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Publisher: SciELO   (Total: 715 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 715 Journals sorted alphabetically
ABCD. Arquivos Brasileiros de Cirurgia Digestiva     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.207, CiteScore: 1)
ACIMED     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Agronómica     Open Access  
Acta Amazonica     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.36, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Bioethica     Open Access   (SJR: 0.196, CiteScore: 0)
Acta Botanica Brasilica     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.325, CiteScore: 1)
Acta botánica mexicana     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.212, CiteScore: 0)
Acta Cirurgica Brasileira     Open Access   (SJR: 0.395, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Limnologica Brasiliensia     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.28, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Literaria     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Acta Medica Colombiana     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Médica Costarricense     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Neurológica Colombiana     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Ortopédica Brasileira     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.343, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Paulista de Enfermagem     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.275, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Pediátrica Costarricense     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Scientiarum. Agronomy     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.431, CiteScore: 1)
Acta zoológica mexicana     Open Access  
Actualidades Biológicas     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
African Human Rights Law J.     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
African Natural History     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.198, CiteScore: 1)
Afro-Asia     Open Access  
Ágora - studies in psychoanalytic theory     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.132, CiteScore: 0)
Agricultura Tecnica     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Agrociencia     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.2, CiteScore: 0)
Agrociencia Uruguay     Open Access  
Agronomía Mesoamericana     Open Access  
Aisthesis     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.106, CiteScore: 0)
Alea : Estudos Neolatinos     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Alfa : Revista de Linguística     Open Access  
Alpha (Osorno)     Open Access   (SJR: 0.138, CiteScore: 0)
Ambiente & sociedade     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.235, CiteScore: 0)
Ambiente & Agua : An Interdisciplinary J. of Applied Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.263, CiteScore: 1)
Ambiente Construído     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
América Latina en la historia económica     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.134, CiteScore: 0)
Anais Brasileiros de Dermatologia     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.52, CiteScore: 1)
Anais da Academia Brasileira de Ciências     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.418, CiteScore: 1)
Anais do Museu Paulista : História e Cultura Material     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Anales de Medicina Interna     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Anales del Instituto de la Patagonia     Open Access  
Anales del Sistema Sanitario de Navarra     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.157, CiteScore: 0)
Análise Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.16, CiteScore: 0)
Análise Social     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.16, CiteScore: 0)
Andean geology     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.674, CiteScore: 1)
Antipoda. Revista de Antropología y Arqueología     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.135, CiteScore: 0)
Anuario Colombiano de Historia Social y de la Cultura     Open Access   (SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Anuario de Historia Regional y de las Fronteras     Open Access  
Apuntes : Revista de Estudios sobre Patrimonio Cultural - J. of Cultural Heritage Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Archivos de Medicina Veterinaria     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.194, CiteScore: 0)
Archivos de Neurociencias     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.111, CiteScore: 0)
Archivos de Pediatria del Uruguay     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Archivos de Zootecnia     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.202, CiteScore: 0)
Archivos Españoles de Urología     Open Access   (SJR: 0.178, CiteScore: 0)
Argos     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
ARQ     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.113, CiteScore: 0)
Arquitectura y Urbanismo     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Arquivo Brasileiro de Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia     Open Access   (SJR: 0.248, CiteScore: 0)
Arquivos Brasileiros de Cardiologia     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.381, CiteScore: 1)
Arquivos Brasileiros de Endocrinologia e Metabologia     Open Access  
Arquivos Brasileiros de Oftalmologia     Open Access   (SJR: 0.518, CiteScore: 1)
Arquivos de Gastroenterologia     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.396, CiteScore: 1)
Arquivos de Medicina     Open Access  
Arquivos de Neuro-Psiquiatria     Open Access   (SJR: 0.448, CiteScore: 1)
Arquivos do Instituto Biológico     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Arquivos Internacionais de Otorrinolaringologia     Open Access  
ARS     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Atenea (Concepción)     Open Access   (SJR: 0.112, CiteScore: 0)
Atmósfera     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.449, CiteScore: 1)
Audiology - Communication Research     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Avaliação : Revista da Avaliação da Educação Superior (Campinas)     Open Access  
Avances en Odontoestomatologia     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.105, CiteScore: 0)
Avances en Periodoncia e Implantología Oral     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Bakhtiniana : Revista de Estudos do Discurso     Open Access   (SJR: 0.103, CiteScore: 0)
BAR. Brazilian Administration Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.137, CiteScore: 0)
Biota Neotropica     Open Access   (SJR: 0.381, CiteScore: 1)
Biotecnología Aplicada     Open Access   (SJR: 0.146, CiteScore: 0)
Biotecnología en el Sector Agropecuario y Agroindustrial     Open Access  
Boletim de Ciências Geodésicas     Open Access   (SJR: 0.188, CiteScore: 0)
Boletim do Museu Paraense Emílio Goeldi. Ciências Humanas     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.238, CiteScore: 0)
Boletin Chileno de Parasitologia     Open Access  
Boletín de Filología     Open Access  
Boletín de la Sociedad Botánica de México     Open Access  
Boletin de la Sociedad Chilena de Quimica     Open Access  
Boletín de la Sociedad Geológica Mexicana     Open Access   (SJR: 0.291, CiteScore: 1)
Boletín del Museo Chileno de Arte Precolombino     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.233, CiteScore: 0)
Bosque     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.29, CiteScore: 1)
Bragantia     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.555, CiteScore: 1)
Brazilian Archives of Biology and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.281, CiteScore: 1)
Brazilian Dental J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.476, CiteScore: 1)
Brazilian J. of Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.523, CiteScore: 1)
Brazilian J. of Chemical Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.395, CiteScore: 1)
Brazilian J. of Food Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.206, CiteScore: 0)
Brazilian J. of Medical and Biological Research     Open Access   (SJR: 0.611, CiteScore: 2)
Brazilian J. of Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.63, CiteScore: 2)
Brazilian J. of Oceanography     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.425, CiteScore: 1)
Brazilian J. of Oral Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.131, CiteScore: 0)
Brazilian J. of Physical Therapy     Open Access   (SJR: 0.802, CiteScore: 2)
Brazilian J. of Plant Physiology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.178, CiteScore: 3)
Brazilian J. of Veterinary Research and Animal Science     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.225, CiteScore: 0)
Brazilian Oral Research     Open Access  
Brazilian Political Science Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Caderno CRH     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.233, CiteScore: 0)
Caderno de Estudos     Open Access  
Cadernos CEDES     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.119, CiteScore: 0)
Cadernos de Pesquisa     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.183, CiteScore: 0)
Cadernos de Saúde Pública     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.568, CiteScore: 1)
Cadernos de Tradução     Open Access  
Cadernos Metrópole     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cadernos Nietzsche     Open Access  
Cadernos Pagu     Open Access   (SJR: 0.356, CiteScore: 0)
Cadernos Saúde Coletiva     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Caldasia     Open Access   (SJR: 0.195, CiteScore: 0)
Calidad en la educación     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cerâmica     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.186, CiteScore: 0)
CES Medicina     Open Access  
Chilean J. of Agricultural Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.377, CiteScore: 1)
Chungara (Arica) - Revista de Antropologia Chilena     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.565, CiteScore: 1)
Ciência & Educação (Bauru)     Open Access  
Ciência & Saúde Coletiva     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.566, CiteScore: 1)
Ciência Animal Brasileira     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.216, CiteScore: 0)
Ciência da Informação     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.121, CiteScore: 0)
Ciencia del suelo     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ciência e Agrotecnologia     Open Access   (SJR: 0.383, CiteScore: 1)
Ciencia e Cultura     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ciencia e investigación agraria     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.211, CiteScore: 0)
Ciencia forestal en México     Open Access  
Ciência Rural     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.337, CiteScore: 1)
Ciencia y Enfermeria - Revista Iberoamericana de Investigacion     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.158, CiteScore: 0)
Ciencias Marinas     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.414, CiteScore: 1)
Ciencias Psicológicas     Open Access  
Cirugia Plastica Ibero-Latinoamericana     Open Access   (SJR: 0.166, CiteScore: 0)
CLEI Electronic J.     Open Access  
Clínica y Salud     Open Access   (SJR: 0.173, CiteScore: 0)
Clinics     Open Access   (SJR: 0.536, CiteScore: 1)
CoDAS     Open Access   (SJR: 0.267, CiteScore: 0)
Computación y Sistemas     Open Access   (SJR: 0.226, CiteScore: 1)
Comuni@cción     Open Access  
Comunicación y sociedad     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.327, CiteScore: 0)
Contaduría y Administración     Open Access   (SJR: 0.219, CiteScore: 0)
Contexto Internacional     Open Access  
Convergencia     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.196, CiteScore: 0)
Correo Científico Médico     Open Access  
Corrosão e Protecção de Materiais     Open Access  
Crop Breeding and Applied Biotechnology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.609, CiteScore: 1)
Cuadernos de Economía     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cuadernos de Economia - Latin American J. of Economics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cuadernos de Historia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cuadernos de Historia de la Salud Publica     Open Access  
Cuadernos de Medicina Forense     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Cuadernos.info     Open Access   (SJR: 0.38, CiteScore: 0)
Cubo. A Mathematical J.     Open Access  
Cuicuilco     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cultivos Tropicales     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Culturales     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Dados - Revista de Ciências Sociais     Open Access   (SJR: 0.37, CiteScore: 0)
De Jure     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
DELTA : Documentação de Estudos em Lingüística Teórica e Aplicada     Open Access   (SJR: 0.133, CiteScore: 0)
Dementia & Neuropsychologia     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.205, CiteScore: 0)
Dental Press J. of Orthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.489, CiteScore: 1)
Desacatos     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Desarrollo y Sociedad     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.109, CiteScore: 0)
Diálogo Andino - Revista de Historia, Geografía y Cultura Andina     Open Access   (SJR: 0.116, CiteScore: 0)
Diánoia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Dimensión Empresarial     Open Access  
Dynamis : Acta Hispanica ad Medicinae Scientiarumque Historiam Illustrandam     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.131, CiteScore: 0)
e-J. of Portuguese History     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Eclética Química     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ecología en Bolivia     Open Access  
Economia Aplicada     Open Access   (SJR: 0.208, CiteScore: 0)
Economia e Sociedade     Open Access  
EconoQuantum     Open Access  
Educação & Sociedade     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Educação e Pesquisa     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.163, CiteScore: 0)
Educação em Revista     Open Access  
Educación Matemática     Open Access  
Educación Médica     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.236, CiteScore: 0)
Educación Médica Superior     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.237, CiteScore: 0)
Educación y Educadores     Open Access  
Educar em Revista     Open Access  
EDUMECENTRO     Open Access  
En-Claves del pensamiento     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.194, CiteScore: 0)
Encuentros     Open Access  
Ene : Revista de Enfermería     Open Access  
Enfermería Global     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.165, CiteScore: 0)
Enfermería Nefrológica     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.198, CiteScore: 0)
Enfoques     Open Access  
Engenharia Agrícola     Open Access   (SJR: 0.305, CiteScore: 1)
Engenharia Sanitaria e Ambiental     Open Access   (SJR: 0.218, CiteScore: 0)
Ensaio Avaliação e Políticas Públicas em Educação     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.254, CiteScore: 0)
Entomologia y Vectores     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Escritos de Psicología : Psychological Writings     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Estudios Atacameños     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.446, CiteScore: 1)
Estudios Constitucionales     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.319, CiteScore: 0)
Estudios de Cultura Maya     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.272, CiteScore: 0)
Estudios de Economía     Open Access   (SJR: 0.121, CiteScore: 0)
Estudios de historia moderna y contemporánea de México     Open Access   (SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Estudios Filologicos     Open Access   (SJR: 0.107, CiteScore: 0)
Estudios Fronterizos     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Estudios internacionales     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Estudios Pedagogicos (Valdivia)     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.338, CiteScore: 0)

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Journal Cover
Cadernos de Tradução
Number of Followers: 0  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Online) 2175-7968
Published by SciELO Homepage  [715 journals]
  • TRANSLATION IN EXILE

    •  
  • PAUL BOWLES: TRANSLATING FROM TANGIER

    • Abstract: This essay examines the complex relationships between American writer Paul Bowles and Moroccan writers/storytellers whose works he translated (Ahmed Yacoubi, Larbi Layachi, Mohammed Mrabet, and Mohamed Choukri), with attention to reasons for Bowles’s turn to translation, the unique character of his translations of oral stories, the status of the “original” in these cases, as well as the surrounding postcolonial and Orientalist contexts of this translation activity. It advances the notion that Bowles’s translation activity is at once collaborative, dialogic, and mutually beneficial, motivated by the translator’s genuine interest in preserving and making more widely available local cultural production that might otherwise have gone unnoticed and unrecorded.Résumé Cet essai examine les relations complexes existant entre l’écrivain américain Paul Bowles et les écrivains ou conteurs marocains, notamment Ahmed Yacoubi, Larbi Layachi, Mohammed Mrabet, and Mohamed Choukri, dont Bowles a traduit les textes. Tout en prenant en compte les contextes postcoloniaux et orientalistes qui président à cette traduction, l’auteur de cet essai porte une attention particulière aux raisons ayant amené Bowles à la traduction, au caractère unique de ses traductions d’histoires orales, et au statut d’“originaux” de ces textes. Cet essai propose que l’activité de traduction de Bowles est à la fois collaborative, dialogique, et mutuellement avantageuse, ainsi que motivée par l’intérêt sincère du traducteur de préserver et de disseminer cette production culturelle locale qui sinon aurait pu demeurer inaperçue et non documentée.
       
  • CATALAN TRANSLATIONS IN EXILE UNDER FRANCO’S DICTATORSHIP

    • Abstract: Resumen Después de tres años de guerra civil en España, la victoria del dictador Francisco Franco en 1939 supuso el exilio para miles de ciudadanos y muchos intelectuales catalanes tuvieron que abandonar el país. La lengua catalana quedó prohibida en el ámbito público y la producción editorial en catalán también pasó a ser, oficialmente, prohibida. A pesar de las dificultades, algunos traductores prosiguieron su labor en el exilio.Summary After three years of civil war in Spain, Franco’s victory in 1939 meant exile for thousands of citizens, and most Catalan intellectuals had to leave the country. The Catalan language was banned in the public domain and publishing in Catalan became officially forbidden. However, despite the difficulties, some translators continued their work in exile.
       
  • ROSA CHACEL: SPANISH NOVELIST AND TRANSLATOR IN EXILE

    • Abstract: Resumen Rosa Chacel pasó varias décadas en el exilio tras la guerra civil española. Residió principalmente en Buenos Aires y en Río de Janeiro. Durante este período de su vida combinó su obra de novelista y ensayista con traducciones literarias. En este artículo vamos a presentar la labor traductora de Rosa Chacel desde varios ángulos. En primer lugar, nos interesaremos por las circunstancias de su trabajo de traductora. También nos preguntaremos hasta qué punto dominaba Rosa Chacel las lenguas extranjeras de las que traducía. Luego veremos qué huellas ha dejado esta actividad en su obra novelística. Finalmente, nos preguntaremos qué puentes se pueden tender entre las obras que traduce y sus propias concepciones estéticas. Rosa Chacel spent several decades in exile after the Spanish civil war. She lived mainly in Buenos Aires and Rio de Janeiro. During this period of her life she combined her work as a novelist and essayist with literary translations. In this article we will present the work of Rosa Chacel as a translator from various angles. First, we examine the circumstances of her work as a translator. Our next question is to what extent Rosa Chacel dominated the foreign languages she was translating from. Then we will look at the traces this activity left in her novels. Finally, we consider the connections that can be established between the works she translated and her own aesthetic concepts.
       
  • TRANSLATION AS A CONCEPT OF LITERARY WRITING IN EXILE: MASCHA KALÉKO
           AND WERNER LANSBURGH

    • Abstract: Zusammenfassung Dieser Beitrag geht der Beobachtung nach, dass in literarischen Texten von Schriftstellerinnen und Schriftstellern, die zwischen 1933 und 1945 aus dem nationalsozialistischen Deutschland geflohen sind, Übersetzungen als Formen mehrsprachigen Schreibens auftauchen. Am Beispiel von Mascha Kaléko und Werner Lansburgh wird anhand von einigen Textbeispielen gezeigt, wie durch übersetzende Schreibverfahren der existenzielle Zusammenhang von Sprache und Exil sowohl reflektiert als auch ästhetisch umgesetzt wird. This article explores the phenomenon of literature produced by writers who had to flee from Nazi-Germany between 1933-1945 in which they use translation as a form of multilingual writing. The analysis focuses on texts by Mascha Kaléko and Werner Lansburgh and addresses the following questions: Can translation be seen as a concept or a technique of literary writing in exile and how does it reflect aesthetically on the existential difficulties of language in exile'
       
  • POETRY AND TRANSLATION IN EXILE: ALAÍDE FOPPA’S OEUVRE

    • Abstract: Resumen: Este artículo analiza la poética de traducción de la autora guatemalteca Alaíde Foppa (1914) y el contexto en el que tradujo como exiliada en México. En 1980 fue secuestrada en Guatemala y hasta ahora se desconoce el paradero de sus restos. Foppa era una mujer polifacética: poetisa, activista, feminista, crítica de arte, editora, académica y traductora. El análisis se centra en tres traducciones, del francés, del italiano y del inglés: la poesía de Paul Éluard, Miguel Ángel y Mary Oxlie de Morpet. También se examinan los paratextos como prólogos y ensayos con el fin de entender la visión de Foppa sobre la traducción de poesía y sus estrategias de traducción. El análisis apunta hacia una tendencia a la “traducción recreativa” (Jones 2011) y la “traducción como obra personal” (Campos 1996). Al mismo tiempo se investiga hasta qué punto su exilio y su multilingüismo tuvieron un impacto sobre su trabajo como traductora. This article analyzes the translation poetics and the translation context of Guatemalan author Alaíde Foppa (1914) who lived in exile in Mexico. In 1980 she was kidnapped in Guatemala and the resting place of her remains is still unknown. Foppa was a woman of many talents: she was a poet, activist, feminist, art critic, editor, academic and translator. The focus is on three of the available poetry translations, from French, Italian and English: Paul Éluard, Michelangelo and Mary Oxlie of Morpet. The analysis of paratexts such as prologues and essays will help reveal Foppa’s vision on poetry translation and translation strategies. The analysis shows a tendency towards “recreative translation” (Jones 2011) and “translation as a personal oeuvre” (Campos 1996). At the same time, the paper aims at exploring to what extent Foppa’s situation as an exile as well as her multilingualism had an impact on her work as a translator.
       
  • BETWEEN THE TRANSNATIONAL AND THE TRANSLATIONAL: LANGUAGE, IDENTITY, AND
           AUTHORSHIP IN MA JIAN’S NOVELS

    • Abstract: This paper aims to explore the power exerted by the translator to form cultural identities and to build literary images that often overlap or blur national borders. The sinophone writer Ma Jian’s identity is challenged both in terms of authorship and readership, as his public is a culturally undistinguished “western reader”, and the translator de facto becomes the author. As a representative of the Chinese diaspora, he not only lives in a “deterritorialized” literary space, his novels also share a similar textual instability. Due to his bitter criticism of Chinese government and his internationally recognised role as a dissident writer, his works do not circulate in the People’s Republic of China, and are mainly distributed thanks to the English renditions by Flora Drew.Riassunto Il contributo analizza il potere esercitato dal traduttore nel formare identità culturali e nella costruzione di immagini letterarie chespesso si sovrappongono o sbiadiscono i confini nazionali. L’identità dello scrittore sinofono Ma Jian è messa in discussione sia sul piano del suo ruolo di autore sia in termini di lettori di riferimento della sua opera: il pubblico cui essa si rivolge è infatti un non meglio identificato “lettore occidentale”, mentre la figura del traduttore si sovrappone de facto a quella dell’autore. Non solo Ma Jian, in quanto esponente della “diaspora cinese” contemporanea, vive in uno spazio letterario “deterritorializzato”, ma anche le sue opere sono oggetto di una simile instabilità testuale. A causa delle sue accese critiche al governo cinese e al suo ruolo internazionalmente riconosciuto di scrittore dissidente, infatti, i suoi romanzi non circolano nel suo Paese di origine, la Repubblica Popolare Cinese, pur essendo scritte in lingua cinese e, invece, sono distribuite e conosciute essenzialmente grazie alla traduzione in lingua inglese di Flora Drew.
       
  • SELF-TRANSLATION AND EXILE: A STUDY OF THE CASES OF NGUGI WA
           THIONG’O AND ARIEL DORFMAN

    • Abstract: In this article, we focus on the trajectories of exiled writers who act as self-translators and as “individuals who act purposefully in a social context” (Palumo 2009, 9). We discuss the extent to which exile has paved the way for self-translation and also transformed those exiled writers into individuals who act as self-translators, “ambassadors, agents” (Grutman and Van Bolderen 2014, 325) in the USA, “constantly fighting […] to restore [their] significance” (Brodsky 1994, 5). For the purposes of this study, we focus on the cases of the Kenyan novelist, Ngugi wa Thiong’o and of the Argentine-Chilean-American novelist and playwright, Ariel Dorfman. Both Ngugi and Dorfman have, in different ways, been forced out of their home countries, they have sought exile in the USA, and they have written and translated into (and out of) English throughout their lives. Our analysis of these two cases will use an adapted version of John Glad’s multidimensional model of the process of literary creation of exiled writers. By analyzing both these cases through an adapted version of Glad’s model, we hope to contribute to the discussion on self-translation and on exile as a fact that affects this activity directly and in different ways.Resumo Neste artigo, concentramo-nos nas trajetórias de escritores exilados que atuam como autotradutores e como “indivíduos que atuam propositadamente em um contexto social” (Palumo 2009, 9). Discutimos até que ponto o exílio abriu o caminho para a autotradução e também transformou os escritores exilados em indivíduos que atuam como autotradutores, “embaixadores e agentes” (Grutman e Van Bolderen 2014, 325) nos EUA “em luta constante [...] para restaurar [sua] importância” (Brodsky 1994, 5). Para os propósitos deste estudo, concentramo-nos nos casos do escritor queniano, Ngugi wa Thiong’o e do romancista e dramaturgo argentino-chileno-americano, Ariel Dorfman. Ambos, Ngugi e Dorfman, de maneiras diferentes, foram forçados a sair de seus países de origem, buscaram o exílio nos EUA, escreveram e traduziram ao longo de suas vidas. Nossa análise desses dois casos usará uma versão adaptada do modelo multidimensional de John Glad para a análise do processo de criação literária de escritores exilados. Ao analisar esses dois casos através de uma versão adaptada do modelo de Glad, esperamos contribuir para a discussão sobre a autotradução e sobre o exílio como um fator que afeta essa atividade diretamente e de diferentes maneiras.
       
  • EXILE AND DISCOURSE ON TRANSLATION

    • Abstract: Résumé Le Catéchisme préparatoire au baptême a été traduit dans différentes langues du Congo. Ces traductions ont été faites par des missionnaires catholiques flamands à la fin du dix-neuvième siècle et au début du vingtième siècle. Jules Garmyn a traduit Le Catéchisme préparatoire au baptême en tshiluba (1898) ; Camille Van Ronslé en bobangi (1898), en kikongo (1900) et en lingala (1911) ; Jules Van Houtte en lonkundu (1912). Les missionnaires étaient des traducteurs nonnatifs. Ils traduisaient vers des langues qui n’étaient pas leurs langues maternelles, vers des langues qu’ils avaient apprises en fonction de leur mission. Les missionnaires avaient bien compris que la traduction était un instrument puissant qui aidait à propager la foi. La traduction est faite dans une perspective fonctionnelle. Elle devait aider à changer radicalement les mœurs et coutumes des populations locales. Le Catéchisme préparatoire aubaptême est un texte imprégné de la culture et de la tradition occidentales. Nous nous demanderons comment les missionnaires ont traité les spécificités lexicales et métaphoriques du texte source et comment les traductions ont pu fonctionner dans les cultures congolaises, cultures pour lesquelles le texte source est un élément profondément étrange. Ce thème ne sera abordé que succinctement. Il détournerait le lecteur du fond de notre contribution : la place de la notion d’exil dans le discours sur la traduction. La notion d’exil est souvent comprise de façon subjectivée. La notion est centrée sur l’auteur ou le traducteur qui se trouvent dans une situation d’exil. Antoine Berman et Walter Benjamin nous aiderons à essayer de comprendre la notion d’exil d’une autre façon, de façon désubjectivée. Les langues, les textes, l’original, la traduction se trouvent dans une situation d’exil. Nous nous demanderons ce que la notion d’exil pourrait apporter à la compréhension du mouvement – un mouvement de la Belgique vers le Congo – dans lequel le Catéchisme préparatoire au baptême est pris. The Catéchisme préparatoire au baptême has been translated into various languages of Congo. These translations were made by Flemish Catholic missionaries in the late nineteenth century and early twentieth century. Jules Garmyn translated the Catéchisme préparatoire au baptême in Tshiluba (1898); Camille Van Ronslé in Bobangi (1898), Kikongo (1900) and Lingala (1911); Jules Van Houtte in Lonkundu (1912). The missionaries were non-native translators. They translated into languages that were not their native languages, into languages they had learned according to their mission. The missionaries had understood that translation was a powerful instrument that helped to spread the faith. Translation is done from a functional perspective. It had to help to change radically the habits and customs of local people. The Catéchisme préparatoire au baptême is a text steeped in the Western culture and tradition. We will ask how the missionaries treated the lexical and metaphorical characteristics of the source text and how the translations functioned in Congolese cultures, cultures for which the source text is a deeply strange element. This theme will be discussed only briefly. It would divert the reader from the core of our contribution: the place of the notion of exile in discourse on translation. The notion of exile is often understood in a subjectified way. The notion is centered on the author or translator who are in a situation of exile. Antoine Berman and Walter Benjamin will help us to try to understand the notion of exile in another way, in a desubjectified way. The languages, the texts, the original, the translation are in a situation of exile. We will ask what the notion of exile could bring to the understanding of a movement – a movement from Belgium to Congo – in which the Catéchisme préparatoire au baptême is taken.
       
  • THESES ON PURE LANGUAGE AND POSTLITERATE TRANSLATION: WALTER BENJAMIN AND
           THE EXPERIENCE OF EXISTENTIAL EXILE IN LANGUAGE AND TRANSLATION

    • Abstract: It is the merit of Walter Benjamin to have spun a thread for what is now considered a desubjectivised theory of translation. In “Die Aufgabe des Übersetzers” (transl. “The Task of The Translator”), he advances the central thesis that all languages share one basic characteristic: slowly but steadily, they all move toward a point of convergence. To designate this point of convergence, Benjamin makes use of the elusive concept of “reine Sprache”. Benjamin’s tread will be taken up in this article, and it will be interwoven with what are coined “instances of postliteracy” as they are encountered in literature, only to form the tapestry that depicts not only the remembrance but also the ever-renewing promise of a purified language that constitutes the essence of a metaphysical exile in language.Resumen En « Die Aufgabe des Übersetzers » (trad. « La tarea del Traductor »), Walter Benjamin da origen a una teoría desubjetivizada de la traducción. En su ensayo, avanza la tesis de que todas las lenguas comparten una característica básica: todas están orientadas hacia un punto de convergencia, a saber : hacia la « reine Sprache » (trad. « lenguaje puro »). Siguiendo en los pasos de Benjamin, el presente artículo constituye una reflexión sobre esta noción esquiva de « lenguaje puro » y desea profundizar sobre la manifestación del parentesco suprahistórico de los idiomas en lo que se denominan, un tanto paradojicamente, « trazas literarias de postliterariedad ». Dichas trazas arrojan una luz sin precedentes sobre el exilio metafísico del ser humano en el lenguaje.
       
  • TRANSLATION AND EXILE IN THE 21TH CENTURY. FOR A COLLECTIVE POETIC OF
           RESILIENCE

    • Abstract: Resumé Partant du principe que la traduction est un phénomène composite qui dépasse le travail, pourtant fondamental, du traducteur, et qu’il convoque actuellement ce que je propose d’appeler une «poétique collective de résilience», je souligne l’importance de la planification culturelle des traductions, à partir de la sélection faite par les catalogues des éditeurs indépendants, qui travaillent en marge des contingences des grands groupes éditoriaux. Après la présentation des principaux rapports entre l’univers éditorial portugais et l’exil au cours des dernières décennies, j’analyse en particulier le cas des écrivains et des œuvres liés à l’exil du catalogue de la maison d’édition portugaise “Cavalo de Ferro”. Assuming that the translation is a composite phenomenon that goes beyond the translator’s work, although essential, and currently convenes what I propose to call a “collective poetic of resilience”, I stress the importance of cultural planning of translations from the selection made by the catalogues of independent publishers, working at the margins of the contingencies of large publishing groups. After the presentation of the main relationships between the Portuguese editorial universe and the exile over the last decades, I’ll analyse, in particular, writers and books related to exil in the catalogue of the Portuguese publishing house “Cavalo de Ferro”.
       
  • ELIE LUZAC AND L’HOMME PLUS QUE MACHINE (1748): THE DIALOGIC VOICE OF AN
           ENLIGHTENMENT PRINTER

    • Abstract: Résumé Responsable en tant qu’imprimeur-libraire de la diffusion des idées matérialistes que La Mettrie propage dans son Homme machine (1747), l’éditeur Elie Luzac (1721-1796) produit dans ses écrits une parole dialogique (Bakhtine) qui oscille entre l’assertion et le déni. Descendant de réfugiés huguenots, Luzac condamne ce qu’il publie et publie ce qu’il condamne. Ce bégaiement discursif se matérialise en particulier dans la publication de L’homme plus que machine (1748) qui cite les thèses de La Mettrie pour les contester. Faisant suite au succès de scandale de la version anglaise de L’homme machine (Man a Machine, 1749), une traduction anglaise de L’homme plus que machine, Man more than a Machine, voit le jour en 1752. La présente contribution examine la façon dont la voix appelée ici énarrative du traducteur efface les atermoiements du texte original pour lui substituer un discours dont le caractère explicitement antimatérialiste contraste avec les véhémences rhétoriques de Man a Machine. Early into his career as one of the most successful printerpublishers of the Dutch Republic, Elie Luzac (1721-1796) played a pivotal role in disseminating the materialist ideas of La Mettrie’s Homme machine (1747). This paper focuses on the dialogic voice (Bakhtine) in a publication by Luzac himself, which oscillates between asserting and refuting La Mettrie’s views. Descended from Huguenot refugees, Luzac condemns what he publishes and publishes what he condemns. This discursive ambiguity emerges in Luzac’s L’homme plus que machine (1748), a work which cites La Mettrie’s theses in order to contest them. Building on the succès de scandale of the English version of L’homme machine (Man a Machine, 1749), the English translation of L’homme plus que machine, Man more than a Machine, appeared in 1752. The present contribution examines how the translator’s Voice, which is defined as an enarrative voice, effaces the concealed claims of the original text and replaces them with a discourse whose explicit anti-materialist tenor contrasts with the vehement rhetoric of Man a Machine.
       
  • GENTZLER, Edwin. Translation, hypertext, and creativity: Contemporary
           translation theories. Bristol: Multilingual Matters, 2001. 232 p

    • Abstract: Résumé Responsable en tant qu’imprimeur-libraire de la diffusion des idées matérialistes que La Mettrie propage dans son Homme machine (1747), l’éditeur Elie Luzac (1721-1796) produit dans ses écrits une parole dialogique (Bakhtine) qui oscille entre l’assertion et le déni. Descendant de réfugiés huguenots, Luzac condamne ce qu’il publie et publie ce qu’il condamne. Ce bégaiement discursif se matérialise en particulier dans la publication de L’homme plus que machine (1748) qui cite les thèses de La Mettrie pour les contester. Faisant suite au succès de scandale de la version anglaise de L’homme machine (Man a Machine, 1749), une traduction anglaise de L’homme plus que machine, Man more than a Machine, voit le jour en 1752. La présente contribution examine la façon dont la voix appelée ici énarrative du traducteur efface les atermoiements du texte original pour lui substituer un discours dont le caractère explicitement antimatérialiste contraste avec les véhémences rhétoriques de Man a Machine. Early into his career as one of the most successful printerpublishers of the Dutch Republic, Elie Luzac (1721-1796) played a pivotal role in disseminating the materialist ideas of La Mettrie’s Homme machine (1747). This paper focuses on the dialogic voice (Bakhtine) in a publication by Luzac himself, which oscillates between asserting and refuting La Mettrie’s views. Descended from Huguenot refugees, Luzac condemns what he publishes and publishes what he condemns. This discursive ambiguity emerges in Luzac’s L’homme plus que machine (1748), a work which cites La Mettrie’s theses in order to contest them. Building on the succès de scandale of the English version of L’homme machine (Man a Machine, 1749), the English translation of L’homme plus que machine, Man more than a Machine, appeared in 1752. The present contribution examines how the translator’s Voice, which is defined as an enarrative voice, effaces the concealed claims of the original text and replaces them with a discourse whose explicit anti-materialist tenor contrasts with the vehement rhetoric of Man a Machine.
       
  • SIN-WAI, Chan. The Future of Translation Technology: Towards a World
           without Babel. London and New York: Routledge, 2017. 302 p

    • Abstract: Résumé Responsable en tant qu’imprimeur-libraire de la diffusion des idées matérialistes que La Mettrie propage dans son Homme machine (1747), l’éditeur Elie Luzac (1721-1796) produit dans ses écrits une parole dialogique (Bakhtine) qui oscille entre l’assertion et le déni. Descendant de réfugiés huguenots, Luzac condamne ce qu’il publie et publie ce qu’il condamne. Ce bégaiement discursif se matérialise en particulier dans la publication de L’homme plus que machine (1748) qui cite les thèses de La Mettrie pour les contester. Faisant suite au succès de scandale de la version anglaise de L’homme machine (Man a Machine, 1749), une traduction anglaise de L’homme plus que machine, Man more than a Machine, voit le jour en 1752. La présente contribution examine la façon dont la voix appelée ici énarrative du traducteur efface les atermoiements du texte original pour lui substituer un discours dont le caractère explicitement antimatérialiste contraste avec les véhémences rhétoriques de Man a Machine. Early into his career as one of the most successful printerpublishers of the Dutch Republic, Elie Luzac (1721-1796) played a pivotal role in disseminating the materialist ideas of La Mettrie’s Homme machine (1747). This paper focuses on the dialogic voice (Bakhtine) in a publication by Luzac himself, which oscillates between asserting and refuting La Mettrie’s views. Descended from Huguenot refugees, Luzac condemns what he publishes and publishes what he condemns. This discursive ambiguity emerges in Luzac’s L’homme plus que machine (1748), a work which cites La Mettrie’s theses in order to contest them. Building on the succès de scandale of the English version of L’homme machine (Man a Machine, 1749), the English translation of L’homme plus que machine, Man more than a Machine, appeared in 1752. The present contribution examines how the translator’s Voice, which is defined as an enarrative voice, effaces the concealed claims of the original text and replaces them with a discourse whose explicit anti-materialist tenor contrasts with the vehement rhetoric of Man a Machine.
       
  • CREZEE, Ineke; MIKKELSON, Holly; MONZON-STOREY, Laura. Introduction to
           Healthcare for Spanish-speaking Interpreters and Translators.
           Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2015. 388 p

    • Abstract: Résumé Responsable en tant qu’imprimeur-libraire de la diffusion des idées matérialistes que La Mettrie propage dans son Homme machine (1747), l’éditeur Elie Luzac (1721-1796) produit dans ses écrits une parole dialogique (Bakhtine) qui oscille entre l’assertion et le déni. Descendant de réfugiés huguenots, Luzac condamne ce qu’il publie et publie ce qu’il condamne. Ce bégaiement discursif se matérialise en particulier dans la publication de L’homme plus que machine (1748) qui cite les thèses de La Mettrie pour les contester. Faisant suite au succès de scandale de la version anglaise de L’homme machine (Man a Machine, 1749), une traduction anglaise de L’homme plus que machine, Man more than a Machine, voit le jour en 1752. La présente contribution examine la façon dont la voix appelée ici énarrative du traducteur efface les atermoiements du texte original pour lui substituer un discours dont le caractère explicitement antimatérialiste contraste avec les véhémences rhétoriques de Man a Machine. Early into his career as one of the most successful printerpublishers of the Dutch Republic, Elie Luzac (1721-1796) played a pivotal role in disseminating the materialist ideas of La Mettrie’s Homme machine (1747). This paper focuses on the dialogic voice (Bakhtine) in a publication by Luzac himself, which oscillates between asserting and refuting La Mettrie’s views. Descended from Huguenot refugees, Luzac condemns what he publishes and publishes what he condemns. This discursive ambiguity emerges in Luzac’s L’homme plus que machine (1748), a work which cites La Mettrie’s theses in order to contest them. Building on the succès de scandale of the English version of L’homme machine (Man a Machine, 1749), the English translation of L’homme plus que machine, Man more than a Machine, appeared in 1752. The present contribution examines how the translator’s Voice, which is defined as an enarrative voice, effaces the concealed claims of the original text and replaces them with a discourse whose explicit anti-materialist tenor contrasts with the vehement rhetoric of Man a Machine.
       
  • SERRA, Ordep. Hinos Órficos: Perfumes. Introdução, tradução,
           comentário e notas de Ordep Serra. São Paulo: Odysseus Editora, 2015.
           768 p

    • Abstract: Résumé Responsable en tant qu’imprimeur-libraire de la diffusion des idées matérialistes que La Mettrie propage dans son Homme machine (1747), l’éditeur Elie Luzac (1721-1796) produit dans ses écrits une parole dialogique (Bakhtine) qui oscille entre l’assertion et le déni. Descendant de réfugiés huguenots, Luzac condamne ce qu’il publie et publie ce qu’il condamne. Ce bégaiement discursif se matérialise en particulier dans la publication de L’homme plus que machine (1748) qui cite les thèses de La Mettrie pour les contester. Faisant suite au succès de scandale de la version anglaise de L’homme machine (Man a Machine, 1749), une traduction anglaise de L’homme plus que machine, Man more than a Machine, voit le jour en 1752. La présente contribution examine la façon dont la voix appelée ici énarrative du traducteur efface les atermoiements du texte original pour lui substituer un discours dont le caractère explicitement antimatérialiste contraste avec les véhémences rhétoriques de Man a Machine. Early into his career as one of the most successful printerpublishers of the Dutch Republic, Elie Luzac (1721-1796) played a pivotal role in disseminating the materialist ideas of La Mettrie’s Homme machine (1747). This paper focuses on the dialogic voice (Bakhtine) in a publication by Luzac himself, which oscillates between asserting and refuting La Mettrie’s views. Descended from Huguenot refugees, Luzac condemns what he publishes and publishes what he condemns. This discursive ambiguity emerges in Luzac’s L’homme plus que machine (1748), a work which cites La Mettrie’s theses in order to contest them. Building on the succès de scandale of the English version of L’homme machine (Man a Machine, 1749), the English translation of L’homme plus que machine, Man more than a Machine, appeared in 1752. The present contribution examines how the translator’s Voice, which is defined as an enarrative voice, effaces the concealed claims of the original text and replaces them with a discourse whose explicit anti-materialist tenor contrasts with the vehement rhetoric of Man a Machine.
       
  • ARLT, Roberto. A Vida Porca. Tradução de Davidson de Oliveira Diniz.
           Belo Horizonte: Relicário, 2014. 256 p

    • Abstract: Résumé Responsable en tant qu’imprimeur-libraire de la diffusion des idées matérialistes que La Mettrie propage dans son Homme machine (1747), l’éditeur Elie Luzac (1721-1796) produit dans ses écrits une parole dialogique (Bakhtine) qui oscille entre l’assertion et le déni. Descendant de réfugiés huguenots, Luzac condamne ce qu’il publie et publie ce qu’il condamne. Ce bégaiement discursif se matérialise en particulier dans la publication de L’homme plus que machine (1748) qui cite les thèses de La Mettrie pour les contester. Faisant suite au succès de scandale de la version anglaise de L’homme machine (Man a Machine, 1749), une traduction anglaise de L’homme plus que machine, Man more than a Machine, voit le jour en 1752. La présente contribution examine la façon dont la voix appelée ici énarrative du traducteur efface les atermoiements du texte original pour lui substituer un discours dont le caractère explicitement antimatérialiste contraste avec les véhémences rhétoriques de Man a Machine. Early into his career as one of the most successful printerpublishers of the Dutch Republic, Elie Luzac (1721-1796) played a pivotal role in disseminating the materialist ideas of La Mettrie’s Homme machine (1747). This paper focuses on the dialogic voice (Bakhtine) in a publication by Luzac himself, which oscillates between asserting and refuting La Mettrie’s views. Descended from Huguenot refugees, Luzac condemns what he publishes and publishes what he condemns. This discursive ambiguity emerges in Luzac’s L’homme plus que machine (1748), a work which cites La Mettrie’s theses in order to contest them. Building on the succès de scandale of the English version of L’homme machine (Man a Machine, 1749), the English translation of L’homme plus que machine, Man more than a Machine, appeared in 1752. The present contribution examines how the translator’s Voice, which is defined as an enarrative voice, effaces the concealed claims of the original text and replaces them with a discourse whose explicit anti-materialist tenor contrasts with the vehement rhetoric of Man a Machine.
       
  • INTERVIEW WITH NG'G' WA THIONG’O

    • Abstract: Résumé Responsable en tant qu’imprimeur-libraire de la diffusion des idées matérialistes que La Mettrie propage dans son Homme machine (1747), l’éditeur Elie Luzac (1721-1796) produit dans ses écrits une parole dialogique (Bakhtine) qui oscille entre l’assertion et le déni. Descendant de réfugiés huguenots, Luzac condamne ce qu’il publie et publie ce qu’il condamne. Ce bégaiement discursif se matérialise en particulier dans la publication de L’homme plus que machine (1748) qui cite les thèses de La Mettrie pour les contester. Faisant suite au succès de scandale de la version anglaise de L’homme machine (Man a Machine, 1749), une traduction anglaise de L’homme plus que machine, Man more than a Machine, voit le jour en 1752. La présente contribution examine la façon dont la voix appelée ici énarrative du traducteur efface les atermoiements du texte original pour lui substituer un discours dont le caractère explicitement antimatérialiste contraste avec les véhémences rhétoriques de Man a Machine. Early into his career as one of the most successful printerpublishers of the Dutch Republic, Elie Luzac (1721-1796) played a pivotal role in disseminating the materialist ideas of La Mettrie’s Homme machine (1747). This paper focuses on the dialogic voice (Bakhtine) in a publication by Luzac himself, which oscillates between asserting and refuting La Mettrie’s views. Descended from Huguenot refugees, Luzac condemns what he publishes and publishes what he condemns. This discursive ambiguity emerges in Luzac’s L’homme plus que machine (1748), a work which cites La Mettrie’s theses in order to contest them. Building on the succès de scandale of the English version of L’homme machine (Man a Machine, 1749), the English translation of L’homme plus que machine, Man more than a Machine, appeared in 1752. The present contribution examines how the translator’s Voice, which is defined as an enarrative voice, effaces the concealed claims of the original text and replaces them with a discourse whose explicit anti-materialist tenor contrasts with the vehement rhetoric of Man a Machine.
       
 
 
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