Publisher: SciELO   (Total: 912 journals)

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Showing 601 - 800 of 912 Journals sorted alphabetically
Revista Chilena de Anatomia     Open Access  
Revista Chilena de Cardiología     Open Access  
Revista Chilena de Cirugía     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Chilena de Derecho     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.645, CiteScore: 0)
Revista Chilena de Derecho Privado     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Chilena de Enfermedades Respiratorias     Open Access  
Revista Chilena de Infectología     Open Access   (SJR: 0.202, CiteScore: 0)
Revista Chilena de Literatura     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.16, CiteScore: 0)
Revista Chilena de Neuro-Psiquiatria     Open Access   (SJR: 0.137, CiteScore: 0)
Revista Chilena de Nutricion     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.167, CiteScore: 0)
Revista Chilena de Obstetricia y Ginecologia     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.139, CiteScore: 0)
Revista Chilena de Pediatria     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.171, CiteScore: 0)
Revista Chilena de Radiologia     Open Access   (SJR: 0.124, CiteScore: 0)
Revista Ciência Agronômica     Open Access   (SJR: 0.498, CiteScore: 1)
Revista Ciencia y Cultura     Open Access  
Revista Ciencias Técnicas Agropecuarias     Open Access  
Revista Científica Ciencia Médica     Open Access  
Revista Científica de la UCSA     Open Access  
Revista Científica General José María Córdova     Open Access  
Revista Clínica de Medicina de Familia     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Revista Clínica de Periodoncia, Implantología y Rehabilitación Oral     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revista Colombiana de Anestesiología     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.154, CiteScore: 0)
Revista Colombiana de Antropologia     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.232, CiteScore: 0)
Revista Colombiana de Biotecnología     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Colombiana de Cancerología     Open Access   (SJR: 0.106, CiteScore: 0)
Revista Colombiana de Cardiologia     Open Access   (SJR: 0.113, CiteScore: 0)
Revista Colombiana de Ciencias Químico-Farmacéuticas     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Colombiana de Educación     Open Access  
Revista Colombiana de Entomología     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.184, CiteScore: 0)
Revista Colombiana de Estadística     Open Access   (SJR: 0.361, CiteScore: 1)
Revista Colombiana de Matemáticas     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.136, CiteScore: 0)
Revista Colombiana de Psicología     Open Access   (SJR: 0.151, CiteScore: 0)
Revista Colombiana de Química     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.115, CiteScore: 0)
Revista Contabilidade & Finanças     Open Access   (SJR: 0.145, CiteScore: 0)
Revista Costarricense de Cardiología     Open Access  
Revista Costarricense de Psicología     Open Access  
Revista Cubana de Anestesiología y Reanimación     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Cubana de Angiología y Cirugía Vascular     Open Access  
Revista Cubana de Cirugía     Open Access  
Revista Cubana de Endocrinología     Open Access  
Revista Cubana de Enfermería     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.102, CiteScore: 0)
Revista Cubana de Estomatologí­a     Open Access   (SJR: 0.128, CiteScore: 0)
Revista Cubana de Hematología, Inmunología y Hemoterapia     Open Access   (SJR: 0.196, CiteScore: 0)
Revista Cubana de Información en Ciencias de la Salud     Open Access   (SJR: 0.229, CiteScore: 0)
Revista Cubana de Informática Médica     Open Access  
Revista Cubana de Investigaciones Biomédicas     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.13, CiteScore: 0)
Revista Cubana de Medicina     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revista Cubana de Medicina General Integral     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.263, CiteScore: 0)
Revista Cubana de Medicina Militar     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.202, CiteScore: 0)
Revista Cubana de Medicina Tropical     Open Access   (SJR: 0.143, CiteScore: 0)
Revista Cubana de Obstetricia y Ginecología     Open Access   (SJR: 0.191, CiteScore: 0)
Revista Cubana de Oftalmología     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Cubana de Ortopedia y Traumatologí­a     Open Access   (SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Revista Cubana de Plantas Medicinales     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.127, CiteScore: 0)
Revista Cubana de Salud Pública     Open Access   (SJR: 0.262, CiteScore: 0)
Revista da Educação Física : UEM     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista da Escola de Enfermagem da USP     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.279, CiteScore: 1)
Revista da Faculdade de Educação     Open Access  
Revista da Sociedade Brasileira de Fonoaudiologia     Open Access  
Revista da Sociedade Brasileira de Medicina Tropical     Open Access   (SJR: 0.658, CiteScore: 1)
Revista de Administração - RAUSP     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista de Administração Contemporânea     Open Access  
Revista de Administração de Empresas     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.16, CiteScore: 0)
Revista de Administração Pública     Open Access   (SJR: 0.294, CiteScore: 0)
Revista de Análisis Económico     Open Access   (SJR: 0.112, CiteScore: 0)
Revista de Antropologia     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.102, CiteScore: 0)
Revista de Bioética y Derecho     Open Access  
Revista de Biología Marina y Oceanografía     Open Access   (SJR: 0.23, CiteScore: 0)
Revista de Biología Tropical     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.326, CiteScore: 1)
Revista de Ciencia Politica     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.368, CiteScore: 1)
Revista de Ciencia y Tecnología     Open Access  
Revista de Ciências Agrárias     Open Access  
Revista de Ciencias Médicas de Pinar del Río     Open Access  
Revista de Ciencias Sociales     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista de Cirugía     Open Access   (SJR: 0.121, CiteScore: 0)
Revista de Derecho     Open Access   (SJR: 0.364, CiteScore: 0)
Revista de Derecho (Concepción)     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revista de Derecho (Coquimbo)     Open Access  
Revista de Economía     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista de Economia Contemporânea     Open Access   (SJR: 0.121, CiteScore: 0)
Revista de Economía del Caribe     Open Access  
Revista de Economia e Sociologia Rural     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.265, CiteScore: 0)
Revista de Economía Institucional     Open Access   (SJR: 0.141, CiteScore: 0)
Revista de Economia Poli­tíca     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.282, CiteScore: 0)
Revista de Enfermagem Referência     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revista de Estudios Historico-Juridicos     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
Revista de Estudios Sociales     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.166, CiteScore: 0)
Revista de Filosofia     Open Access   (SJR: 0.102, CiteScore: 0)
Revista de Filosofía Open Insight     Open Access  
Revista de Geografía Norte Grande     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.296, CiteScore: 1)
Revista de Gestão Costeira Integrada     Open Access   (SJR: 0.251, CiteScore: 1)
Revista de Historia (Concepción)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista de Historia Americana y Argentina     Open Access  
Revista de Historia del Derecho     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista de Ingeniería     Open Access  
Revista de Investigacion Psicologica     Open Access  
Revista de la Academia Colombiana de Ciencias Exactas, Físicas y Naturales     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista de la Asociación Española de Neuropsiquiatría     Open Access  
Revista de la Ciencia del Suelo y Nutricion Vegetal     Open Access   (SJR: 0.224, CiteScore: 0)
Revista de la Construcción     Open Access   (SJR: 0.234, CiteScore: 1)
Revista de la Facultad de Agronomía     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revista de la Facultad de Derecho : Universidad de la República     Open Access  
Revista de la Facultad de Derecho y Ciencias Políticas     Open Access  
Revista de la Facultad de Medicina (México)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista de la Sociedad Boliviana de Pediatría     Open Access  
Revista de la Sociedad Española de Enfermería Nefrológica     Open Access  
Revista de la Sociedad Química del Perú     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista de la Sociedad Venezolana de Microbiologia     Open Access  
Revista de la Universidad Industrial de Santander. Salud     Open Access  
Revista de Medicina Veterinaria     Open Access  
Revista de Microbiologia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista de Nutrição     Open Access   (SJR: 0.282, CiteScore: 0)
Revista de Odontologia da UNESP     Open Access  
Revista de Odontologia da Universidade de São Paulo     Open Access  
Revista de Osteoporosis y Metabolismo Mineral     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.121, CiteScore: 0)
Revista de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello     Open Access  
Revista de Protección Vegetal     Open Access  
Revista de Psicología del Trabajo y de las Organizaciones     Open Access   (SJR: 0.418, CiteScore: 1)
Revista de Psiquiatria Clínica     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.271, CiteScore: 1)
Revista de Psiquiatria do Rio Grande do Sul     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista de Salud Animal     Open Access  
Revista de Salud Pública     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.171, CiteScore: 0)
Revista de Saúde Pública     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.807, CiteScore: 2)
Revista de Sociologia e Polí­tica     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.482, CiteScore: 0)
Revista del Instituto de Medicina Tropical     Open Access  
Revista del Nacional     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Dental Press de Ortodontia e Ortopedia Facial     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Diacrítica     Open Access  
Revista Direito GV     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista do Colégio Brasileiro de Cirurgiões     Open Access   (SJR: 0.221, CiteScore: 1)
Revista do Departamento de Psicologia. UFF     Open Access  
Revista do Hospital das Clinicas     Open Access  
Revista do Instituto de Estudos Brasileiros     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista do Instituto de Medicina Tropical de São Paulo     Open Access   (SJR: 0.669, CiteScore: 1)
Revista Dor     Open Access  
Revista Ecuatoriana de Neurología     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista EIA     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista electrónica de investigación educativa     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.187, CiteScore: 0)
Revista Electronica Educare     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revista Española de Cirugía Oral y Maxilofacial     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.117, CiteScore: 0)
Revista Española de Enfermedades Digestivas     Open Access   (SJR: 0.417, CiteScore: 1)
Revista Española de Salud Pública     Open Access   (SJR: 0.249, CiteScore: 1)
Revista Española de Sanidad Penitenciaria     Open Access   (SJR: 0.135, CiteScore: 0)
Revista Estudos Feministas     Open Access   (SJR: 0.208, CiteScore: 0)
Revista Facultad de Ciencias Económicas: Investigación y Reflexión     Open Access  
Revista Facultad de Ingenieria - Universidad de Tarapaca     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Facultad de Ingeniería Universidad de Antioquia     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.172, CiteScore: 0)
Revista Facultad de Medicina de la Universidad Nacional de Colombia     Open Access   (SJR: 0.125, CiteScore: 0)
Revista Facultad Nacional de Agronomía, Medellín     Open Access   (SJR: 0.138, CiteScore: 0)
Revista Facultad Nacional de Salud Pública     Open Access  
Revista Gaúcha de Enfermagem     Open Access   (SJR: 0.225, CiteScore: 1)
Revista Geológica de América Central     Open Access  
Revista Geológica de Chile     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Gerencia y Políticas de Salud     Open Access   (SJR: 0.136, CiteScore: 0)
Revista Habanera de Ciencias Médicas     Open Access   (SJR: 0.211, CiteScore: 0)
Revista Historia y Sociedad     Open Access  
Revista IBRACON de Estruturas e Materiais     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Ingeniería Biomédica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Ingenieria de Construcción     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.204, CiteScore: 0)
Revista Ingenierías Universidad de Medellín     Open Access  
Revista Integra Educativa     Open Access  
Revista Interamericana de Bibliotecología     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Revista Internacional de Contaminación Ambiental     Open Access   (SJR: 0.152, CiteScore: 0)
Revista ION     Open Access  
Revista IUS     Open Access  
Revista Katálysis     Open Access  
Revista Lasallista de Investigación     Open Access   (SJR: 0.146, CiteScore: 0)
Revista Latino-Americana de Enfermagem     Open Access   (SJR: 0.339, CiteScore: 1)
Revista Latinoamericana de Bioética     Open Access  
Revista Latinoamericana de Ciencias Sociales, Niñez y Juventud     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Latinoamericana de Derecho Social     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Revista Latinoamericana de Desarrollo Económico     Open Access  
Revista Latinoamericana de Educación Inclusiva     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Latinoamericana de Filosofía     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Latinoamericana de Hipertension     Open Access   (SJR: 0.158, CiteScore: 0)
Revista Latinoamericana de Investigación en Matemática Educativa     Open Access   (SJR: 0.171, CiteScore: 0)
Revista Latinoamericana de Psicopatologia Fundamental     Open Access   (SJR: 0.201, CiteScore: 0)
Revista Medica de Chile     Open Access   (SJR: 0.259, CiteScore: 1)
Revista Médica del Hospital Nacional de Niños Dr. Carlos Sáenz Herrera     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Médica del Uruguay     Open Access  
Revista Médica Electrónica     Open Access  
Revista Médica La Paz     Open Access  
Revista Médico-Científica : Luz y Vida     Open Access  
Revista Mexicana de Análisis de la Conducta     Open Access   (SJR: 0.405, CiteScore: 1)
Revista Mexicana de Astronomía y Astrofísica     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.596, CiteScore: 1)
Revista Mexicana de Biodiversidad     Open Access   (SJR: 0.421, CiteScore: 1)
Revista Mexicana de Ciencias Agrícolas     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Mexicana de Ciencias Farmaceuticas     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Mexicana de Ciencias Geológicas     Open Access   (SJR: 0.308, CiteScore: 1)
Revista Mexicana de Ciencias Pecuarias     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.17, CiteScore: 0)
Revista Mexicana de Economía y Finanzas     Open Access  
Revista Mexicana de Física     Open Access   (SJR: 0.203, CiteScore: 0)
Revista mexicana de física E     Open Access  
Revista Mexicana de Fitopatología     Open Access  
Revista Mexicana de Ingeniería Biomédica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Mexicana de Ingeniería Química     Open Access   (SJR: 0.328, CiteScore: 1)
Revista Mexicana de Investigación Educativa     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.291, CiteScore: 0)
Revista Mexicana de Micologí­a     Open Access  
Revista Mexicana de Sociologí­a     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.142, CiteScore: 0)
Revista Musical Chilena     Open Access   (SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)

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Revista da Sociedade Brasileira de Medicina Tropical
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.658
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 0  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Print) 0037-8682
Published by SciELO Homepage  [912 journals]
  • Synanthropic rodents as virus reservoirs and transmitters

    • Abstract: Abstract This review focuses on reports of hepatitis E virus, hantavirus, rotavirus, coronavirus, and arenavirus in synanthropic rodents (Rattus rattus, Rattus norvegicus, and Mus musculus) within urban environments. Despite their potential impact on human health, relatively few studies have addressed the monitoring of these viruses in rodents. Comprehensive control and preventive activities should include actions such as the elimination or reduction of rat and mouse populations, sanitary education, reduction of shelters for the animals, and restriction of the access of rodents to residences, water, and food supplies.
       
  • Minimum concentration of Amphotericin B in serum according to the
           formulation, dose, and daily or prolonged intermittent therapeutic regimen
           

    • Abstract: Abstract INTRODUCTION: The therapeutic efficacy of daily amphotericin B infusion is related to its maximum concentration in blood; however, trough levels may be useful in intermittent regimens of this antifungal drug. METHODS : High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used to determine the minimum concentration (Cmin) of amphotericin B in the serum of patients receiving deoxycholate (D-Amph) or liposomal amphotericin B (L-AmB) for the treatment of cryptococcal meningitis (n=28), histoplasmosis (n=8), paracoccidioidomycosis (n=1), and leishmaniasis (n=1). RESULTS: Daily use of D-Amph 30 to 50 mg or L-AmB 50 mg resulted in a similar Cmin, but a significant increase ocurred with L-AmB 100 mg/day. The geometric mean Cmin tended to decrease with a reduction in the dose and frequency of intermittent L-AmB infusions: 357 ng/mL (100 mg 4 to 5 times/week) > 263 ng/mL (50 mg 4 to 5 times/week) > 227 ng/mL (50 mg 1 to 3 times/week). The impact on Cmin was variable in patients whose dose or therapeutic scheme was changed, especially when administered the intermittent infusion of amphotericin B. The mean Cmin for each L-AmB schedule of intermittent therapy was equal or higher than the minimum inhibitory concentration of amphotericin B against Cryptococcus isolates from 10/12 patients. The Cmin of amphotericin B in patients with cryptococcal meningitis was comparable between those that survived or died. CONCLUSIONS: By evaluating the Cmin of amphotericin B, we demonstrated the therapeutic potential of its intermittent use including in the consolidation phase of neurocryptococcosis treatment, despite the great variability in serum levels among patients.
       
  • Genotype®MTBDRplus and Xpert®MTB/RIF in the diagnosis of tuberculosis
           

    • Abstract: Abstract INTRODUCTION: The present study sought to assess the mean and activity based cost (ABC) of the laboratory diagnosis for tuberculosis through the application of conventional and molecular techniques-Xpert®MTB/RIF and Genotype®MTBDRplus-in a tertiary referral hospital in Brazil. METHODS: The mean cost and ABC formed the basis for the cost analysis of the TB laboratory diagnosis. RESULTS: The mean cost and ABC were US$ 4.00 and US$ 3.24, respectively, for a bacilloscopy; US$ 6.73 and US$ 5.27 for a Lowenstein-Jensen (LJ) culture; US$ 105.42 and US$ 76.56 for a drug sensitivity test (DST)-proportions method (PM) in LJ; US$ 148.45 and US$ 136.80 for a DST-BACTECTM MGITTM 960 system; US$ 11.53 and US$ 9.89 for an Xpert®MTB/RIF; and US$ 84.21 and US$ 48.38 for a Genotype®MTBDRplus. CONCLUSIONS: The mean cost and ABC proved to be good decision-making parameters in the diagnosis of TB and MDR-TB. The effective implementation of algorithms will depend on the conditions at each location.
       
  • Relationship between antifungal susceptibility profile and virulence
           factors in Candida albicans isolated from nail specimens

    • Abstract: Abstract INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to evaluate some virulence factors in Candida albicans isolates from patients with onychomycosis and determine the correlation between these factors and the antifungal resistance profile. METHODS: Seventy species of C. albicans were confirmed using polymerase chain reaction amplification of the HWP1 gene. According to the Clinical & Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines, the susceptibility profile of four antifungal agents was investigated, and the production of aspartyl protease, phospholipase, haemolysin, and biofilm was determined. The correlation between these profiles was also investigated. RESULTS: The isolates indicated different levels of resistance and production of virulence factors. Significant correlations were observed between the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of fluconazole/itraconazole and biofilm production, between phospholipase production and fluconazole/itraconazole MIC, and between fluconazole MIC and hemolytic activity in C. albicans isolates. The results also showed significant correlations between phospholipase activity and biofilm production. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings will contribute to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of C. albicans and characterize the relationship between virulence factors and antifungal resistance, which may suggest new therapeutic strategies considering the possible involvement of the virulence mechanism in the effectiveness of treatment.
       
  • Surveillance of human retroviruses in blood samples from patients with
           hepatitis B and C in São Paulo, Brazil

    • Abstract: Abstract INTRODUCTION Human retroviruses and the hepatitis B and C viruses (HBV and HCV, respectively) share routes of transmission; thus, coinfections occur and could alter subsequent disease outcomes. A preliminary study on human T-lymphotropic virus types 1 and 2 (HTLV-1/2) in serum samples from HBV- and HCV-infected individuals in São Paulo revealed 1.3% and 5.3% rates of coinfection, respectively. These percentages were of concern since they were detected in HTLV-endemic regions and in high-risk individuals in Brazil. The present study was conducted to extend and confirm these data. METHODS HTLV-1/2 and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection status were identified in 1,984 sera for HBV and HCV viral load quantification - 1,290 samples from HBV-infected individuals (53.3% men, mean age: 47.1 years) and 694 samples from HCV-infected individuals (56.3% men, mean age: 50.1 years). HTLV-1/2 antibodies were detected by enzyme immunoassay, followed by western blotting and line immunoassay; HIV infection was detected by enzyme immunoassay. RESULTS HTLV-1/-2 infection was detected in 1.9% HBV-infected individuals (0.7% HTLV-1 and 1.2% HTLV-2) and in 4.0% (2.4% HTLV-1 and 1.6% HTLV-2) HCV-infected individuals; HIV infection was detected in 9.2% and 14.5%, respectively. Strong associations with HTLV and HIV, male sex, and older age were found in HBV/HTLV and HCV/HTLV-coinfected individuals (p<0.05). CONCLUSIONS HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 were confirmed to be prevalent in individuals with HBV and HCV in São Paulo; coinfected individuals deserve further clinical and laboratory investigation.
       
  • Association of leptin and leptin receptor polymorphisms with coronary
           artery disease in a North Chinese Han population

    • Abstract: Abstract INTRODUCTION: Leptin (LEP) is a peptide hormone that acts via leptin receptor (LEPR) binding. Genetic evidence from different human populations has implicated LEP/LEPR in the pathogenesis of coronary artery disease (CAD), and suggests that certain LEP/LEPR gene polymorphisms may increase the risk of CAD. The aim of this study was to assess two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in LEP genes (rs2167270 and rs7799039) and two in LEPR genes (rs6588147, rs1137100) for association with CAD. METHODS: We enrolled 271 North Chinese Han CAD patients, and 113 healthy age- and sex-matched controls. Genomic DNA was extracted from whole blood, and the four SNPs were assessed using a MassArray system. RESULTS: The G allele frequency at rs2167270 was significantly higher among CAD cases than among controls. The AG genotype at rs7799039 was associated with a significantly decreased risk of CAD unlike the AA genotype used as the reference. The A allele was significantly associated with the CAD patient group. Interestingly, statistically significant differences in genotype and allele frequency at LEP rs2167270 and rs7799039 existed among females but not among males. CONCLUSIONS: The current study detected a significant association between genetic variations at LEP rs7799039 and rs2167270 and the risk of CAD in a north Chinese population, and revealed that LEP rs2167270 and rs7799039 gene polymorphisms might act as predisposing factors for CAD.
       
  • Demographic and clinical characteristics of pulmonary arterial
           hypertension caused by schistosomiasis are indistinguishable from other
           etiologies

    • Abstract: Abstract INTRODUCTION: Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a serious pulmonary circulation disease caused by several etiologies, including schistosomiasis. The present study retrospectively evaluated the clinical and hemodynamic characteristics of patients with schistosomal PAH (PAH-Sch) compared to those of non-Sch PAH patients (non-Sch PAH). METHODS: Patients treated at the Pronto-Socorro Cardiológico de Pernambuco and diagnosed by right cardiac catheterization were divided into PAH-Sch and non-Sch PAH groups. Their socio-demographic and clinical characteristics, N-terminal-pro B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), and echocardiography and hemodynamic parameters were retrospectively reviewed. RESULTS: Among the included 98 patients (mean age, 45 ± 14 years; 68 women [69.4%]), we found 56 PAH-Sch and 42 non-Sch PAH. The age distribution was heterogeneous in the PAH-Sch group, with patients predominantly ranging from 50-59 (p <0.004). Dyspnea was the most common symptom, reported by 92 patients (93.8%), and commonly present for over two years prior to diagnosis. Clinical symptoms were similar in both groups, with no differences in functional class, pulmonary artery systolic pressure (p = 0.102), 6-minute walk test score (p = 0.234), NT-proBNP serum levels (p = 0.081), or hemodynamic parameters. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with PAH-Sch present clinical, laboratory, and hemodynamic profiles similar to those with PAH resulting from other etiologies of poor prognosis. PAH is an important manifestation of schistosomiasis in endemic regions that is often diagnosed late.
       
  • Phylogenetic Group/Subgroups Distributions, Virulence Factors, and
           Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Escherichia coli Strains from Urinary
           Tract Infections in Hatay

    • Abstract: Abstract INTRODUCTION: Nosocomial and community acquired urinary tract infections (UTIs) are one of the most encountered infections in the world. METHODS: This study aimed to determine the antibiotic susceptibility, phylogeny, and virulence genes of 153 Escherichia coli strains isolated from UTIs. Antimicrobial susceptibility of the isolates to different classes of antimicrobials was determined by the VITEK-2 automated system. Presence of virulence genes and phylogenetic groups were investigated by PCR. RESULTS: Regarding susceptibility to antimicrobials, ampicillin resistance was most abundant (67.3%), followed by amoxicillin-clavulanic acid (50.9%); least abundant was resistance to amikacin (1.3%) and nitrofurantoin (1.3%). Multi drug resistance (MDR) was observed in 34.6% of the isolates, and all isolates were found to be susceptible to imipenem, meropenem and fosfomycine. The majority of the isolates belonged to the phylogenetic group B23 (35.9%), followed by A1 (20.9%), D1 (18.9%), D2 (12.4%), A0 (%5.9), B1 (3.9%) and B2 (1.9%). Among E. coli strains examined, 49% had iucD, 32.7% papE-F, 26.1% papC, 15% cnf2, 11.1% sfa, 7.8% cnf1, 1.3% afaE, 1.3% afaD, 1.3% hlyA, 0.7% f17a-A, 0.7% clpG and 0.7% eaeA genes. CONCLUSIONS Our research demonstrated that virulence factors were distributed among different phylogroup/subgroups, which play a role in UTIs pathogenesis in humans. For this reason, complex and detailed studies are required to determine the relationship between virulence factors and specific E. coli strains that cause UTIs in humans.
       
  • Efficacy of the Benznidazole+Posaconazole combination therapy in
           parasitemia reduction: An experimental murine model of acute Chagas

    • Abstract: Abstract INTRODUCTION: Benznidazole (BZL) and Nifurtimox (NFX) are the pharmacological treatment for acute phase Chagas Disease (CD); however, therapy resistance and residual mortality development remain important unresolved issues. Posaconazole (POS) has shown a trypanocidal effect in vivo and in vitro. Thus, this study aimed at comparing the T. Cruzi parasitic load-reducing effect of the combination of BZL+POS against that of monotherapy with either, during acute phase CD, in an experimental murine model. METHODS Nineteen Wistar rats were randomly allocated to four groups and inoculated with the trypomastigotes of T. cruzi strain´s JChVcl1. The rats were administered anti-parasites from day 20-29 post-infection. The Pizzi and Brener method was used for parasitemia measurement. Longitudinal data analysis for the continuous outcome of repeated measures was performed using parasitemia as the outcome measured at days 20, 22, 24, 27, and 29 post-infection. RESULTS All four groups had similar parasitic loads (p=0.143) prior to therapy initiation. Among the three treatment groups, the BZL+POS (n=5) group showed the highest mean parasitic load reduction (p=0.000) compared with the control group. Likewise, the BZL+POS group rats showed an earlier therapeutic effect and were the only ones without parasites in their myocardial samples. CONCLUSIONS: Treatment of acute phase CD with BZL+POS was more efficacious at parasitemia and myocardial injury reduction, compared with monotherapy with either.
       
  • Susceptibility of Aedes aegypti populations to pyriproxyfen in the Federal
           District of Brazil

    • Abstract: Abstract INTRODUCTION: In Brasilia, pyriproxyfen (PPF; 0.01 mg/L) has been used for the larval control of Aedes aegypti mosquitoes since 2016. Information on the susceptibility of Ae. aegypti to PPF, and the development of resistance in populations from the Federal District of Brazil (FD) is limited. It is essential to monitor the susceptibility of Ae. aegypti to insecticides in order to improve vector control strategies. This study aimed to evaluate the susceptibility of Ae. aegypti populations from five areas of Brasilia to PPF. METHODS: We performed dose-response tests to estimate the emergence inhibition and resistance ratio of each field population, including the Rockefeller reference population. We also analyzed egg positivity, and the density and mortality of larvae and pupae. RESULTS: Populations from Vila Planalto (RR50=1.7), Regiment Guards Cavalry (RR50=2.5), and Sub-secretary of Justice Complex (RR50=3.7) presented high susceptibility to PPF, while the RR values of populations from Lago Norte (RR50=7.7) and Varjão (RR50=5.9) were moderately high, suggesting the emergence of insipient resistance to PPF in Brasilia. At 30 ng/mL, the highest larvae mortality rate was 2.7% for the population from Lago Norte, while that of pupae was 92.1% for Varjão and Vila Planalto. CONCLUSIONS: The five populations of Ae. aegypti from the FD are susceptible to PPF and there is a need to monitor the susceptibility of Ae. aegypti in new areas of the FD.
       
  • Hepatitis B: Prevalence and occult infection in HIV-infected patients

    • Abstract: Abstract INTRODUCTION: HBV and HIV have identical transmission routes. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of HBV in HIV patients and to detect the presence of occult HBV infection. METHODS: All samples were tested for serology markers and using qPCR. RESULTS: This study included 232 individuals, out of which 36.6% presented with HBV markers and 11.8% presented with HBsAg or HBV-DNA, including 3 patients that showed OBI. CONCLUSIONS: We observed a high prevalence of HBV among HIV patients. In addition, the results suggest that OBI can occur in patients with serological profiles that are indicative of past infection. Therefore, the application of molecular tests may enable the identification of infections that are not evident solely based on serology.
       
  • Increased capture of Aedes aegypti (Linnaeus, 1762) (Diptera: Culicidae)
           by removing one ADULTRAP component

    • Abstract: Abstract INTRODUCTION: Aedes aegypti is the main vector responsible for the transmission of numerous arboviruses. Adultrap® has been developed to catch these insects. METHODS: We tested the effectiveness of capturing adults with and without one of the components of Adultrap®. RESULTS: The mean number of insects caught by the original trap was 1.25 (standard deviation = 1.28), while the average obtained with the modified trap was 8.88 (standard deviation = 3.44). The medians were statistically different (p = 0.001) according to the Mann-Whitney test. CONCLUSIONS: The modification of Adultrap® increased the average catch of Ae. aegypti by up to seven times.
       
  • HIV prevalence in recently incarcerated adult males in the Federal
           District, Brasilia, Brazil

    • Abstract: Abstract INTRODUCTION: This study intends to describe a HIV intake screening strategy in recently incarcerated adults in Distrito Federal, Brasilia, Brazil. METHODS: We tested 455 recently incarcerated adults in Distrito Federal in 2016 using rapid tests (RT) applied to oral samples (OS). RESULTS: The estimated frequency of positive tests was 0.88% (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.34% to 2.24%). CONCLUSIONS: The present findings reveal the potential significance of detecting new HIV infection cases in a vulnerable population using point-of-care rapid diagnostic tests.
       
  • In vivo antileishmanial activity of Annona mucosa
           extracts

    • Abstract: Abstract INTRODUCTION: Leishmaniasis, a disease caused by a parasite endemic to large areas of tropical and subtropical countries, is a growing public health problem. METHODS: Male BALB/c mice were infected with Leishmania amazonensis and treated with extracts isolated from Annona mucosa. RESULTS: Treated groups had significantly reduced footpad swelling. The group treated intraperitoneally with hexane extract showed footpad swelling similar to groups treated with Pentamidine® and Glucantime®. Groups treated with dichloromethane extract and hexane extract presented the recovering phenotype associated with reduced parasite levels. CONCLUSIONS: Extracts of A. mucosa are promising sources of novel antileishmanial compounds.
       
  • Characterization of adverse reactions to benznidazole in patients with
           Chagas disease in the Federal District, Brazil

    • Abstract: Abstract INTRODUCTION: Benznidazole is used for treating Chagas disease (CD). This cross-sectional study aimed to characterize the adverse drug reactions (ADRs) of benznidazole at a public hospital in Brazil’s Federal District. METHODS: Medical records were analyzed and ADRs were categorized by type, intensity, seriousness, and causality. RESULTS: Of the 62 patients who started benznidazole treatment for CD, 41 (66%) presented with 105 ADRs; 23 (37%) discontinued the treatment. Most reactions were classified as probable (81%), severe (63%), serious (67%), and dose-dependent (56%). CONCLUSIONS: The high incidence of ADRs because of treatment withdrawal revealed the need for safer alternatives for CD treatment.
       
  • Human platelet antigen-3 polymorphism as a risk factor for rheumatological
           manifestations in hepatitis C

    • Abstract: Abstract INTRODUCTION: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is involved in the pathogenesis of autoimmune and rheumatic disorders. Although the human platelet antigens (HPA) polymorphism are associated with HCV persistence, they have not been investigated in rheumatological manifestations (RM). This study focused on verifying associations between allele and genotype HPA and RM in patients with chronic hepatitis C. METHODS: Patients (159) with chronic hepatitis C of both genders were analyzed. RESULTS: Women showed association between HPA-3 polymorphisms and RM. CONCLUSIONS: An unprecedented strong association between rheumatological manifestations and HPA-3 polymorphism, possibly predisposing women to complications during the disease course, was observed.
       
  • Chemical composition and larvicidal activities of essential oil of
           Cinnamomum camphora (L.) leaf against Anopheles stephensi

    • Abstract: Abstract INTRODUCTION Anopheles stephensi is the main malaria vector in Southeast Asia. Recently, plant-sourced larvicides are attracting great interests. METHODS: The essential oil was extracted from the leaf of Cinnamomum camphora (L.), and a bioassay was conducted to determine the larvicidal efficacy. The chemical composition of the essential oil was determined by GC-MS analysis. RESULTS: The oil showed strong, dose-dependent larvicidal activities. The onset of larvicidal efficiency was rapid. The LC50 and LC95 were determined as 0.146% and 1.057% at 1 h, 0.031% and 0.237% at 12 h, 0.026% and 0.128% at 24 h, respectively. The oil contains 32 compounds. CONCLUSIONS The essential oil of C. camphora leaf has an excellent larvicidal potential for the control of A. stephensi.
       
  • New report of Eratyrus cuspidatus Stål, 1859 (Hemiptera: Reduviidae:
           Triatominae) in the State of Campeche, Mexico

    • Abstract: Abstract INTRODUCTION: Triatomine bugs are vectors of Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease. METHODS: Triatomine bugs were collected and identified following established protocols. In addition, infection with T. cruzi was detected by microscopic and molecular analysis. RESULTS: We captured an adult male specimen of the Eratyrus cuspidatus species that has not been reported in the state of Campeche. CONCLUSIONS: This finding provides new information on the distribution of E. cuspidatus in Mexico. However, more studies are needed to determine their epidemiological significance.
       
  • In vitro characterization of virulence factors among species of the
           Candida parapsilosis complex

    • Abstract: Abstract INTRODUCTION: Candida parapsilosis complex species differ from each other with regard to their prevalence and virulence. METHODS: The hydrolytic enzyme activity, biofilm production, and adhesion to epithelial cells were analyzed in 87 C. parapsilosis complex strains. RESULTS: Among the studied isolates, 97.7%, 63.2%, and 82.8% exhibited very strong proteinase, esterase, and hemolysin activity, respectively. All the C. parapsilosis complex isolates produced biofilms and presented an average adherence of 96.0 yeasts/100 epithelial cells. CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that Candida parapsilosis complex isolates showed different levels of enzyme activity, biofilm production, and adhesion to epithelial cells.
       
  • Seroprevalence of cytomegalovirus and its coinfection with Epstein-Barr
           virus in adult residents from Manaus: a population-based study

    • Abstract: Abstract INTRODUCTION: This study assessed the seroprevalence of cytomegalovirus, associated factors, and Epstein-Barr virus coinfection among adult residents of Manaus. METHODS: Using a cross-sectional study design, we collected blood samples from 136 individuals in a household survey in 2016. Prevalence ratios were calculated using Poisson regression. RESULTS: Cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr virus seroprevalences were 67.6% (95% CI: 9.7-75.6%) and 97.8% (95% CI: 95.3-100.0%), respectively. Coinfection was observed in 66.2% (95% CI: 58.1-74.2%) of participants. Bivariate analysis showed no statistical association. CONCLUSIONS: Seroprevalences were high among participants and approximately 7 out of 10 individuals had cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr virus coinfection.
       
  • Imported hepatopulmonary echinococcosis: first report of Echinococcus
           granulosus sensu stricto (G1) in Bolivia

    • Abstract: Abstract Hepatopulmonary hydatidosis in young children is a rare and atypical presentation of Echinococcus granulosus infection. We report the first case of cystic echinococcosis caused by a microvariant of E. granulosus sensu stricto. Chemotherapy and systemic corticoids were administered before curative surgery was performed. Recurrence was not observed for more than 24 months of follow-up.
       
  • Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) associated with mosquito-borne
           diseases: Chikungunya virus X yellow fever immunization

    • Abstract: Abstract Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) is a demyelinating autoimmune neuropathic condition characterized by extensive bilateral and confluent lesions in the cerebral white matter and cerebellum. The basal ganglia and gray matter may also be involved. In most cases, the symptoms are preceded by viral infection or vaccination. In this report, we present a case of ADEM associated with optic neuritis presenting alongside two potential triggering factors: chikungunya virus infection and yellow fever immunization.
       
  • Urogenital tuberculosis in a patient with end-stage renal disease

    • Abstract: Abstract Tuberculosis is one of the most common infections worldwide with particularly high incidence rates in countries with unfavorable socioeconomic conditions and among persons with impaired immune systems. While most patients with this disease will present with pulmonary tuberculosis, immunocompromised individuals also commonly present with extrapulmonary manifestations. We report the case of a 28-year-old male patient with end-stage renal disease who presented with long-standing systemic symptoms and genitourinary manifestations, who was diagnosed with urogenital tuberculosis both by clinical and microbiologic criteria. Clinicians should always suspect tuberculosis in patients with chronic symptoms, especially in those with immunosuppression.
       
  • Postpartum histoplasmosis in an HIV-negative woman: a case report and
           phylogenetic characterization by internal transcribed spacer region
           analysis

    • Abstract: Abstract The present report describes the first case of postpartum disseminated histoplasmosis in a 24-year-old HIV-negative woman. On the tenth day after vaginal delivery, the patient presented with dyspnea, fever, hypotension, tachycardia, and painful hepatomegaly. Yeast-like Histoplasma capsulatum features were isolated in the buffy coat. The phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that the fungal isolate was similar to other H. capsulatum isolates identified in HIV patients from Ceará and Latin America. Thus, histoplasmosis development in individuals with transitory immunosuppression or during the period of immunological recovery should be carefully examined.
       
  • Tegumentary leishmaniasis mimicking visceralization in a cirrhotic
           patient: atypical cutaneous lesions and local immunological features

    • Abstract: Abstract Tegumentary leishmaniasis (TL) diagnosis is challenging due to the lack of a gold standard diagnostic tool. The diagnosis is significantly harder in regions where visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is also prevalent since immunological tests may present cross-reactivity. A cirrhotic patient from an endemic Brazilian region for TL and VL presented with atypical cutaneous lesions, a usual clinico-laboratory feature of VL (including a positive rk39 test result), but he was diagnosed with TL histopathologically; VL was ruled out by necropsy. Physicians working in co-prevalent areas should be aware of atypical features, unusual clinical course, and unexpected laboratory findings of leishmaniasis.
       
  • Vertebral cryptococcosis: An uncommon cause of a paravertebral mass

    • Abstract: Abstract Tegumentary leishmaniasis (TL) diagnosis is challenging due to the lack of a gold standard diagnostic tool. The diagnosis is significantly harder in regions where visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is also prevalent since immunological tests may present cross-reactivity. A cirrhotic patient from an endemic Brazilian region for TL and VL presented with atypical cutaneous lesions, a usual clinico-laboratory feature of VL (including a positive rk39 test result), but he was diagnosed with TL histopathologically; VL was ruled out by necropsy. Physicians working in co-prevalent areas should be aware of atypical features, unusual clinical course, and unexpected laboratory findings of leishmaniasis.
       
  • Cryptococcus neoformans var. gattii isolate with Unusual
           Morphology

    • Abstract: Abstract Tegumentary leishmaniasis (TL) diagnosis is challenging due to the lack of a gold standard diagnostic tool. The diagnosis is significantly harder in regions where visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is also prevalent since immunological tests may present cross-reactivity. A cirrhotic patient from an endemic Brazilian region for TL and VL presented with atypical cutaneous lesions, a usual clinico-laboratory feature of VL (including a positive rk39 test result), but he was diagnosed with TL histopathologically; VL was ruled out by necropsy. Physicians working in co-prevalent areas should be aware of atypical features, unusual clinical course, and unexpected laboratory findings of leishmaniasis.
       
  • Laryngotracheobronchial papillomatosis: an uncommon cause of recurrent
           respiratory infection

    • Abstract: Abstract Tegumentary leishmaniasis (TL) diagnosis is challenging due to the lack of a gold standard diagnostic tool. The diagnosis is significantly harder in regions where visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is also prevalent since immunological tests may present cross-reactivity. A cirrhotic patient from an endemic Brazilian region for TL and VL presented with atypical cutaneous lesions, a usual clinico-laboratory feature of VL (including a positive rk39 test result), but he was diagnosed with TL histopathologically; VL was ruled out by necropsy. Physicians working in co-prevalent areas should be aware of atypical features, unusual clinical course, and unexpected laboratory findings of leishmaniasis.
       
  • A Very Rare Case of Brucellosis-Related Tubo-ovarian Abscess

    • Abstract: Abstract Tegumentary leishmaniasis (TL) diagnosis is challenging due to the lack of a gold standard diagnostic tool. The diagnosis is significantly harder in regions where visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is also prevalent since immunological tests may present cross-reactivity. A cirrhotic patient from an endemic Brazilian region for TL and VL presented with atypical cutaneous lesions, a usual clinico-laboratory feature of VL (including a positive rk39 test result), but he was diagnosed with TL histopathologically; VL was ruled out by necropsy. Physicians working in co-prevalent areas should be aware of atypical features, unusual clinical course, and unexpected laboratory findings of leishmaniasis.
       
  • Reflections on vector control in Brazil

    • Abstract: Abstract Tegumentary leishmaniasis (TL) diagnosis is challenging due to the lack of a gold standard diagnostic tool. The diagnosis is significantly harder in regions where visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is also prevalent since immunological tests may present cross-reactivity. A cirrhotic patient from an endemic Brazilian region for TL and VL presented with atypical cutaneous lesions, a usual clinico-laboratory feature of VL (including a positive rk39 test result), but he was diagnosed with TL histopathologically; VL was ruled out by necropsy. Physicians working in co-prevalent areas should be aware of atypical features, unusual clinical course, and unexpected laboratory findings of leishmaniasis.
       
  • Anopheles control is considerably more complicated than
           Aedes control

    • Abstract: Abstract Tegumentary leishmaniasis (TL) diagnosis is challenging due to the lack of a gold standard diagnostic tool. The diagnosis is significantly harder in regions where visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is also prevalent since immunological tests may present cross-reactivity. A cirrhotic patient from an endemic Brazilian region for TL and VL presented with atypical cutaneous lesions, a usual clinico-laboratory feature of VL (including a positive rk39 test result), but he was diagnosed with TL histopathologically; VL was ruled out by necropsy. Physicians working in co-prevalent areas should be aware of atypical features, unusual clinical course, and unexpected laboratory findings of leishmaniasis.
       
  • Influenza Sentinel Surveillance and Severe Acute Respiratory Infection in
           a Reference Hospital in Southern Brazil

    • Abstract: Abstract INTRODUCTION: We report the results of the active surveillance of influenza infections in hospitalized patients and the evaluation of the seasonality and correlation with temperature and rainfall data. METHODS: During the 2-year study period, 775 patients were tested for 15 respiratory viruses (RVs). RESULTS: Most of the 57% of (n=444) virus-positive samples were human rhinovirus and respiratory syncytial virus. However, 10.4% (n=46) were influenza virus (80% FluA; 20% FluB). Age and SARI were significantly associated with influenza. FluB circulation was higher is 2013. CONCLUSIONS: In the post-epidemic period, influenza remains an important cause of hospitalization in SARI patients.
       
  • Injuries caused by fish to fishermen in the Vale do Alto Juruá,
           Western Brazilian Amazon

    • Abstract: Abstract INTRODUCTION: This study aimed to document injuries caused by fish among professional fishermen in the Western Brazilian Amazon. METHODS: We undertook a descriptive, retrospective study, involving 51 professional fishermen, to determine clinical, epidemiological, and therapeutic aspects of their injuries. RESULTS: Among 51 fishermen interviewed, most injuries were due to mandi (Pimelodus spp.), and the hands were the most injured region, resulting in pain and bleeding in all cases. CONCLUSIONS: Our study findings confirm the morbidity of fish-related injuries, and reaffirm the need for relevant information regarding prevention and injury management.
       
  • Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the ICU: prevalence, resistance profile, and
           antimicrobial consumption

    • Abstract: Abstract INTRODUCTION: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the main pathogens causing infection in intensive care units (ICUs) and usually presents antimicrobial resistance. METHODS: Data were obtained from ICUs between 2010 and 2013. RESULTS: P. aeruginosa had a prevalence of 14.5% of which 48.7% were multidrug resistant. We observed increasing resistance to carbapenems and polymyxin B and growing consumption of aminoglycosides, meropenem, ceftazidime, and polymyxin B. The regression impact between resistance and consumption was significant with respect to amikacin, imipenem, meropenem, and polymyxin B. CONCLUSIONS: Monitoring antimicrobial consumption and resistant microorganisms should be reinforced to combat antimicrobial- and multi-drug resistance.
       
  • Spatiotemporal distribution of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome
           incidence in Brazil between 2012 and 2016

    • Abstract: Abstract INTRODUCTION: Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) remains a major public health issue in Brazil. This ecological study aimed to evaluate the spatiotemporal distribution of notified new AIDS cases in Brazil between 2012 and 2016. METHODS: A Bayesian spatiotemporal model based on the Poisson distribution was used to obtain smoothed incidence estimates of AIDS in each of the 133 Brazilian intermediate regions. RESULTS: Spatial distribution of new AIDS cases is highly heterogeneous. Regions with higher gross domestic product per capita tend to have higher incidence rates of AIDS. CONCLUSIONS: Strategies to prevent and control AIDS should consider regional differences.
       
  • Investigation of carbapenemases and aminoglycoside modifying enzymes of
           Acinetobacter baumannii isolates recovered from patients admitted to
           intensive care units in a tertiary-care hospital in Brazil

    • Abstract: Abstract INTRODUCTION: Acinetobacter baumannii are opportunistic bacteria, highly capable of acquiring antimicrobial resistance through the production of carbapenemases and aminoglycoside modifying enzymes (AMEs). METHODS: Carbapenemase and AME genes were investigated in A. baumannii recovered from inpatients of a Brazilian hospital. RESULTS: The key genes found were bla OXA-51-like, the association ISAba1- bla OXA-23-like, and the AME genes aph(3´)-VI, aac(6´)-Ib, aac(3)-Ia, and aph(3´)-Ia. Different clusters spread through the institution wards. CONCLUSIONS: The dissemination of bla OXA-23-like and AME-carrying A. baumannii through the hospital highlights the need for improved preventive measures to reduce the spread of infection.
       
  • Fragment detection of Coleopteran and Triatomine insects in experimentally
           contaminated acai pulp and sugarcane juice

    • Abstract: Abstract INTRODUCTION: Oral transmission of acute Chagas disease is an emerging public health concern. This study aimed to detect insect fragments in experimentally contaminated food, by comparing triatomines with other insects. METHODS Food samples were experimentally contaminated with insects, processed to recover their fragments by light filth, and analyzed by microscopy and Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). RESULTS: Morphological differences between coleopteran and triatomine insects were observed in microscopic images. PCR was efficient in amplifying Triatominae DNA in the experimentally contaminated food. CONCLUSIONS: This methodology could be utilized by food analysts to identify possible insect contamination in food samples.
       
  • Seroprevalence of arenavirus and hantavirus in indigenous populations from
           the Caribbean, Colombia

    • Abstract: Abstract INTRODUCTION: In Colombia, there is insufficient epidemiological surveillance of zoonotic hemorrhagic viruses. METHODS: We performed a sero-epidemiological study in indigenous populations of Wayuü, Kankuamos, and Tuchin communities using Maciel hantavirus and Junin arenavirus antigens for IgG detection by ELISA. RESULTS IgG antibodies to hantavirus and arenavirus were found in 5/506 (1%) and 2/506 (0.4%) serum samples, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Arenavirus and hantavirus circulate in indigenous populations from the Colombian Caribbean region, and the results indicate that the indigenous populations are exposed to these zoonotic agents, with unknown consequences on their health, despite low seroprevalence.
       
  • Evidence of a sylvatic enzootic cycle of Leishmania infantum in the State
           of Amapá, Brazil

    • Abstract: Abstract INTRODUCTION: Leishmania infantum was considered to be absent from Amapá until 2017 when canine infection was detected. However, there is a lack of knowledge about which reservoir species are involved in transmission in this region. METHODS: Between 2014 and 2016, 86 samples from wild mammals and 74 from domestic dogs were collected in Wajãpi Indigenous Territory and were tested for the presence of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) of Leishmania. RESULTS: The DNA of Le. infantum was detected in two rodent samples, Dasyprocta sp. and Proechimys cuvieri. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first evidence characterizing a sylvatic transmission cycle of Le. infantum in the State of Amapá.
       
  • Human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome epidemic
           in adolescents from a Brazilian metropolis (1978-2017)

    • Abstract: Abstract INTRODUCTION: Prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus among adolescents is increasing. This study aimed to analyze this current situation in Rio de Janeiro City. METHODS: This was a retrospective longitudinal study using secondary data from the National System of Notifiable Diseases database of cases in adolescents aged 13-19 years. RESULTS: There were 885 acquired immunodeficiency syndrome cases from 1978 to 2017 and 445 human immunodeficiency virus new cases from 2014 to 2017. Over time, sexually transmitted human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome cases increase. CONCLUSIONS: Human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome epidemic in adolescents requires novel prevention policies.
       
  • Association of adverse drug reaction to anti-tuberculosis medication with
           quality of life in patients in a tertiary referral hospital

    • Abstract: Abstract INTRODUCTION: Adverse drug reactions can develop when using anti-tuberculosis medication, and the effects of the drugs can also significantly hinder the treatment of patients. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 73 patients using two standardized questionnaires and the World Health Organization Quality of Life-Bref. RESULTS: All patients reported the presence of adverse drug reactions, 71.6% of which are minor and 28.3% both major and minor. The global quality of life analysis showed that patients with tuberculosis have a good average (67.3%). CONCLUSIONS: There is an association between quality of life and adverse drug reaction, educational level, and vulnerability.
       
  • Epidemiological aspects and spatial distribution of visceral leishmaniasis
           in Governador Valadares, Brazil, between 2008 and 2012

    • Abstract: Abstract INTRODUCTION: Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is an important parasitic disease. We evaluated the epidemiological aspects and spatial distribution of visceral leishmaniasis in Governador Valadares, Brazil. METHODS: All cases of VL, registered by the municipal health department, were analyzed and georeferenced. RESULTS: The human mortality rate was 15% and canine seroprevalence rate was 29.0%. Higher numbers of canine VL cases correlated with higher incidence of human cases. CONCLUSIONS: The high rate of canine seroprevalence, resurgence of the human disease, and correlation between canine and human VL reinforces the role of the dog in disease transmission within the municipality.
       
  • The austral-most record of the genus Haemagogus Williston
           (Diptera: Culicidae)

    • Abstract: Abstract INTRODUCTION: The genus Haemagogus Williston is restricted to Central America and North and middle of South America and it includes numerous species of yellow fever virus vectors. METHODS: Adult female and larvae mosquitoes were collected using hand aspirators and dipper and pipette, respectively. RESULTS: The first record of a species of Haemagogus and particularly of Haemagogus spegazzinii was from La Pampa, Argentina. With this registry, the number of species found in La Pampa province rises to 18. CONCLUSIONS: New information on breeding sites for the species and implications of this new record suggest a possible extension of distribution in the near future.
       
  • Post-exposure human rabies prophylaxis: spatial patterns of inadequate
           procedures in Ceará - Brazil, 2007 to 2015

    • Abstract: Abstract INTRODUCTION: This study investigated the spatial distribution of inappropriate post-exposure human rabies procedures in Ceará, Brazil, between 2007 and 2015. METHODS: The ecological study population was based on the records of post-exposure human rabies procedures from the Notification Disease Information System. We analyzed the data using the Moran Index (I) and the Moran Local Index. RESULTS: There were 222,036 (95.8%) records with inappropriate post-exposure human rabies procedures. There was heterogeneity in their spatial distribution, with two significant clusters in the northeast and northwest regions. CONCLUSIONS: These findings help elaborate differentiated strategies to reduce unnecessary post-exposure human rabies procedures.
       
  • Social determinants of mortality due to visceral leishmaniasis in Brazil
           (2001-2015): an ecological study

    • Abstract: Abstract INTRODUCTION We aimed to analyze the relationship between visceral leishmaniasis mortality and social determinants of health (SDH). METHODS This was an ecological study of all leishmaniasis-related deaths in Brazil, from 2001 to 2015. We analyzed 49 indicators of human development and social vulnerability. The association was tested using the classical and spatial regression model. RESULTS Mortality was associated with indicators that expressed low human development and high social vulnerability: lack of garbage collection, low schooling, unemployment rate, low per capita income, and income inequality (Gini index). CONCLUSIONS: There was an association between high mortality by leishmaniasis and low SDH.
       
  • Gonotrophic discordance in Culex quinquefasciatus (Diptera: Culicidae) in
           the city of São Paulo, Brazil

    • Abstract: Abstract INTRODUCTION: This study aimed to assess the occurrence of gonotrophic discordance in females of Culex quinquefasciatus in São Paulo, Brazil. METHODS: Resting females were collected monthly for 8 months. Females of Cx. quinquefasciatus were identified, and their midgut and ovaries were dissected. RESULTS: Two hundred females were dissected, out of which, 27.5% were nulliparous and 57% were parous. Most females had no blood in the midgut, but gonotrophic discordance was found in 21% females. CONCLUSIONS: Females of Cx. quinquefasciatus showed a high parity rate and gonotrophic discordance, which could favor the vector capacity of this species.
       
  • Prevalence of coinfections in women living with human immunodeficiency
           virus in Northeast Brazil

    • Abstract: Abstract INTRODUCTION: Despite the success of antiretrovirals, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfections continue to cause mortality. We investigated the prevalence of coinfections in women with HIV/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in Sergipe, Brazil. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional study. The coinfections investigated were syphilis, hepatitis B and C, toxoplasmosis, rubella, tuberculosis, and cytomegalovirus. RESULTS: Among the 435 women, 85 (19.5%) had coinfections. The most prevalent was HIV/syphilis, followed by tuberculosis, toxoplasmosis, hepatitis C, hepatitis B, and rubella. Additionally, 300 (96.2%) were seropositive for cytomegalovirus immunoglobulin G. CONCLUSIONS: Despite significant progress in the treatment for people with HIV, coinfections continued to affect this population.
       
  • The deadliest snake according to ethnobiological perception of the
           population of the Alto Juruá region, western Brazilian Amazonia

    • Abstract: Abstract INTRODUCTION: We examined the ethnobiological perception of the population of the Alto Juruá region about different snake species, in terms of their dangerousness and manifestations of envenomation. METHODS: We interviewed 100 villagers who were active in the forests. RESULTS: Lachesis muta was considered the most venomous snake, and Bothrops atrox appeared to be the most feared snake species. CONCLUSIONS: The high incidence, severity, and mortality of B. atrox bites and the severity and mortality of L. muta bites were the factors that contributed to these species being perceived as the most feared and venomous snakes.
       
  • Exposure to Leishmania spp. infection and Lutzomyia spp. in individuals
           living in an area endemic for visceral leishmaniasis in Brazil

    • Abstract: Abstract INTRODUCTION: This study aimed to investigate human exposure to Leishmania spp. infection and sandflies in an area endemic for the disease. METHODS: The presence of antibodies specific for Leishmania spp. and saliva of Lutzomyia spp. and that of L. infantum DNA in blood were evaluated. RESULTS: Antibodies against Leishmania spp. and sandfly saliva were observed in 20.8% and 37.7% of individuals, respectively. DNA of Leishmania spp. was amplified from the blood of one patient. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that Leishmania spp. infection may be underdiagnosed in this area.
       
  • A rare cause of vertebral osteomyelitis: the first case report of rat-bite
           fever in Portugal

    • Abstract: Abstract Rat-bite fever is a rarely diagnosed illness caused by Streptobacillus moniliformis . Although this disease is distributed worldwide, there have been few cases reported in Europe. Here, we report a case of vertebral osteomyelitis and sternoclavicular septic arthritis caused by S. moniliformis in a Portuguese patient previously bitten by a rat. Laboratory diagnosis was performed using molecular identification. This is the first case report of rat-bite fever in Portugal. The case described here serves as a reminder for physicians to consider this diagnosis in patients who have developed fever syndromes after being in contact with rodents.
       
  • de novo Histoid leprosy: an expatriate case recently diagnosed in
           Johannesburg

    • Abstract: Abstract: Histoid leprosy (HL) is a rare variant of lepromatous leprosy with unique clinical, histopathological, and microbiological features. A 32-year-old man from Malawi who immigrated to Johannesburg 1-year-ago, presented with a 4-month history of flesh-colored nodules on the face and trunk and hyperpigmented plaques on the chest and limbs. Skin slit smears confirmed multibacillary leprosy, and skin punch biopsies showed proliferation of spindled cells containing a large number of acid-fast bacilli. The prevalence of de novo HL is increasing in the era of leprosy elimination. HL cases may act as reservoirs and negatively affect the global control of leprosy.
       
  • Surgical Treatment of Cutaneous Anthrax

    • Abstract: Abstract: Histoid leprosy (HL) is a rare variant of lepromatous leprosy with unique clinical, histopathological, and microbiological features. A 32-year-old man from Malawi who immigrated to Johannesburg 1-year-ago, presented with a 4-month history of flesh-colored nodules on the face and trunk and hyperpigmented plaques on the chest and limbs. Skin slit smears confirmed multibacillary leprosy, and skin punch biopsies showed proliferation of spindled cells containing a large number of acid-fast bacilli. The prevalence of de novo HL is increasing in the era of leprosy elimination. HL cases may act as reservoirs and negatively affect the global control of leprosy.
       
  • Erythema at the bacillus Calmette-Guerin scar after influenza vaccination

    • Abstract: Abstract: Histoid leprosy (HL) is a rare variant of lepromatous leprosy with unique clinical, histopathological, and microbiological features. A 32-year-old man from Malawi who immigrated to Johannesburg 1-year-ago, presented with a 4-month history of flesh-colored nodules on the face and trunk and hyperpigmented plaques on the chest and limbs. Skin slit smears confirmed multibacillary leprosy, and skin punch biopsies showed proliferation of spindled cells containing a large number of acid-fast bacilli. The prevalence of de novo HL is increasing in the era of leprosy elimination. HL cases may act as reservoirs and negatively affect the global control of leprosy.
       
  • Erratum

    • Abstract: Abstract: Histoid leprosy (HL) is a rare variant of lepromatous leprosy with unique clinical, histopathological, and microbiological features. A 32-year-old man from Malawi who immigrated to Johannesburg 1-year-ago, presented with a 4-month history of flesh-colored nodules on the face and trunk and hyperpigmented plaques on the chest and limbs. Skin slit smears confirmed multibacillary leprosy, and skin punch biopsies showed proliferation of spindled cells containing a large number of acid-fast bacilli. The prevalence of de novo HL is increasing in the era of leprosy elimination. HL cases may act as reservoirs and negatively affect the global control of leprosy.
       
 
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