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Publisher: SciELO   (Total: 796 journals)

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ABCD. Arquivos Brasileiros de Cirurgia Digestiva     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
ACIMED     Open Access   (SJR: 0.11, h-index: 4)
Acta Amazonica     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.319, h-index: 13)
Acta Bioethica     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.119, h-index: 3)
Acta Bioquimica Clinica Latinoamericana     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.134, h-index: 7)
Acta Botanica Brasilica     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.403, h-index: 17)
Acta botánica mexicana     Open Access   (SJR: 0.212, h-index: 4)
Acta Cirurgica Brasileira     Open Access   (SJR: 0.271, h-index: 14)
Acta Limnologica Brasiliensia     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.204, h-index: 2)
Acta Literaria     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 2)
Acta Médica Costarricense     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Medica Peruana     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Neurológica Colombiana     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Ortopédica Brasileira     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.159, h-index: 9)
Acta Paulista de Enfermagem     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.34, h-index: 12)
Acta Pediátrica Costarricense     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Scientiarum. Agronomy     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.65, h-index: 11)
Acta Toxicológica Argentina     Open Access  
Acta zoológica mexicana     Open Access  
Actualidades Biológicas     Open Access  
African Human Rights Law J.     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
African Natural History     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Afro-Asia     Open Access  
Ágora - studies in psychoanalytic theory     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 1)
Agricultura Tecnica     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Agrociencia     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.192, h-index: 13)
Agrociencia Uruguay     Open Access  
Agronomía Mesoamericana     Open Access  
Aisthesis     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Alea : Estudos Neolatinos     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.126, h-index: 2)
Alpha (Osorno)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ambiente & sociedade     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.189, h-index: 5)
Ambiente & Agua : An Interdisciplinary J. of Applied Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ambiente Construído     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
América Latina en la historia económica     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.101, h-index: 1)
Anais Brasileiros de Dermatologia     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.456, h-index: 16)
Anais da Academia Brasileira de Ciências     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.344, h-index: 34)
Anais do Museu Paulista : História e Cultura Material     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Anales de Medicina Interna     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Anales del Instituto de la Patagonia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Anales del Sistema Sanitario de Navarra     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.179, h-index: 15)
Análise Psicológica     Open Access  
Análise Social     Open Access  
Analisis Politico     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 2)
Andean geology     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.825, h-index: 22)
Angiologia e Cirurgia Vascular     Open Access  
Annali dell'Istituto Superiore di Sanità     Open Access   (SJR: 0.272, h-index: 25)
Anuario Colombiano de Historia Social y de la Cultura     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Anuario de Historia Regional y de las Fronteras     Open Access  
Apuntes : Revista de Estudios sobre Patrimonio Cultural - J. of Cultural Heritage Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Archivos de cardiología de México     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.136, h-index: 11)
Archivos de Medicina Interna     Open Access  
Archivos de Medicina Veterinaria     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.249, h-index: 13)
Archivos de Neurociencias     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.104, h-index: 4)
Archivos de Pediatria del Uruguay     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Archivos de Zootecnia     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.231, h-index: 6)
Archivos Españoles de Urología     Open Access   (SJR: 0.228, h-index: 16)
Archivos Venezolanos de Farmacología y Terapéutica     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.102, h-index: 2)
Argos     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 1)
ARQ     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 1)
Arquitectura y Urbanismo     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Arquivo Brasileiro de Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.292, h-index: 18)
Arquivos Brasileiros de Cardiologia     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.33, h-index: 29)
Arquivos Brasileiros de Endocrinologia e Metabologia     Open Access   (SJR: 0.329, h-index: 26)
Arquivos Brasileiros de Oftalmologia     Open Access   (SJR: 0.298, h-index: 15)
Arquivos de Gastroenterologia     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.43, h-index: 18)
Arquivos de Medicina     Open Access  
Arquivos de Neuro-Psiquiatria     Open Access   (SJR: 0.357, h-index: 33)
Arquivos do Instituto Biológico     Open Access  
Arquivos Internacionais de Otorrinolaringologia     Open Access  
ARS     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Atenea (Concepción)     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 2)
Atmósfera     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.346, h-index: 13)
Audiology - Communication Research     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Avaliação : Revista da Avaliação da Educação Superior (Campinas)     Open Access  
Avances en Odontoestomatologia     Open Access   (SJR: 0.112, h-index: 4)
Avances en Periodoncia e Implantología Oral     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Bakhtiniana : Revista de Estudos do Discurso     Open Access  
BAR. Brazilian Administration Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.165, h-index: 4)
Biocell     Open Access   (SJR: 0.228, h-index: 19)
Biota Neotropica     Open Access   (SJR: 0.437, h-index: 12)
Biotecnología Aplicada     Open Access  
Boletim de Ciências Geodésicas     Open Access   (SJR: 0.202, h-index: 4)
Boletim do Museu Paraense Emílio Goeldi. Ciências Humanas     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.201, h-index: 2)
Boletin Chileno de Parasitologia     Open Access  
Boletín de Filología     Open Access  
Boletín de Historia Argentina y Americana Dr. Emilio Ravignani     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Boletin de la Sociedad Argentina de Botanica     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.191, h-index: 3)
Boletín de la Sociedad Botánica de México     Open Access  
Boletin de la Sociedad Chilena de Quimica     Open Access  
Boletín de la Sociedad Geológica Mexicana     Open Access   (SJR: 0.206, h-index: 7)
Boletín del Museo Chileno de Arte Precolombino     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Bosque     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.245, h-index: 7)
Bragantia     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.685, h-index: 18)
Brazilian Archives of Biology and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.237, h-index: 24)
Brazilian Dental J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.433, h-index: 28)
Brazilian J. of Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.436, h-index: 30)
Brazilian J. of Chemical Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.437, h-index: 25)
Brazilian J. of Food Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Brazilian J. of Medical and Biological Research     Open Access   (SJR: 0.431, h-index: 62)

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Journal Cover Brazilian Journal of Medical and Biological Research
  [SJR: 0.431]   [H-I: 62]   [0 followers]  Follow
    
  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
   ISSN (Print) 0100-879X - ISSN (Online) 1414-431X
   Published by SciELO Homepage  [796 journals]
  • Follicular helper T cell in immunity and autoimmunity

    • Abstract: The traditional concept that effector T helper (Th) responses are mediated by Th1/Th2 cell subtypes has been broadened by the recent demonstration of two new effector T helper cells, the IL-17 producing cells (Th17) and the follicular helper T cells (Tfh). These new subsets have many features in common, such as the ability to produce IL-21 and to express the IL-23 receptor (IL23R), the inducible co-stimulatory molecule ICOS, and the transcription factor c-Maf, all of them essential for expansion and establishment of the final pool of both subsets. Tfh cells differ from Th17 by their ability to home to B cell areas in secondary lymphoid tissue through interactions mediated by the chemokine receptor CXCR5 and its ligand CXCL13. These CXCR5+ CD4+ T cells are considered an effector T cell type specialized in B cell help, with a transcriptional profile distinct from Th1 and Th2 cells. The role of Tfh cells and its primary product, IL-21, on B-cell activation and differentiation is essential for humoral immunity against infectious agents. However, when deregulated, Tfh cells could represent an important mechanism contributing to exacerbated humoral response and autoantibody production in autoimmune diseases. This review highlights the importance of Tfh cells by focusing on their biology and differentiation processes in the context of normal immune response to infectious microorganisms and their role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases.
       
  • Averting the legacy of kidney disease - focus on childhood

    • Abstract: World Kidney Day 2016 focuses on kidney disease in childhood and the antecedents of adult kidney disease that can begin in earliest childhood. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) in childhood differs from that in adults, in that the largest diagnostic group among children includes congenital anomalies and inherited disorders, with glomerulopathies and kidney disease as a consequence of diabetes being relatively uncommon. In addition, many children with acute kidney injury will ultimately develop sequelae that may lead to hypertension and CKD in later childhood or in adult life. Children born early or who are small-for-date newborns have relatively increased risk for the development of CKD later in life. Persons with a high-risk birth and early childhood history should be watched closely in order to help detect early signs of kidney disease in time to provide effective prevention or treatment. Successful therapy is feasible for advanced CKD in childhood; there is evidence that children fare better than adults, if they receive kidney replacement therapy including dialysis and transplantation, although only a minority of children may require this ultimate intervention. Because there are disparities in access to care, effort is needed so that children with kidney disease, wherever they live, may be treated effectively, irrespective of their geographic or economic circumstances. Our hope is that the World Kidney Day will inform the general public, policy makers and caregivers about the needs and possibilities surrounding kidney disease in childhood.
       
  • Evaluation of energy expenditure in forward and backward movements
           performed by soccer referees

    • Abstract: The aim of this study was to measure the energy expenditure for locomotor activities usually performed by soccer referees during a match (walking, jogging, and running) under laboratory conditions, and to compare forward with backward movements. The sample was composed by 10 male soccer referees, age 29±7.8 years, body mass 77.5±6.2 kg, stature 1.78±0.07 m and professional experience of 7.33±4.92 years. Referees were evaluated on two separate occasions. On the first day, maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) was determined by a maximal treadmill test, and on the second day, the oxygen consumption was determined in different speeds of forward and backward movements. The mean VO2max was 41.20±3.60 mL·kg-1·min-1 and the mean heart rate achieved in the last stage of the test was 190.5±7.9 bpm. When results of forward and backward movements were compared at 1.62 m/s (walking speed), we found significant differences in VO2, in metabolic equivalents, and in kcal. However, the same parameters in forward and backward movements at jogging velocities (2.46 m/s) were not significantly different, showing that these motor activities have similar intensity. Backward movements at velocities equivalent to walking and jogging are moderate-intensity activities, with energy expenditure less than 9 kcal. Energy expenditure was overestimated by at least 35% when calculated by mathematical equations. In summary, we observed that backward movements are not high-intensity activities as has been commonly reported, and when calculated using equations available in the literature, energy expenditure was overestimated compared to the values obtained by indirect calorimetry.
       
  • Deficiency of sex hormones does not affect 17-ß-estradiol-induced
           coronary vasodilation in the isolated rat heart

    • Abstract: The relaxation of coronary arteries by estrogens in the coronary vascular beds of naive and hypertensive rats has been well described. However, little is known about this action in gonadectomized rats. We investigated the effect of 17-ß-estradiol (E2) in coronary arteries from gonadectomized rats, as well as the contributions of endothelium-derived factors and potassium channels. Eight-week-old female and male Wistar rats weighing 220-300 g were divided into sham-operated and gonadectomized groups (n=9−12 animals per group). The baseline coronary perfusion pressure (CPP) was determined, and the vasoactive effects of 10 μM E2 were assessed by bolus administration before and after endothelium denudation or by perfusion with NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), indomethacin, clotrimazole, L-NAME plus indomethacin, L-NAME plus clotrimazole or tetraethylammonium (TEA). The CPP differed significantly between the female and sham-operated male animals. Gonadectomy reduced the CPP only in female rats. Differences in E2-induced relaxation were observed between the female and male animals, but male castration did not alter this response. For both sexes, the relaxation response to E2 was, at least partly, endothelium-dependent. The response to E2 was reduced only in the sham-operated female rats treated with L-NAME. However, in the presence of indomethacin, clotrimazole, L-NAME plus indomethacin or L-NAME plus clotrimazole, or TEA, the E2 response was significantly reduced in all groups. These results highlight the importance of prostacyclin, endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor, and potassium channels in the relaxation response of coronary arteries to E2 in all groups, whereas nitric oxide may have had an important role only in the sham-operated female group.
       
  • Promoting inflammatory lymphangiogenesis by vascular endothelial growth
           factor-C (VEGF-C) aggravated intestinal inflammation in mice with
           experimental acute colitis

    • Abstract: Angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis are thought to play a role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). However, it is not understood if inflammatory lymphangiogenesis is a pathological consequence or a productive attempt to resolve the inflammation. This study investigated the effect of lymphangiogenesis on intestinal inflammation by overexpressing a lymphangiogenesis factor, vascular endothelial growth factor-C (VEGF-C), in a mouse model of acute colitis. Forty eight-week-old female C57BL/6 mice were treated with recombinant adenovirus overexpressing VEGF-C or with recombinant VEGF-C156S protein. Acute colitis was then established by exposing the mice to 5% dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) for 7 days. Mice were evaluated for disease activity index (DAI), colonic inflammatory changes, colon edema, microvessel density, lymphatic vessel density (LVD), and VEGFR-3mRNA expression in colon tissue. When acute colitis was induced in mice overexpressing VEGF-C, there was a significant increase in colonic epithelial damage, inflammatory edema, microvessel density, and neutrophil infiltration compared to control mice. These mice also exhibited increased lymphatic vessel density (73.0±3.9 vs 38.2±1.9, P<0.001) and lymphatic vessel size (1974.6±104.3 vs 1639.0±91.5, P<0.001) compared to control mice. Additionally, the expression of VEGFR-3 mRNA was significantly upregulated in VEGF-C156S mice compared to DSS-treated mice after induction of colitis (42.0±1.4 vs 3.5±0.4, P<0.001). Stimulation of lymphangiogenesis by VEGF-C during acute colitis promoted inflammatory lymphangiogenesis in the colon and aggravated intestinal inflammation. Inflammatory lymphangiogenesis may have pleiotropic effects at different stages of IBD.
       
  • HPV vaccines: a controversial issue'

    • Abstract: Controversy still exists over whether the benefits of the available HPV vaccines outweigh the risks and this has suppressed uptake of the HPV vaccines in comparison to other vaccines. Concerns about HPV vaccine safety have led some physicians, healthcare officials and parents to withhold the recommended vaccination from the target population. The most common reason for not administering the prophylactic HPV vaccines are concerns over adverse effects. The aim of this review is the assessment of peer-reviewed scientific data related to measurable outcomes from the use of HPV vaccines throughout the world with focused attention on the potential adverse effects. We found that the majority of studies continue to suggest a positive risk-benefit from vaccination against HPV, with minimal documented adverse effects, which is consistent with other vaccines. However, much of the published scientific data regarding the safety of HPV vaccines appears to originate from within the financially competitive HPV vaccine market. We advocate a more independent monitoring system for vaccine immunogenicity and adverse effects to address potential conflicts of interest with regular systematic literature reviews by qualified individuals to vigilantly assess and communicate adverse effects associated with HPV vaccination. Finally, our evaluation suggests that an expanded use of HPV vaccine into more diverse populations, particularly those living in low-resource settings, would provide numerous health and social benefits.
       
  • Genetic aberrations in multiple myeloma characterized by cIg-FISH: a
           Brazilian context

    • Abstract: Genetic abnormalities are critical prognostic factors for patients diagnosed with multiple myeloma (MM). This retrospective, multicenter study aimed to contribute with the genetic and clinical characterization of MM patients in a country with continental dimensions such as Brazil. Genetic abnormalities were assessed by cIg-fluorescent in situ hybridization (cIg-FISH) in a series of 152 MM patients (median age 55 years, 58.5% men). Overall, genetic abnormalities were detected in 52.7% (80/152) of patients. A 14q32 rearrangement was detected in 33.5% (n=51), including t(11;14), t(4;14) and t(14;16) in 18.4, 14.1, and 1% of cases, respectively. del(13q) was identified in 42.7% (n=65) of patients, of whom 49.2% (32/65) presented a concomitant 14q32 rearrangement. del(17p) had a frequency of 5.2% (n=8). del(13q) was associated with high plasma cell burden (≥50%, P=0.02), and del(17p) with advanced ISS stages (P=0.05) and extramedullary disease (P=0.03). t(4;14) was associated with advanced Durie-Salmon stages (P=0.008), renal insufficiency (P=0.01) and was more common in patients over 60 years old. This study reports similar frequencies of genetic abnormalities to most series worldwide, whereas the t(14;16) and del(17p), two high risk factors for newly diagnosed patients, exhibited lower frequencies. Our results expand the knowledge on the molecular features of MM in Brazil, a country where innovative therapies that could overcome a poor prognosis for some genetic abnormalities are not always available.
       
  • Activation of locus coeruleus heme oxygenase-carbon monoxide pathway
           promoted an anxiolytic-like effect in rats

    • Abstract: The heme oxygenase-carbon monoxide pathway has been shown to play an important role in many physiological processes and is capable of altering nociception modulation in the nervous system by stimulating soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC). In the central nervous system, the locus coeruleus (LC) is known to be a region that expresses the heme oxygenase enzyme (HO), which catalyzes the metabolism of heme to carbon monoxide (CO). Additionally, several lines of evidence have suggested that the LC can be involved in the modulation of emotional states such as fear and anxiety. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the activation of the heme oxygenase-carbon monoxide pathway in the LC in the modulation of anxiety by using the elevated plus maze test (EPM) and light-dark box test (LDB) in rats. Experiments were performed on adult male Wistar rats weighing 250-300 g (n=182). The results showed that the intra-LC microinjection of heme-lysinate (600 nmol), a substrate for the enzyme HO, increased the number of entries into the open arms and the percentage of time spent in open arms in the elevated plus maze test, indicating a decrease in anxiety. Additionally, in the LDB test, intra-LC administration of heme-lysinate promoted an increase on time spent in the light compartment of the box. The intracerebroventricular microinjection of guanylate cyclase, an sGC inhibitor followed by the intra-LC microinjection of the heme-lysinate blocked the anxiolytic-like reaction on the EPM test and LDB test. It can therefore be concluded that CO in the LC produced by the HO pathway and acting via cGMP plays an anxiolytic-like role in the LC of rats.
       
 
 
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