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Publisher: Springer-Verlag (Total: 2351 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 2351 Journals sorted alphabetically
3D Printing in Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
3D Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.222, CiteScore: 1)
4OR: A Quarterly J. of Operations Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.825, CiteScore: 1)
AAPS J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 1.118, CiteScore: 4)
AAPS PharmSciTech     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.752, CiteScore: 3)
Abdominal Imaging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.866, CiteScore: 2)
Abhandlungen aus dem Mathematischen Seminar der Universitat Hamburg     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.439, CiteScore: 0)
Academic Psychiatry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.53, CiteScore: 1)
Academic Questions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.106, CiteScore: 0)
Accreditation and Quality Assurance: J. for Quality, Comparability and Reliability in Chemical Measurement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.316, CiteScore: 1)
Acoustical Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.359, CiteScore: 1)
Acoustics Australia     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.232, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Analytica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.367, CiteScore: 0)
Acta Applicandae Mathematicae     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.675, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Biotheoretica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.284, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Diabetologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 1.587, CiteScore: 3)
Acta Endoscopica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
acta ethologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.769, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Geochimica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.24, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Geodaetica et Geophysica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.305, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Geophysica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.312, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Geotechnica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 1.588, CiteScore: 3)
Acta Informatica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.517, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Mathematica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 7.066, CiteScore: 3)
Acta Mathematica Hungarica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.452, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Mathematica Sinica, English Series     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.379, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Mathematica Vietnamica     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.27, CiteScore: 0)
Acta Mathematicae Applicatae Sinica, English Series     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.208, CiteScore: 0)
Acta Mechanica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 1.04, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Mechanica Sinica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.607, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Metallurgica Sinica (English Letters)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.576, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Meteorologica Sinica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.638, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Neurochirurgica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.822, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Neurologica Belgica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.376, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Neuropathologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 7.589, CiteScore: 12)
Acta Oceanologica Sinica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.334, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Physiologiae Plantarum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.574, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Politica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.605, CiteScore: 1)
Activitas Nervosa Superior     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.147, CiteScore: 0)
adhäsion KLEBEN & DICHTEN     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.103, CiteScore: 0)
ADHD Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.72, CiteScore: 2)
Adhesion Adhesives & Sealants     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Administration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Services Research     Partially Free   (Followers: 17, SJR: 1.005, CiteScore: 2)
Adsorption     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.703, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Applied Clifford Algebras     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.698, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Atmospheric Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37, SJR: 0.956, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Computational Mathematics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.812, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Contraception     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Data Analysis and Classification     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56, SJR: 1.09, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Gerontology     Partially Free   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.144, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Health Sciences Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29, SJR: 1.64, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Manufacturing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.475, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Polymer Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45, SJR: 1.04, CiteScore: 3)
Advances in Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.075, CiteScore: 3)
Aegean Review of the Law of the Sea and Maritime Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Aequationes Mathematicae     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.517, CiteScore: 1)
Aerobiologia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.673, CiteScore: 2)
Aesthetic Plastic Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.825, CiteScore: 1)
African Archaeological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.862, CiteScore: 1)
Afrika Matematika     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.235, CiteScore: 0)
AGE     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Ageing Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.39, CiteScore: 1)
Aggiornamenti CIO     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Aging Clinical and Experimental Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.67, CiteScore: 2)
Agricultural Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.276, CiteScore: 1)
Agriculture and Human Values     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.173, CiteScore: 3)
Agroforestry Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.663, CiteScore: 1)
Agronomy for Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.864, CiteScore: 6)
AI & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.227, CiteScore: 1)
AIDS and Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.792, CiteScore: 3)
Air Quality, Atmosphere & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.862, CiteScore: 3)
Akupunktur & Aurikulomedizin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Algebra and Logic     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.531, CiteScore: 0)
Algebra Universalis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.583, CiteScore: 1)
Algebras and Representation Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.095, CiteScore: 1)
Algorithmica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.56, CiteScore: 1)
Allergo J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.234, CiteScore: 0)
Allergo J. Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Alpine Botany     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.11, CiteScore: 3)
ALTEX : Alternatives to Animal Experimentation     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
AMBIO     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.569, CiteScore: 4)
American J. of Cardiovascular Drugs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.951, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Community Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29, SJR: 1.329, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.772, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Cultural Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.46, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Dance Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.181, CiteScore: 0)
American J. of Potato Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.611, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Psychoanalysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.314, CiteScore: 0)
American Sociologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.35, CiteScore: 0)
Amino Acids     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.135, CiteScore: 3)
AMS Review     Partially Free   (Followers: 4)
Analog Integrated Circuits and Signal Processing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.211, CiteScore: 1)
Analysis and Mathematical Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.536, CiteScore: 1)
Analysis in Theory and Applications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Analysis of Verbal Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32, SJR: 0.978, CiteScore: 3)
Anatomical Science Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.367, CiteScore: 1)
Angewandte Schmerztherapie und Palliativmedizin     Hybrid Journal  
Angiogenesis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 2.177, CiteScore: 5)
Animal Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 1.389, CiteScore: 3)
Annales françaises de médecine d'urgence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.192, CiteScore: 0)
Annales Henri Poincaré     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.097, CiteScore: 2)
Annales mathématiques du Québec     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.438, CiteScore: 0)
Annali dell'Universita di Ferrara     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.429, CiteScore: 0)
Annali di Matematica Pura ed Applicata     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.197, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Biomedical Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 1.042, CiteScore: 3)
Annals of Combinatorics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.932, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Data Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Annals of Dyslexia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.85, CiteScore: 2)
Annals of Finance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31, SJR: 0.579, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Forest Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.986, CiteScore: 2)
Annals of Global Analysis and Geometry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.228, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Hematology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.043, CiteScore: 2)
Annals of Mathematics and Artificial Intelligence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.413, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Microbiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.479, CiteScore: 2)
Annals of Nuclear Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.687, CiteScore: 2)
Annals of Operations Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.943, CiteScore: 2)
Annals of Ophthalmology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Annals of Regional Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.614, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Software Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Annals of Solid and Structural Mechanics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.239, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Surgical Oncology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.986, CiteScore: 4)
Annals of Telecommunications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.223, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of the Institute of Statistical Mathematics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.495, CiteScore: 1)
Antonie van Leeuwenhoek     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.834, CiteScore: 2)
Apidologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.22, CiteScore: 3)
APOPTOSIS     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.424, CiteScore: 4)
Applicable Algebra in Engineering, Communication and Computing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.294, CiteScore: 1)
Applications of Mathematics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.602, CiteScore: 1)
Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45, SJR: 0.571, CiteScore: 2)
Applied Biochemistry and Microbiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.21, CiteScore: 1)
Applied Categorical Structures     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.49, CiteScore: 0)
Applied Composite Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49, SJR: 0.58, CiteScore: 2)
Applied Entomology and Zoology     Partially Free   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.422, CiteScore: 1)
Applied Geomatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.733, CiteScore: 3)
Applied Geophysics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.488, CiteScore: 1)
Applied Intelligence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.6, CiteScore: 2)
Applied Magnetic Resonance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.319, CiteScore: 1)
Applied Mathematics & Optimization     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.886, CiteScore: 1)
Applied Mathematics - A J. of Chinese Universities     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.17, CiteScore: 0)
Applied Mathematics and Mechanics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.461, CiteScore: 1)
Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 66, SJR: 1.182, CiteScore: 4)
Applied Physics A     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.481, CiteScore: 2)
Applied Physics B: Lasers and Optics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.74, CiteScore: 2)
Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.519, CiteScore: 2)
Applied Research in Quality of Life     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.316, CiteScore: 1)
Applied Solar Energy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.225, CiteScore: 0)
Applied Spatial Analysis and Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.542, CiteScore: 1)
Aquaculture Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.591, CiteScore: 2)
Aquarium Sciences and Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Aquatic Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36, SJR: 0.656, CiteScore: 2)
Aquatic Geochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.591, CiteScore: 1)
Aquatic Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 1.109, CiteScore: 3)
Arabian J. for Science and Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.303, CiteScore: 1)
Arabian J. of Geosciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.319, CiteScore: 1)
Archaeological and Anthropological Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 1.052, CiteScore: 2)
Archaeologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.224, CiteScore: 0)
Archiv der Mathematik     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.725, CiteScore: 1)
Archival Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 63, SJR: 0.745, CiteScore: 2)
Archive for History of Exact Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.186, CiteScore: 1)
Archive for Mathematical Logic     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.909, CiteScore: 1)
Archive for Rational Mechanics and Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 3.93, CiteScore: 3)
Archive of Applied Mechanics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.79, CiteScore: 2)
Archives and Museum Informatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 146, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Archives of Computational Methods in Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.41, CiteScore: 5)
Archives of Dermatological Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 1.006, CiteScore: 2)
Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.773, CiteScore: 2)
Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.956, CiteScore: 2)
Archives of Microbiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.644, CiteScore: 2)
Archives of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.146, CiteScore: 2)
Archives of Osteoporosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.71, CiteScore: 2)
Archives of Sexual Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.493, CiteScore: 3)
Archives of Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 1.541, CiteScore: 5)
Archives of Virology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.973, CiteScore: 2)
Archives of Women's Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.274, CiteScore: 3)
Archivio di Ortopedia e Reumatologia     Hybrid Journal  
Archivum Immunologiae et Therapiae Experimentalis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.946, CiteScore: 3)
ArgoSpine News & J.     Hybrid Journal  
Argumentation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.349, CiteScore: 1)
Arid Ecosystems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.2, CiteScore: 0)
Arkiv för Matematik     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.766, CiteScore: 1)
Arnold Mathematical J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.355, CiteScore: 0)
Arthropod-Plant Interactions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.839, CiteScore: 2)
Arthroskopie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.131, CiteScore: 0)
Artificial Intelligence and Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.937, CiteScore: 2)
Artificial Intelligence Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.833, CiteScore: 4)
Artificial Life and Robotics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.226, CiteScore: 0)
Asia Europe J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.504, CiteScore: 1)
Asia Pacific Education Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.479, CiteScore: 1)
Asia Pacific J. of Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.185, CiteScore: 2)
Asia-Pacific Education Researcher     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.353, CiteScore: 1)
Asia-Pacific Financial Markets     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.187, CiteScore: 0)
Asia-Pacific J. of Atmospheric Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.855, CiteScore: 1)
Asian Business & Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.378, CiteScore: 1)
Asian J. of Business Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Asian J. of Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.543, CiteScore: 1)
AStA Advances in Statistical Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.548, CiteScore: 1)
AStA Wirtschafts- und Sozialstatistisches Archiv     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.183, CiteScore: 0)
ästhetische dermatologie & kosmetologie     Full-text available via subscription  
Astronomy and Astrophysics Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 3.385, CiteScore: 5)

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Journal Cover
Archives of Sexual Behavior
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.493
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 10  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1573-2800 - ISSN (Online) 0004-0002
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2351 journals]
  • Sex Ratio in Children and Adolescents Referred to the Gender Identity
           Development Service in the UK (2009–2016)
    • Authors: Nastasja M. de Graaf; Guido Giovanardi; Claudia Zitz; Polly Carmichael
      Pages: 1301 - 1304
      PubDate: 2018-07-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10508-018-1204-9
      Issue No: Vol. 47, No. 5 (2018)
       
  • The Crisis in Content Validity Among Existing Measures of Transphobia
    • Authors: Thomas J Billard
      Pages: 1305 - 1306
      PubDate: 2018-07-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10508-018-1191-x
      Issue No: Vol. 47, No. 5 (2018)
       
  • “Voyeuristic Disorder”: Etymological and Historical Note
    • Authors: Diederik F. Janssen
      Pages: 1307 - 1311
      PubDate: 2018-07-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10508-018-1199-2
      Issue No: Vol. 47, No. 5 (2018)
       
  • Age of Onset in Pedohebephilic Interests
    • Authors: Ian V. McPhail
      Pages: 1313 - 1317
      PubDate: 2018-07-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10508-018-1198-3
      Issue No: Vol. 47, No. 5 (2018)
       
  • Antecedents of Emotional Distress and Sexual Dissatisfaction in
           Circumcised Men: Previous Findings and Future Directions—Comment on
           Bossio and Pukall (2017)
    • Authors: Tim Hammond; Mark D. Reiss
      Pages: 1319 - 1320
      PubDate: 2018-07-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10508-018-1180-0
      Issue No: Vol. 47, No. 5 (2018)
       
  • Correction to: Antecedents of Emotional Distress and Sexual
           Dissatisfaction in Circumcised Men: Previous Findings and Future
           Directions—Comment on Bossio and Pukall (2017)
    • Authors: Tim Hammond; Mark D. Reiss
      Pages: 1321 - 1321
      Abstract: The term “body eudysmorphia” in the 6th paragraph of this Letter to the Editor incorrectly read “body dysmorphia” in the letter as originally published. The original article has been corrected.
      PubDate: 2018-07-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10508-018-1192-9
      Issue No: Vol. 47, No. 5 (2018)
       
  • The Proof of the Pudding Is in the Tasting: Data Are Needed to Test Models
           and Hypotheses Related to Compulsive Sexual Behaviors
    • Authors: Mateusz Gola; Marc N. Potenza
      Pages: 1323 - 1325
      PubDate: 2018-07-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10508-018-1167-x
      Issue No: Vol. 47, No. 5 (2018)
       
  • Compulsive Sexual Behavior as an Impulse Control Disorder: Awaiting Field
           Studies Data
    • Authors: Michael T. Walton; Navjot Bhullar
      Pages: 1327 - 1331
      PubDate: 2018-07-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10508-018-1200-0
      Issue No: Vol. 47, No. 5 (2018)
       
  • Olfactory Function Relates to Sexual Experience in Adults
    • Authors: Johanna Bendas; Thomas Hummel; Ilona Croy
      Pages: 1333 - 1339
      Abstract: The olfactory system contributes significantly to human social behavior and especially to mate choice and empathic functioning. In this context, previous research examining individuals with impaired olfactory function indicated an influence of the sense of smell on different aspects of sexuality. However, the applied samples, methods, and results are diverse and an involvement of confounding factors, such as breathing problems, depression or social insecurity cannot be ruled out. The present study examined the potential correlation between odor threshold in healthy participants and their sexual desire, sexual experience, and sexual performance. In 70 adults (28 male, 42 female; mean age 24.8 ± 4.1 years), odor threshold was assessed using the “Sniffin’ Sticks.” The participants also responded to a battery of questions on sexual desire (Sexual Desire Inventory), sexual experience (orgasm frequency, perceived pleasantness of sexual activities on a visual analogue scale) as well as sexual performance (frequency of having sex, average duration of sexual intercourse). Odor sensitivity correlated positively with sexual experience: Participants with high olfactory sensitivity reported higher pleasantness of sexual activities. Further, women with high olfactory sensitivity reported a higher frequency of orgasms during sexual intercourse. These findings were exclusively present for sexual experience; no significant correlations were detected for sexual desire or sexual performance. The experience of sexual interactions appears to be enriched by olfactory input. We discuss that the perception of certain body odors may contribute to the concept of sexual pleasure by enhanced recruitment of reward areas.
      PubDate: 2018-07-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10508-018-1203-x
      Issue No: Vol. 47, No. 5 (2018)
       
  • Thirty Years of Research on Gay Men and HIV Prevention in France: A
           Narrative Review of the Literature
    • Authors: Gabriel Girard; Véronique Doré
      Pages: 1341 - 1349
      Abstract: Research on homosexuality and HIV/AIDS in the social sciences has evolved into a vast and multiform field of study since the beginning of the epidemic in the Global North. Studies from France in this domain have remained relatively unknown at the international level. This article offers a narrative review of publications that resulted from research on homosexuality and HIV/AIDS, from 1985 to 2016. It offers an analysis of how the constitution of a field of research conditions the ways scientific questions are asked (and answered). This epistemological concern is addressed through a sociohistorical contextualization of the main issues surrounding prevention and how they have been addressed by researchers in France. A review of French publications on HIV prevention among gay men reveals certain specificities. In terms of the social science disciplines, psychology and psychoanalysis are much less present in this domain, whereas epidemiology, sociology, and anthropology are the most represented. The works analyzed in this article also reveal the circulation and local adaptations of risk categories imported from the English-speaking world, such as “relapse” and “bareback.” Regardless, research on HIV prevention in France largely evolved contemporaneously in the same way that it did elsewhere.
      PubDate: 2018-07-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10508-018-1163-1
      Issue No: Vol. 47, No. 5 (2018)
       
  • Meta-Analysis of Alcohol and Serodiscordant Condomless Sex Among People
           Living with HIV
    • Authors: Sarahmona M. Przybyla; Gabriela Krawiec; Stephanie A. Godleski; Cory A. Crane
      Pages: 1351 - 1366
      Abstract: While observational studies have found that alcohol consumption is associated with serodiscordant condomless sex among people living with HIV (PLHIV), no meta-analysis has yet examined this trend. We conducted a meta-analysis to synthesize empirical evidence on the association between alcohol and condomless sex with partners at risk of HIV acquisition. To meet inclusion criteria, studies: (1) specifically targeted PLHIV or provided stratified data for HIV-infected participants; (2) provided a quantitative measure of alcohol use; (3) provided a quantitative measure of condomless sex with serodiscordant partners; and (4) reported the results of statistical tests examining the relationship between alcohol use and serodiscordant condomless sex. Using random-effects models, weighted effect sizes were calculated. Three separate analyses were conducted to examine serodiscordant condomless sex in association with any alcohol consumption, binge/problematic drinking, and alcohol in a sexual context. A total of 36 independent effect sizes from 27 studies (including 25,065 HIV-infected participants) were pooled in the meta-analysis. Any alcohol consumption, binge/problematic drinking, and alcohol use in a sexual context were each associated with condomless sex with serodiscordant partners [OR 1.64 (95% CI 1.46–1.85); OR 1.65 (95% CI 1.14–2.39); OR 2.88 (95% CI 2.01–4.12), respectively]. Meta-analytic findings demonstrate a consistent positive relationship between alcohol use and serodiscordant condomless sex among PLHIV. Future public health programming for HIV-infected individuals needs to address the role of alcohol consumption in sexual risk-taking behavior.
      PubDate: 2018-07-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10508-017-1050-1
      Issue No: Vol. 47, No. 5 (2018)
       
  • Heterosexual College Students Who Hookup with Same-Sex Partners
    • Authors: Arielle Kuperberg; Alicia M. Walker
      Pages: 1387 - 1403
      Abstract: Individuals who identify as heterosexual but engage in same-sex sexual behavior fascinate both researchers and the media. We analyzed the Online College Social Life Survey dataset of over 24,000 undergraduate students to examine students whose last hookup was with a same-sex partner (N = 383 men and 312 women). The characteristics of a significant minority of these students (12% of men and 25% of women) who labelled their sexual orientation “heterosexual” differed from those who self-identified as “homosexual,” “bisexual,” or “uncertain.” Differences among those who identified as heterosexual included more conservative attitudes, less prior homosexual and more prior heterosexual sexual experience, features of the hookups, and sentiments about the encounter after the fact. Latent class analysis revealed six distinctive “types” of heterosexually identified students whose last hookup was with a same-sex partner. Three types, comprising 60% of students, could be classified as mostly private sexual experimentation among those with little prior same-sex experience, including some who did not enjoy the encounter; the other two types in this group enjoyed the encounter, but differed on drunkenness and desire for a future relationship with their partner. Roughly, 12% could be classified as conforming to a “performative bisexuality” script of women publicly engaging in same-sex hookups at college parties, and the remaining 28% had strong religious practices and/or beliefs that may preclude a non-heterosexual identity, including 7% who exhibited “internalized heterosexism.” Results indicate several distinctive motivations for a heterosexual identity among those who hooked up with same-sex partners; previous research focusing on selective “types” excludes many exhibiting this discordance.
      PubDate: 2018-07-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10508-018-1194-7
      Issue No: Vol. 47, No. 5 (2018)
       
  • Willingness of Emerging Adults to Engage in Consensual Non-Monogamy: A
           Mixed-Methods Analysis
    • Authors: Kayla M. Sizemore; Spencer B. Olmstead
      Pages: 1423 - 1438
      Abstract: Over the past decade, research on consensual non-monogamy (CNM) has increased. However, willingness to engage in CNM is an understudied phenomenon within this field. Because qualitative methods are rarely used to study this phenomenon, little is known about why individuals may or may not be willing to engage in CNM. Further, research on CNM has devoted little attention to the period of emerging adulthood. The current study used a mixed-methods approach to examine a sample of emerging adults’ (ages 18–29; N = 549) willingness to engage in CNM. Results from a qualitative content analysis revealed three distinct groups (Unwilling, Willing, and Open-Minded), and several subthemes emerged within each group that help explain why emerging adults are willing to engage in CNM. Quantitative analyses examined the relationship between group membership and demographic characteristics, finding that a greater proportion of women and heterosexual participants were Unwilling. Results also indicated that a greater proportion of men were Willing, and a greater proportion of sexual minorities were Open-Minded. Group mean differences were examined using quantitative measures of CNM attitudes and willingness. The Unwilling group reported more negative attitudes towards CNM compared to the Open-Minded and Willing groups. Additionally, the Open-Minded group reported more negative attitudes compared to the Willing group. On the willingness to engage in CNM Scale, the Unwilling group had lower mean scores compared to the Willing and Open-Minded groups. The Willing group had higher mean scores compared to the Open-Minded group. Implications for CNM research and methodology are discussed.
      PubDate: 2018-07-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10508-017-1075-5
      Issue No: Vol. 47, No. 5 (2018)
       
  • Open Relationships, Nonconsensual Nonmonogamy, and Monogamy Among U.S.
           Adults: Findings from the 2012 National Survey of Sexual Health and
           Behavior
    • Authors: Ethan Czuy Levine; Debby Herbenick; Omar Martinez; Tsung-Chieh Fu; Brian Dodge
      Pages: 1439 - 1450
      Abstract: People in open and other consensually nonmonogamous partnerships have been historically underserved by researchers and providers. Many studies group such partnerships together with nonconsensual nonmonogamy (NCNM) under the banner of “concurrent sexual partnerships.” Discrimination from service providers poses a substantial barrier to care. Responding to such concerns, this investigation explored sociodemographic correlates with open relationships and associations between relationship structure and sexual risk, HIV/STI testing, and relationship satisfaction in a nationally representative probability sample. Data were drawn from the 2012 National Survey of Sexual Health and Behavior (n = 2270). We used multinomial logistic regression to identify correlates with relationship structure, and linear and logistic regression to investigate associations between relationship structure and testing, condom use, and relationship satisfaction. Eighty-nine percent of participants reported monogamy, 4% reported open relationships, and 8% reported NCNM. Males, gay/lesbian individuals, bisexual individuals, and those who identified as “Other, Non-Hispanic” were more likely to report open relationships. Bisexual individuals and Black, Non-Hispanic participants were more likely to report NCNM; older participants were less likely to do so. Participants in open relationships reported more frequent condom use for anal intercourse and lower relationship satisfaction than monogamous participants. NCNM participants reported more HIV testing and lower satisfaction. Identities, experiences, and behaviors within open and other consensually nonmonogamous populations should be regarded as unique and diverse, rather than conflated with those common to other relationship structures. There is a need for greater awareness of diverse relationship structures among researchers and providers, and incorporation of related content into educational programming.
      PubDate: 2018-07-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10508-018-1178-7
      Issue No: Vol. 47, No. 5 (2018)
       
  • Associations Between Neighborhood Characteristics, Social Cohesion, and
           Perceived Sex Partner Risk and Non-Monogamy Among HIV-Seropositive and
           HIV-Seronegative Women in the Southern U.S.
    • Authors: Danielle F. Haley; Gina M. Wingood; Michael R. Kramer; Regine Haardörfer; Adaora A. Adimora; Anna Rubtsova; Andrew Edmonds; Neela D. Goswami; Christina Ludema; DeMarc A. Hickson; Catalina Ramirez; Zev Ross; Hector Bolivar; Hannah L. F. Cooper
      Pages: 1451 - 1463
      Abstract: Neighborhood social and physical factors shape sexual network characteristics in HIV-seronegative adults in the U.S. This multilevel analysis evaluated whether these relationships also exist in a predominantly HIV-seropositive cohort of women. This cross-sectional multilevel analysis included data from 734 women enrolled in the Women’s Interagency HIV Study’s sites in the U.S. South. Census tract-level contextual data captured socioeconomic disadvantage (e.g., tract poverty), number of alcohol outlets, and number of non-profits in the census tracts where women lived; participant-level data, including perceived neighborhood cohesion, were gathered via survey. We used hierarchical generalized linear models to evaluate relationships between tract characteristics and two outcomes: perceived main sex partner risk level (e.g., partner substance use) and perceived main sex partner non-monogamy. We tested whether these relationships varied by women’s HIV status. Greater tract-level socioeconomic disadvantage was associated with greater sex partner risk (OR 1.29, 95% CI 1.06–1.58) among HIV-seropositive women and less partner non-monogamy among HIV-seronegative women (OR 0.69, 95% CI 0.51–0.92). Perceived neighborhood trust and cohesion was associated with lower partner risk (OR 0.83, 95% CI 0.69–1.00) for HIV-seropositive and HIV-seronegative women. The tract-level number of alcohol outlets and non-profits were not associated with partner risk characteristics. Neighborhood characteristics are associated with perceived sex partner risk and non-monogamy among women in the South; these relationships vary by HIV status. Future studies should examine causal relationships and explore the pathways through which neighborhoods influence partner selection and risk characteristics.
      PubDate: 2018-07-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10508-018-1205-8
      Issue No: Vol. 47, No. 5 (2018)
       
  • Explaining the Relationship Between Sexually Explicit Internet Material
           and Casual Sex: A Two-Step Mediation Model
    • Authors: Laura Vandenbosch; Johanna M. F. van Oosten
      Pages: 1465 - 1480
      Abstract: Despite increasing interest in the implications of adolescents’ use of sexually explicit Internet material (SEIM), we still know little about the relationship between SEIM use and adolescents’ casual sexual activities. Based on a three-wave online panel survey study among Dutch adolescents (N = 1079; 53.1% boys; 93.5% with an exclusively heterosexual orientation; Mage = 15.11; SD = 1.39), we found that watching SEIM predicted engagement in casual sex over time. In turn, casual sexual activities partially predicted adolescents’ use of SEIM. A two-step mediation model was tested to explain the relationship between watching SEIM and casual sex. It was partially confirmed. First, watching SEIM predicted adolescents’ perceptions of SEIM as a relevant information source from Wave 2 to Wave 3, but not from Wave 1 to Wave 2. Next, such perceived utility of SEIM was positively related to stronger instrumental attitudes toward sex and thus their views about sex as a core instrument for sexual gratification. Lastly, adolescents’ instrumental attitudes toward sex predicted adolescents’ engagement in casual sex activities consistently across waves. Partial support emerged for a reciprocal relationship between watching SEIM and perceived utility. We did not find a reverse relationship between casual sex activities and instrumental attitudes toward sex. No significant gender differences emerged.
      PubDate: 2018-07-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10508-017-1145-8
      Issue No: Vol. 47, No. 5 (2018)
       
  • Morphometric and Vascular Modifications of the Clitoris During Pregnancy:
           A Longitudinal, Pilot Study
    • Authors: Cesare Battaglia; Nicola Persico; Isabella Zanetti; Francesca Guasina; Mara Mattioli; Paolo Casadio; Elena Morotti
      Pages: 1497 - 1505
      Abstract: During pregnancy, women go through a series of physical and emotional changes that may have an impact on their sexuality. The aim of the study was to examine modifications in sexual function during pregnancy by means of translabial ultrasonography and administration of questionnaires on sexual activity. Eighteen healthy and adult (25–35 years) pregnant women without sexual dysfunction and with a stable heterosexual relationship were examined at 10–12, 18–20, and 30–32 weeks of gestation. Patients underwent ultrasonographic translabial clitoral volume and labia minora thickness measurements and color Doppler assessment of the dorsal clitoral and posterior labial arteries. On the same day, each patient completed the two-factor Italian McCoy Female Questionnaire (MFSQ) and the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI). The mean clitoral body volume progressively increased during pregnancy, and color Doppler analysis of the dorsal clitoral artery showed a significant decrease in the pulsatility index from the first to the third trimester. Similarly, the labia minora thickness increased and the posterior labial artery pulsatility index progressively decreased throughout gestation. The MFSQ score for sexuality and partnership and the number of intercourses/week did not significantly change during the study period. However, the MFSQ score for partnership reached the lowest value in the third trimester of pregnancy. Analysis of the FSFI data showed no significant differences throughout pregnancy for the majority of the domains (sexual desire, arousal, orgasm, lubrication, and pain), with the exception of the satisfaction item, which decreased during the third trimester. A significant proportion of women are concerned that changes in their body during pregnancy may have a detrimental effect on sexuality. Despite significant changes in genital morphology and vascularity throughout gestation, these modifications do not seem to have an impact on sexual function in pregnancy.
      PubDate: 2018-07-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10508-017-1046-x
      Issue No: Vol. 47, No. 5 (2018)
       
  • Public Perception of Female Fertility: Initial Fertility, Peak Fertility,
           and Age-Related Infertility Among U.S. Adults
    • Authors: Robin E. Jensen; Nicole Martins; Melissa M. Parks
      Pages: 1507 - 1516
      Abstract: Perceptions of fertility are thought to impact reproductive behaviors, yet little is known about how lay people conceptualize the female fertility timeline. In this research, public perception of the female fertility timeline was assessed via a national survey of U.S. adults (N = 990) ranging in age from 18 to 89 years. Although there is no scientific consensus on the makeup of the female fertility timeline, results from this research indicate that the U.S. public posits fertility onset at (approximately) 13 years, peak fertility at 22, ideal first pregnancy age at 23, too late for pregnancy at 46, and infertility at 49. Regression analysis revealed that perceived peak fertility and ideal pregnancy age were positively correlated such that participants perceived the ideal pregnancy age as directly following peak fertility. Education was significantly related to fertility perceptions; those with more education perceived initial fertility to be lower and peak fertility and ideal pregnancy age to be higher. In other words, more highly educated individuals perceived fertility to manifest over a longer period of time as compared to individuals with less education. Black and Hispanic participants and participants with lower income perceived ideal first pregnancy age as significantly lower than did White participants and participants with higher income. These differences may suggest that the seeds of health disparities associated with phenomena such as adolescent pregnancy are lurking in fertility timeline perceptions.
      PubDate: 2018-07-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10508-018-1197-4
      Issue No: Vol. 47, No. 5 (2018)
       
  • Usage of the Terms Prostitution, Sex Work, Transactional Sex, and Survival
           Sex: Their Utility in HIV Prevention Research
    • Authors: Karen McMillan; Heather Worth; Patrick Rawstorne
      Pages: 1517 - 1527
      Abstract: This article considers the terms prostitution, sex work, transactional sex, and survival sex, the logic of their deployment and utility to research concerned with people who are paid for sex, and HIV. The various names for paid sex in HIV research are invested in strategically differentiated positionings of people who receive payment and emphasize varying degrees of choice. The terminologies that seek to distinguish a range of economically motivated paid sex practices from sex work are characterized by an emphasis on the local and the particular, efforts to evade the stigma attached to the labels sex worker and prostitute, and an analytic prioritizing of culture. This works to bestow cultural legitimacy on some locally specific forms of paid sex and positions those practices as artifacts of culture rather than economy. This article contends that, in HIV research in particular, it is necessary to be cognizant of ways the deployment of alternative paid sex categories relocates and reinscribes stigma elsewhere. While local identity categories may be appropriate for program implementation, a global category is necessary for planning and funding purposes and offers a purview beyond that of isolated local phenomena. We argue that “sex work” is the most useful global term for use in research into economically motivated paid sex and HIV, primarily because it positions paid sex as a matter of labor, not culture or morality.
      PubDate: 2018-07-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10508-017-1140-0
      Issue No: Vol. 47, No. 5 (2018)
       
  • The Relationship Between Psychological Temporal Perspective and HIV/STI
           Risk Behaviors Among Male Sex Workers in Mexico City
    • Authors: Sandra G. Sosa-Rubí; Aarón Salinas-Rodríguez; Airain Alejandra Montoya-Rodríguez; Omar Galárraga
      Pages: 1551 - 1563
      Abstract: Men who have sex with men (MSM) face a disproportionate burden of HIV incidence and HIV prevalence, particularly young men who have sex with men. The aim of this article was to analyze the relation between a psychological temporal perspective and HIV/sexually transmitted infection (STI) risk behaviors among male sex workers (MSWs), a potentially highly present-oriented group of MSM. A total sample of 326 MSWs were included and responded to a validated psychological scale: the Zimbardo’s Time Perspective Inventory; they also reported how frequently they engaged in protective behaviors against HIV and other STI risks behaviors, including condom use with casual and regular partners, as well as prior HIV testing. We adjusted structural equation models to analyze the relation between a psychological temporal perspective and HIV/STI risk behaviors. We found that orientation toward the past was correlated with decreased condom use with casual partners (β = − 0.18; CI95% − 0.23, − 0.12). Future orientation was not associated with condom use with casual partners. Regarding condom use with regular partners, past and present orientation were related to lower likelihood of condom use (β = − 0.23; CI95% − 0.29, − 0.17; β = − 0.11; CI95% − 0.19, − 0.02), whereas future orientation increased the likelihood of condom use with regular partners (β = 0.40; CI95% 0.31, 0.50). Time orientation (past, present, or future) did not predict the probability of having an HIV test. The design of HIV/STI prevention programs among vulnerable populations, such as MSM and MSWs, should consider specific time-frame mechanisms that can importantly affect sexual risk behavior decisions.
      PubDate: 2018-07-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10508-017-1123-1
      Issue No: Vol. 47, No. 5 (2018)
       
 
 
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