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Publisher: Springer-Verlag (Total: 2352 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 2352 Journals sorted alphabetically
3D Printing in Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
3D Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.222, CiteScore: 1)
4OR: A Quarterly J. of Operations Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.825, CiteScore: 1)
AAPS J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 1.118, CiteScore: 4)
AAPS PharmSciTech     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.752, CiteScore: 3)
Abdominal Imaging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.866, CiteScore: 2)
Abhandlungen aus dem Mathematischen Seminar der Universitat Hamburg     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.439, CiteScore: 0)
Academic Psychiatry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.53, CiteScore: 1)
Academic Questions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.106, CiteScore: 0)
Accreditation and Quality Assurance: J. for Quality, Comparability and Reliability in Chemical Measurement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29, SJR: 0.316, CiteScore: 1)
Acoustical Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.359, CiteScore: 1)
Acoustics Australia     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.232, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Analytica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.367, CiteScore: 0)
Acta Applicandae Mathematicae     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.675, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Biotheoretica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.284, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Diabetologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 1.587, CiteScore: 3)
Acta Endoscopica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
acta ethologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.769, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Geochimica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.24, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Geodaetica et Geophysica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.305, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Geophysica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.312, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Geotechnica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 1.588, CiteScore: 3)
Acta Informatica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.517, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Mathematica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 7.066, CiteScore: 3)
Acta Mathematica Hungarica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.452, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Mathematica Sinica, English Series     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.379, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Mathematica Vietnamica     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.27, CiteScore: 0)
Acta Mathematicae Applicatae Sinica, English Series     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.208, CiteScore: 0)
Acta Mechanica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 1.04, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Mechanica Sinica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.607, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Metallurgica Sinica (English Letters)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.576, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Meteorologica Sinica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.638, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Neurochirurgica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.822, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Neurologica Belgica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.376, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Neuropathologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 7.589, CiteScore: 12)
Acta Oceanologica Sinica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.334, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Physiologiae Plantarum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.574, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Politica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.605, CiteScore: 1)
Activitas Nervosa Superior     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.147, CiteScore: 0)
adhäsion KLEBEN & DICHTEN     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.103, CiteScore: 0)
ADHD Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.72, CiteScore: 2)
Adhesion Adhesives & Sealants     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Administration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Services Research     Partially Free   (Followers: 17, SJR: 1.005, CiteScore: 2)
Adsorption     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.703, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Applied Clifford Algebras     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.698, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Atmospheric Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37, SJR: 0.956, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Computational Mathematics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.812, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Contraception     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Data Analysis and Classification     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 59, SJR: 1.09, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Gerontology     Partially Free   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.144, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Health Sciences Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 1.64, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Manufacturing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.475, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Polymer Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45, SJR: 1.04, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.075, CiteScore: 3)
Aegean Review of the Law of the Sea and Maritime Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Aequationes Mathematicae     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.517, CiteScore: 1)
Aerobiologia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.673, CiteScore: 2)
Aesthetic Plastic Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.825, CiteScore: 1)
African Archaeological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.862, CiteScore: 1)
Afrika Matematika     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.235, CiteScore: 0)
AGE     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Ageing Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.39, CiteScore: 1)
Aggiornamenti CIO     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Aging Clinical and Experimental Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.67, CiteScore: 2)
Agricultural Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.276, CiteScore: 1)
Agriculture and Human Values     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.173, CiteScore: 3)
Agroforestry Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.663, CiteScore: 1)
Agronomy for Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 1.864, CiteScore: 6)
AI & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.227, CiteScore: 1)
AIDS and Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.792, CiteScore: 3)
Air Quality, Atmosphere & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.862, CiteScore: 3)
Akupunktur & Aurikulomedizin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Algebra and Logic     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.531, CiteScore: 0)
Algebra Universalis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.583, CiteScore: 1)
Algebras and Representation Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.095, CiteScore: 1)
Algorithmica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.56, CiteScore: 1)
Allergo J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.234, CiteScore: 0)
Allergo J. Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Alpine Botany     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.11, CiteScore: 3)
ALTEX : Alternatives to Animal Experimentation     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
AMBIO     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.569, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Cardiovascular Drugs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.951, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Community Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29, SJR: 1.329, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.772, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Cultural Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.46, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Dance Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.181, CiteScore: 0)
American J. of Potato Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.611, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Psychoanalysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.314, CiteScore: 0)
American Sociologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.35, CiteScore: 0)
Amino Acids     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.135, CiteScore: 3)
AMS Review     Partially Free   (Followers: 4)
Analog Integrated Circuits and Signal Processing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.211, CiteScore: 1)
Analysis and Mathematical Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.536, CiteScore: 1)
Analysis in Theory and Applications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Analysis of Verbal Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32, SJR: 0.978, CiteScore: 3)
Anatomical Science Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.367, CiteScore: 1)
Angewandte Schmerztherapie und Palliativmedizin     Hybrid Journal  
Angiogenesis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 2.177, CiteScore: 5)
Animal Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 1.389, CiteScore: 3)
Annales françaises de médecine d'urgence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.192, CiteScore: 0)
Annales Henri Poincaré     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.097, CiteScore: 2)
Annales mathématiques du Québec     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.438, CiteScore: 0)
Annali dell'Universita di Ferrara     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.429, CiteScore: 0)
Annali di Matematica Pura ed Applicata     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.197, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Biomedical Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 1.042, CiteScore: 3)
Annals of Combinatorics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.932, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Data Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Annals of Dyslexia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.85, CiteScore: 2)
Annals of Finance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32, SJR: 0.579, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Forest Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.986, CiteScore: 2)
Annals of Global Analysis and Geometry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.228, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Hematology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.043, CiteScore: 2)
Annals of Mathematics and Artificial Intelligence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.413, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Microbiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.479, CiteScore: 2)
Annals of Nuclear Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.687, CiteScore: 2)
Annals of Operations Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.943, CiteScore: 2)
Annals of Ophthalmology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Annals of Regional Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.614, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Software Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Annals of Solid and Structural Mechanics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.239, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Surgical Oncology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.986, CiteScore: 4)
Annals of Telecommunications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.223, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of the Institute of Statistical Mathematics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.495, CiteScore: 1)
Antonie van Leeuwenhoek     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.834, CiteScore: 2)
Apidologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.22, CiteScore: 3)
APOPTOSIS     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.424, CiteScore: 4)
Applicable Algebra in Engineering, Communication and Computing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.294, CiteScore: 1)
Applications of Mathematics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.602, CiteScore: 1)
Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44, SJR: 0.571, CiteScore: 2)
Applied Biochemistry and Microbiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.21, CiteScore: 1)
Applied Categorical Structures     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.49, CiteScore: 0)
Applied Composite Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49, SJR: 0.58, CiteScore: 2)
Applied Entomology and Zoology     Partially Free   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.422, CiteScore: 1)
Applied Geomatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.733, CiteScore: 3)
Applied Geophysics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.488, CiteScore: 1)
Applied Intelligence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.6, CiteScore: 2)
Applied Magnetic Resonance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.319, CiteScore: 1)
Applied Mathematics & Optimization     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.886, CiteScore: 1)
Applied Mathematics - A J. of Chinese Universities     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.17, CiteScore: 0)
Applied Mathematics and Mechanics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.461, CiteScore: 1)
Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 66, SJR: 1.182, CiteScore: 4)
Applied Physics A     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.481, CiteScore: 2)
Applied Physics B: Lasers and Optics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.74, CiteScore: 2)
Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.519, CiteScore: 2)
Applied Research in Quality of Life     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.316, CiteScore: 1)
Applied Solar Energy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.225, CiteScore: 0)
Applied Spatial Analysis and Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.542, CiteScore: 1)
Aquaculture Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.591, CiteScore: 2)
Aquarium Sciences and Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Aquatic Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36, SJR: 0.656, CiteScore: 2)
Aquatic Geochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.591, CiteScore: 1)
Aquatic Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.109, CiteScore: 3)
Arabian J. for Science and Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.303, CiteScore: 1)
Arabian J. of Geosciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.319, CiteScore: 1)
Archaeological and Anthropological Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 1.052, CiteScore: 2)
Archaeologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.224, CiteScore: 0)
Archiv der Mathematik     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.725, CiteScore: 1)
Archival Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 65, SJR: 0.745, CiteScore: 2)
Archive for History of Exact Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.186, CiteScore: 1)
Archive for Mathematical Logic     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.909, CiteScore: 1)
Archive for Rational Mechanics and Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 3.93, CiteScore: 3)
Archive of Applied Mechanics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.79, CiteScore: 2)
Archives and Museum Informatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 153, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Archives of Computational Methods in Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.41, CiteScore: 5)
Archives of Dermatological Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 1.006, CiteScore: 2)
Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.773, CiteScore: 2)
Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.956, CiteScore: 2)
Archives of Microbiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.644, CiteScore: 2)
Archives of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.146, CiteScore: 2)
Archives of Osteoporosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.71, CiteScore: 2)
Archives of Sexual Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.493, CiteScore: 3)
Archives of Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 1.541, CiteScore: 5)
Archives of Virology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.973, CiteScore: 2)
Archives of Women's Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.274, CiteScore: 3)
Archivio di Ortopedia e Reumatologia     Hybrid Journal  
Archivum Immunologiae et Therapiae Experimentalis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.946, CiteScore: 3)
ArgoSpine News & J.     Hybrid Journal  
Argumentation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.349, CiteScore: 1)
Arid Ecosystems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.2, CiteScore: 0)
Arkiv för Matematik     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.766, CiteScore: 1)
Arnold Mathematical J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.355, CiteScore: 0)
Arthropod-Plant Interactions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.839, CiteScore: 2)
Arthroskopie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.131, CiteScore: 0)
Artificial Intelligence and Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.937, CiteScore: 2)
Artificial Intelligence Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.833, CiteScore: 4)
Artificial Life and Robotics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.226, CiteScore: 0)
Asia Europe J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.504, CiteScore: 1)
Asia Pacific Education Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.479, CiteScore: 1)
Asia Pacific J. of Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.185, CiteScore: 2)
Asia-Pacific Education Researcher     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.353, CiteScore: 1)
Asia-Pacific Financial Markets     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.187, CiteScore: 0)
Asia-Pacific J. of Atmospheric Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.855, CiteScore: 1)
Asian Business & Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.378, CiteScore: 1)
Asian J. of Business Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Asian J. of Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.543, CiteScore: 1)
AStA Advances in Statistical Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.548, CiteScore: 1)
AStA Wirtschafts- und Sozialstatistisches Archiv     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.183, CiteScore: 0)
ästhetische dermatologie & kosmetologie     Full-text available via subscription  
Astronomy and Astrophysics Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 3.385, CiteScore: 5)

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Journal Cover
ADHD Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorders
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.72
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 25  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1866-6647 - ISSN (Online) 1866-6116
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2352 journals]
  • Quality of life in substance use disorder patients with and without
           attention deficit hyperactivity disorder 12 months after treatment: a
           naturalistic follow-up study
    • Abstract: There is sparse research on quality of life (QoL) as an outcome measure in patients with substance use disorders (SUD), with or without attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). We aimed to investigate whether SUD patients with and without ADHD (SUD + ADHD vs. SUD − ADHD) differed in QoL at baseline and at a 12-month follow-up after SUD treatment. The groups were additionally compared with data from a national population sample (NPS). From a sample of 16 SUD + ADHD and 87 SUD − ADHD patients originally recruited between 2010 and 2012, eight SUD + ADHD (50.0%) and 28 SUD − ADHD (32.2%) patients were reached at follow-up. QoL was measured with the short version of the World Health Organization QoL instrument (WHOQOL-BREF). Cross-sectional data on QoL from NPS was utilized. Compared to NPS, SUD patients reported significantly lower QoL at baseline and follow-up. Furthermore, QoL was similar at baseline in SUD + ADHD and SUD − ADHD patients. At a 12-month follow-up after SUD treatment, SUD + ADHD patients ‘QoL had improved, however, not significantly differing from SUD − ADHD patients or the NPS. SUD − ADHD patients’ QoL remained significantly lower. At follow-up, SUD + ADHD patients’ QoL improved nominally compared to SUD − ADHD patients, but not the NPS. The clinical and functional relevance of these findings should be investigated further.
      PubDate: 2019-03-22
       
  • Relational impairments, sluggish cognitive tempo, and severe inattention
           are associated with elevated self-rated depressive symptoms in adolescents
           with ADHD
    • Abstract: This study examines how ADHD-related symptoms and impairments interact to predict depression symptoms in young adolescents with ADHD. A sample of 342 adolescents (71% male, mean age = 13 years old) with DSM-IV-TR diagnosed ADHD completed baseline clinical assessments upon entry to a psychosocial treatment study for ADHD. Ratings of ADHD and sluggish cognitive tempo (SCT) symptoms, and social and academic impairment were obtained from parents, while ratings of depressive symptoms and conflict with parents were obtained from youth. Among adolescents with ADHD, elevated depressive symptoms were associated with higher SCT symptom severity, lower hyperactive/impulsive (HI) symptom severity, higher social impairments, higher conflict with parents, and lower academic problems. Interaction effects indicated that clinically significant depressive symptoms were most likely to occur when high levels of parent–youth conflict were present along with high inattentive (IN) symptoms, high SCT, and/or low HI. Among children and adolescents with ADHD, depression prevention efforts might target IN/SCT symptom management, as well as improving interpersonal relationships with parents and peers. Future work is needed to verify these findings longitudinally.
      PubDate: 2019-03-09
       
  • Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder and future expectations in
           Russian adolescents
    • Abstract: In recent years, there has been an increasing focus on the role of future expectations—the extent to which a future outcome is deemed likely—in the health and well-being of adolescents, with research linking future expectations to outcomes such as an increased likelihood of engaging in risky health behaviors. As yet, however, there has been no research on future expectations and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in adolescence. To address this research gap, the current study examined the association between ADHD symptoms/possible ADHD status and future expectations in a school-based sample of adolescents. Data were analyzed from 537 Russian adolescents (aged 12–17) with teacher-reported ADHD symptoms and self-reported future expectations. Logistic regression analysis was used to examine associations. In fully adjusted analyses, inattention symptoms/possible ADHD inattentive status was associated with lower future educational expectations, while a possible ADHD hyperactivity status was associated with increased odds for negative future expectations relating to work, family and succeeding in what is most important. The findings of this study suggest that greater ADHD symptoms/possible ADHD status in adolescence may be linked to an increased risk for negative future expectations across a variety of different life domains.
      PubDate: 2019-03-09
       
  • Correction to: Living “in the zone”: hyperfocus in adult ADHD
    • Abstract:
      Authors have noted one error in the online published article, which they wish to clarify. The version of the Hobby Hyperfocus (HF) subscale that we administered to participants was unintentionally missing one answer option (“once a week”).
      PubDate: 2019-03-08
       
  • Sluggish cognitive tempo: longitudinal stability and validity
    • Authors: Alexander Vu; Lee Thompson; Erik Willcutt; Stephen Petrill
      Abstract: Emerging research has identified sluggish cognitive tempo (SCT) as a construct separate from ADHD predominately inattentive presentation. The present study explores the longitudinal stability of SCT over a period of 7 years, specifically the independent effects of SCT on behavioural and academic outcomes concurrently over a 3-year period. A sample of 639 twins, aged 6–12 years, participating in the Western Reserve Reading and Math Project (WRRMP) were assessed at seven annual home visits. The WRRMP sample is an unselected sample of twins representative of the general population of typically developing school-age children. The current investigation will focus on parent and teacher reports which assess attention deficit hyperactive/impulsive disorder (ADHD) and standardized achievement measures which assess academic outcomes. Over periods longer than 1 or 2 years, SCT does not display good longitudinal stability (r < .60). SCT also does not have consistent significant independent effects on academic outcomes once the effects of ADHD were controlled for. Over a 7-year period, SCT does not demonstrate consistent longitudinal stability. SCT significantly predicts social problems, internalizing behaviours, and anxious/depressive behaviours after the effects of ADHD are controlled for. SCT has no significant independent effects on cognitive or educational outcomes after the effects of inattentive ADHD are controlled for.
      PubDate: 2019-02-20
      DOI: 10.1007/s12402-019-00287-7
       
  • The importance of avoidant personality in social anxiety disorder with and
           without attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder
    • Authors: Caner Yoldas; Bilge Dogan; Oktay Kocabas; Cagdas Oyku Memis; Doga Sevincok; Levent Sevincok
      Abstract: In the present study, our primary aim was to compare the generalized social anxiety (GSAD) patients with and without attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in terms of avoidant personality disorder (AVPD), and some clinical variables. We also investigated the relationship of AVPD and depression with ADHD and GSAD. We hypothesized that ADHD may be associated with AVPD in patients with GSAD. Seventy-six patients with GSAD were evaluated for depression, AVPD, and childhood and adulthood diagnoses of ADHD. The GSAD patients with (n = 34) and without adulthood ADHD (n = 30) were compared with respect to some sociodemographic and clinical variables. GSAD patients with adulthood ADHD had significantly higher comorbid diagnosis of AVPD, more avoidant personality and depression symptoms than those without ADHD. Pearson’s correlation coefficient in total sample (n = 76) showed that the mean number of AVPD criteria was significantly associated with the severity of Beck Depression Inventory, Wender Utah Rating Scale (WURS), and inattention symptoms of ADHD. There were no correlations between the total and subscale scores of Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale and the mean number of AVPD criteria. The scores of WURS significantly predicted the mean number of AVPD criteria (β = 0.305, p= 0.007). The severity of current depression (β = 0.143, p = 0.30) and inattention symptoms of adulthood ADHD (β = 0.112, p = 0.46) were not associated with the severity of AVPD symptoms. These results might demonstrate that comorbid AVPD in adult SAD patients was related to a childhood ADHD independent from depression, and inattention symptoms of ADHD in adulthood.
      PubDate: 2019-02-14
      DOI: 10.1007/s12402-019-00291-x
       
  • Special edition on the occasion of Jan K. Buitelaar’s 65th
           anniversary
    • Authors: Barbara Franke; Tobias Banaschewski; Luis A. Rohde; Manfred Gerlach
      PubDate: 2019-02-13
      DOI: 10.1007/s12402-019-00290-y
       
  • Attention and behavioral control skills in Iranian school children
    • Authors: Behnaz Kiani; Habib Hadianfard; John T. Mitchell
      Abstract: This study assessed quality of life, emotional and behavioral problems, prosocial behavior, and functional impairment in a sample of Iranian children based on their attention and behavioral control skills. The sample consisted of 280 male and female children aged between 6 and 12 years old who were divided into strong, moderate, and weak groups based on parental ratings of attention and behavioral control skills on the strengths and weaknesses of ADHD symptom and normal behavior rating scale (SWAN). In addition, parents completed the pediatric quality of life inventory version 4.0 generic core scales (PedsQL 4.0), the strengths and difficulties questionnaire, and the Weiss functional impairment rating scale-parent report (WFIRS-P). The strong group generally showed better quality of life than the weak group. The strong group was better than the moderate group, and the moderate group was better than the weak group on school functioning. The weak group had more conduct problems and hyperactivity/inattention and less prosocial behavior than the moderate group and the strong group. The moderate group had more hyperactivity/inattention than the strong group. The weak group showed more impairment than the moderate group and the strong group on all subscales and the total scale of the WFIRS-P. The quality of life, behavioral problems, prosocial behavior, and functional impairment can be different in children based on their attention and behavioral control skills.
      PubDate: 2019-02-09
      DOI: 10.1007/s12402-019-00289-5
       
  • Prescribing for young people with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder
           in UK primary care: analysis of data from the Clinical Practice Research
           Datalink
    • Authors: Tamsin Newlove-Delgado; William Hamilton; Tamsin J. Ford; Ken Stein; Obioha C. Ukoumunne
      Abstract: Guidance on management of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in the UK was issued by the National Institute for Clinical Excellence in 2008. No UK study has examined all psychotropic prescribing in young people with ADHD since the introduction of the guidance; this is especially relevant due to the high prevalence of psychiatric comorbidity in this population. The aim of this study was to describe primary care prescribing of ADHD and other psychotropic medications for young people with ADHD. The analysis of records of patients with an ADHD diagnosis in the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink from 2005 to 2013 was performed. Estimation of the prevalence of prescribing of ADHD and other psychotropic medications over 8-year follow-up for cases aged 10–20 years in 2005 was carried out. Of 9390 ADHD cases, 61.6% [95% confidence interval (CI) 60.6–62.5%] had a prescription at some point for ADHD medication. Prescribing of other psychotropic medications was higher in girls than in boys (36.4% vs. 22.7%; p < 0.001). ADHD prescribing prevalence declined steeply between the ages of 16 and 18 from 37.8% (95% CI 36.6–38.9) to 23.7% (95% CI 22.7–24.6%). There was a parallel increase in prescribing of other psychotropics from 3.8% (95% CI 3.4–4.3%) to 6.6% (95% CI 6.0–7.3%). There is scope to optimise the management of ADHD and psychiatric comorbidities in young people, and there is a need for sustainable models of ADHD care for young adults, supported by appropriate training and specialist services.
      PubDate: 2019-02-07
      DOI: 10.1007/s12402-019-00288-6
       
  • Is there a prodrom period in patients with social anxiety disorder' A
           discussion on the hypothesis of social anxiety disorder development
           secondary to attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder
    • Authors: Ahmet Koyuncu; Ezgi Ince; Erhan Ertekin; Fahri Çelebi; Raşit Tükel
      Abstract: The association between social anxiety disorder (SAD) and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is poorly established. In fact, increasing and converging evidences suggest that there is a close relationship between the two disorders. High comorbidity rate between these two disorders, follow-up studies showing high rates of later development of SAD in ADHD and treatment studies in which ADHD medications have been helpful for both conditions all indicate this relationship. Recently, we have published a hypothesis regarding the development of SAD secondary to ADHD. In this hypothesis, we recognized that patients with SAD seem to go through a prodromal period that we labeled as “pre-social anxiety.” Detecting patients in this period before meeting full-blown SAD criteria provides early intervention and prevention of SAD. New, comprehensive follow-up studies which will investigate whether ADHD causes later SAD secondarily are needed. In the current review, taken into account our developmental hypothesis, we will discuss whether high comorbidity of SAD and ADHD is a chance finding (i.e., the two disorders are found in cases with no causal relationship between them) or can SAD develop secondarily due to childhood ADHD. Is there a prodrom period in patients with SAD as in cancer or psychosis patients' We are going to summarize the overlapping features of SAD and ADHD in terms of child/parents interaction and family issues, aversive childhood experiences, social skill deficits, and development of cognitive distortions.
      PubDate: 2019-01-02
      DOI: 10.1007/s12402-018-00283-3
       
  • Evaluating attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder using ecological
           momentary assessment: a systematic review
    • Authors: Carolina Miguelez-Fernandez; Santiago J. de Leon; Itziar Baltasar-Tello; Inmaculada Peñuelas-Calvo; María Luisa Barrigon; Alba Sedano Capdevila; David Delgado-Gómez; Enrique Baca-García; Juan J. Carballo
      Pages: 247 - 265
      Abstract: Ecological momentary assessment is an excellent tool for the measurement of different day-to-day domains in patients and capturing real-world and real-time data. The purpose of this review is to evaluate feasibility in current ecological momentary assessment studies on emotional and behavioral functioning, functional impairments, and quality of life patients with an attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder diagnosis. This systematic review follows the recommendation of Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines selecting articles published from January 1, 1990, up to the latest access on May 2018, identifying a pool of 23 eligible studies. Twenty-three studies demonstrate the validity of ecological momentary assessment methodology in evaluating different aspects of patients with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Fifteen studies focus on the child’s or adolescent’s daily behavior, while eight studies only focus on adults. The studies presented in this review monitored patients and their families over a maximum period of 28 days. We can conclude that ecological momentary assessment can be successfully implemented with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder patients to evaluate diverse backgrounds. However, more studies are needed with a longer monitoring period, especially in adolescents, to determine the effectiveness of ecological momentary assessment on patients with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.
      PubDate: 2018-12-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s12402-018-0261-1
      Issue No: Vol. 10, No. 4 (2018)
       
  • Hyperactivity in mice lacking one allele of the glutamic acid
           decarboxylase 67 gene
    • Authors: Karen Müller Smith
      Pages: 267 - 271
      Abstract: GABAergic interneuron loss, maturational delay or imbalance of glutamatergic to GABAergic signaling has been implicated in several neuropsychiatric disorders including Tourette syndrome and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). In schizophrenia, decreases in parvalbumin (PV), somatostatin (Sst) and glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) RNA have been observed and seem to indicate a failure in maturation in PV and Sst neurons. In Tourette syndrome, which has a high level of comorbid ADHD, reduced numbers of parvalbumin expressing neurons have been observed in the basal ganglia of affected patients. In addition, polymorphisms in the GAD1 gene that codes for GAD67 protein have been associated with ADHD. We have examined whether mice with a disrupted Gad67 allele, the Gad67 GFP knock-in mice (Gad67-GFP+/−), display abnormal locomotor behavior or altered anxiety behavior on the elevated plus maze. We found that Gad67-GFP+/− mice displayed a mild hyperactivity compared to control littermates.
      PubDate: 2018-12-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s12402-018-0254-0
      Issue No: Vol. 10, No. 4 (2018)
       
  • What stops practitioners discussing medication breaks in children and
           adolescents with ADHD' Identifying barriers through theory-driven
           qualitative research
    • Authors: Kinda Ibrahim; Parastou Donyai
      Pages: 273 - 283
      Abstract: National and international guidelines on the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children and adolescents call for annual reviews to assess continuing need for medication by considering brief periods without medication, referred to as ‘Drug holidays’. However, drug holidays are reactively initiated by families, or recommended by practitioners if growth has been suppressed by medication rather than proactively to check the need. There is little evidence of planned, practitioner-initiated drug holidays from methylphenidate. The aim of this study was to identify what stops practitioners from routinely discussing planned drug holidays from methylphenidate with children, adolescents, and their parents. Practitioners involved in shared-care prescribing for children and adolescents with ADHD in one UK County were included. Interviews with 8 general practitioners (GPs) and 8 Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service (CAMHS) practitioners were conducted. Transcripts were analysed qualitatively against the components of the Capability–Opportunity–Motivation–Behaviour (COM-B) model. Possible interventions for increasing prescribers’ engagement with planned drug holidays were considered in response. Multiple barriers to practitioner engagement in planned drug holidays from methylphenidate were identified. Capability, in terms of knowledge and skills, was not a barrier identified for CAMHS practitioners but was for GPs. Opportunity was a main barrier for both groups, who reported lack of time and the absence of educational material about drug holidays. Motivation was more complex to define, with CAMHS practitioners questioning the need for drug holidays and GPs being more accepting due to worries about long-term medication side effects as well as cost savings. ‘Education’ and ‘enablement’ interventions were identified as key activities targeting all three components, which could feasibly increase uptake of practitioner-initiated planned drug holidays from methylphenidate. The application of the COM-B system identified a number of key barriers to practitioner engagement with drug holidays in children and adolescents with ADHD. Accordingly, a number of interventions could be developed to facilitate change. For example, educating and training GPs about ADHD management and drug holidays, and developing a decision aid to help families make informed decisions about whether or not to implement drug holidays could be used.
      PubDate: 2018-12-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s12402-018-0258-9
      Issue No: Vol. 10, No. 4 (2018)
       
  • Parent and child neurocognitive functioning predict response to behavioral
           parent training for youth with ADHD
    • Authors: Whitney D. Fosco; Dustin E. Sarver; Michael J. Kofler; Paula A. Aduen
      Pages: 285 - 295
      Abstract: Parental cognitive functioning is thought to play a key role in parenting behavior and may inform response to behavioral intervention. This open-label pilot study examined the extent to which parent and child cognition impacted response to behavioral parent training for children with ADHD. Fifty-four participants (27 parent–child dyads; Mages = 10.6 and 45.2 for children and parents, respectively) completed tasks assessing visuospatial and phonological working memory, inhibitory control, and choice-reaction speed at pre-treatment. Drift diffusion modeling decomposed choice-reaction time data into indicators of processing speed (drift rate) and response caution (boundary separation). Parents completed a 10-week manualized behavioral parent training program. Primary outcomes were pre- and post-treatment child ADHD and conduct problem severity, and parent-reported relational frustration and parenting confidence. Bayesian multiple regressions assessed parent and child cognitive processes as predictors of post-treatment outcomes, controlling for pre-treatment behavior. Better child visuospatial and phonological WM and higher parental response caution were associated with greater reductions in inattention. For conduct problems, better parental self-regulation (stronger inhibitory control and greater response caution) predicted fewer post-treatment conduct problems. Higher parental response caution also predicted lower post-treatment relational frustration and higher parental confidence. Bayesian evidence supported no relation between parent and child cognitive functions and treatment-related changes in hyperactivity. This pilot study demonstrates that cognitive processes central to etiologic theories of ADHD and models of parenting behavior can be successfully integrated into treatment outcome research to inform which families are most likely to benefit from behavioral interventions. This study demonstrates the feasibility of bridging the translational research gap between basic and applied clinical science and facilitates research on the role of cognition in psychosocial interventions.
      PubDate: 2018-12-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s12402-018-0259-8
      Issue No: Vol. 10, No. 4 (2018)
       
  • How do children with and without ADHD talk about frustration': Use of
           a novel emotion narrative recall task
    • Authors: Nicholas D. Fogleman; Kirsten D. Leaberry; Paul J. Rosen; Danielle M. Walerius; Kelly Slaughter
      Pages: 297 - 307
      Abstract: Children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) experience difficulties related to emotional reactivity and regulation. The current study examines differences in the emotional reactivity and regulation of children with and without ADHD in the context of their real-life experiences of negative emotion using a novel ecologically valid methodology. Eighty-three 8–12-year-old children (46 ADHD, 38 non-ADHD) participated in the study. Children completed the negative emotion narrative recall task, a novel task whereby children provided a narrative recall of a real-life event where they experienced negative emotion. ANCOVA indicated children with ADHD recalled significantly more overall frustration and intense frustration than children without ADHD. Children with ADHD exhibiting more negative emotional reactivity while recalling negative emotions than children without ADHD. The current study suggests that children with ADHD are uniquely impacted by negative emotional experiences and represents an important step in understanding the emotional reactivity and regulation of children with ADHD.
      PubDate: 2018-12-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s12402-018-0255-z
      Issue No: Vol. 10, No. 4 (2018)
       
  • Performance-based measures and behavioral ratings of executive function in
           diagnosing attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in children
    • Authors: Alexander Tan; Lauren Delgaty; Kayla Steward; Melissa Bunner
      Pages: 309 - 316
      Abstract: Deficits in real-world executive functioning (EF) are a frequent characteristic of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). However, the predictive value of using performance-based and behavioral rating measures of EF when diagnosing ADHD remains unclear. The current study investigates the use of performance-based EF measures and a parent-report questionnaire with established ecological validity and clinical utility when diagnosing ADHD. Participants included 21 healthy controls, 21 ADHD—primary inattentive, and 21 ADHD—combined type subjects aged 6–15 years. A brief neuropsychological battery was administered to each subject including common EF assessment measures. Significant differences were not found between groups on most performance-based EF measures, whereas significant differences (p < 0.05) were found on most parent-report behavioral rating scales. Furthermore, performance-based measures did not predict group membership above chance levels. Results further support differences in predictive value of EF performance-based measures compared to parent-report questionnaires when diagnosing ADHD. Further research must investigate the relationship between performance-based and behavioral rating measures when assessing EF in ADHD.
      PubDate: 2018-12-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s12402-018-0256-y
      Issue No: Vol. 10, No. 4 (2018)
       
  • ADHD symptoms in a young patient with central diabetes insipidus
    • Authors: Irene Dupong; Sophie Guilmin-Crepon; Peyre Hugo
      Pages: 317 - 320
      Abstract: Diabetes insipidus is known to be associated with neurodevelopmental disorders. In this case report, we present a child suffering from a central diabetes insipidus (DI) and an attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The DI was due to a mutation on the vasopressin gene, impairing its secretion. We discuss the effects of this impairment on the central nervous system and how it might be linked to ADHD symptoms.
      PubDate: 2018-12-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s12402-018-0264-y
      Issue No: Vol. 10, No. 4 (2018)
       
  • Patients in medical treatment for attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder
           (ADHD): Are they at risk in drug screening'
    • Authors: Christina Mohr Jensen; Torben Breindahl
      Abstract: The use of medicines to treat attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has increased worldwide, including the use of amphetamine-based medicines or prodrugs that metabolise to amphetamine in vivo. At the same time, drugs-of-abuse testing by non-specific, point-of-care immunoassay methods (‘quick tests’) has increased. This article discusses the risk of ‘false positive’ results or post-analytical misinterpretations of results when immunoassays are used to analyse biological samples from ADHD patients. A rapid evidence review was conducted to identify studies that have focused on the risk of ‘false positive’ test results in immunoassay testing of patients treated with atomoxetine, bupropion, clonidine, guanfacine, methylphenidate, and modafinil. There is only evidence to suggest that bupropion should cause ‘false positive’ immunoassay results. However, there is a lack of systematic, updated evaluations and validations of cross-reactivity patterns for immunoassays in the literature. Advanced laboratory methods can distinguish the use of medicines from illicit amphetamine by stereospecific analysis of dextro- and levoamphetamine; however, these analytical services are not commonly available for routine drug testing. The present situation calls for more awareness, proper education and information on these critical ethical issues in drug testing, both for clinicians, other healthcare professionals involved in drug testing and for patients in medical treatment for ADHD. The pitfalls of immunoassays due to cross-reactivity and insufficient specificity/sensitivity can have serious negative consequences for patients safety with regard to incorrect laboratory drug-testing results. Consequently, confirmatory laboratory analysis should always be performed for ‘presumptive’ positive immunoassay screening results.
      PubDate: 2018-12-07
      DOI: 10.1007/s12402-018-0282-9
       
  • The early motor development in children diagnosed with ADHD: a systematic
           review
    • Authors: Sine Ravn Havmoeller; Per H. Thomsen; Sanne Lemcke
      Abstract: Although there is limited knowledge about early signs of ADHD, deviations in motor development are suggested as a possible indicator of such early signs. The purpose of the present systematic review was to gather knowledge about motor development before three years of age in children later diagnosed with ADHD. A systematic search was completed in four research databases, and the quality of the identified studies was systematically assessed. Of 440 initial search results, only five studies met the inclusion criteria and were fully abstracted. Major methodological heterogeneity was found between the studies, and the results are pointing in various directions. One study found an association between delay in gross motor development and ADHD, while another did not. However, associations between both good early motor development as well as delayed were also found in one study. A study of premature infants showed no association between early motor development and attention problems at school age, and a study of high-risk children from a neonatal care unit found no association between abnormal general movements and later ADHD without comorbidity. The results of the studies are pointing in various directions. No firm conclusion can be drawn on early motor development in children with ADHD due to the very different results of the studies and the methodological heterogeneity.
      PubDate: 2018-12-04
      DOI: 10.1007/s12402-018-0280-y
       
  • Editors must be vigilant to guarantee the quality and credibility of
           published scientific work
    • Authors: Manfred Gerlach
      PubDate: 2018-10-17
      DOI: 10.1007/s12402-018-0275-8
       
 
 
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