for Journals by Title or ISSN
for Articles by Keywords
help

Publisher: Springer-Verlag   (Total: 2355 journals)

 A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

        1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 | Last   [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

Showing 1 - 200 of 2355 Journals sorted alphabetically
3D Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.214, h-index: 10)
4OR: A Quarterly J. of Operations Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.073, h-index: 25)
AAPS J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 1.192, h-index: 74)
AAPS PharmSciTech     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.718, h-index: 54)
Abdominal Imaging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.723, h-index: 60)
Abhandlungen aus dem Mathematischen Seminar der Universitat Hamburg     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.447, h-index: 12)
Academic Psychiatry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.492, h-index: 32)
Academic Questions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.135, h-index: 6)
Accreditation and Quality Assurance: J. for Quality, Comparability and Reliability in Chemical Measurement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.378, h-index: 30)
Acoustical Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.355, h-index: 20)
Acoustics Australia     Hybrid Journal  
Acta Analytica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.387, h-index: 6)
Acta Applicandae Mathematicae     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.624, h-index: 34)
Acta Biotheoretica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.419, h-index: 25)
Acta Diabetologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.318, h-index: 46)
Acta Endoscopica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.113, h-index: 8)
acta ethologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.465, h-index: 23)
Acta Geochimica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Acta Geodaetica et Geophysica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.294, h-index: 13)
Acta Geotechnica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 1.818, h-index: 22)
Acta Informatica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.524, h-index: 32)
Acta Mathematica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 8.021, h-index: 47)
Acta Mathematica Hungarica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.53, h-index: 29)
Acta Mathematica Sinica, English Series     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.406, h-index: 30)
Acta Mathematica Vietnamica     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.451, h-index: 5)
Acta Mathematicae Applicatae Sinica, English Series     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.22, h-index: 20)
Acta Mechanica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.898, h-index: 52)
Acta Mechanica Sinica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.426, h-index: 29)
Acta Metallurgica Sinica (English Letters)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.525, h-index: 18)
Acta Meteorologica Sinica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.524, h-index: 14)
Acta Neurochirurgica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.833, h-index: 73)
Acta Neurologica Belgica     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.348, h-index: 27)
Acta Neuropathologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 6.61, h-index: 117)
Acta Oceanologica Sinica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.295, h-index: 17)
Acta Parasitologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.581, h-index: 28)
Acta Physiologiae Plantarum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.551, h-index: 39)
Acta Politica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.658, h-index: 20)
Activitas Nervosa Superior     Hybrid Journal  
adhäsion KLEBEN & DICHTEN     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.103, h-index: 4)
ADHD Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.871, h-index: 15)
Adhesion Adhesives & Sealants     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Administration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Services Research     Partially Free   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.795, h-index: 40)
Adsorption     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.774, h-index: 52)
Advances in Applied Clifford Algebras     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.319, h-index: 15)
Advances in Atmospheric Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 0.959, h-index: 44)
Advances in Computational Mathematics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.255, h-index: 44)
Advances in Contraception     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Data Analysis and Classification     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53, SJR: 1.113, h-index: 14)
Advances in Gerontology     Partially Free   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.141, h-index: 3)
Advances in Health Sciences Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 1.397, h-index: 42)
Advances in Manufacturing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.2, h-index: 4)
Advances in Polymer Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41, SJR: 0.637, h-index: 89)
Advances in Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.79, h-index: 44)
Aegean Review of the Law of the Sea and Maritime Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Aequationes Mathematicae     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.882, h-index: 23)
Aerobiologia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.511, h-index: 36)
Aesthetic Plastic Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.821, h-index: 49)
African Archaeological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.612, h-index: 24)
Afrika Matematika     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.248, h-index: 6)
AGE     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 1.358, h-index: 33)
Ageing Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.337, h-index: 10)
Aggiornamenti CIO     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Aging Clinical and Experimental Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.529, h-index: 55)
Agricultural Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Agriculture and Human Values     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.197, h-index: 49)
Agroforestry Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.64, h-index: 56)
Agronomy for Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.732, h-index: 59)
AI & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.171, h-index: 19)
AIDS and Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 2.006, h-index: 71)
Air Quality, Atmosphere & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.706, h-index: 19)
Akupunktur & Aurikulomedizin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Algebra and Logic     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.566, h-index: 18)
Algebra Universalis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.388, h-index: 22)
Algebras and Representation Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.868, h-index: 20)
Algorithmica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.898, h-index: 56)
Allergo J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.183, h-index: 20)
Allergo J. Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Alpine Botany     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.729, h-index: 20)
ALTEX : Alternatives to Animal Experimentation     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.392, h-index: 32)
AMBIO     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.094, h-index: 87)
American J. of Cardiovascular Drugs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.864, h-index: 39)
American J. of Community Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 1.237, h-index: 83)
American J. of Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.634, h-index: 13)
American J. of Cultural Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.283, h-index: 3)
American J. of Dance Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.175, h-index: 13)
American J. of Potato Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.558, h-index: 35)
American J. of Psychoanalysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.293, h-index: 13)
American Sociologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.18, h-index: 13)
Amino Acids     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.362, h-index: 83)
AMS Review     Partially Free   (Followers: 4)
Analog Integrated Circuits and Signal Processing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.21, h-index: 37)
Analysis and Mathematical Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.665, h-index: 7)
Analysis in Theory and Applications     Hybrid Journal  
Analysis of Verbal Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 1.096, h-index: 123)
Anatomical Science Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.301, h-index: 26)
Angewandte Schmerztherapie und Palliativmedizin     Hybrid Journal  
Angiogenesis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 2.212, h-index: 69)
Animal Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.122, h-index: 55)
Annales françaises de médecine d'urgence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.156, h-index: 4)
Annales Henri Poincaré     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.377, h-index: 32)
Annales mathématiques du Québec     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Annali dell'Universita di Ferrara     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.504, h-index: 14)
Annali di Matematica Pura ed Applicata     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.167, h-index: 26)
Annals of Behavioral Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 2.112, h-index: 98)
Annals of Biomedical Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 1.182, h-index: 94)
Annals of Combinatorics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.849, h-index: 15)
Annals of Data Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Annals of Dyslexia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.857, h-index: 40)
Annals of Finance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.686, h-index: 14)
Annals of Forest Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.929, h-index: 57)
Annals of Global Analysis and Geometry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.136, h-index: 23)
Annals of Hematology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.117, h-index: 62)
Annals of Mathematics and Artificial Intelligence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.593, h-index: 42)
Annals of Microbiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.402, h-index: 26)
Annals of Nuclear Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.68, h-index: 45)
Annals of Operations Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.186, h-index: 78)
Annals of Ophthalmology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Annals of Regional Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.405, h-index: 42)
Annals of Software Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Annals of Solid and Structural Mechanics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.553, h-index: 8)
Annals of Surgical Oncology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.902, h-index: 127)
Annals of Telecommunications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.315, h-index: 25)
Annals of the Institute of Statistical Mathematics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.931, h-index: 31)
Antonie van Leeuwenhoek     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.992, h-index: 87)
Apidologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.14, h-index: 57)
APOPTOSIS     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.554, h-index: 87)
Applicable Algebra in Engineering, Communication and Computing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.354, h-index: 27)
Applications of Mathematics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.274, h-index: 20)
Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44, SJR: 0.575, h-index: 80)
Applied Biochemistry and Microbiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.267, h-index: 26)
Applied Cancer Research     Open Access  
Applied Categorical Structures     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.361, h-index: 21)
Applied Composite Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47, SJR: 0.705, h-index: 35)
Applied Entomology and Zoology     Partially Free   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.554, h-index: 34)
Applied Geomatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.323, h-index: 9)
Applied Geophysics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.541, h-index: 13)
Applied Intelligence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.777, h-index: 43)
Applied Magnetic Resonance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.358, h-index: 34)
Applied Mathematics & Optimization     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.955, h-index: 33)
Applied Mathematics - A J. of Chinese Universities     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.275, h-index: 8)
Applied Mathematics and Mechanics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.37, h-index: 26)
Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60, SJR: 1.262, h-index: 161)
Applied Physics A     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.535, h-index: 121)
Applied Physics B: Lasers and Optics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.983, h-index: 104)
Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.677, h-index: 47)
Applied Research in Quality of Life     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.288, h-index: 15)
Applied Solar Energy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.251, h-index: 6)
Applied Spatial Analysis and Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.351, h-index: 9)
Aquaculture Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.613, h-index: 40)
Aquarium Sciences and Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Aquatic Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 0.646, h-index: 44)
Aquatic Geochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.764, h-index: 39)
Aquatic Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.172, h-index: 53)
Arabian J. for Science and Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.345, h-index: 20)
Arabian J. of Geosciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.417, h-index: 16)
Archaeological and Anthropological Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 1.056, h-index: 15)
Archaeologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.397, h-index: 13)
Archiv der Mathematik     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.597, h-index: 29)
Archival Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53, SJR: 0.804, h-index: 22)
Archive for History of Exact Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.28, h-index: 15)
Archive for Mathematical Logic     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.946, h-index: 23)
Archive for Rational Mechanics and Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 4.091, h-index: 66)
Archive of Applied Mechanics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.865, h-index: 40)
Archives and Museum Informatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 119)
Archives of Computational Methods in Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 2.841, h-index: 40)
Archives of Dermatological Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.9, h-index: 65)
Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.846, h-index: 84)
Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.695, h-index: 47)
Archives of Microbiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.702, h-index: 85)
Archives of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.039, h-index: 56)
Archives of Osteoporosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.092, h-index: 13)
Archives of Sexual Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.198, h-index: 74)
Archives of Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.595, h-index: 76)
Archives of Virology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.086, h-index: 90)
Archives of Women's Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 1.264, h-index: 50)
Archivio di Ortopedia e Reumatologia     Hybrid Journal  
Archivum Immunologiae et Therapiae Experimentalis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.2, h-index: 42)
ArgoSpine News & J.     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.102, h-index: 3)
Argumentation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.295, h-index: 18)
Arid Ecosystems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Arkiv för Matematik     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.948, h-index: 22)
Arnold Mathematical J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Arthropod-Plant Interactions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.797, h-index: 17)
Arthroskopie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.145, h-index: 8)
Artificial Intelligence and Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.288, h-index: 25)
Artificial Intelligence Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.948, h-index: 48)
Artificial Life and Robotics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.231, h-index: 14)
Asia Europe J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.247, h-index: 9)
Asia Pacific Education Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.371, h-index: 17)
Asia Pacific J. of Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.676, h-index: 50)
Asia-Pacific Education Researcher     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.353, h-index: 13)
Asia-Pacific Financial Markets     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.19, h-index: 15)
Asia-Pacific J. of Atmospheric Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 1.006, h-index: 14)
Asian Business & Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.41, h-index: 10)
Asian J. of Business Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Asian J. of Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.263, h-index: 8)
AStA Advances in Statistical Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.681, h-index: 15)
AStA Wirtschafts- und Sozialstatistisches Archiv     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.195, h-index: 5)
ästhetische dermatologie & kosmetologie     Full-text available via subscription  

        1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 | Last   [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

Journal Cover Acta Neuropathologica
  [SJR: 6.61]   [H-I: 117]   [3 followers]  Follow
    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 1432-0533 - ISSN (Online) 0001-6322
   Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2355 journals]
  • The multi-morbid old brain
    • Authors: Johannes Attems
      Pages: 169 - 170
      PubDate: 2017-08-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s00401-017-1723-9
      Issue No: Vol. 134, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Impact of multiple pathologies on the threshold for clinically overt
           dementia
    • Authors: Alifiya Kapasi; Charles DeCarli; Julie A. Schneider
      Pages: 171 - 186
      Abstract: Longitudinal clinical–pathological studies have increasingly recognized the importance of mixed pathologies (the coexistence of one or more neurodegenerative and cerebrovascular disease pathologies) as important factors in the development of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and other forms of dementia. Older persons with AD pathology, often have concomitant cerebrovascular disease pathologies (macroinfarcts, microinfarcts, atherosclerosis, arteriolosclerosis, cerebral amyloid angiopathy) as well as other concomitant neurodegenerative disease pathologies (Lewy bodies, TDP-43, hippocampal sclerosis). These additional pathologies lower the threshold for clinical diagnosis of AD. Many of these findings from pathologic studies, especially for CVD, have been confirmed using sophisticated neuroimaging technologies. In vivo biomarker studies are necessary to provide an understanding of specific pathologic contributions and time course relationships along the spectrum of accumulating pathologies. In this review, we provide a clinical–pathological perspective on the role of multiple brain pathologies in dementia followed by a review of the available clinical and biomarker data on some of the mixed pathologies.
      PubDate: 2017-08-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s00401-017-1717-7
      Issue No: Vol. 134, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Interactions of pathological proteins in neurodegenerative diseases
    • Authors: Tara L. Spires-Jones; Johannes Attems; Dietmar Rudolf Thal
      Pages: 187 - 205
      Abstract: Neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD), frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTD), Lewy body disease (LBD), Parkinson’s disease (PD), and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) have in common that protein aggregates represent pathological hallmark lesions. Amyloid β-protein, τ-protein, α-synuclein, and TDP-43 are the most frequently aggregated proteins in these disorders. Although they are assumed to form disease-characteristic aggregates, such as amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in AD or Lewy bodies in LBD/PD, they are not restricted to these clinical presentations. They also occur in non-diseased individuals and can co-exist in the same brain without or with a clinical picture of a distinct dementing or movement disorder. In this review, we discuss the co-existence of these pathologies and potential additive effects in the human brain as well as related functional findings on cross-seeding and molecular interactions between these aggregates/proteins. We conclude that there is evidence for interactions at the molecular level as well as for additive effects on brain damage by multiple pathologies occurring in different functionally important neurons. Based upon this information, we hypothesize a cascade of events that may explain general mechanisms in the development of neurodegenerative disorders: (1) distinct lesions are a prerequisite for the development of a distinct disease (e.g., primary age-related tauopathy for AD), (2) disease-specific pathogenic events further trigger the development of a specific disease (e.g., Aβ aggregation in AD that exaggerate further Aβ and AD-related τ pathology), (3) the symptomatic disease manifests, and (4) neurodegenerative co-pathologies may be either purely coincidental or (more likely) have influence on the disease development and/or its clinical presentation.
      PubDate: 2017-08-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s00401-017-1709-7
      Issue No: Vol. 134, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Peritoneal dialysis reduces amyloid-beta plasma levels in humans and
           attenuates Alzheimer-associated phenotypes in an APP/PS1 mouse model
    • Authors: Wang-Sheng Jin; Lin-Lin Shen; Xian-Le Bu; Wei-Wei Zhang; Si-Han Chen; Zhi-Lin Huang; Jia-Xiang Xiong; Chang-Yue Gao; Zhifang Dong; Ya-Ni He; Zhi-An Hu; Hua-Dong Zhou; Weihong Song; Xin-Fu Zhou; Yi-Zheng Wang; Yan-Jiang Wang
      Pages: 207 - 220
      Abstract: Clearance of amyloid-beta (Aβ) from the brain is an important therapeutic strategy for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Current studies mainly focus on the central approach of Aβ clearance by introducing therapeutic agents into the brain. In a previous study, we found that peripheral tissues and organs play important roles in clearing brain-derived Aβ, suggesting that the peripheral approach of removing Aβ from the blood may also be effective for AD therapy. Here, we investigated whether peritoneal dialysis, a clinically available therapeutic method for chronic kidney disease (CKD), reduces brain Aβ burden and attenuates AD-type pathologies and cognitive impairments. Thirty patients with newly diagnosed CKD were enrolled. The plasma Aβ concentrations of the patients were measured before and after peritoneal dialysis. APP/PS1 mice were subjected to peritoneal dialysis once a day for 1 month from 6 months of age (prevention study) or 9 months of age (treatment study). The Aβ in the interstitial fluid (ISF) was collected using microdialysis. Behavioural performance, long-term potentiation (LTP), Aβ burden and other AD-type pathologies were measured after 1 month of peritoneal dialysis. Peritoneal dialysis significantly reduced plasma Aβ levels in both CKD patients and APP/PS1 mice. Aβ levels in the brain ISF of APP/PS1 mice immediately decreased after reduction of Aβ in the blood during peritoneal dialysis. In both prevention and treatment studies, peritoneal dialysis substantially reduced Aβ deposition, attenuated other AD-type pathologies, including Tau hyperphosphorylation, glial activation, neuroinflammation, neuronal loss, and synaptic dysfunction, and rescued the behavioural deficits of APPswe/PS1 mice. Importantly, the Aβ phagocytosis function of microglia was enhanced in APP/PS1 mice after peritoneal dialysis. Our study suggests that peritoneal dialysis is a promising therapeutic method for AD, and Aβ clearance using a peripheral approach could be a desirable therapeutic strategy for AD.
      PubDate: 2017-08-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s00401-017-1721-y
      Issue No: Vol. 134, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Amyloid-β accumulation in the CNS in human growth hormone recipients
           in the UK
    • Authors: Diane L. Ritchie; Peter Adlard; Alexander H. Peden; Suzanne Lowrie; Margaret Le Grice; Kimberley Burns; Rosemary J. Jackson; Helen Yull; Michael J. Keogh; Wei Wei; Patrick F. Chinnery; Mark W. Head; James W. Ironside
      Pages: 221 - 240
      Abstract: Human-to-human transmission of Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease (CJD) has occurred through medical procedures resulting in iatrogenic CJD (iCJD). One of the commonest causes of iCJD was the use of human pituitary-derived growth hormone (hGH) to treat primary or secondary growth hormone deficiency. As part of a comprehensive tissue-based analysis of the largest cohort yet collected (35 cases) of UK hGH-iCJD cases, we describe the clinicopathological phenotype of hGH-iCJD in the UK. In the 33/35 hGH-iCJD cases with sufficient paraffin-embedded tissue for full pathological examination, we report the accumulation of the amyloid beta (Aβ) protein associated with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) in the brains and cerebral blood vessels in 18/33 hGH-iCJD patients and for the first time in 5/12 hGH recipients who died from causes other than CJD. Aβ accumulation was markedly less prevalent in age-matched patients who died from sporadic CJD and variant CJD. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that Aβ, which can accumulate in the pituitary gland, was present in the inoculated hGH preparations and had a seeding effect in the brains of around 50% of all hGH recipients, producing an AD-like neuropathology and cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA), regardless of whether CJD neuropathology had occurred. These findings indicate that Aβ seeding can occur independently and in the absence of the abnormal prion protein in the human brain. Our findings provide further evidence for the prion-like seeding properties of Aβ and give insights into the possibility of iatrogenic transmission of AD and CAA.
      PubDate: 2017-08-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s00401-017-1703-0
      Issue No: Vol. 134, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Spinal poly-GA inclusions in a C9orf72 mouse model trigger motor deficits
           and inflammation without neuron loss
    • Authors: Martin H. Schludi; Lore Becker; Lillian Garrett; Tania F. Gendron; Qihui Zhou; Franziska Schreiber; Bastian Popper; Leda Dimou; Tim M. Strom; Juliane Winkelmann; Anne von Thaden; Kristin Rentzsch; Stephanie May; Meike Michaelsen; Benjamin M. Schwenk; Jing Tan; Benedikt Schoser; Marianne Dieterich; Leonard Petrucelli; Sabine M. Hölter; Wolfgang Wurst; Helmut Fuchs; Valerie Gailus-Durner; Martin Hrabe de Angelis; Thomas Klopstock; Thomas Arzberger; Dieter Edbauer
      Pages: 241 - 254
      Abstract: Translation of the expanded (ggggcc)n repeat in C9orf72 patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) causes abundant poly-GA inclusions. To elucidate their role in pathogenesis, we generated transgenic mice expressing codon-modified (GA)149 conjugated with cyan fluorescent protein (CFP). Transgenic mice progressively developed poly-GA inclusions predominantly in motoneurons and interneurons of the spinal cord and brain stem and in deep cerebellar nuclei. Poly-GA co-aggregated with p62, Rad23b and the newly identified Mlf2, in both mouse and patient samples. Consistent with the expression pattern, 4-month-old transgenic mice showed abnormal gait and progressive balance impairment, but showed normal hippocampus-dependent learning and memory. Apart from microglia activation we detected phosphorylated TDP-43 but no neuronal loss. Thus, poly-GA triggers behavioral deficits through inflammation and protein sequestration that likely contribute to the prodromal symptoms and disease progression of C9orf72 patients.
      PubDate: 2017-08-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s00401-017-1711-0
      Issue No: Vol. 134, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • In-depth clinico-pathological examination of RNA foci in a large cohort of
           C9ORF72 expansion carriers
    • Authors: Mariely DeJesus-Hernandez; NiCole A. Finch; Xue Wang; Tania F. Gendron; Kevin F. Bieniek; Michael G. Heckman; Aliaksei Vasilevich; Melissa E. Murray; Linda Rousseau; Rachael Weesner; Anthony Lucido; Meeia Parsons; Jeannie Chew; Keith A. Josephs; Joseph E. Parisi; David S. Knopman; Ronald C. Petersen; Bradley F. Boeve; Neill R. Graff-Radford; Jan de Boer; Yan W. Asmann; Leonard Petrucelli; Kevin B. Boylan; Dennis W. Dickson; Marka van Blitterswijk; Rosa Rademakers
      Pages: 255 - 269
      Abstract: A growing body of evidence suggests that a loss of chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 (C9ORF72) expression, formation of dipeptide-repeat proteins, and generation of RNA foci contribute to disease pathogenesis in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia. Although the levels of C9ORF72 transcripts and dipeptide-repeat proteins have already been examined thoroughly, much remains unknown about the role of RNA foci in C9ORF72-linked diseases. As such, we performed a comprehensive RNA foci study in an extensive pathological cohort of C9ORF72 expansion carriers (n = 63). We evaluated two brain regions using a newly developed computer-automated pipeline allowing recognition of cell nuclei and RNA foci (sense and antisense) supplemented by manual counting. In the frontal cortex, the percentage of cells with sense or antisense RNA foci was 26 or 12%, respectively. In the cerebellum, 23% of granule cells contained sense RNA foci and 1% antisense RNA foci. Interestingly, the highest percentage of cells with RNA foci was observed in cerebellar Purkinje cells (~70%). In general, more cells contained sense RNA foci than antisense RNA foci; however, when antisense RNA foci were present, they were usually more abundant. We also observed that an increase in the percentage of cells with antisense RNA foci was associated with a delayed age at onset in the frontal cortex (r = 0.43, p = 0.003), whereas no other associations with clinico-pathological features were seen. Importantly, our large-scale study is the first to provide conclusive evidence that RNA foci are not the determining factor of the clinico-pathological variability observed in C9ORF72 expansion carriers and it emphasizes that the distribution of RNA foci does not follow the pattern of neurodegeneration, stressing the complex interplay between different aspects of C9ORF72-related diseases.
      PubDate: 2017-08-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s00401-017-1725-7
      Issue No: Vol. 134, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • DNA methylation age-acceleration is associated with disease duration and
           age at onset in C9orf72 patients
    • Authors: Ming Zhang; Maria Carmela Tartaglia; Danielle Moreno; Christine Sato; Paul McKeever; Anna Weichert; Julia Keith; Janice Robertson; Lorne Zinman; Ekaterina Rogaeva
      Pages: 271 - 279
      Abstract: The repeat expansion in C9orf72 is the most common cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia. C9orf72 patients present with a wide range in disease duration and age of onset. The strongest risk factor for both syndromes is aging, which was linked to DNA methylation (DNAm) age based on the cumulative assessment of the methylation levels of 353 CpGs included on the genome-wide 450k BeadChip. DNAm age may reflect biological age better than chronological age. We conducted a genome-wide blood DNA methylation study of 46 unrelated C9orf72 patients. After correction for multiple testing, none of the CpGs demonstrated association between its methylation level and disease duration or age of onset. However, we detected a significant reverse correlation of DNAm age-acceleration with disease duration and age of onset, suggesting that for every 5-year increase in DNAm age-acceleration there is a 3.2-year earlier age of onset and 1.5-year shorter disease duration. The significant correlations remain after adjusting for gender, TMEM106B genotypes, disease phenotype and C9orf72 5′CpG island methylation status. A similar trend was observed for the blood DNA of affected members of an extended C9orf72 family; and tissues from the central nervous system of C9orf72 autopsy cases. For instance, regression analysis suggested that a 5-year increase in DNAm age-acceleration is linked to an earlier age of onset by 4.7 or 5.5 years for frontal cortex or spinal cord, respectively. Blood DNAm age may be a useful biomarker for biological age, because blood DNAm age-acceleration was similar to all investigated brain tissues, except for cerebellum that ages more slowly. In conclusion, DNA methylation analysis of C9orf72 patients revealed that increased DNAm age-acceleration is associated with a more severe disease phenotype with a shorter disease duration and earlier age of onset.
      PubDate: 2017-08-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s00401-017-1713-y
      Issue No: Vol. 134, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • The enteric nervous system is a potential autoimmune target in multiple
           sclerosis
    • Authors: Marie Wunsch; Samir Jabari; Barbara Voussen; Michael Enders; Shanthi Srinivasan; François Cossais; Thilo Wedel; Martina Boettner; Anna Schwarz; Linda Weyer; Oktay Göcer; Michael Schroeter; Mathias Maeurer; Matthias Woenckhaus; Karolin Pollok; Helena Radbruch; Luisa Klotz; Claus-Jürgen Scholz; Joachim Nickel; Andreas Friebe; Klaus Addicks; Süleyman Ergün; Paul V. Lehmann; Stefanie Kuerten
      Pages: 281 - 295
      Abstract: Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic autoimmune disease of the central nervous system (CNS) in young adults that has serious negative socioeconomic effects. In addition to symptoms caused by CNS pathology, the majority of MS patients frequently exhibit gastrointestinal dysfunction, which was previously either explained by the presence of spinal cord lesions or not directly linked to the autoimmune etiology of the disease. Here, we studied the enteric nervous system (ENS) in a B cell- and antibody-dependent mouse model of MS by immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy at different stages of the disease. ENS degeneration was evident prior to the development of CNS lesions and the onset of neurological deficits in mice. The pathology was antibody mediated and caused a significant decrease in gastrointestinal motility, which was associated with ENS gliosis and neuronal loss. We identified autoantibodies against four potential target antigens derived from enteric glia and/or neurons by immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry. Antibodies against three of the target antigens were also present in the plasma of MS patients as confirmed by ELISA. The analysis of human colon resectates provided evidence of gliosis and ENS degeneration in MS patients compared to non-MS controls. For the first time, this study establishes a pathomechanistic link between the well-established autoimmune attack on the CNS and ENS pathology in MS, which might provide a paradigm shift in our current understanding of the immunopathogenesis of the disease with broad diagnostic and therapeutic implications.
      PubDate: 2017-08-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s00401-017-1742-6
      Issue No: Vol. 134, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Identification of T cell target antigens in glioblastoma stem-like cells
           using an integrated proteomics-based approach in patient specimens
    • Authors: Carmen Rapp; Rolf Warta; Slava Stamova; Ali Nowrouzi; Christoph Geisenberger; Zoltan Gal; Saskia Roesch; Steffen Dettling; Simone Juenger; Mariana Bucur; Christine Jungk; Philip DaoTrong; Rezvan Ahmadi; Felix Sahm; David Reuss; Valentina Fermi; Esther Herpel; Volker Eckstein; Niels Grabe; Christoph Schramm; Markus A. Weigand; Juergen Debus; Andreas von Deimling; Andreas Unterberg; Amir Abdollahi; Philipp Beckhove; Christel Herold-Mende
      Pages: 297 - 316
      Abstract: Glioblastoma (GBM) is a highly aggressive brain tumor and still remains incurable. Among others, an immature subpopulation of self-renewing and therapy-resistant tumor cells—often referred to as glioblastoma stem-like cells (GSCs)—has been shown to contribute to disease recurrence. To target these cells personalized immunotherapy has gained a lot of interest, e.g. by reactivating pre-existing anti-tumor immune responses against GSC antigens. To identify T cell targets commonly presented by GSCs and their differentiated counterpart, we used a proteomics-based separation of GSC proteins in combination with a T cell activation assay. Altogether, 713 proteins were identified by LC–ESI–MS/MS mass spectrometry. After a thorough filtering process, 32 proteins were chosen for further analyses. Immunogenicity of corresponding peptides was tested ex vivo. A considerable number of these antigens induced T cell responses in GBM patients but not in healthy donors. Moreover, most of them were overexpressed in primary GBM and also highly expressed in recurrent GBM tissues. Interestingly, expression of the most frequent T cell target antigens could also be confirmed in quiescent, slow-cycling GSCs isolated in high purity by the DEPArray technology. Finally, for a subset of these T cell target antigens, an association between expression levels and higher T cell infiltration as well as an increased expression of positive immune modulators was observed. In summary, we identified novel immunogenic proteins, which frequently induce tumor-specific T cell responses in GBM patients and were also detected in vitro in therapy-resistant quiescent, slow-cycling GSCs. Stable expression of these T cell targets in primary and recurrent GBM support their suitability for future clinical use.
      PubDate: 2017-08-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s00401-017-1702-1
      Issue No: Vol. 134, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Synchronous gemistocytic astrocytoma IDH-mutant and oligodendroglioma
           IDH-mutant and 1p/19q-codeleted in a patient with CCDC26 polymorphism
    • Authors: Rachael A. Vaubel; Thomas M. Kollmeyer; Alissa A. Caron; Emily G. Barr Fritcher; Jesse S. Voss; Haohai Liang; Robert B. Jenkins; Caterina Giannini; Benjamin R. Kipp
      Pages: 317 - 319
      PubDate: 2017-08-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s00401-017-1727-5
      Issue No: Vol. 134, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Modulation of IgG–FcRn interactions to overcome antibody-mediated
           inhibition of nerve regeneration
    • Authors: Gang Zhang; Jianxin Lin; Sameera Ghauri; Kazim A. Sheikh
      Pages: 321 - 324
      PubDate: 2017-08-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s00401-017-1730-x
      Issue No: Vol. 134, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • NG2 plays a role in neuroinflammation but is not expressed by immune cells
    • Authors: Maja Kitic; Khalad Karram; Nicole Israel; Nir Yogev; Sonja M. Lacher; Yilang Tang; Hatice Yigit; Jan Bauer; Florian Wanke; Anela Knezovic; Jacqueline Trotter; Florian C. Kurschus; Ari Waisman
      Pages: 325 - 327
      PubDate: 2017-08-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s00401-017-1735-5
      Issue No: Vol. 134, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Immunohistochemical analysis of H3K27me3 demonstrates global reduction in
           group-A childhood posterior fossa ependymoma and is a powerful predictor
           of outcome
    • Abstract: Posterior fossa ependymomas (EPN_PF) in children comprise two morphologically identical, but biologically distinct tumor entities. Group-A (EPN_PFA) tumors have a poor prognosis and require intensive therapy. In contrast, group-B tumors (EPN_PFB) exhibit excellent prognosis and the current consensus opinion recommends future clinical trials to test the possibility of treatment de-escalation in these patients. Therefore, distinguishing these two tumor subtypes is critical. EPN_PFA and EPN_PFB can be distinguished based on DNA methylation signatures, but these assays are not routinely available. We have previously shown that a subset of poorly prognostic childhood EPN_PF exhibits global reduction in H3K27me3. Therefore, we set out to determine whether a simple immunohistochemical assay for H3K27me3 could be used to segregate EPN_PFA from EPN_PFB tumors. We assembled a cohort of 230 childhood ependymomas and H3K27me3 immunohistochemistry was assessed as positive or negative in a blinded manner. H3K27me3 staining results were compared with DNA methylation-based subgroup information available in 112 samples [EPN_PFA (n = 72) and EPN_PFB tumors (n = 40)]. H3K27me3 staining was globally reduced in EPN_PFA tumors and immunohistochemistry showed 99% sensitivity and 100% specificity in segregating EPN_PFA from EPN_PFB tumors. Moreover, H3K27me3 immunostaining was sufficient to delineate patients with worse prognosis in two independent, non-overlapping cohorts (n = 133 and n = 97). In conclusion, immunohistochemical evaluation of H3K27me3 global reduction is an economic, easily available and readily adaptable method for defining high-risk EPN_PFA from low-risk posterior fossa EPN_PFB tumors to inform prognosis and to enable the design of future clinical trials.
      PubDate: 2017-07-21
       
  • α-Synuclein transfer between neurons and astrocytes indicates that
           astrocytes play a role in degradation rather than in spreading
    • Abstract: Recent evidence suggests that disease progression in Parkinson’s disease (PD) could occur by the spreading of α-synuclein (α-syn) aggregates between neurons. Here we studied the role of astrocytes in the intercellular transfer and fate of α-syn fibrils, using in vitro and ex vivo models. α-Syn fibrils can be transferred to neighboring cells; however, the transfer efficiency changes depending on the cell types. We found that α-syn is efficiently transferred from astrocytes to astrocytes and from neurons to astrocytes, but less efficiently from astrocytes to neurons. Interestingly, α-syn puncta are mainly found inside the lysosomal compartments of the recipient cells. However, differently from neurons, astrocytes are able to efficiently degrade fibrillar α-syn, suggesting an active role for these cells in clearing α-syn deposits. Astrocytes co-cultured with organotypic brain slices are able to take up α-syn fibrils from the slices. Altogether our data support a role for astrocytes in trapping and clearing α-syn pathological deposits in PD.
      PubDate: 2017-07-19
       
  • Medulloblastoma: experimental models and reality
    • Abstract: Medulloblastoma is the most frequent malignant brain tumor in childhood, but it may also affect infants, adolescents, and young adults. Recent advances in the understanding of the disease have shed light on molecular and clinical heterogeneity, which is now reflected in the updated WHO classification of brain tumors. At the same time, it is well accepted that preclinical research and clinical trials have to be subgroup-specific. Hence, valid models have to be generated specifically for every medulloblastoma subgroup to properly mimic molecular fingerprints, clinical features, and responsiveness to targeted therapies. This review summarizes the availability of experimental medulloblastoma models with a particular focus on how well these models reflect the actual disease subgroup. We further describe technical advantages and disadvantages of the models and finally point out how some models have successfully been used to introduce new drugs and why some medulloblastoma subgroups are extraordinary difficult to model.
      PubDate: 2017-07-19
       
  • Microglial-mediated PDGF-CC activation increases cerebrovascular
           permeability during ischemic stroke
    • Abstract: Treatment of acute ischemic stroke with the thrombolytic tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) can significantly improve neurological outcomes; however, thrombolytic therapy is associated with an increased risk of intra-cerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Previously, we demonstrated that during stroke tPA acting on the parenchymal side of the neurovascular unit (NVU) can increase blood–brain barrier (BBB) permeability and ICH through activation of latent platelet-derived growth factor-CC (PDGF-CC) and signaling by the PDGF receptor-α (PDGFRα). However, in vitro, activation of PDGF-CC by tPA is very inefficient and the mechanism of PDGF-CC activation in the NVU is not known. Here, we show that the integrin Mac-1, expressed on brain microglia/macrophages (denoted microglia throughout), acts together with the endocytic receptor LRP1 in the NVU to promote tPA-mediated activation of PDGF-CC. Mac-1-deficient mice (Mac-1−/−) are protected from tPA-induced BBB permeability but not from permeability induced by intracerebroventricular injection of active PDGF-CC. Immunofluorescence analysis demonstrates that Mac-1, LRP1, and the PDGFRα all localize to the NVU of arterioles, and following middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) Mac-1−/− mice show significantly less PDGFRα phosphorylation, BBB permeability, and infarct volume compared to wild-type mice. Bone-marrow transplantation studies indicate that resident CD11b+ cells, but not bone-marrow-derived leukocytes, mediate the early activation of PDGF-CC by tPA after MCAO. Finally, using a model of thrombotic stroke with late thrombolysis, we show that wild-type mice have an increased incidence of spontaneous ICH following thrombolysis with tPA 5 h after MCAO, whereas Mac-1−/− mice are resistant to the development of ICH even with late tPA treatment. Together, these results indicate that Mac-1 and LRP1 act as co-factors for the activation of PDGF-CC by tPA in the NVU, and suggest a novel mechanism for tightly regulating PDGFRα signaling in the NVU and controlling BBB permeability.
      PubDate: 2017-07-19
       
  • Childhood white matter disorders: much more than just diseases of myelin
    • PubDate: 2017-07-18
       
  • Microglia contribute to normal myelinogenesis and to oligodendrocyte
           progenitor maintenance during adulthood
    • Authors: Nora Hagemeyer; Klara-Maria Hanft; Maria-Anna Akriditou; Nicole Unger; Eun S. Park; E. Richard Stanley; Ori Staszewski; Leda Dimou; Marco Prinz
      Abstract: Whereas microglia involvement in virtually all brain diseases is well accepted their role in the control of homeostasis in the central nervous system (CNS) is mainly thought to be the maintenance of neuronal function through the formation, refinement, and monitoring of synapses in both the developing and adult brain. Although the prenatal origin as well as the neuron-centered function of cortical microglia has recently been elucidated, much less is known about a distinct amoeboid microglia population formerly described as the “fountain of microglia” that appears only postnatally in myelinated regions such as corpus callosum and cerebellum. Using large-scale transcriptional profiling, fate mapping, and genetic targeting approaches, we identified a unique molecular signature of this microglia subset that arose from a CNS endogenous microglia pool independent from circulating myeloid cells. Microglia depletion experiments revealed an essential role of postnatal microglia for the proper development and homeostasis of oligodendrocytes and their progenitors. Our data provide new cellular and molecular insights into the myelin-supporting function of microglia in the normal CNS.
      PubDate: 2017-07-06
      DOI: 10.1007/s00401-017-1747-1
       
  • Affected female carriers of MTM1 mutations display a wide spectrum of
           clinical and pathological involvement: delineating diagnostic clues
    • Authors: Valérie Biancalana; Sophie Scheidecker; Marguerite Miguet; Annie Laquerrière; Norma B. Romero; Tanya Stojkovic; Osorio Abath Neto; Sandra Mercier; Nicol Voermans; Laura Tanner; Curtis Rogers; Elisabeth Ollagnon-Roman; Helen Roper; Célia Boutte; Shay Ben-Shachar; Xavière Lornage; Nasim Vasli; Elise Schaefer; Pascal Laforet; Jean Pouget; Alexandre Moerman; Laurent Pasquier; Pascale Marcorelle; Armelle Magot; Benno Küsters; Nathalie Streichenberger; Christine Tranchant; Nicolas Dondaine; Raphael Schneider; Claire Gasnier; Nadège Calmels; Valérie Kremer; Karine Nguyen; Julie Perrier; Erik Jan Kamsteeg; Pierre Carlier; Robert-Yves Carlier; Julie Thompson; Anne Boland; Jean-François Deleuze; Michel Fardeau; Edmar Zanoteli; Bruno Eymard; Jocelyn Laporte
      Abstract: X-linked myotubular myopathy (XLMTM), a severe congenital myopathy, is caused by mutations in the MTM1 gene located on the X chromosome. A majority of affected males die in the early postnatal period, whereas female carriers are believed to be usually asymptomatic. Nevertheless, several affected females have been reported. To assess the phenotypic and pathological spectra of carrier females and to delineate diagnostic clues, we characterized 17 new unrelated affected females and performed a detailed comparison with previously reported cases at the clinical, muscle imaging, histological, ultrastructural and molecular levels. Taken together, the analysis of this large cohort of 43 cases highlights a wide spectrum of clinical severity ranging from severe neonatal and generalized weakness, similar to XLMTM male, to milder adult forms. Several females show a decline in respiratory function. Asymmetric weakness is a noteworthy frequent specific feature potentially correlated to an increased prevalence of highly skewed X inactivation. Asymmetry of growth was also noted. Other diagnostic clues include facial weakness, ptosis and ophthalmoplegia, skeletal and joint abnormalities, and histopathological signs that are hallmarks of centronuclear myopathy such as centralized nuclei and necklace fibers. The histopathological findings also demonstrate a general disorganization of muscle structure in addition to these specific hallmarks. Thus, MTM1 mutations in carrier females define a specific myopathy, which may be independent of the presence of an XLMTM male in the family. As several of the reported affected females carry large heterozygous MTM1 deletions not detectable by Sanger sequencing, and as milder phenotypes present as adult-onset limb-girdle myopathy, the prevalence of this myopathy is likely to be greatly underestimated. This report should aid diagnosis and thus the clinical management and genetic counseling of MTM1 carrier females. Furthermore, the clinical and pathological history of this cohort may be useful for therapeutic projects in males with XLMTM, as it illustrates the spectrum of possible evolution of the disease in patients surviving long term.
      PubDate: 2017-07-06
      DOI: 10.1007/s00401-017-1748-0
       
 
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
Fax: +00 44 (0)131 4513327
 
About JournalTOCs
API
Help
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-2016