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Publisher: Springer-Verlag (Total: 2353 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 2353 Journals sorted alphabetically
3D Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.214, h-index: 10)
4OR: A Quarterly J. of Operations Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.073, h-index: 25)
AAPS J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 1.192, h-index: 74)
AAPS PharmSciTech     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.718, h-index: 54)
Abdominal Imaging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.723, h-index: 60)
Abhandlungen aus dem Mathematischen Seminar der Universitat Hamburg     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.447, h-index: 12)
Academic Psychiatry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.492, h-index: 32)
Academic Questions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.135, h-index: 6)
Accreditation and Quality Assurance: J. for Quality, Comparability and Reliability in Chemical Measurement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.378, h-index: 30)
Acoustical Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.355, h-index: 20)
Acoustics Australia     Hybrid Journal  
Acta Analytica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.387, h-index: 6)
Acta Applicandae Mathematicae     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.624, h-index: 34)
Acta Biotheoretica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.419, h-index: 25)
Acta Diabetologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.318, h-index: 46)
Acta Endoscopica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.113, h-index: 8)
acta ethologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.465, h-index: 23)
Acta Geochimica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Acta Geodaetica et Geophysica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.294, h-index: 13)
Acta Geotechnica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 1.818, h-index: 22)
Acta Informatica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.524, h-index: 32)
Acta Mathematica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 8.021, h-index: 47)
Acta Mathematica Hungarica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.53, h-index: 29)
Acta Mathematica Sinica, English Series     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.406, h-index: 30)
Acta Mathematica Vietnamica     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.451, h-index: 5)
Acta Mathematicae Applicatae Sinica, English Series     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.22, h-index: 20)
Acta Mechanica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.898, h-index: 52)
Acta Mechanica Sinica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.426, h-index: 29)
Acta Metallurgica Sinica (English Letters)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.525, h-index: 18)
Acta Meteorologica Sinica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.524, h-index: 14)
Acta Neurochirurgica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.833, h-index: 73)
Acta Neurologica Belgica     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.348, h-index: 27)
Acta Neuropathologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 6.61, h-index: 117)
Acta Oceanologica Sinica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.295, h-index: 17)
Acta Parasitologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.581, h-index: 28)
Acta Physiologiae Plantarum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.551, h-index: 39)
Acta Politica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.658, h-index: 20)
Activitas Nervosa Superior     Hybrid Journal  
adhäsion KLEBEN & DICHTEN     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.103, h-index: 4)
ADHD Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.871, h-index: 15)
Adhesion Adhesives & Sealants     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Administration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Services Research     Partially Free   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.795, h-index: 40)
Adsorption     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.774, h-index: 52)
Advances in Applied Clifford Algebras     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.319, h-index: 15)
Advances in Atmospheric Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 0.959, h-index: 44)
Advances in Computational Mathematics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.255, h-index: 44)
Advances in Contraception     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Data Analysis and Classification     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53, SJR: 1.113, h-index: 14)
Advances in Gerontology     Partially Free   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.141, h-index: 3)
Advances in Health Sciences Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 1.397, h-index: 42)
Advances in Manufacturing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.2, h-index: 4)
Advances in Polymer Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41, SJR: 0.637, h-index: 89)
Advances in Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.79, h-index: 44)
Aegean Review of the Law of the Sea and Maritime Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Aequationes Mathematicae     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.882, h-index: 23)
Aerobiologia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.511, h-index: 36)
Aesthetic Plastic Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.821, h-index: 49)
African Archaeological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.612, h-index: 24)
Afrika Matematika     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.248, h-index: 6)
AGE     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 1.358, h-index: 33)
Ageing Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.337, h-index: 10)
Aggiornamenti CIO     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Aging Clinical and Experimental Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.529, h-index: 55)
Agricultural Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Agriculture and Human Values     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.197, h-index: 49)
Agroforestry Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.64, h-index: 56)
Agronomy for Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.732, h-index: 59)
AI & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.171, h-index: 19)
AIDS and Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 2.006, h-index: 71)
Air Quality, Atmosphere & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.706, h-index: 19)
Akupunktur & Aurikulomedizin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Algebra and Logic     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.566, h-index: 18)
Algebra Universalis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.388, h-index: 22)
Algebras and Representation Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.868, h-index: 20)
Algorithmica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.898, h-index: 56)
Allergo J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.183, h-index: 20)
Allergo J. Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Alpine Botany     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.729, h-index: 20)
ALTEX : Alternatives to Animal Experimentation     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.392, h-index: 32)
AMBIO     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.094, h-index: 87)
American J. of Cardiovascular Drugs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.864, h-index: 39)
American J. of Community Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 1.237, h-index: 83)
American J. of Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.634, h-index: 13)
American J. of Cultural Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.283, h-index: 3)
American J. of Dance Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.175, h-index: 13)
American J. of Potato Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.558, h-index: 35)
American J. of Psychoanalysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.293, h-index: 13)
American Sociologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.18, h-index: 13)
Amino Acids     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.362, h-index: 83)
AMS Review     Partially Free   (Followers: 4)
Analog Integrated Circuits and Signal Processing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.21, h-index: 37)
Analysis and Mathematical Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.665, h-index: 7)
Analysis in Theory and Applications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Analysis of Verbal Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29, SJR: 1.096, h-index: 123)
Anatomical Science Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.301, h-index: 26)
Angewandte Schmerztherapie und Palliativmedizin     Hybrid Journal  
Angiogenesis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 2.212, h-index: 69)
Animal Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.122, h-index: 55)
Annales françaises de médecine d'urgence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.156, h-index: 4)
Annales Henri Poincaré     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.377, h-index: 32)
Annales mathématiques du Québec     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Annali dell'Universita di Ferrara     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.504, h-index: 14)
Annali di Matematica Pura ed Applicata     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.167, h-index: 26)
Annals of Behavioral Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 2.112, h-index: 98)
Annals of Biomedical Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 1.182, h-index: 94)
Annals of Combinatorics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.849, h-index: 15)
Annals of Data Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Annals of Dyslexia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.857, h-index: 40)
Annals of Finance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.686, h-index: 14)
Annals of Forest Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.929, h-index: 57)
Annals of Global Analysis and Geometry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.136, h-index: 23)
Annals of Hematology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.117, h-index: 62)
Annals of Mathematics and Artificial Intelligence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.593, h-index: 42)
Annals of Microbiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.402, h-index: 26)
Annals of Nuclear Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.68, h-index: 45)
Annals of Operations Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.186, h-index: 78)
Annals of Ophthalmology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Annals of Regional Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.405, h-index: 42)
Annals of Software Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Annals of Solid and Structural Mechanics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.553, h-index: 8)
Annals of Surgical Oncology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.902, h-index: 127)
Annals of Telecommunications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.315, h-index: 25)
Annals of the Institute of Statistical Mathematics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.931, h-index: 31)
Antonie van Leeuwenhoek     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.992, h-index: 87)
Apidologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.14, h-index: 57)
APOPTOSIS     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.554, h-index: 87)
Applicable Algebra in Engineering, Communication and Computing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.354, h-index: 27)
Applications of Mathematics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.274, h-index: 20)
Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44, SJR: 0.575, h-index: 80)
Applied Biochemistry and Microbiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.267, h-index: 26)
Applied Cancer Research     Open Access  
Applied Categorical Structures     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.361, h-index: 21)
Applied Composite Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48, SJR: 0.705, h-index: 35)
Applied Entomology and Zoology     Partially Free   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.554, h-index: 34)
Applied Geomatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.323, h-index: 9)
Applied Geophysics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.541, h-index: 13)
Applied Intelligence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.777, h-index: 43)
Applied Magnetic Resonance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.358, h-index: 34)
Applied Mathematics & Optimization     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.955, h-index: 33)
Applied Mathematics - A J. of Chinese Universities     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.275, h-index: 8)
Applied Mathematics and Mechanics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.37, h-index: 26)
Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 62, SJR: 1.262, h-index: 161)
Applied Physics A     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.535, h-index: 121)
Applied Physics B: Lasers and Optics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.983, h-index: 104)
Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.677, h-index: 47)
Applied Research in Quality of Life     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.288, h-index: 15)
Applied Solar Energy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.251, h-index: 6)
Applied Spatial Analysis and Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.351, h-index: 9)
Aquaculture Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.613, h-index: 40)
Aquarium Sciences and Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Aquatic Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 0.646, h-index: 44)
Aquatic Geochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.764, h-index: 39)
Aquatic Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.172, h-index: 53)
Arabian J. for Science and Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.345, h-index: 20)
Arabian J. of Geosciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.417, h-index: 16)
Archaeological and Anthropological Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 1.056, h-index: 15)
Archaeologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.397, h-index: 13)
Archiv der Mathematik     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.597, h-index: 29)
Archival Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53, SJR: 0.804, h-index: 22)
Archive for History of Exact Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.28, h-index: 15)
Archive for Mathematical Logic     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.946, h-index: 23)
Archive for Rational Mechanics and Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 4.091, h-index: 66)
Archive of Applied Mechanics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.865, h-index: 40)
Archives and Museum Informatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 125)
Archives of Computational Methods in Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 2.841, h-index: 40)
Archives of Dermatological Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.9, h-index: 65)
Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.846, h-index: 84)
Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.695, h-index: 47)
Archives of Microbiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.702, h-index: 85)
Archives of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.039, h-index: 56)
Archives of Osteoporosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.092, h-index: 13)
Archives of Sexual Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.198, h-index: 74)
Archives of Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.595, h-index: 76)
Archives of Virology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.086, h-index: 90)
Archives of Women's Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.264, h-index: 50)
Archivio di Ortopedia e Reumatologia     Hybrid Journal  
Archivum Immunologiae et Therapiae Experimentalis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.2, h-index: 42)
ArgoSpine News & J.     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.102, h-index: 3)
Argumentation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.295, h-index: 18)
Arid Ecosystems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Arkiv för Matematik     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.948, h-index: 22)
Arnold Mathematical J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Arthropod-Plant Interactions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.797, h-index: 17)
Arthroskopie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.145, h-index: 8)
Artificial Intelligence and Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.288, h-index: 25)
Artificial Intelligence Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.948, h-index: 48)
Artificial Life and Robotics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.231, h-index: 14)
Asia Europe J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.247, h-index: 9)
Asia Pacific Education Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.371, h-index: 17)
Asia Pacific J. of Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.676, h-index: 50)
Asia-Pacific Education Researcher     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.353, h-index: 13)
Asia-Pacific Financial Markets     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.19, h-index: 15)
Asia-Pacific J. of Atmospheric Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 1.006, h-index: 14)
Asian Business & Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.41, h-index: 10)
Asian J. of Business Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Asian J. of Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.263, h-index: 8)
AStA Advances in Statistical Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.681, h-index: 15)
AStA Wirtschafts- und Sozialstatistisches Archiv     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.195, h-index: 5)
ästhetische dermatologie & kosmetologie     Full-text available via subscription  

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Journal Cover Acta Neuropathologica
  [SJR: 6.61]   [H-I: 117]   [5 followers]  Follow
    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 1432-0533 - ISSN (Online) 0001-6322
   Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2353 journals]
  • Grading of diffuse astrocytic gliomas: Broders, Kernohan, Zülch, the
           WHO… and Shakespeare
    • Authors: David N. Louis; Andreas von Deimling
      Pages: 517 - 520
      PubDate: 2017-10-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s00401-017-1765-z
      Issue No: Vol. 134, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Autism spectrum disorder: neuropathology and animal models
    • Authors: Merina Varghese; Neha Keshav; Sarah Jacot-Descombes; Tahia Warda; Bridget Wicinski; Dara L. Dickstein; Hala Harony-Nicolas; Silvia De Rubeis; Elodie Drapeau; Joseph D. Buxbaum; Patrick R. Hof
      Pages: 537 - 566
      Abstract: Abstract Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) has a major impact on the development and social integration of affected individuals and is the most heritable of psychiatric disorders. An increase in the incidence of ASD cases has prompted a surge in research efforts on the underlying neuropathologic processes. We present an overview of current findings in neuropathology studies of ASD using two investigational approaches, postmortem human brains and ASD animal models, and discuss the overlap, limitations, and significance of each. Postmortem examination of ASD brains has revealed global changes including disorganized gray and white matter, increased number of neurons, decreased volume of neuronal soma, and increased neuropil, the last reflecting changes in densities of dendritic spines, cerebral vasculature and glia. Both cortical and non-cortical areas show region-specific abnormalities in neuronal morphology and cytoarchitectural organization, with consistent findings reported from the prefrontal cortex, fusiform gyrus, frontoinsular cortex, cingulate cortex, hippocampus, amygdala, cerebellum and brainstem. The paucity of postmortem human studies linking neuropathology to the underlying etiology has been partly addressed using animal models to explore the impact of genetic and non-genetic factors clinically relevant for the ASD phenotype. Genetically modified models include those based on well-studied monogenic ASD genes (NLGN3, NLGN4, NRXN1, CNTNAP2, SHANK3, MECP2, FMR1, TSC1/2), emerging risk genes (CHD8, SCN2A, SYNGAP1, ARID1B, GRIN2B, DSCAM, TBR1), and copy number variants (15q11-q13 deletion, 15q13.3 microdeletion, 15q11-13 duplication, 16p11.2 deletion and duplication, 22q11.2 deletion). Models of idiopathic ASD include inbred rodent strains that mimic ASD behaviors as well as models developed by environmental interventions such as prenatal exposure to sodium valproate, maternal autoantibodies, and maternal immune activation. In addition to replicating some of the neuropathologic features seen in postmortem studies, a common finding in several animal models of ASD is altered density of dendritic spines, with the direction of the change depending on the specific genetic modification, age and brain region. Overall, postmortem neuropathologic studies with larger sample sizes representative of the various ASD risk genes and diverse clinical phenotypes are warranted to clarify putative etiopathogenic pathways further and to promote the emergence of clinically relevant diagnostic and therapeutic tools. In addition, as genetic alterations may render certain individuals more vulnerable to developing the pathological changes at the synapse underlying the behavioral manifestations of ASD, neuropathologic investigation using genetically modified animal models will help to improve our understanding of the disease mechanisms and enhance the development of targeted treatments.
      PubDate: 2017-10-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s00401-017-1736-4
      Issue No: Vol. 134, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Persistent microglial activation and synaptic loss with behavioral
           abnormalities in mouse offspring exposed to CASPR2-antibodies in utero
    • Authors: Ester Coutinho; David A. Menassa; Leslie Jacobson; Steven J. West; Joana Domingos; Teresa C. Moloney; Bethan Lang; Paul J. Harrison; David L. H. Bennett; David Bannerman; Angela Vincent
      Pages: 567 - 583
      Abstract: Abstract Gestational transfer of maternal antibodies against fetal neuronal proteins may be relevant to some neurodevelopmental disorders, but until recently there were no proteins identified. We recently reported a fivefold increase in CASPR2-antibodies in mid-gestation sera from mothers of children with intellectual and motor disabilities. Here, we exposed mice in utero to purified IgG from patients with CASPR2-antibodies (CASPR2-IgGs) or from healthy controls (HC-IgGs). CASPR2-IgG but not HC-IgG bound to fetal brain parenchyma, from which CASPR2-antibodies could be eluted. CASPR2-IgG exposed neonates achieved milestones similarly to HC-IgG exposed controls but, when adult, the CASPR2-IgG exposed progeny showed marked social interaction deficits, abnormally located glutamatergic neurons in layers V–VI of the somatosensory cortex, a 16% increase in activated microglia, and a 15–52% decrease in glutamatergic synapses in layers of the prefrontal and somatosensory cortices. Thus, in utero exposure to CASPR2-antibodies led to permanent behavioral, cellular, and synaptic abnormalities. These findings support a pathogenic role for maternal antibodies in human neurodevelopmental conditions, and CASPR2 as a potential target.
      PubDate: 2017-10-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s00401-017-1751-5
      Issue No: Vol. 134, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Microglial-mediated PDGF-CC activation increases cerebrovascular
           permeability during ischemic stroke
    • Authors: Enming Joseph Su; Chunzhang Cao; Linda Fredriksson; Ingrid Nilsson; Christina Stefanitsch; Tamara K. Stevenson; Juanjuan Zhao; Margret Ragsdale; Yu-Yo Sun; Manuel Yepes; Chia-Yi Kuan; Ulf Eriksson; Dudley K. Strickland; Daniel A. Lawrence; Li Zhang
      Pages: 585 - 604
      Abstract: Abstract Treatment of acute ischemic stroke with the thrombolytic tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) can significantly improve neurological outcomes; however, thrombolytic therapy is associated with an increased risk of intra-cerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Previously, we demonstrated that during stroke tPA acting on the parenchymal side of the neurovascular unit (NVU) can increase blood–brain barrier (BBB) permeability and ICH through activation of latent platelet-derived growth factor-CC (PDGF-CC) and signaling by the PDGF receptor-α (PDGFRα). However, in vitro, activation of PDGF-CC by tPA is very inefficient and the mechanism of PDGF-CC activation in the NVU is not known. Here, we show that the integrin Mac-1, expressed on brain microglia/macrophages (denoted microglia throughout), acts together with the endocytic receptor LRP1 in the NVU to promote tPA-mediated activation of PDGF-CC. Mac-1-deficient mice (Mac-1−/−) are protected from tPA-induced BBB permeability but not from permeability induced by intracerebroventricular injection of active PDGF-CC. Immunofluorescence analysis demonstrates that Mac-1, LRP1, and the PDGFRα all localize to the NVU of arterioles, and following middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) Mac-1−/− mice show significantly less PDGFRα phosphorylation, BBB permeability, and infarct volume compared to wild-type mice. Bone-marrow transplantation studies indicate that resident CD11b+ cells, but not bone-marrow-derived leukocytes, mediate the early activation of PDGF-CC by tPA after MCAO. Finally, using a model of thrombotic stroke with late thrombolysis, we show that wild-type mice have an increased incidence of spontaneous ICH following thrombolysis with tPA 5 h after MCAO, whereas Mac-1−/− mice are resistant to the development of ICH even with late tPA treatment. Together, these results indicate that Mac-1 and LRP1 act as co-factors for the activation of PDGF-CC by tPA in the NVU, and suggest a novel mechanism for tightly regulating PDGFRα signaling in the NVU and controlling BBB permeability.
      PubDate: 2017-10-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s00401-017-1749-z
      Issue No: Vol. 134, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Sushi repeat-containing protein 1: a novel disease-associated molecule in
           cerebral amyloid angiopathy
    • Authors: Yasuteru Inoue; Mitsuharu Ueda; Masayoshi Tasaki; Akari Takeshima; Akihito Nagatoshi; Teruaki Masuda; Yohei Misumi; Takayuki Kosaka; Toshiya Nomura; Mayumi Mizukami; Sayaka Matsumoto; Taro Yamashita; Hitoshi Takahashi; Akiyoshi Kakita; Yukio Ando
      Pages: 605 - 617
      Abstract: Abstract Sporadic cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is characterized by cerebrovascular amyloid beta (Aβ) deposits and causes cerebral hemorrhage and dementia. The exact molecules that co-accumulate with cerebrovascular Aβ deposits are still not fully known. In our study here, we performed proteomic analyses with microdissected leptomeningeal arteries and cerebral neocortical arterioles from 8 cases with severe CAA, 12 cases with mild CAA, and 10 control cases without CAA, and we determined the levels of highly expressed proteins in cerebral blood vessels in CAA. We focused on sushi repeat-containing protein 1 (SRPX1), which is specifically expressed in CAA-affected cerebral blood vessels. Because SRPX1, which is known as a tumor suppressor gene, reportedly induced apoptosis in tumor cells, we hypothesized that SRPX1 may play an important role in Aβ-induced apoptosis in CAA. Immunohistochemical studies revealed that SRPX1 co-accumulated with Aβ deposits in cerebral blood vessels of all autopsied cases with severe CAA. In contrast, no SRPX1 co-accumulated with Aβ deposits in senile plaques. Furthermore, we demonstrated that both Aβ40 and Aβ42 bound to SRPX1 in vitro and enhanced SRPX1 expression in primary cultures of cerebrovascular smooth muscle cells. SRPX1 enhanced caspase activity induced by Aβ40. Knockdown of SRPX1, in contrast, reduced the formation of Aβ40 accumulations and the activity of caspase in cultured cerebrovascular smooth muscle cells. SRPX1 may thus be a novel molecule that is up-regulated in cerebrovascular Aβ deposits and that may increase Aβ-induced cerebrovascular degeneration in CAA.
      PubDate: 2017-10-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s00401-017-1720-z
      Issue No: Vol. 134, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • [F-18]-AV-1451 binding correlates with postmortem neurofibrillary tangle
           Braak staging
    • Authors: Marta Marquié; Michael Siao Tick Chong; Alejandro Antón-Fernández; Eline E. Verwer; Nil Sáez-Calveras; Avery C. Meltzer; Prianca Ramanan; Ana C. Amaral; Jose Gonzalez; Marc D. Normandin; Matthew P. Frosch; Teresa Gómez-Isla
      Pages: 619 - 628
      Abstract: Abstract [F-18]-AV-1451, a PET tracer specifically developed to detect brain neurofibrillary tau pathology, has the potential to facilitate accurate diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), staging of brain tau burden and monitoring disease progression. Recent PET studies show that patients with mild cognitive impairment and AD dementia exhibit significantly higher in vivo [F-18]-AV-1451 retention than cognitively normal controls. Importantly, PET patterns of [F-18]-AV-1451 correlate well with disease severity and seem to match the predicted topographic Braak staging of neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) in AD, although this awaits confirmation. We studied the correlation of autoradiographic binding patterns of [F-18]-AV-1451 and the stereotypical spatiotemporal pattern of progression of NFTs using legacy postmortem brain samples representing different Braak NFT stages (I-VI). We performed [F-18]-AV-1451 phosphor-screen autoradiography and quantitative tau measurements (stereologically based NFT counts and biochemical analysis of tau pathology) in three brain regions (entorhinal cortex, superior temporal sulcus and visual cortex) in a total of 22 cases: low Braak (I–II, n = 6), intermediate Braak (III–IV, n = 7) and high Braak (V–VI, n = 9). Strong and selective [F-18]-AV-1451 binding was detected in all tangle-containing regions matching precisely the observed pattern of PHF-tau immunostaining across the different Braak stages. As expected, no signal was detected in the white matter or other non-tangle containing regions. Quantification of [F-18]-AV-1451 binding was very significantly correlated with the number of NFTs present in each brain region and with the total tau and phospho-tau content as reported by Western blot and ELISA. [F-18]-AV-1451 is a promising biomarker for in vivo quantification of brain tau burden in AD. Neuroimaging–pathologic studies conducted on postmortem material from individuals imaged while alive are now needed to confirm these observations.
      PubDate: 2017-10-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s00401-017-1740-8
      Issue No: Vol. 134, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Endocytic vesicle rupture is a conserved mechanism of cellular invasion by
           amyloid proteins
    • Authors: William P. Flavin; Luc Bousset; Zachary C. Green; Yaping Chu; Stratos Skarpathiotis; Michael J. Chaney; Jeffrey H. Kordower; Ronald Melki; Edward M. Campbell
      Pages: 629 - 653
      Abstract: Abstract Numerous pathological amyloid proteins spread from cell to cell during neurodegenerative disease, facilitating the propagation of cellular pathology and disease progression. Understanding the mechanism by which disease-associated amyloid protein assemblies enter target cells and induce cellular dysfunction is, therefore, key to understanding the progressive nature of such neurodegenerative diseases. In this study, we utilized an imaging-based assay to monitor the ability of disease-associated amyloid assemblies to rupture intracellular vesicles following endocytosis. We observe that the ability to induce vesicle rupture is a common feature of α-synuclein (α-syn) assemblies, as assemblies derived from WT or familial disease-associated mutant α-syn all exhibited the ability to induce vesicle rupture. Similarly, different conformational strains of WT α-syn assemblies, but not monomeric or oligomeric forms, efficiently induced vesicle rupture following endocytosis. The ability to induce vesicle rupture was not specific to α-syn, as amyloid assemblies of tau and huntingtin Exon1 with pathologic polyglutamine repeats also exhibited the ability to induce vesicle rupture. We also observe that vesicles ruptured by α-syn are positive for the autophagic marker LC3 and can accumulate and fuse into large, intracellular structures resembling Lewy bodies in vitro. Finally, we show that the same markers of vesicle rupture surround Lewy bodies in brain sections from PD patients. These data underscore the importance of this conserved endocytic vesicle rupture event as a damaging mechanism of cellular invasion by amyloid assemblies of multiple neurodegenerative disease-associated proteins, and suggest that proteinaceous inclusions such as Lewy bodies form as a consequence of continued fusion of autophagic vesicles in cells unable to degrade ruptured vesicles and their amyloid contents.
      PubDate: 2017-10-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s00401-017-1722-x
      Issue No: Vol. 134, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • IFN-β-induced reactive oxygen species and mitochondrial damage contribute
           to muscle impairment and inflammation maintenance in dermatomyositis
    • Authors: Alain Meyer; Gilles Laverny; Yves Allenbach; Elise Grelet; Vanessa Ueberschlag; Andoni Echaniz-Laguna; Béatrice Lannes; Ghada Alsaleh; Anne Laure Charles; François Singh; Joffrey Zoll; Evelyne Lonsdorfer; François Maurier; Olivier Boyer; Jacques-Eric Gottenberg; Anne Sophie Nicot; Jocelyn Laporte; Olivier Benveniste; Daniel Metzger; Jean Sibilia; Bernard Geny
      Pages: 655 - 666
      Abstract: Abstract Dermatomyositis (DM) is an autoimmune disease associated with enhanced type I interferon (IFN) signalling in skeletal muscle, but the mechanisms underlying muscle dysfunction and inflammation perpetuation remain unknown. Transcriptomic analysis of early untreated DM muscles revealed that the main cluster of down-regulated genes was mitochondria-related. Histochemical, electron microscopy, and in situ oxygraphy analysis showed mitochondrial abnormalities, including increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and decreased respiration, which was correlated with low exercise capacities and a type I IFN signature. Moreover, IFN-β induced ROS production in human myotubes was found to contribute to mitochondrial malfunctions. Importantly, the ROS scavenger N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) prevented mitochondrial dysfunctions, type I IFN-stimulated transcript levels, inflammatory cell infiltrate, and muscle weakness in an experimental autoimmune myositis mouse model. Thus, these data highlight a central role of mitochondria and ROS in DM. Mitochondrial dysfunctions, mediated by IFN-β induced-ROS, contribute to poor exercise capacity. In addition, mitochondrial dysfunctions increase ROS production that drive type I IFN-inducible gene expression and muscle inflammation, and may thus self-sustain the disease. Given that current DM treatments only induce partial recovery and expose to serious adverse events (including muscular toxicity), protecting mitochondria from dysfunctions may open new therapeutic avenues for DM.
      PubDate: 2017-10-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s00401-017-1731-9
      Issue No: Vol. 134, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Angiocentric glioma with MYB - QKI fusion located in the brainstem, rather
           than cerebral cortex
    • Authors: Emily Chan; Andrew W. Bollen; Deepika Sirohi; Jessica Van Ziffle; James P. Grenert; Cassie N. Kline; Tarik Tihan; Arie Perry; Nalin Gupta; David A. Solomon
      Pages: 671 - 673
      PubDate: 2017-10-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s00401-017-1759-x
      Issue No: Vol. 134, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Childhood white matter disorders: much more than just diseases of myelin
    • Authors: Marianna Bugiani; Marjo S. van der Knaap
      Pages: 329 - 330
      PubDate: 2017-09-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s00401-017-1750-6
      Issue No: Vol. 134, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • White matter injury in the preterm infant: pathology and mechanisms
    • Authors: Stephen A. Back
      Pages: 331 - 349
      Abstract: Abstract The human preterm brain is particularly susceptible to cerebral white matter injury (WMI) that disrupts the normal progression of developmental myelination. Advances in the care of preterm infants have resulted in a sustained reduction in the severity of WMI that has shifted from more severe focal necrotic lesions to milder diffuse WMI. Nevertheless, WMI remains a global health problem and the most common cause of chronic neurological morbidity from cerebral palsy and diverse neurobehavioral disabilities. Diffuse WMI involves maturation-dependent vulnerability of the oligodendrocyte (OL) lineage with selective degeneration of late oligodendrocyte progenitors (preOLs) triggered by oxidative stress and other insults. The magnitude and distribution of diffuse WMI are related to both the timing of appearance and regional distribution of susceptible preOLs. Diffuse WMI disrupts the normal progression of OL lineage maturation and myelination through aberrant mechanisms of regeneration and repair. PreOL degeneration is accompanied by early robust proliferation of OL progenitors that regenerate and augment the preOL pool available to generate myelinating OLs. However, newly generated preOLs fail to differentiate and initiate myelination along their normal developmental trajectory despite the presence of numerous intact-appearing axons. Disrupted preOL maturation is accompanied by diffuse gliosis and disturbances in the composition of the extracellular matrix and is mediated in part by inhibitory factors derived from reactive astrocytes. Signaling pathways implicated in disrupted myelination include those mediated by Notch, WNT-beta catenin, and hyaluronan. Hence, there exists a potentially broad but still poorly defined developmental window for interventions to promote white matter repair and myelination and potentially reverses the widespread disturbances in cerebral gray matter growth that accompanies WMI.
      PubDate: 2017-09-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s00401-017-1718-6
      Issue No: Vol. 134, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Phenotypic and functional characterization of T cells in white matter
           lesions of multiple sclerosis patients
    • Authors: Gijsbert P. van Nierop; Marvin M. van Luijn; Samira S. Michels; Marie-Jose Melief; Malou Janssen; Anton W. Langerak; Werner J. D. Ouwendijk; Rogier Q. Hintzen; Georges M. G. M. Verjans
      Pages: 383 - 401
      Abstract: Abstract T cells are considered pivotal in the pathology of multiple sclerosis (MS), but their function and antigen specificity are unknown. To unravel the role of T cells in MS pathology, we performed a comprehensive analysis on T cells recovered from paired blood, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), normal-appearing white matter (NAWM) and white matter lesions (WML) from 27 MS patients with advanced disease shortly after death. The differentiation status of T cells in these compartments was determined by ex vivo flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. T-cell reactivity in short-term T-cell lines (TCL), generated by non-specific stimulation of T cells recovered from the same compartments, was determined by intracellular cytokine flow cytometry. Central memory T cells predominated in CSF and effector memory T cells were enriched in NAWM and WML. WML-derived CD8+ T cells represent chronically activated T cells expressing a cytotoxic effector phenotype (CD95L and granzyme B) indicative for local antigenic stimulation (CD137). The same lesions also contained higher CD8+ T-cell frequencies expressing co-inhibitory (TIM3 and PD1) and co-stimulatory (ICOS) T-cell receptors, yet no evidence for T-cell senescence (CD57) was observed. The oligoclonal T-cell receptor (TCR) repertoire, particularly among CD8+ T cells, correlated between TCL generated from anatomically separated WML of the same MS patient, but not between paired NAWM and WML. Whereas no substantial T-cell reactivity was detected towards seven candidate human MS-associated autoantigens (cMSAg), brisk CD8+ T-cell reactivity was detected in multiple WML-derived TCL towards autologous Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) infected B cells (autoBLCL). In one MS patient, the T-cell response towards autoBLCL in paired intra-lesional TCL was dominated by TCRVβ2+CD8+ T cells, which were localized in the parenchyma of the respective tissues expressing a polarized TCR and CD8 expression suggesting immunological synapse formation in situ. Collectively, the data suggest the involvement of effector memory cytotoxic T cells recognizing antigens expressed by autoBLCL, but not the assayed human cMSAg, in WML of MS patients.
      PubDate: 2017-09-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s00401-017-1744-4
      Issue No: Vol. 134, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Myelin regulatory factor drives remyelination in multiple sclerosis
    • Authors: Greg J. Duncan; Jason R. Plemel; Peggy Assinck; Sohrab B. Manesh; Fraser G. W. Muir; Ryan Hirata; Matan Berson; Jie Liu; Michael Wegner; Ben Emery; G. R. Wayne Moore; Wolfram Tetzlaff
      Pages: 403 - 422
      Abstract: Abstract Remyelination is limited in the majority of multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions despite the presence of oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) in most lesions. This observation has led to the view that a failure of OPCs to fully differentiate underlies remyelination failure. OPC differentiation requires intricate transcriptional regulation, which may be disrupted in chronic MS lesions. The expression of few transcription factors has been differentially compared between remyelinating lesions and lesions refractory to remyelination. In particular, the oligodendrocyte transcription factor myelin regulatory factor (MYRF) is essential for myelination during development, but its role during remyelination and expression in MS lesions is unknown. To understand the role of MYRF during remyelination, we genetically fate mapped OPCs following lysolecithin-induced demyelination of the corpus callosum in mice and determined that MYRF is expressed in new oligodendrocytes. OPC-specific Myrf deletion did not alter recruitment or proliferation of these cells after demyelination, but decreased the density of new glutathione S-transferase π positive oligodendrocytes. Subsequent remyelination in both the spinal cord and corpus callosum is highly impaired following Myrf deletion from OPCs. Individual OPC-derived oligodendrocytes, produced in response to demyelination, showed little capacity to express myelin proteins following Myrf deletion. Collectively, these data demonstrate a crucial role of MYRF in the transition of oligodendrocytes from a premyelinating to a myelinating phenotype during remyelination. In the human brain, we find that MYRF is expressed in NogoA and CNP-positive oligodendrocytes. In MS, there was both a lower density and proportion of oligodendrocyte lineage cells and NogoA+ oligodendrocytes expressing MYRF in chronically demyelinated lesions compared to remyelinated shadow plaques. The relative scarcity of oligodendrocyte lineage cells expressing MYRF in demyelinated MS lesions demonstrates, for the first time, that chronic lesions lack oligodendrocytes that express this necessary transcription factor for remyelination and supports the notion that a failure to fully differentiate underlies remyelination failure.
      PubDate: 2017-09-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s00401-017-1741-7
      Issue No: Vol. 134, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Microglia contribute to normal myelinogenesis and to oligodendrocyte
           progenitor maintenance during adulthood
    • Authors: Nora Hagemeyer; Klara-Maria Hanft; Maria-Anna Akriditou; Nicole Unger; Eun S. Park; E. Richard Stanley; Ori Staszewski; Leda Dimou; Marco Prinz
      Pages: 441 - 458
      Abstract: Abstract Whereas microglia involvement in virtually all brain diseases is well accepted their role in the control of homeostasis in the central nervous system (CNS) is mainly thought to be the maintenance of neuronal function through the formation, refinement, and monitoring of synapses in both the developing and adult brain. Although the prenatal origin as well as the neuron-centered function of cortical microglia has recently been elucidated, much less is known about a distinct amoeboid microglia population formerly described as the “fountain of microglia” that appears only postnatally in myelinated regions such as corpus callosum and cerebellum. Using large-scale transcriptional profiling, fate mapping, and genetic targeting approaches, we identified a unique molecular signature of this microglia subset that arose from a CNS endogenous microglia pool independent from circulating myeloid cells. Microglia depletion experiments revealed an essential role of postnatal microglia for the proper development and homeostasis of oligodendrocytes and their progenitors. Our data provide new cellular and molecular insights into the myelin-supporting function of microglia in the normal CNS.
      PubDate: 2017-09-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s00401-017-1747-1
      Issue No: Vol. 134, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Deleterious ABCA7 mutations and transcript rescue mechanisms in early
           onset Alzheimer’s disease
    • Authors: Arne De Roeck; On behalf of the European Early-Onset Dementia (EU EOD) consortium; Tobi Van den Bossche; Julie van der Zee; Jan Verheijen; Wouter De Coster; Jasper Van Dongen; Lubina Dillen; Yalda Baradaran-Heravi; Bavo Heeman; Raquel Sanchez-Valle; Albert Lladó; Benedetta Nacmias; Sandro Sorbi; Ellen Gelpi; Oriol Grau-Rivera; Estrella Gómez-Tortosa; Pau Pastor; Sara Ortega-Cubero; Maria A. Pastor; Caroline Graff; Håkan Thonberg; Luisa Benussi; Roberta Ghidoni; Giuliano Binetti; Alexandre de Mendonça; Madalena Martins; Barbara Borroni; Alessandro Padovani; Maria Rosário Almeida; Isabel Santana; Janine Diehl-Schmid; Panagiotis Alexopoulos; Jordi Clarimon; Alberto Lleó; Juan Fortea; Magda Tsolaki; Maria Koutroumani; Radoslav Matěj; Zdenek Rohan; Peter De Deyn; Sebastiaan Engelborghs; Patrick Cras; Christine Van Broeckhoven; Kristel Sleegers
      Pages: 475 - 487
      Abstract: Abstract Premature termination codon (PTC) mutations in the ATP-Binding Cassette, Sub-Family A, Member 7 gene (ABCA7) have recently been identified as intermediate-to-high penetrant risk factor for late-onset Alzheimer’s disease (LOAD). High variability, however, is observed in downstream ABCA7 mRNA and protein expression, disease penetrance, and onset age, indicative of unknown modifying factors. Here, we investigated the prevalence and disease penetrance of ABCA7 PTC mutations in a large early onset AD (EOAD)—control cohort, and examined the effect on transcript level with comprehensive third-generation long-read sequencing. We characterized the ABCA7 coding sequence with next-generation sequencing in 928 EOAD patients and 980 matched control individuals. With MetaSKAT rare variant association analysis, we observed a fivefold enrichment (p = 0.0004) of PTC mutations in EOAD patients (3%) versus controls (0.6%). Ten novel PTC mutations were only observed in patients, and PTC mutation carriers in general had an increased familial AD load. In addition, we observed nominal risk reducing trends for three common coding variants. Seven PTC mutations were further analyzed using targeted long-read cDNA sequencing on an Oxford Nanopore MinION platform. PTC-containing transcripts for each investigated PTC mutation were observed at varying proportion (5–41% of the total read count), implying incomplete nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD). Furthermore, we distinguished and phased several previously unknown alternative splicing events (up to 30% of transcripts). In conjunction with PTC mutations, several of these novel ABCA7 isoforms have the potential to rescue deleterious PTC effects. In conclusion, ABCA7 PTC mutations play a substantial role in EOAD, warranting genetic screening of ABCA7 in genetically unexplained patients. Long-read cDNA sequencing revealed both varying degrees of NMD and transcript-modifying events, which may influence ABCA7 dosage, disease severity, and may create opportunities for therapeutic interventions in AD.
      PubDate: 2017-09-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s00401-017-1714-x
      Issue No: Vol. 134, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • IRE1 signaling exacerbates Alzheimer’s disease pathogenesis
    • Authors: Claudia Duran-Aniotz; Victor Hugo Cornejo; Sandra Espinoza; Álvaro O. Ardiles; Danilo B. Medinas; Claudia Salazar; Andrew Foley; Ivana Gajardo; Peter Thielen; Takao Iwawaki; Wiep Scheper; Claudio Soto; Adrian G. Palacios; Jeroen J. M. Hoozemans; Claudio Hetz
      Pages: 489 - 506
      Abstract: Abstract Altered proteostasis is a salient feature of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), highlighting the occurrence of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and abnormal protein aggregation. ER stress triggers the activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR), a signaling pathway that enforces adaptive programs to sustain proteostasis or eliminate terminally damaged cells. IRE1 is an ER-located kinase and endoribonuclease that operates as a major stress transducer, mediating both adaptive and proapoptotic programs under ER stress. IRE1 signaling controls the expression of the transcription factor XBP1, in addition to degrade several RNAs. Importantly, a polymorphism in the XBP1 promoter was suggested as a risk factor to develop AD. Here, we demonstrate a positive correlation between the progression of AD histopathology and the activation of IRE1 in human brain tissue. To define the significance of the UPR to AD, we targeted IRE1 expression in a transgenic mouse model of AD. Despite initial expectations that IRE1 signaling may protect against AD, genetic ablation of the RNase domain of IRE1 in the nervous system significantly reduced amyloid deposition, the content of amyloid β oligomers, and astrocyte activation. IRE1 deficiency fully restored the learning and memory capacity of AD mice, associated with improved synaptic function and improved long-term potentiation (LTP). At the molecular level, IRE1 deletion reduced the expression of amyloid precursor protein (APP) in cortical and hippocampal areas of AD mice. In vitro experiments demonstrated that inhibition of IRE1 downstream signaling reduces APP steady-state levels, associated with its retention at the ER followed by proteasome-mediated degradation. Our findings uncovered an unanticipated role of IRE1 in the pathogenesis of AD, offering a novel target for disease intervention.
      PubDate: 2017-09-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s00401-017-1694-x
      Issue No: Vol. 134, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • H3-/IDH-wild type pediatric glioblastoma is comprised of molecularly and
           prognostically distinct subtypes with associated oncogenic drivers
    • Authors: Andrey Korshunov; Daniel Schrimpf; Marina Ryzhova; Dominik Sturm; Lukas Chavez; Volker Hovestadt; Tanvi Sharma; Antje Habel; Anna Burford; Chris Jones; Olga Zheludkova; Ella Kumirova; Christof M. Kramm; Andrey Golanov; David Capper; Andreas von Deimling; Stefan M. Pfister; David T. W. Jones
      Pages: 507 - 516
      Abstract: Abstract Pediatric glioblastoma (pedGBM) is an extremely aggressive pediatric brain tumor, accounting for ~6% of all central nervous system neoplasms in children. Approximately half of pedGBM harbor recurrent somatic mutations in histone 3 variants or, infrequently, IDH1/2. The remaining subset of pedGBM is highly heterogeneous, and displays a variety of genomic and epigenetic features. In the current study, we aimed to further stratify an H3-/IDH-wild type (wt) pedGBM cohort assessed through genome-wide molecular profiling. As a result, we identified three molecular subtypes of these tumors, differing in their genomic and epigenetic signatures as well as in their clinical behavior. We designated these subtypes ‘pedGBM_MYCN’ (enriched for MYCN amplification), ‘pedGBM_RTK1’ (enriched for PDGFRA amplification) and ‘pedGBM_RTK2’ (enriched for EGFR amplification). These molecular subtypes were associated with significantly different outcomes, i.e. pedGBM_RTK2 tumors show a significantly longer survival time (median OS 44 months), pedGBM_MYCN display extremely poor outcomes (median OS 14 months), and pedGBM_RTK1 tumors harbor an intermediate prognosis. In addition, the various molecular subtypes of H3-/IDH-wt pedGBM were clearly distinguishable from their adult counterparts, underlining their biological distinctiveness. In conclusion, our study demonstrates significant molecular heterogeneity of H3-/IDH-wt pedGBM in terms of DNA methylation and cytogenetic alterations. The recognition of three molecular subtypes of H3-/IDH-wt pedGBM further revealed close correlations with biological parameters and clinical outcomes and may therefore, be predictive of response to standard treatment protocols, but could also be useful for stratification for novel, molecularly based therapies.
      PubDate: 2017-09-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s00401-017-1710-1
      Issue No: Vol. 134, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • A specific antibody to detect transcription factor T-Pit: a reliable
           marker of corticotroph cell differentiation and a tool to improve the
           classification of pituitary neuroendocrine tumours
    • Authors: Evelina Sjöstedt; Jens Bollerslev; Jan Mulder; Cecilia Lindskog; Fredrik Pontén; Olivera Casar-Borota
      PubDate: 2017-08-19
      DOI: 10.1007/s00401-017-1768-9
       
  • The 2017 World Health Organization classification of tumors of the
           pituitary gland: a summary
    • Authors: M. Beatriz S. Lopes
      Abstract: Abstract The 4th edition of the World Health Organization (WHO) classification of endocrine tumors has been recently released. In this new edition, major changes are recommended in several areas of the classification of tumors of the anterior pituitary gland (adenophypophysis). The scope of the present manuscript is to summarize these recommended changes, emphasizing a few significant topics. These changes include the following: (1) a novel approach for classifying pituitary neuroendocrine tumors according to pituitary adenohypophyseal cell lineages; (2) changes to the histological grading of pituitary neuroendocrine tumors with the elimination of the term “atypical adenoma;” and (3) introduction of new entities like the pituitary blastoma and re-definition of old entities like the null-cell adenoma. This new classification is very practical and mostly based on immunohistochemistry for pituitary hormones, pituitary-specific transcription factors, and other immunohistochemical markers commonly used in pathology practice, not requiring routine ultrastructural analysis of the tumors. Evaluation of tumor proliferation potential, by mitotic count and Ki-67 labeling index, and tumor invasion is strongly recommended on individual case basis to identify clinically aggressive adenomas. In addition, the classification offers the treating clinical team information on tumor prognosis by identifying specific variants of adenomas associated with an elevated risk for recurrence. Changes in the classification of non-neuroendocrine tumors are also proposed, in particular those tumors arising in the posterior pituitary including pituicytoma, granular cell tumor of the posterior pituitary, and spindle cell oncocytoma. These changes endorse those previously published in the 2016 WHO classification of CNS tumors. Other tumors arising in the sellar region are also reviewed in detail including craniopharyngiomas, mesenchymal and stromal tumors, germ cell tumors, and hematopoietic tumors. It is hoped that the 2017 WHO classification of pituitary tumors will establish more biologically and clinically uniform groups of tumors, make it possible for practicing pathologists to better diagnose these tumors, and contribute to our understanding of clinical outcomes for patients harboring pituitary tumors.
      PubDate: 2017-08-18
      DOI: 10.1007/s00401-017-1769-8
       
  • Brainstem angiocentric gliomas with MYB–QKI rearrangements
    • Authors: Laura D’Aronco; Cécile Rouleau; Tenzin Gayden; Louis Crevier; Jean-Claude Décarie; Sébastien Perreault; Nada Jabado; Pratiti Bandopadhayay; Keith L. Ligon; Benjamin Ellezam
      PubDate: 2017-08-12
      DOI: 10.1007/s00401-017-1763-1
       
 
 
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