     Hybrid Journal  
J. of Microbiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.641, h-index: 35)
J. of Mining Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.296, h-index: 11)
J. of Molecular Evolution     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.07, h-index: 99)
J. of Molecular Histology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.791, h-index: 43)
J. of Molecular Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.452, h-index: 100)
J. of Molecular Modeling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.55, h-index: 42)
J. of Molecular Neuroscience     Partially Free   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.242, h-index: 61)
J. of Mountain Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.295, h-index: 11)
J. of Muscle Research and Cell Motility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.052, h-index: 51)
J. of Nanoparticle Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.777, h-index: 66)
J. of Natural Medicines     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.586, h-index: 22)
J. of Near-Death Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
J. of Nephrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.857, h-index: 48)
J. of Network and Systems Management     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.331, h-index: 23)
J. of Neural Transmission     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.302, h-index: 77)
J. of Neuro-Oncology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.342, h-index: 80)
J. of Neuroimmune Pharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.239, h-index: 36)
J. of Neurology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 1.406, h-index: 91)
J. of NeuroVirology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.367, h-index: 63)
J. of Nondestructive Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.452, h-index: 22)
J. of Nonlinear Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.772, h-index: 36)
J. of Nonverbal Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.122, h-index: 38)
J. of Nuclear Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 1.456, h-index: 60)
J. of Nutrition, Health and Aging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.886, h-index: 50)
J. of Obstetrics and Gynecology of India     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.174, h-index: 3)
J. of Occupational Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.166, h-index: 43)
J. of Ocean Engineering and Marine Energy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
J. of Ocean University of China (English Edition)     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.144, h-index: 8)
J. of Oceanography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 1.031, h-index: 46)
J. of Ocular Biology, Diseases, and Informatics     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.228, h-index: 8)
J. of Optical and Fiber Communications Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.831, h-index: 2)
J. of Optics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
J. of Optimization Theory and Applications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.928, h-index: 55)
J. of Ornithology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
J. of Orofacial Orthopedics / Fortschritte der Kieferorthopädie     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.667, h-index: 27)
J. of Orthopaedic Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.684, h-index: 42)
J. of Paleolimnology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.284, h-index: 58)
J. of Parasitic Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.272, h-index: 5)
J. of Pediatric Neuropsychology     Hybrid Journal  
J. of Pest Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.002, h-index: 21)
J. of Pharmaceutical Health Care and Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Pharmaceutical Innovation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.617, h-index: 14)
J. of Pharmaceutical Investigation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.16, h-index: 2)
J. of Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.567, h-index: 41)
J. of Phase Equilibria and Diffusion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.367, h-index: 31)

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Journal Cover Erkenntnis
  [SJR: 0.621]   [H-I: 16]   [17 followers]  Follow
    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 1572-8420 - ISSN (Online) 0165-0106
   Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2335 journals]
  • Physicalism and Supervenience: A Case for a New Sense of Physical
           Duplication
    • Authors: Michael Roche
      Pages: 669 - 681
      Abstract: Abstract Physicalism is the view, roughly, that everything is physical. This thesis is often characterized in terms of a particular supervenience thesis. Central to this thesis is the idea of physical duplication. I argue that the standard way of understanding physical duplication leads—along with other claims—to a sub-optimal (and perhaps surprising) consequence for the physicalist. I block this consequence by shifting to an alternative sense of physical duplication. I then argue that physicalism is best characterized by a supervenience thesis that employs both the new sense of physical duplication and a new class of possible worlds.
      PubDate: 2016-08-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10670-015-9761-y
      Issue No: Vol. 81, No. 4 (2016)
       
  • An Argument for the Ontological Innocence of Mereology
    • Authors: Rohan French
      Pages: 683 - 704
      Abstract: Abstract In Parts of Classes David Lewis argued that mereology is ‘ontologically innocent’, mereological notions not incurring additional ontological commitments. Unfortunately, though, Lewis’s argument for this is not fully spelled out. Here we use some formal results concerning translations between formal languages to argue for the ontological innocence of mereology directly.
      PubDate: 2016-08-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10670-015-9762-x
      Issue No: Vol. 81, No. 4 (2016)
       
  • Conjunction, Connection and Counterfactuals
    • Authors: Chaoan He
      Pages: 705 - 719
      Abstract: Abstract The standard Lewis–Stalnaker semantics of counterfactuals, given the Strong Centering Thesis, implies that all true–true counterfactuals are trivially true. McGlynn (Analysis 72:276–285, 2012) developed a theory, based on Penczek (Erkenntnis 46:79–85, 1997), to rehabilitate the non-triviality of true–true counterfactuals. I show here that counterfactuals with true but irrelevant components are counterexamples to McGlynn’s account. I argue that an extended version of the connection hypothesis is sustainable, and grounds a full theory of counterfactuals explicable in a broadly standard way, if an indispensable asymmetry between semifacuals and other counterfactuals is acknowledged.
      PubDate: 2016-08-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10670-015-9763-9
      Issue No: Vol. 81, No. 4 (2016)
       
  • Compositionality Solves Carnap’s Problem
    • Authors: Denis Bonnay; Dag Westerståhl
      Pages: 721 - 739
      Abstract: Abstract The standard relation of logical consequence allows for non-standard interpretations of logical constants, as was shown early on by Carnap. But then how can we learn the interpretations of logical constants, if not from the rules which govern their use? Answers in the literature have mostly consisted in devising clever rule formats going beyond the familiar what follows from what. A more conservative answer is possible. We may be able to learn the correct interpretations from the standard rules, because the space of possible interpretations is a priori restricted by universal semantic principles. We show that this is indeed the case. The principles are familiar from modern formal semantics: compositionality, supplemented, for quantifiers, with topic-neutrality.
      PubDate: 2016-08-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10670-015-9764-8
      Issue No: Vol. 81, No. 4 (2016)
       
  • Internalism in the Epistemology of Testimony Redux
    • Authors: B. J. C. Madison
      Pages: 741 - 755
      Abstract: Abstract In general, epistemic internalists hold that an individual’s justification for a belief is exhausted by her reflectively accessible reasons for thinking that the contents of her beliefs are true. Applying this to the epistemology of testimony, a hearer’s justification for beliefs acquired through testimony is exhausted by her reflectively accessible reasons to think that the contents of the speaker’s testimony is true. A consequence of internalism is that subjects that are alike with respect to their reflectively accessible reasons are alike with respect to what they have justification to believe. Testimony should be thought no different: hearers that are alike with respect to reflectively accessible reasons to think that a speaker’s testimony is true are alike with respect to their justification for beliefs based upon that testimony. But it has been recently argued that this view faces powerful counterexamples (Wright in Erkenntnis, 2015. doi:10.1007/s10670-015-9729-y). So the central question is this: assuming that a hearer can acquire justification to believe a proposition through the testimony of a speaker, can epistemic internalism provide the resources to explain how such justification is possible? My aim in this paper is to address these counterexamples, and in so doing, defend epistemic internalist accounts of testimony.
      PubDate: 2016-08-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10670-015-9765-7
      Issue No: Vol. 81, No. 4 (2016)
       
  • Testimonial Reasons
    • Authors: David Matheson
      Pages: 757 - 774
      Abstract: Abstract In this paper I consider whether the reasons on which our testimonial beliefs are directly based—“testimonial reasons”—are basic reasons for belief. After laying out a Dretske-inspired psychologistic conception of reasons for belief in general and a corresponding conception of basic reasons for belief, I present a prima facie case against the basicality of testimonial reasons. I then respond to a challenge from Audi to this case. To the extent that my response is successful, the viability of an important kind of inferentialism about testimonial belief is preserved.
      PubDate: 2016-08-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10670-015-9766-6
      Issue No: Vol. 81, No. 4 (2016)
       
  • Expressivism, Attitudinal Complexity and Two Senses of Disagreement in
           Attitude
    • Authors: John Eriksson
      Pages: 775 - 794
      Abstract: Abstract It has recently become popular to apply expressivism outside the moral domain, e.g., to truth and epistemic justification. This paper examines the prospects of generalizing expressivism to taste. This application has much initial plausibility. Many of the standard arguments used in favor of moral expressivism seem to apply to taste. For example, it seems conceivable that you and I disagree about whether chocolate is delicious although we don’t disagree about the facts, which suggests that taste judgments are noncognitive attitudes rather than beliefs. However, there is also a striking difference between moral disagreements and disagreements about taste. Faced with a moral disagreement, we intuit that (at least) either party is at fault. Disagreements about taste, by contrast, are occurrences where neither party intuitively is at fault. This leads to a dilemma. On the one hand, if a disagreement in attitude is not intuited as faultless, then it seems implausible if applied to taste. If, on the other hand, a disagreement in attitude is a disagreement that we intuit as faultless, then it seems implausible if applied to the moral domain. The aim of this paper is to examine how an expressivist can avoid this dilemma.
      PubDate: 2016-08-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10670-015-9767-5
      Issue No: Vol. 81, No. 4 (2016)
       
  • The Mystery of the Triceratops ’s Mother: How to be a Realist About
           the Species Category
    • Authors: Adrian Mitchell Currie
      Pages: 795 - 816
      Abstract: Abstract Can we be realists about a general category but pluralists about concepts relating to that category? I argue that paleobiological methods of delineating species are not affected by differing species concepts, and that this underwrites an argument that species concept pluralists should be species category realists. First, the criteria by which paleobiologists delineate species are ‘indifferent’ to the species category. That is, their method for identifying species applies equally to any species concept. To identify a new species, paleobiologists show that interspecies processes, such as phenotypic plasticity (including pathology), sexual dimorphism, or ontogenetic diversity, are a worse explanation of the variance between specimens than intraspecies processes. As opposed to operating under a single or plurality of species concepts, then, paleobiologists use abductive inferences, which would be required regardless of any particular species concept. Second, paleobiologists are frequently interested in large-scale, long-term morphological patterns in the fossil record, and resolving the fine-grained differences which result from different species concepts is irrelevant at those scales. I argue that this claim about paleobiological practice supports what I call ‘indifference realism’ about the species category. The indifference realist argues that when legitimate investigation is indifferent to a plurality of concepts, we should be realists about the category those concepts pertain to.
      PubDate: 2016-08-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10670-015-9769-3
      Issue No: Vol. 81, No. 4 (2016)
       
  • The Problem of Coherence and Truth Redux
    • Authors: Michael Schippers
      Pages: 817 - 851
      Abstract: Abstract In “What price coherence?” (Analysis 54:129–132, 1994), Klein and Warfield put forward a simple argument that triggered an extensive debate on the epistemic virtues of coherence. As is well-known, this debate yielded far-reaching impossibility results to the effect that coherence is not conducive to truth, even if construed in a ceteris paribus sense. A large part of the present paper is devoted to a re-evaluation of these results. As is argued, all explications of truth-conduciveness leave out an important aspect: while it might not be the case that coherence is truth-conducive, it might be conducive to verisimilitude or epistemic utility. Unfortunately, it is shown that the answer for both these issues must be in the negative, again. Furthermore, we shift the focus from sets of beliefs to particular beliefs: as is shown, neither is any of the extant probabilistic measures of coherence truth-conducive on the level of particular beliefs, nor does weakening these measures to quasi-orderings establish the link between coherence and truth for an important amount of measures. All in all, the results in this paper cast a serious doubt on the approach of establishing a link between coherence and truth. Finally, recent arguments that shift the focus from the relationship between coherence and truth to the one between coherence and confirmation are assessed.
      PubDate: 2016-08-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10670-015-9771-9
      Issue No: Vol. 81, No. 4 (2016)
       
  • Modeling Value Disagreement
    • Authors: Erich Rast
      Pages: 853 - 880
      Abstract: Abstract In this article, monist values are expressed as preferences like in economics and decision making. On the basis of this formalization, various ways of defining value disagreement of agents within a group are investigated. Twelve notions of categorical value disagreement are laid out. Since these are too coarse-grained for many purposes, known distance-based approaches like Kendall’s Tau and Spearman’s footrule are generalized from linear orders to preorders and position-sensitive variants are developed. The account is further generalized to allow for agents with incomplete information. The article ends with a discussion of known limitations of preference-based accounts of values and how these might be overcome by accounting for parity and essential incompleteness. It is also shown that one intuitively compelling notion of disagreement does not give rise to a proper distance measure.
      PubDate: 2016-08-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10670-015-9772-8
      Issue No: Vol. 81, No. 4 (2016)
       
  • Fundamentality and the Mind-Body Problem
    • Authors: Philip Goff
      Pages: 881 - 898
      Abstract: Abstract In the recent metaphysics literature, a number of philosophers have independently endeavoured to marry sparse ontology to abundant truth. The aim is to keep ontological commitments minimal, whilst allowing true sentences to quantify over a vastly greater range of entities than those which they are ontologically committed to. For example, an ontological commitment only to concrete, microscopic simples might be conjoined with a commitment to truths such as ‘There are twenty people working in this building’ and ‘There are prime numbers greater than 5.’ I argue that a significant challenge to this project comes from the philosophy of mind. As Theodore Sider has pointed out, anti-physicalism is consistent with a sparse ontology. However, I will try to show that the premises of the standard anti-physicalist arguments can be used to form an argument to the conclusion that sentences which quantify over subjects of experience ontologically commit us to subjects of experience. Truths about consciousness cannot be bought more cheaply than their superficial grammar suggests.
      PubDate: 2016-08-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10670-015-9773-7
      Issue No: Vol. 81, No. 4 (2016)
       
  • Is Testimonial Knowledge Second-Hand Knowledge?
    • Authors: Federico Luzzi
      Pages: 899 - 918
      Abstract: Abstract Fricker (2006a) has proposed that a hearer’s knowledge that p acquired through trusting a speaker requires the speaker to know that p, and that therefore testimonial knowledge through trust is necessarily second-hand knowledge. In this paper, I argue that Fricker’s view is problematic for four reasons: firstly, Fricker’s dismissal of a central challenge to the second-handedness of testimonial knowledge is based on a significant misrepresentation of this challenge; secondly, on closer scrutiny an important distinction Fricker wants to draw is compromised by her account of trust; thirdly, Fricker’s conception of trust is at odds with our natural understanding of this notion; fourthly, the reasons Fricker cites in support of her view are not sufficient to single out her view as the correct one, since rival views can also accommodate the relevant data.
      PubDate: 2016-08-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10670-015-9774-6
      Issue No: Vol. 81, No. 4 (2016)
       
  • Content Externalism and Quine’s Criterion are Incompatible
    • Authors: T. Parent
      Abstract: Abstract Externalism holds that the content of our utterances and thoughts are determined partly by the environment. Here, I offer an argument which suggests that externalism is incompatible with a natural view about ontological commitment–namely, the Quinean view that such commitments are fixed by the range of the variables in your theory. The idea briefly is that, if Oscar mistakenly believes that water = XYZ, the externalist ontologically commits Oscar to two watery kinds. In contrast, the Quinean commits him to one such kind (albeit a metaphysically impossible kind). The penultimate section addresses a variety of objections to the argument.
      PubDate: 2016-08-23
      DOI: 10.1007/s10670-016-9835-5
       
  • Learning from Simple Indicative Conditionals
    • Authors: Leendert M. Huisman
      Abstract: Abstract An agent who receives information in the form of an indicative conditional statement and who trusts her source will modify her credences to bring them in line with the conditional. I will argue that the agent, upon the acquisition of such information, should, in general, expand her prior credence function to an indeterminate posterior one; that is, to a set of credence functions. Two different ways the agent might interpret the conditional will be presented, and the properties of the resulting indeterminate posteriors compared. The cause of the expansion from a single prior credence function to a set of credence functions forming the indeterminate posterior one will be explained. The expansion undermines the Bayesian dogma that the result of assimilating new information into a determinate prior credence functions is always a determinate posterior one.
      PubDate: 2016-08-18
      DOI: 10.1007/s10670-016-9833-7
       
  • Language from the Ground Up: A Study of Homesign Communication
    • Authors: Endre Begby
      Abstract: Abstract Philosophers are often beholden to a picture of language as a largely static, well-defined structure which is handed over from generation to generation by an arduous process of learning: language, on this view, is something that we are given, and that we can make use of, but which we play no significant role in creating ourselves. This picture is often maintained in conjunction with the idea that several distinctively human cognitive capacities could only develop via the language acquisition process, as thus understood. This paper argues that the phenomenon of homesign, i.e., spontaneous gesture systems devised by deaf children for the purpose of communicating with their non-signing peers, can shed valuable empirical light on these convictions. Contrary to grounding assumptions of Wittgensteinian, Gricean, and Peircean approaches to language, homesign shows how core properties of language—including semantic properties—can be built from the ground up in idiosyncratic ways to serve the communicative needs of individuals.
      PubDate: 2016-08-17
      DOI: 10.1007/s10670-016-9839-1
       
  • The Real Trouble with Recalcitrant Emotions
    • Authors: Alex Grzankowski
      Abstract: Abstract Cognitivists (sometimes called ‘Judgementalists’) about the emotions minimally hold that it is a necessary condition for being in an emotional state that one make a certain judgement or have a certain belief. For example, if I am angry with Sam, then I must believe that Sam has wronged me. Perhaps I must also elicit a certainly bodily response or undergo some relevant experience, but crucial to the view is the belief or judgement. In the face of ‘recalcitrant emotions’, this once very popular view has come under heavy criticism that has led many theorists to either abandon the view or to offer more nuanced representational views of the emotions. Against what seems to now be received wisdom, I argue that cognitivists have tools at their disposal that allow them to alleviate the apparent conflicts presented by cases of recalcitrance. But I also believe that cognitivists are still in trouble. Although cognitivists have a range of underexplored resources, their use comes at a high cost. In particular, cognitivists must adopt a widespread and thoroughgoing inaccessibility to our own thoughts and judgements that should strike one as implausible. It is mental opacity rather than mental conflict that is the real problem posed by recalcitrance.
      PubDate: 2016-08-11
      DOI: 10.1007/s10670-016-9836-4
       
  • Why Truth-Conditional Semantics in Generative Linguistics is Still the
           Better Bet
    • Authors: Toby Napoletano
      Abstract: Abstract In his “Meaning and Formal Semantics in Generative Grammar” (Erkenntnis 80(1):61–87, 2015), Stephen Schiffer argues that truth-conditional semantics is a poor fit with generative linguistics. In particular, he thinks that it fails to explain speakers’ abilities to understand the sentences of their language. In its place, he recommends his “Best Bet Theory”—a theory which aims to directly explain speakers’ abilities to mean things by their utterances and know what others mean by their utterances. I argue that Schiffer does not provide good reason to prefer the Best Bet Theory over truth-conditional semantics in the context of generative linguistics. First, his negative arguments against the truth-conditional approach are unpersuasive, and second, the Best Bet Theory involves an explanatory circularity which makes it unfit for linguistic theorizing. I conclude that the Best Bet Theory is thus not even a viable competitor to truth-conditional semantics in generative linguistics.
      PubDate: 2016-08-08
      DOI: 10.1007/s10670-016-9838-2
       
  • Three Questions About Immunity to Error Through Misidentification
    • Authors: Giovanni Merlo
      Abstract: Abstract It has been observed that, unlike other kinds of singular judgments, mental self-ascriptions are immune to error through misidentification: they may go wrong, but not as a result of mistaking someone else’s mental states for one’s own. Although recent years have witnessed increasing interest in this phenomenon, three basic questions about it remain without a satisfactory answer: what is exactly an error through misidentification? What does immunity to such errors consist in? And what does it take to explain the fact that mental self-ascriptions exhibit this sort of immunity? The aim of this paper is to bring these questions into focus, propose some tentative answers and use them to show that one prominent attempt to explain the immunity to error through misidentification of mental self-ascriptions is unsuccessful.
      PubDate: 2016-08-04
      DOI: 10.1007/s10670-016-9834-6
       
  • The Contingency Problem for Neo-Conventionalism
    • Authors: Jonathan Livingstone-Banks
      Abstract: Abstract Traditional conventionalism about modality claims that a proposition is necessarily true iff it is true by convention. In the wake of the widespread repudiation of truth-byconvention, traditional conventionalism has fallen out of favour. However, a family of theories of modality have arisen that, whilst abandoning truth-by-convention, retain the spirit of traditional conventionalism. These ‘neo-conventionalist’ theories surpass their forebears and don’t fall victim to the criticisms inherited through truth-by-convention. However, not all criticisms levelled at traditional conventionalism target truth-by-convention. Any conventional theory of modality must face the contingency problem. This claims that the contingency of our linguistic conventions jeopardises the necessity of the necessities they determine. I present the contingency problem as relevant to both the traditional conventionalist and the neo-conventionalist. I examine a response from Einheuser that builds upon a response from Wright. I show that the Einheuser response does more to accommodate the conventionalist’s modal beliefs, but that it does not fully satisfy some further conditions that ought to be laid upon such a response. I then suggest how the response can be revised so as to satisfy these conditions. The resulting model of conventionalism is compatible with the validity of S4, and suitably in the spirit of conventionalism.
      PubDate: 2016-07-30
      DOI: 10.1007/s10670-016-9837-3
       
  • Three Cheers for Dispositions: A Dispositional Approach to Acting for a
           Normative Reason
    • Authors: Susanne Mantel
      Abstract: Abstract Agents sometimes act for normative reasons—for reasons that objectively favor their actions. Jill, for instance, calls a doctor for the normative reason that Kate is injured. In this article I explore a dispositional approach to acting for a normative reason. I argue for the need of epistemic, motivational, and executional dispositional elements of a theory of acting for a normative reason. Dispositions play a mediating role between, on the one hand, the normative reason and its normative force, and the action on the other hand. Thereby, they help to deal with problem cases such as cases of deviant causal chains and improper instrumental motivation.
      PubDate: 2016-07-26
      DOI: 10.1007/s10670-016-9832-8
       
 
 
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