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Publisher: Springer-Verlag   (Total: 2335 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 2335 Journals sorted alphabetically
3D Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.214, h-index: 10)
4OR: A Quarterly J. of Operations Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.073, h-index: 25)
AAPS J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.192, h-index: 74)
AAPS PharmSciTech     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.718, h-index: 54)
Abdominal Imaging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.723, h-index: 60)
Abhandlungen aus dem Mathematischen Seminar der Universitat Hamburg     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.447, h-index: 12)
Academic Psychiatry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.492, h-index: 32)
Academic Questions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.135, h-index: 6)
Accreditation and Quality Assurance: J. for Quality, Comparability and Reliability in Chemical Measurement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.378, h-index: 30)
Acoustical Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.355, h-index: 20)
Acta Analytica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.387, h-index: 6)
Acta Applicandae Mathematicae     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.624, h-index: 34)
Acta Biotheoretica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.419, h-index: 25)
Acta Diabetologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.318, h-index: 46)
Acta Endoscopica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.113, h-index: 8)
acta ethologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.465, h-index: 23)
Acta Geochimica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Acta Geodaetica et Geophysica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.294, h-index: 13)
Acta Geotechnica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.818, h-index: 22)
Acta Informatica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.524, h-index: 32)
Acta Mathematica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 8.021, h-index: 47)
Acta Mathematica Hungarica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.53, h-index: 29)
Acta Mathematica Sinica, English Series     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.406, h-index: 30)
Acta Mathematica Vietnamica     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.451, h-index: 5)
Acta Mathematicae Applicatae Sinica, English Series     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.22, h-index: 20)
Acta Mechanica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.898, h-index: 52)
Acta Mechanica Sinica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.426, h-index: 29)
Acta Metallurgica Sinica (English Letters)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.525, h-index: 18)
Acta Meteorologica Sinica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.524, h-index: 14)
Acta Neurochirurgica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.833, h-index: 73)
Acta Neurologica Belgica     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.348, h-index: 27)
Acta Neuropathologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 6.61, h-index: 117)
Acta Oceanologica Sinica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.295, h-index: 17)
Acta Parasitologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.581, h-index: 28)
Acta Physiologiae Plantarum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.551, h-index: 39)
Acta Politica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.658, h-index: 20)
adhäsion KLEBEN & DICHTEN     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.103, h-index: 4)
ADHD Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.871, h-index: 15)
Adhesion Adhesives & Sealants     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Administration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Services Research     Partially Free   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.795, h-index: 40)
Adsorption     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.774, h-index: 52)
Advances in Applied Clifford Algebras     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.319, h-index: 15)
Advances in Atmospheric Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 0.959, h-index: 44)
Advances in Computational Mathematics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.255, h-index: 44)
Advances in Contraception     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Data Analysis and Classification     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48, SJR: 1.113, h-index: 14)
Advances in Gerontology     Partially Free   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.141, h-index: 3)
Advances in Health Sciences Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 1.397, h-index: 42)
Advances in Manufacturing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.2, h-index: 4)
Advances in Polymer Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40, SJR: 0.637, h-index: 89)
Advances in Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.79, h-index: 44)
Aegean Review of the Law of the Sea and Maritime Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Aequationes Mathematicae     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.882, h-index: 23)
Aerobiologia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.511, h-index: 36)
Aesthetic Plastic Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.821, h-index: 49)
African Archaeological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.612, h-index: 24)
Afrika Matematika     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.248, h-index: 6)
AGE     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 1.358, h-index: 33)
Ageing Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.337, h-index: 10)
Aggiornamenti CIO     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Aging Clinical and Experimental Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.529, h-index: 55)
Agricultural Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Agriculture and Human Values     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.197, h-index: 49)
Agroforestry Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.64, h-index: 56)
Agronomy for Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.732, h-index: 59)
AI & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.171, h-index: 19)
AIDS and Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 2.006, h-index: 71)
Air Quality, Atmosphere & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.706, h-index: 19)
Akupunktur & Aurikulomedizin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Algebra and Logic     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.566, h-index: 18)
Algebra Universalis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.388, h-index: 22)
Algebras and Representation Theory     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.868, h-index: 20)
Algorithmica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.898, h-index: 56)
Allergo J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.183, h-index: 20)
Allergo J. Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Alpine Botany     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.729, h-index: 20)
ALTEX : Alternatives to Animal Experimentation     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.392, h-index: 32)
AMBIO     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.094, h-index: 87)
American J. of Cardiovascular Drugs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.864, h-index: 39)
American J. of Community Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 1.237, h-index: 83)
American J. of Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.634, h-index: 13)
American J. of Cultural Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.283, h-index: 3)
American J. of Dance Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.175, h-index: 13)
American J. of Potato Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.558, h-index: 35)
American J. of Psychoanalysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.293, h-index: 13)
American Sociologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.18, h-index: 13)
Amino Acids     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.362, h-index: 83)
AMS Review     Partially Free   (Followers: 4)
Analog Integrated Circuits and Signal Processing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.21, h-index: 37)
Analysis and Mathematical Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.665, h-index: 7)
Analysis in Theory and Applications     Hybrid Journal  
Analysis of Verbal Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32, SJR: 1.096, h-index: 123)
Anatomical Science Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.301, h-index: 26)
Angewandte Schmerztherapie und Palliativmedizin     Hybrid Journal  
Angiogenesis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 2.212, h-index: 69)
Animal Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 1.122, h-index: 55)
Annales françaises de médecine d'urgence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.156, h-index: 4)
Annales Henri Poincaré     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.377, h-index: 32)
Annales mathématiques du Québec     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Annali dell'Universita di Ferrara     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.504, h-index: 14)
Annali di Matematica Pura ed Applicata     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.167, h-index: 26)
Annals of Behavioral Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 2.112, h-index: 98)
Annals of Biomedical Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 1.182, h-index: 94)
Annals of Combinatorics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.849, h-index: 15)
Annals of Data Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Annals of Dyslexia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.857, h-index: 40)
Annals of Finance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.686, h-index: 14)
Annals of Forest Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.929, h-index: 57)
Annals of Global Analysis and Geometry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.136, h-index: 23)
Annals of Hematology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 1.117, h-index: 62)
Annals of Mathematics and Artificial Intelligence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.593, h-index: 42)
Annals of Microbiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.402, h-index: 26)
Annals of Nuclear Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.68, h-index: 45)
Annals of Operations Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.186, h-index: 78)
Annals of Regional Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.405, h-index: 42)
Annals of Software Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Annals of Solid and Structural Mechanics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.553, h-index: 8)
Annals of Surgical Oncology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.902, h-index: 127)
Annals of Telecommunications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.315, h-index: 25)
Annals of the Institute of Statistical Mathematics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.931, h-index: 31)
Antonie van Leeuwenhoek     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.992, h-index: 87)
Apidologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.14, h-index: 57)
APOPTOSIS     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 1.554, h-index: 87)
Applicable Algebra in Engineering, Communication and Computing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.354, h-index: 27)
Applications of Mathematics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.274, h-index: 20)
Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45, SJR: 0.575, h-index: 80)
Applied Biochemistry and Microbiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.267, h-index: 26)
Applied Categorical Structures     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.361, h-index: 21)
Applied Composite Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45, SJR: 0.705, h-index: 35)
Applied Entomology and Zoology     Partially Free   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.554, h-index: 34)
Applied Geomatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.323, h-index: 9)
Applied Geophysics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.541, h-index: 13)
Applied Intelligence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.777, h-index: 43)
Applied Magnetic Resonance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.358, h-index: 34)
Applied Mathematics & Optimization     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.955, h-index: 33)
Applied Mathematics - A J. of Chinese Universities     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.275, h-index: 8)
Applied Mathematics and Mechanics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.37, h-index: 26)
Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 61, SJR: 1.262, h-index: 161)
Applied Physics A     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.535, h-index: 121)
Applied Physics B: Lasers and Optics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.983, h-index: 104)
Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.677, h-index: 47)
Applied Research in Quality of Life     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.288, h-index: 15)
Applied Solar Energy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.251, h-index: 6)
Applied Spatial Analysis and Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.351, h-index: 9)
Aquaculture Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.613, h-index: 40)
Aquarium Sciences and Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Aquatic Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31, SJR: 0.646, h-index: 44)
Aquatic Geochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.764, h-index: 39)
Aquatic Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.172, h-index: 53)
Arabian J. for Science and Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.345, h-index: 20)
Arabian J. of Geosciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.417, h-index: 16)
Archaeological and Anthropological Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 1.056, h-index: 15)
Archaeologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.397, h-index: 13)
Archiv der Mathematik     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.597, h-index: 29)
Archival Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51, SJR: 0.804, h-index: 22)
Archive for History of Exact Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.28, h-index: 15)
Archive for Mathematical Logic     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.946, h-index: 23)
Archive for Rational Mechanics and Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 4.091, h-index: 66)
Archive of Applied Mechanics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.865, h-index: 40)
Archives of Computational Methods in Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 2.841, h-index: 40)
Archives of Dermatological Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.9, h-index: 65)
Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.846, h-index: 84)
Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.695, h-index: 47)
Archives of Microbiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.702, h-index: 85)
Archives of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.039, h-index: 56)
Archives of Osteoporosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.092, h-index: 13)
Archives of Sexual Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.198, h-index: 74)
Archives of Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.595, h-index: 76)
Archives of Virology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.086, h-index: 90)
Archives of Women's Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 1.264, h-index: 50)
Archivio di Ortopedia e Reumatologia     Hybrid Journal  
Archivum Immunologiae et Therapiae Experimentalis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.2, h-index: 42)
ArgoSpine News & J.     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.102, h-index: 3)
Argumentation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.295, h-index: 18)
Arid Ecosystems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Arkiv för Matematik     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.948, h-index: 22)
Arnold Mathematical J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Arthropod-Plant Interactions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.797, h-index: 17)
Arthroskopie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.145, h-index: 8)
Artificial Intelligence and Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.288, h-index: 25)
Artificial Intelligence Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.948, h-index: 48)
Artificial Life and Robotics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.231, h-index: 14)
Asia Europe J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.247, h-index: 9)
Asia Pacific Education Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.371, h-index: 17)
Asia Pacific J. of Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.676, h-index: 50)
Asia-Pacific Education Researcher     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.353, h-index: 13)
Asia-Pacific Financial Markets     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.19, h-index: 15)
Asia-Pacific J. of Atmospheric Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 1.006, h-index: 14)
Asian Business & Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.41, h-index: 10)
Asian J. of Business Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Asian J. of Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.263, h-index: 8)
AStA Advances in Statistical Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.681, h-index: 15)
AStA Wirtschafts- und Sozialstatistisches Archiv     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.195, h-index: 5)
ästhetische dermatologie & kosmetologie     Full-text available via subscription  
Astronomy and Astrophysics Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 4.511, h-index: 44)
Astronomy Letters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.58, h-index: 30)
Astronomy Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.473, h-index: 23)
Astrophysical Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.469, h-index: 11)
Astrophysics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.243, h-index: 11)

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Journal Cover Agricultural Research
  [3 followers]  Follow
    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 2249-720X - ISSN (Online) 2249-7218
   Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2335 journals]
  • Assessment of Sedimentation Rate in Rain-Fed Irrigation Tank Systems Under
           Different Agro-Climatic Zones in Karnataka, India
    • Authors: U. Satishkumar; G. S. Dasog; P. Balakrishnan; K. Ramaswamy
      Pages: 47 - 56
      Abstract: The tank systems spread across Karnataka in southern India serve as traditional but sustainable means of water harvesting and flood control measures and a source of protective irrigation. In recent decades, these are fast losing their storage capacity due to sedimentation. To derive appropriate plans for rate of desiltation and reclamation, ruling rate of sedimentation and life expectancy of these tanks need to be estimated. The present investigation aims at predicting sedimentation rate of 254 tanks spread over different agro-climatic zones of Karnataka to assess the influence of climatic conditions along with topography and soil conditions. The modified Morgan Finney, a lumped sediment yield model, was used which agreed well with the measured sediment yield through capacity-contour and sediment concentration methods. The sediment yield (0.7–1.1 kg m−2) rate does get influenced by climate, the slope and soil characteristics together and would help in evolving desiltation plans. The life expectancy of the sample tanks varied from 2.0 to 85.1 years.
      PubDate: 2017-03-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s40003-016-0237-3
      Issue No: Vol. 6, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Response of AquaCrop Model to Different Irrigation Schedules for Irrigated
           Cabbage
    • Authors: G. S. Pawar; M. U. Kale; J. N. Lokhande
      Pages: 73 - 81
      Abstract: Agricultural sector faces the challenge to produce more food with less water by increasing crop water productivity. As such, the question of improving the present level of crop water productivity in general and for irrigation in particular assumes a great significance in perspective water resource planning. This study was undertaken to improve water productivity, i.e., ‘more crop per drop.’ In this study response of cabbage to different irrigation schedules under mulch and non-mulch condition using calibrated AquaCrop model was evaluated. AquaCrop is a crop model that simulates yield response to water developed by FAO and is appropriate to consider effects where water is the limiting factor for crop production. AquaCrop was calibrated for cabbage (Brassica oleracea var. capitata), a leafy vegetable. Simulations were carried out for the period November 27, 2013, to February 19, 2014 with T1, T2, T3 (treatments irrigation scheduling at 50 % moisture depletion of available water capacity under black, silver, and no polyethylene mulch with drip irrigation) and T4, T5, T6 (irrigation scheduling at 100 % evapotranspiration under black, silver, and no polyethylene mulch with drip irrigation). The model provided excellent simulation of canopy and yield. The harvest index was observed as 80 % for cabbage. Formulated Schedule with S1, S2, S3, S4, and S5 (irrigation schedule at 110, 90, 80, 70, and 60 % ETc) and S6, S7, S8, S9, and S10 (mulch + Irrigation schedule at 110, 90, 80, 70 and 60 % ETc). S8 saved 25.19 % water with only 4.63 % reduction in the yield of cabbage head compared to control and resulted in water use efficiency as 6.05 kg m−3. Thus S8 is recommended to be used for cabbage production, to water productivity.
      PubDate: 2017-03-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s40003-016-0238-2
      Issue No: Vol. 6, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Site-Specific Fertilizer Nitrogen Management Using Optical Sensor in
           Irrigated Wheat in the Northwestern India
    • Authors: Bijay-Singh; Varinderpal-Singh; Yadvinder-Singh; H. S. Thind; Ajay Kumar; O. P. Choudhary; R. K. Gupta; Monika Vashistha
      Abstract: An optical sensor-based fertilizer nitrogen (N) management strategy that relies on visible and near-infrared spectral response from plant canopies was evaluated for irrigated wheat in the northwestern India. GreenSeeker™ optical sensor-guided fertilizer N dose, computed from an estimate of potential yield and response index, takes into account both the temporal and field-to-field variabilities and is applied only once after measuring in-season spectral response from the crop canopy. Seven field experiments were conducted in four wheat seasons to decide whether to apply the optical sensor-guided fertilizer N dose at 2nd or 3rd irrigation stage and to work out the appropriate N management before applying it. Robust relationships between in-season sensor-based estimates of yield and actual wheat yields were observed both at 2nd (R 2 = 0.64) and 3rd (R 2 = 0.86) irrigation stages of the crop. GreenSeeker-based fertilizer N management resulted in high yield levels and high N-use efficiency. Application of 30 kg N ha−1 at planting and 45 kg N ha−1 at 1st irrigation was found to be the appropriate N management before applying the GreenSeeker-guided dose at 2nd irrigation stage. Grain yields obtained by following sensor-guided N management were at par with those observed with the blanket recommendation of 120 kg N ha−1, but with greater recovery efficiency (by 6.7–16.2%) and agronomic efficiency [by 4.7–9.4 kg grain (kg N applied)−1]. The major outcome of this study was that applying a moderate amount of fertilizer N at planting and enough fertilizer N to meet the high N demand during the period between crown root initiation stage and maximum tillering stage before applying a sensor-guided fertilizer N dose at 2nd irrigation stage results not only in high yields but also in high fertilizer N-use efficiency in irrigated wheat.
      PubDate: 2017-03-25
      DOI: 10.1007/s40003-017-0251-0
       
  • Genotypic Variation of Microelements Concentration in Sesame ( Sesamum
           indicum L.) Mini Core Collection
    • Authors: Sarita K. Pandey; Eshita Majumder; Tapash Dasgupta
      Abstract: Evaluation of germplasm for mineral content and selecting varieties with high quantities of essential minerals and incorporating those varieties in breeding program can assist in developing mineral-efficient crops with higher yield which can accumulate minerals from marginal soil. Sesame an oldest oilseed crop is a popular food with medicinal value although its production is often focussed in marginal and sub-marginal lands. In the present study, 60 sesame genotypes of diverse origin collected from Bangladesh, Bulgaria, India and USA were examined in the acid-digested samples by atomic absorption spectrophotometer for Fe, Zn, Cu, Mn, Cr and Co contents. All elements except Cr were found to be highly variable among genotypes. A significant discrimination showed that elements content in the sesame seeds was a seed coat coloured specific character. High-yielding developed varieties of India contain high Zn but low Fe concentration in seed. The concentration of mineral elements in black-seeded genotypes was significantly higher than those in white seeded. The indigenous collections were found to be a good reservoir of mineral elements. Correlation study among trace elements and yield attributes indicated that though Fe and Zn were not correlated significantly with yield and its components, but the two elements were interrelated. Phenotypic and genotypic coefficient of variability and heritability were high for Fe and Zn. The study suggests that observed large genetic variability for element concentrations in the genotypes provides good prospects to breed improved sesame cultivars with elevated levels of micronutrients to mitigate mineral deficiency.
      PubDate: 2017-03-04
      DOI: 10.1007/s40003-017-0252-z
       
  • Using Credible Soil Loss Tolerance Value for Conservation Planning and
           Managing Diverse Physiographic Regions in Rajasthan
    • Authors: R. K. Singh; J. Somasundaram; Brij Lal Lakaria; D. Mandal; B. K. Sethy; N. K. Sinha; R. Lal
      Abstract: Accelerated soil erosion degrades soil quality and undermines ecosystem functions and services. It is important to assess the severity of erosion, demarcate tolerable limits for sustainable crop production, conservation planning for soil resources, and identify the alternative land uses. Irrespective of soil type, climate and vegetation cover, the tolerable level of soil erosion in India has traditionally been taken as 11.2 Mg ha−1 year−1. However, this is an excessive rate for most agro-ecosystems and land uses; hence, this study aims to establish credible soil loss tolerance (‘T’ values) for some soils of western India on the basis of critical soil parameters (i.e., bulk density, infiltration rate, total organic carbon and soil reaction). The condition of a soil or ‘soil state’ (S) is defined through a quantitative model involving different soil functions. The ‘T’ values for some soils of western India ranged between 2.5 and 12.5 Mg ha−1 year−1 compared to default ‘T’ value of 11.2 Mg ha−1 year−1. About 50% of the land area has ‘T’ value >10 Mg ha−1 year−1, and the remaining 50% has <7.5 Mg ha−1 year−1, of which 13.02 M ha is having only ‘T’ value of 2.5 Mg ha−1 year−1. Using the revised ‘T’ values for soil mapping units will help in planning of appropriate conservation measures for effective erosion control, sustainable crop production and improved watershed management in the Rajasthan State of western India.
      PubDate: 2017-02-23
      DOI: 10.1007/s40003-017-0248-8
       
  • A Comprehensive Study of Variation in Selected QPM and Non-QPM Maize
           Inbred Lines
    • Authors: Ankita Sood; Kalpna Thakur; P. N. Sharma; Dorin Gupta; Avinash Singode; Maneet Rana; S. Lata
      Abstract: To enhance the nutritional value of maize (Zea mays L.), genetic characterization and conversion of common maize into crop enriched with quality protein maize may be beneficial. With the hope of producing a superior maize cultivar, the pattern of relationship among 40 maize inbred lines (QPM and non-QPM) adapted to hills was examined using molecular, biochemical and morphological characteristics. Among the non-QPM set, early maturing lines BAJIM-08-26 and KI-30 were found superior for grain yield, and among QPM set, CML189 line was found superior for high tryptophan content. Phenotypic performance-based clustering using Mahalanobis distance revealed seven clusters. Genotypes were grouped on the basis of flowering and yield traits. Two major clusters were defined, one consisting of all QPM lines and other have all non-QPM lines. This distinction is well observed in the plot generated by principal component analysis. This information may be used in selecting genetically divergent lines for ongoing breeding programs for quality enhancement. The selected QPM line(s) could be used as donor and the well-adapted agronomically superior lines as recurrent parent for conversion of non-QPM to QPM lines.
      PubDate: 2017-02-22
      DOI: 10.1007/s40003-017-0249-7
       
  • Quality Characterization of Brown Rice Pasta Supplemented with Vital
           Gluten and Hydrocolloides
    • Authors: Navjot Kaur; Savita Sharma; Deep Narayan Yadav; Hanuman Bobade; Baljit Singh
      Abstract: Pasta was prepared from brown rice (var. PR 118) flour incorporated with sodium alginate (0.5–2.5%), xanthan gum (0.5–2.5%), vital gluten (2–10%) and pre-gelatinized flour (10–50%) as binders. Effect of these binders on the quality characteristics of brown rice pasta was evaluated. Incorporation of xanthan gum (1.5%), vital gluten (8%), pre-gelatinized flour (40%) individually and their combination as xanthan gum (1.5%) + vital gluten (4%) + pre-gelatinized flour (20%) were found optimum to improve the cooking quality and overall acceptability of brown rice pasta. Xanthan gum (1.5%) + pre-gelatinized flour (20%) in combination can also be incorporated into brown rice in order to prepare gluten-free pasta. In addition to being a diversified convenience food, non-wheat pasta would be suitable for people suffering from wheat intolerance. Shelf life of selected pasta samples was evaluated during storage at ambient conditions for 3 months. Type of binder and storage period did not influence the cooking quality and sensory attributes of pasta significantly (p ≤ 0.05). Least significant variation was found in moisture, water activity and free fatty acid content of pasta over 3 months of storage period.
      PubDate: 2017-02-21
      DOI: 10.1007/s40003-017-0250-1
       
  • Agri–Silvi–Horti Systems for Semiarid Regions of North-West
           India
    • Authors: N. Kaushik; Abha Tikkoo; P. K. Yadav; R. P. S. Deswal; Surender Singh
      Abstract: Reduction in yield of arable crops under agroforestry in the tropics and subtropics is well known, but information on how different agroforestry systems influence the yield of crops is scanty. All types of agroforestry models may not be useful for all sites, but the old and traditional practices can be manipulated for meeting site-specific needs. Therefore, various agroforestry models (agri–silvi–horti systems) were developed to study their performance under semiarid conditions in north-west India. The experiment was conducted in ten-year-old silvi–horti systems comprising of shisham (Dalbergia sissoo L.) + aonla (Embilica officinalis Gaertn.), shisham (D. sissoo) + guava (Psidium guajava L.), khejri (Prosopis cineraria (L.) Druce) + aonla (E. officinalis) and khejri (P. cineraria) + guava (P. guajava) planted at a spacing of 6 m × 6 m. Three crop sequences, viz. cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp)—wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), clusterbean (Cyamopsis tetragonoloba (L.) Taub)—barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) and pearl millet (Pennisetum americanum (L.) R. Br.)—oat (Avena sativa L.), were intecropped for 2 years. The crops were also grown in open field. The fodder yield of the kharif crops, namely pearl millet, cowpea and cluster bean, was significantly suppressed by different silvi–horti systems during the period of study, and maximum yield was observed in sole cropping. Among different silvi–horti systems, maximum fodder yield of cowpea (10.27 t/ha) and clusterbean (5.67 t/ha) was recorded under khejri + guava, whereas pearl millet fodder yield (18.93 t/ha) was maximum in khejri + aonla silvi–horti system. Minimum fodder yield (3.47 t/ha) was recorded in clusterbean under shisham + guava, whereas maximum fodder yield (29.3 t/ha) was recorded in pearl millet under sole cropping. In rabi season, maximum grain yield of wheat (4.07 t/ha) and barley (4.38 t/ha) was recorded under sole cropping while minimum yield of wheat (2.34 t/ha) and barley (2.79 t/ha) was recorded under shisham + aonla. Fodder yield of oat was also influenced significantly by different silvi–horti systems. Maximum oat fodder yield of 62.00 t/ha was harvested from open field followed by 56.20 t/ha under khejri + guava. Maximum fruit yield (13.40 t/ha) was observed in aonla + wheat + khejri agri–silvi–horti system. Appreciable build up in organic carbon content (OC) and decrease in soil pH under agri–silvi–horti systems as compared to sole cropping. The available NPK content also increased under agri–silvi–horti systems and decreased with increasing soil depth. The agri–silvi–horti system of khejri + guava + clusterbean–barley fetched higher net returns (Rs. 76,650/ha), while the net returns from sole cropping of clusterbean–barley was only Rs. 15,953/ha.
      PubDate: 2017-01-30
      DOI: 10.1007/s40003-017-0247-9
       
  • Weed and Nitrogen Management Effects on Weed Infestation and Crop
           Productivity of Wheat–Mungbean Sequence in Conventional and Conservation
           Tillage Practices
    • Authors: C. P. Nath; T. K. Das; K. S. Rana; R. Bhattacharyya; H. Pathak; S. Paul; M. C. Meena; S. B. Singh
      Abstract: Weeds appear as a challenge in conservation agriculture, and hence, weed management is of paramount importance. The nitrogen (N) management under changing tillage scenarios is another important dimension of research. Therefore, a field experiment was laid out in a split-plot design with six tillage, residue and N management options in main plots and four weed control practices in subplots. The results showed that the zero tillage (ZT) + residue (R) + 75% of required N + rest N based on GreenSeeker™ (GS) and sequential application of pendimethalin followed by sulphosulphuron alone and in combination resulted in significant reductions in weed dry weight and caused a considerable increase in weed control efficiency and weed control index in wheat. Their carry-over effect was also significant on the reduction in weed growth in mungbean. Residue retention in ZT gave 5.5 and 6.1% higher wheat grain yield in 2013–2014 and 2014–2015, respectively, than the residue incorporation, whereas in mungbean the increment was to the extent of 8.4 and 7.8%. Zero tilled plots recorded 25.5 and 42.8% higher water productivity (for wheat) and mungbean productivity. Highest net energy returns were observed in ZT + R + 75N + GS in wheat in both the years. The treatment ZT + R + 75N + GS also fetched higher gross and net returns in wheat and mungbean. In all cases, herbicides with sequential application proved better than one-time ready-mix application.
      PubDate: 2017-01-30
      DOI: 10.1007/s40003-017-0246-x
       
  • Long-term Effects of Feeding a Novel Phytoadditive on Nutrient
           Utilization, Growth Performance, Metabolic Profile and Antioxidant Status
           of Goats
    • Authors: Santosh L. Ingale; Ashok K. Pattanaik; Shalini Baliyan; Sarita Kankoriya; Narayan Dutta; Kusumakar Sharma
      Abstract: The present study was undertaken to ascertain the health-promoting effects of a phytoadditive (PA) having confirmed in vitro antimethanogenic potential. The PA was prepared by mixing fixed proportions of Withania somnifera, Boerhavia diffusa and Holarrhena antidysenterica. Eighteen Jamunapari kids of three months of age were used in a 180-day study. The kids were divided into three equal groups and supplemented with the PA at 0 (PA-0), 1.5 (PA-1.5) and 2.5 (PA-2.5) percent of expected mean daily feed (DM) intake. A metabolism trial conducted following 180-days of feeding trial indicated no variations (P > 0.05) in intake and digestibility of organic nutrients. The plane of nutrition and nitrogen retention was also similar (P > 0.05) across the treatments. Blood collected at 30-days intervals was assessed for erythrocytic antioxidants and metabolic indices. The PA improved (P < 0.05) the erythrocytic lipid peroxidation, and activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase. The serum levels of glucose, urea, total protein, globulin and alanine aminotransferase remained similar (P > 0.05) among the groups, whereas serum levels of albumin were improved (P < 0.05) in the PA-supplemented groups with a reverse trend (P < 0.05) for total cholesterol. The serum aspartate aminotransferase activity was reduced (P < 0.05) in both the PA-groups. The dietary treatments imparted no difference (P > 0.05) on the average daily gain (g) which was 35 ± 4.0, 31 ± 3.4 and 34 ± 4.0 for the PA-0, PA-1.5 and PA-2.5 groups, respectively. The feed conversion ratio was also comparable across the dietary groups. Overall, it is concluded that while the dietary supplementation of the PA had no influence on the nutrient metabolism or growth, it did stimulate the antioxidant status of growing kids and thus possess potential to be of practical value in stressful management situations.
      PubDate: 2017-01-24
      DOI: 10.1007/s40003-017-0245-y
       
  • Potentials of Bamboo-Based Agroforestry for Sustainable Development in
           Sub-Saharan Africa: A Review
    • Authors: Samuel T. Partey; Daniel A. Sarfo; Oliver Frith; Michael Kwaku; Naresh V. Thevathasan
      Abstract: There is widespread assertion among scientists, government and development experts that bamboo agroforestry could contribute to sustainable rural development in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). However, there are limited available data to verify the suitability of the system in the region. In addition, the current state of knowledge and adoption of agroforestry in SSA offers very little guidance as to which type of agroforestry systems bamboo could be integrated. Here, we reviewed the potential socioeconomic and environmental benefits of bamboo agroforestry and accentuate implications on sustainable rural development in SSA. In addition, we analysed potential research areas that could be intensified, so that future developments and scaling-up of bamboo agroforestry can be rooted in robust scientific findings rather than the intuitions of governments and development actors.
      PubDate: 2017-01-19
      DOI: 10.1007/s40003-017-0244-z
       
  • A Farmer-Led Approach to Achieving a Malnutrition-Free India
    • Authors: Nitya Rao; M. S. Swaminathan
      Abstract: Overcoming the widespread malnutrition prevailing in the country has become a priority task. Based on the experience of the green revolution, it is clear that a farmer-led approach is essential for achieving the goal of freedom from malnutrition. Also there is need for concurrent action in the following five areas—overcoming undernutrition, protein hunger as well as hidden hunger caused by micronutrient malnutrition, attention to clean drinking water and sanitation, and finally ensuring safe handling of food at the post-harvest level to avoid mycotoxins. If we are to achieve our goal of ending malnutrition in the country, it is essential that agriculture, nutrition and health are attended to in an interactive way.
      PubDate: 2017-01-10
      DOI: 10.1007/s40003-016-0240-8
       
  • Edaphic Stresses and Agricultural Sustainability: An Indian Perspective
    • Authors: P. S. Minhas; G. P. Obi Reddy
      Abstract: Increase in agricultural productivity in India is likely to come primarily from sustained intensification, but the increases in the recent past have been accompanied by severe degradation of agroecosystems and the resultant edaphic constraints. The emerging nutrient deficiencies with mining (8–10 million tonnes of NPK annually) along with acidity (pH < 5.5 in 17.93 M ha), salinity (6.73 M ha) and soil contaminants are the most common chemical stresses. Among the physical stresses, severe soil erosivity (water 82.47 M ha and wind 12.40 M ha), shallow soils (26.4 M ha), soil hardening (21.4 M ha) and low water holding capacity (13.75 M ha) threaten the soil productivity. The soils are inherently low in low organic carbon, and climate change is further impacting the farming systems. Conservative estimates show that about two-third losses in agricultural production are caused by these edaphic factors. Therefore, to alleviate the adverse effects of multiple edaphic factors, a holistic approach to build up systems perspectives is urgently required. The new tools emerging especially in the areas of conservation agriculture, precision irrigation technologies, biotechnology and omic sciences etc., are opening up new opportunities for tackling these stresses.
      PubDate: 2017-01-05
      DOI: 10.1007/s40003-016-0236-4
       
  • Spatial Heterogeneity of Soil Metal Cations in the Plains of Humid
           Subtropical Northeastern India
    • Authors: S. K. Reza; Utpal Baruah; S. K. Singh; R. Srinivasan
      Pages: 346 - 352
      Abstract: Analysis and interpolation of soil micronutrients are very important for site-specific management. The objective of this study was to determine the spatial distribution of iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), zinc (Zn) and copper (Cu) in the forest covered area of Chirang district, Assam, using statistics and geostatistics. A total of 607 soil samples from a depth of 0–25 cm at an approximate interval of 1 km were collected over the entire study area. The concentration of Fe, Mn, Zn and Cu ranged between 0.10–263.5, 0.50–149.5, 0.01–3.4 and 0.64–14.6 mg/kg, respectively, with mean values of 45.3, 19.6, 0.4 and 5.0 mg/kg, respectively. Analysis of semivariogram indicated that the Fe and Mn were well described with the spherical model, with the distance of spatial dependence being 5.83 and 1.95 km, respectively, while the Zn and Cu were well described with exponential model, with the distance of spatial dependence being 5.24 and 3.95 km, respectively. To define different classes of spatial dependence for the soil variables, the ratio of nugget and sill was used. Cu was strongly spatially dependent, with the nugget/sill being 0.202 in this given region, while Fe, Mn and Zn were moderately spatially dependent, with the nugget/sill being 0.347, 0.299 and 0.426, respectively. With the kriging analysis, the spatial distribution maps of contents of these four micronutrients in the study area were drawn with the ArcGIS software. It was found that the soils with higher content of Fe, Mn and Zn were mainly distributed in the upper area of the northern part of the study area, while the soils with higher content of Cu were mainly distributed in the center, decreasing toward the south, east and west.
      PubDate: 2016-12-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s40003-016-0217-7
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 4 (2016)
       
  • Storage Quality and Shelf Life of Functional Restructured Spent Hen Meat
           Blocks in Vacuum Packaging at Refrigerated Storage (4 ± 1 °C)
    • Authors: Swati Gupta; B. D. Sharma
      Pages: 391 - 397
      Abstract: The present study was conducted to study the storage quality of vacuum-packaged functional restructured spent hen meat blocks at refrigeration temperature. Slices of control and functional restructured spent hen meat block (FRSHMB) were vacuum-packaged and analysed at regular interval of 15 days at refrigerated temperature (4 ± 1 °C). The pH of control as well as FRSHMB decreased significantly from 30th day of storage. The pH of FRSHMB was significantly lower as compared to the control on the 45th and 60th day of storage. The TBA values of FRSHMB were significantly lower as compared to the control on the 30th, 45th and 60th day of storage. There was a significant increase in standard plate count of both control and FRSHMB with increase in the storage period. Psychrophils were observed on 15th day of storage, whereas anaerobes were detected on 30th day of storage and thereafter increased significantly at each successive storage interval in both control and FRSHMB. Sensory quality of control and FRSHMB was affected from 30th day onwards. All the sensory attributes rated between good to very good up to 45 days of storage. Products became unacceptable due to off flavour and higher microbial load than the permissible limit on the 60th day of storage. The study revealed that functional restructured spent hen meat blocks could be stored safely in vacuum packaging for 45 days at refrigeration temperature (4 ± 1 °C).
      PubDate: 2016-12-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s40003-016-0219-5
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 4 (2016)
       
  • Estimating Water Balance of Small Reservoirs in Arid Regions: A Case Study
           from Kachchh, India
    • Authors: Deepesh Machiwal; Devi Dayal; Sanjay Kumar
      Abstract: Quantification of hydrological processes is necessary for management of small reservoirs especially in arid regions characterized by hot climate, scanty rainfall magnitudes and large rainfall variability. This study focuses on estimating inflow and outflow components of a small reservoir situated in arid Kachchh region of Gujarat, India, by developing a water balance model. Daily reservoir water levels were monitored for years 2012 and 2013. All water balance components, i.e. rainwater directly falling into reservoir, surface runoff, irrigation extractions, and evaporation and percolation, were either measured or estimated. Results indicated that rainfall has a fair control on amount of harvested runoff water. In year 2012, meagre rainfall (79 mm) could store 925 m3 of water with 66 cm depth. In contrast, reservoir water levels were at 2.85 m depth in year 2013 with full capacity of 24,879 m3 when rainfall totalled to 291 mm. The mean percolation rate (0.14 cm h−1), determined from 24-h long-term infiltration tests, revealed that full storage will get depleted within 85 days. A major portion (51%) of storage was lost through evaporation and percolation, and only 21% stored water could be utilized for supplemental irrigation. This finding suggested that suitable measures need to be adopted to check evaporation and seepage losses from the reservoirs in arid regions for improved agricultural productivity. Moreover, results of this study may be useful for water resources managers and decision-makers to develop appropriate operational strategies for the reservoirs in the study area as well as in other arid regions of the world.
      PubDate: 2016-12-20
      DOI: 10.1007/s40003-016-0243-5
       
  • Crack Formation in a Swell–Shrink Soil Under Various Managements
    • Authors: D. K. Painuli; M. Mohanty; Nishant K. Sinha; A. K. Misra
      Abstract: Swell–shrink soils generate wide and deep cracks, generally considered undesirable for crop husbandry. However, there is a lack of information about the management options available to reduce formation of wide and deep cracks in such soil. Therefore, the present study was conducted on an Entic Chromusterts. The results revealed that width (mm) and depth (mm) were 7 and 23, respectively, for initial soil wetness by weight 43% compared to their negligible values for initial wetness 14%, at bulk density 1.15 g cm−3, and these two parameters were 7 and 27 mm, respectively, compared to 6 and 19 mm at bulk density 1.02 g cm−3. Thus excessive wetness and higher compaction generated wide and deep cracks and should be avoided. Incorporation @10 t ha−1 of organic matter and gypsum in the soil reduced width and depth of the cracks and may be practiced; temperature beyond 35 °C generated narrow and shallow cracks. These management options should, however, be adapted for field application as per local needs and available resources.
      PubDate: 2016-12-16
      DOI: 10.1007/s40003-016-0241-7
       
  • Influence of Chromium Contamination on Carbon Mineralization and Enzymatic
           Activities in Vertisol
    • Abstract: Chromium (Cr) contamination may affect different biochemical process in the soil. In a laboratory experiment, graded doses of hexavalent chromium were applied to a clay loam soil to investigate the impact on carbon (C) mineralization rate and the enzymatic activities at various time intervals. The maximum reduction in C mineralization was noticed at 100 mg/kg Cr at 45 days after incubation. Initially, the C mineralization rate was high but decreased at faster rate with lapse of time. It was observed that increasing the Cr concentration from 0 to 100 mg/kg resulted in reduction in dehydrogenase, alkaline phosphatase and fluorescein diacetate activities to the extent of 70, 63 and 41%, respectively. Among the enzymes, dehydrogenase activity was more sensitive to Cr toxicity. In conclusion, Cr toxicity negatively affected the microbial mediated C mineralization and enzymatic activities, which may adversely affect nutrient transformation in the soil and deterioration of soil health.
      PubDate: 2016-12-16
      DOI: 10.1007/s40003-016-0242-6
       
  • Path Loss Estimation for Wireless Underground Sensor Network in
           Agricultural Application
    • Authors: Xiaoqing Yu; Wenting Han; Zenglin Zhang
      Abstract: Path loss models are used to estimate the path loss between transmitter and receiver in applications that involve transmission of electromagnetic waves. This paper describes the wireless underground sensor networks, which communicates within the soil and is different from the terrestrial wireless sensor network. An integrated study of electromagnetic waves propagation for a wireless underground sensor network is described in this paper. Here, path loss model and signal strength are presented, because of electromagnetic waves attenuation in the soil medium. Tests were conducted at various soil volumetric water contents and node deployment depths using three different frequencies, when soil consists of 0% sands, 35% silt and 15% clay. The results showed that radio signal path loss was minimum when frequency and moisture content are low. The experimental results revealed that a 20% increase in the soil moisture content increased the path loss by more than 30%.
      PubDate: 2016-12-08
      DOI: 10.1007/s40003-016-0239-1
       
  • Microbiological and Molecular Investigation of Clinically Suspected
           Caseous Lymphadenitis Cases in Goats
    • Authors: B. N. Tripathi; Jyoti Kumar; G. G. Sonawane; Rajiv Kumar; S. K. Dixit
      Abstract: Chronic suppurative lymphadenitis characterized by abscess formation is of economic significance in sheep and goats. It is principally caused by Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis (caseous lymphadenitis, CLA) and Staphylococcus aureus subsp. anaerobius. Pus samples from superficial lymph nodes of 33 (4.38 %) out of 752 adult Sirohi goats showing clinical lesions similar to CLA were collected for laboratory investigations. Sixteen (48.48 %) bacterial isolates from pus were identified as C. pseudotuberculosis, 12 (36.36 %) as catalase-negative S. aureus subsp. anaerobius while samples from 5 cases were negative. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays targeting putative oligopeptide/dipeptide ABC transporter, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidoreductase coenzyme F420-dependent and proline iminopeptidase genes of C. pseudotuberculosis when carried out directly on the DNA extracted from pus were positive in the same 16 goats. All the C. pseudotuberculosis isolates were also found to be positive for these genes in the PCR. Isolates of S. aureus subsp. anaerobius were found to be positive for 16S rRNA and nuclease (nuc) gene PCR. The present study shows the incidence of CLA as 4.38, 2.12 and 2.12 % based on the clinical, bacterial culture and direct PCR assay on pus samples, respectively. The incidence of abscess disease due to S. aureus subsp. anaerobius was 1.59 %. The three gene PCR assay developed in the study was found to be specific and rapid than the bacterial culture in detecting bacteria directly in the pus samples and can be applied for the diagnosis and control strategy of CLA.
      PubDate: 2016-09-16
      DOI: 10.1007/s40003-016-0233-7
       
 
 
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