Publisher: Sage Publications   (Total: 1090 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 1090 Journals sorted alphabetically
AADE in Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Abstracts in Anthropology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Academic Pathology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Accounting History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.527, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Radiologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.754, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Radiologica Open     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Sociologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 0.939, CiteScore: 2)
Action Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51, SJR: 0.308, CiteScore: 1)
Active Learning in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 361, SJR: 1.397, CiteScore: 2)
Adaptive Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.288, CiteScore: 1)
Administration & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.675, CiteScore: 1)
Adoption & Fostering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.313, CiteScore: 0)
Adsorption Science & Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.258, CiteScore: 1)
Adult Education Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 239, SJR: 0.566, CiteScore: 2)
Adult Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Advances in Dental Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.791, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Developing Human Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31, SJR: 0.614, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Mechanical Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 136, SJR: 0.272, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Methods and Practices in Psychological Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Advances in Structural Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 46, SJR: 0.599, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Tumor Virology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.108, CiteScore: 0)
AERA Open     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Affilia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.496, CiteScore: 1)
Agrarian South : J. of Political Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Air, Soil & Water Research     Open Access   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.214, CiteScore: 1)
Alexandria : The J. of National and Intl. Library and Information Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 67)
Allergy & Rhinology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
AlterNative : An Intl. J. of Indigenous Peoples     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.194, CiteScore: 0)
Alternative Law J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.176, CiteScore: 0)
Alternatives : Global, Local, Political     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.351, CiteScore: 1)
American Behavioral Scientist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.982, CiteScore: 2)
American Economist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
American Educational Research J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 230, SJR: 2.913, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.67, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Cosmetic Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
American J. of Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.646, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Health Promotion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 0.807, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Hospice and Palliative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43, SJR: 0.65, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Law & Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.204, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Lifestyle Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.431, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Medical Quality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.777, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Men's Health     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.595, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Rhinology and Allergy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.972, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Sports Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 216, SJR: 3.949, CiteScore: 6)
American Politics Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33, SJR: 1.313, CiteScore: 1)
American Review of Public Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 2.062, CiteScore: 2)
American Sociological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 333, SJR: 6.333, CiteScore: 6)
American String Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Analytical Chemistry Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.224, CiteScore: 1)
Angiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.849, CiteScore: 2)
Animation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.197, CiteScore: 0)
Annals of Clinical Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.634, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Otology, Rhinology & Laryngology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.807, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Pharmacotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54, SJR: 1.096, CiteScore: 2)
Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48, SJR: 1.225, CiteScore: 3)
Annals of the ICRP     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.548, CiteScore: 1)
Anthropocene Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 3.341, CiteScore: 7)
Anthropological Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42, SJR: 0.739, CiteScore: 1)
Antitrust Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Antiviral Chemistry and Chemotherapy     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.635, CiteScore: 2)
Antyajaa : Indian J. of Women and Social Change     Hybrid Journal  
Applied Biosafety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.131, CiteScore: 0)
Applied Psychological Measurement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 1.17, CiteScore: 1)
Applied Spectroscopy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.489, CiteScore: 2)
Armed Forces & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.29, CiteScore: 1)
Arts and Humanities in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43, SJR: 0.305, CiteScore: 1)
Asia Pacific Media Educator     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.23, CiteScore: 0)
Asia-Pacific J. of Management Research and Innovation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Asia-Pacific J. of Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.558, CiteScore: 1)
Asian and Pacific Migration J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.324, CiteScore: 1)
Asian Cardiovascular and Thoracic Annals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.305, CiteScore: 0)
Asian J. of Comparative Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Asian J. of Legal Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Asian J. of Management Cases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
ASN Neuro     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.534, CiteScore: 3)
Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 1.519, CiteScore: 3)
Assessment for Effective Intervention     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.578, CiteScore: 1)
Australasian Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.433, CiteScore: 1)
Australian & New Zealand J. of Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29, SJR: 1.801, CiteScore: 2)
Australian and New Zealand J. of Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 533, SJR: 0.612, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Career Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Australian J. of Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42, SJR: 0.403, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.497, CiteScore: 1)
Autism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 339, SJR: 1.739, CiteScore: 4)
Autism & Developmental Language Impairments     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Behavior Modification     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.877, CiteScore: 2)
Behavioral and Cognitive Neuroscience Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Bible Translator     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Biblical Theology Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.184, CiteScore: 0)
Big Data & Society     Open Access   (Followers: 52)
Biochemistry Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Bioinformatics and Biology Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.141, CiteScore: 2)
Biological Research for Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.685, CiteScore: 2)
Biomarker Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.81, CiteScore: 2)
Biomarkers in Cancer     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Biomedical Engineering and Computational Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Biomedical Informatics Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Bioscope: South Asian Screen Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.235, CiteScore: 0)
BMS: Bulletin of Sociological Methodology/Bulletin de Méthodologie Sociologique     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.226, CiteScore: 0)
Body & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 1.531, CiteScore: 3)
Bone and Tissue Regeneration Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Brain and Neuroscience Advances     Open Access  
Breast Cancer : Basic and Clinical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.823, CiteScore: 2)
British J. of Music Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
British J. of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 218, SJR: 0.323, CiteScore: 1)
British J. of Pain     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.579, CiteScore: 2)
British J. of Politics and Intl. Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33, SJR: 0.91, CiteScore: 2)
British J. of Visual Impairment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.337, CiteScore: 1)
British J.ism Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
BRQ Business Review Quarterly     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Building Acoustics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.215, CiteScore: 1)
Building Services Engineering Research & Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.583, CiteScore: 1)
Bulletin of Science, Technology & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Business & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Business and Professional Communication Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.348, CiteScore: 1)
Business Information Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.279, CiteScore: 0)
Business Perspectives and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Cahiers Élisabéthains     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.111, CiteScore: 0)
Calcutta Statistical Association Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
California Management Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32, SJR: 2.209, CiteScore: 4)
Canadian J. of Kidney Health and Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.007, CiteScore: 2)
Canadian J. of Nursing Research (CJNR)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Canadian J. of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 142, SJR: 0.626, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian J. of Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 1.769, CiteScore: 3)
Canadian J. of School Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.266, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian Pharmacists J. / Revue des Pharmaciens du Canada     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.536, CiteScore: 1)
Cancer Control     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Growth and Metastasis     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Informatics     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.64, CiteScore: 1)
Capital and Class     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.282, CiteScore: 1)
Cardiac Cath Lab Director     Full-text available via subscription  
Cardiovascular and Thoracic Open     Open Access  
Career Development and Transition for Exceptional Individuals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.44, CiteScore: 1)
Cartilage     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.889, CiteScore: 3)
Cell and Tissue Transplantation and Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cell Transplantation     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.023, CiteScore: 3)
Cephalalgia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.581, CiteScore: 3)
Cephalalgia Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Child Language Teaching and Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35, SJR: 0.501, CiteScore: 1)
Child Maltreatment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.22, CiteScore: 3)
Child Neurology Open     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Childhood     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.894, CiteScore: 2)
Childhood Obesity and Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
China Information     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.767, CiteScore: 2)
China Report     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.221, CiteScore: 0)
Chinese J. of Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Chronic Illness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.672, CiteScore: 2)
Chronic Respiratory Disease     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.808, CiteScore: 2)
Chronic Stress     Open Access  
Citizenship, Social and Economics Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.145, CiteScore: 0)
Cleft Palate-Craniofacial J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.757, CiteScore: 1)
Clin-Alert     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis     Open Access   (Followers: 32, SJR: 0.49, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical and Translational Neuroscience     Open Access  
Clinical Case Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.364, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45, SJR: 0.73, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical EEG and Neuroscience     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.552, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.296, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Arthritis and Musculoskeletal Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.537, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Blood Disorders     Open Access   (SJR: 0.314, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.686, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.283, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Circulatory, Respiratory and Pulmonary Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.425, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Ear, Nose and Throat     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Endocrinology and Diabetes     Open Access   (Followers: 33, SJR: 0.63, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.129, CiteScore: 3)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Pediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Reproductive Health     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.776, CiteScore: 0)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Therapeutics     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.172, CiteScore: 0)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Trauma and Intensive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Women's Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Clinical Nursing Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31, SJR: 0.471, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Pathology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.487, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Psychological Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 3.281, CiteScore: 5)
Clinical Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 76, SJR: 1.322, CiteScore: 3)
Clinical Risk     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.133, CiteScore: 0)
Clinical Trials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 2.399, CiteScore: 2)
Clothing and Textiles Research J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.36, CiteScore: 1)
Common Law World Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Communication & Sport     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.385, CiteScore: 1)
Communication and the Public     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Communication Disorders Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.458, CiteScore: 1)
Communication Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 2.171, CiteScore: 3)
Community College Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.451, CiteScore: 1)
Comparative Political Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 261, SJR: 3.772, CiteScore: 3)
Compensation & Benefits Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Competition & Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.843, CiteScore: 2)
Competition and Regulation in Network Industries     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.143, CiteScore: 0)
Concurrent Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.642, CiteScore: 2)
Conflict Management and Peace Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40, SJR: 2.441, CiteScore: 1)
Contemporary Drug Problems     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.609, CiteScore: 2)
Contemporary Education Dialogue     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.102, CiteScore: 0)
Contemporary Issues in Early Childhood     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.766, CiteScore: 1)
Contemporary Review of the Middle East     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Contemporary Sociology : A J. of Reviews     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 35, SJR: 0.195, CiteScore: 0)
Contemporary Voice of Dalit     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Contexts     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.67
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 19  
 
Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal   * Containing 10 Open Access Open Access article(s) in this issue *
ISSN (Print) 1533-3175 - ISSN (Online) 1938-2731
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1090 journals]
  • New-Onset Alzheimer’s Disease and Normal Subjects 100% Separated
           Statistically by P300 and ICA
    • Authors: Barrie William Jervis, Cristin Bigan, Mircea Besleaga
      Abstract: American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease & Other Dementiasr, Volume 35, Issue , January-December 2020.
      Previously, we described how patients with new-onset Alzheimer’s disease were differentiated from healthy, normal subjects to 100% accuracy, based on the amplitudes of the nonrhythmic back-projected independent components of the P300 peak at the electroencephalogram electrodes and their latency in the response to an oddball, auditory evoked potential paradigm. A neural network and a voting strategy were used for classification. Here, we consider instead the statistical distribution functions of their latencies and amplitudes and suggest that the 2-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test based upon their latency distribution functions offers an alternative biomarker for AD, with their amplitude distribution at the frontal electrode fp2 as possibly another. The technique is general, relatively simple, and noninvasive and might be applied for presymptomatic detection, although further validation with more subjects, preferably in multicenter studies, is recommended. It may also be applicable to study the other P300 peaks and their associated interpretations.
      Citation: American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease & Other Dementiasr
      PubDate: 2020-07-07T09:19:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1533317520935675
      Issue No: Vol. 35 (2020)
       
  • The Swinging Self: The Costs of Shifting Between Self-Images in
           Alzheimer’s Disease
    • Authors: Emin Altintas, Ahmed A. Moustafa, Karim Gallouj, Mohamad El Haj
      Abstract: American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease & Other Dementiasr, Volume 35, Issue , January-December 2020.
      Background:We investigated the ability of patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) to shift between different self-images.Methods:We developed an original task (shifting-self task) in which we invited 28 patients with AD and 30 control participants to generate “who am I” statements that describe 2 alternative self-images (ie, physical-self vs psychological-self). In a control task, participants had to generate 2 blocks of “who am I” statements (ie, physical-self block and psychological-self block).Results:Analyses showed longer completion time in both the shifting-self and control task in patients with AD than in control participants. Completion time on the shifting-self task was longer than that on the control task in patients with AD, suggesting a shifting cost in AD.Conclusion:We propose that one feature of the diminished sense of self in AD is the difficulty of patients to shift between different alternating self-images.
      Citation: American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease & Other Dementiasr
      PubDate: 2020-07-06T10:11:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1533317520905401
      Issue No: Vol. 35 (2020)
       
  • Machine-Learning Algorithms Based on Screening Tests for Mild Cognitive
           Impairment
    • Authors: Jin-Hyuck Park
      Abstract: American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease & Other Dementiasr, Volume 35, Issue , January-December 2020.
      Background:The mobile screening test system for mild cognitive impairment (mSTS-MCI) was developed and validated to address the low sensitivity and specificity of the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) widely used clinically.Objective:This study was to evaluate the efficacy machine learning algorithms based on the mSTS-MCI and Korean version of MoCA.Method:In total, 103 healthy individuals and 74 patients with MCI were randomly divided into training and test data sets, respectively. The algorithm using TensorFlow was trained based on the training data set, and then its accuracy was calculated based on the test data set. The cost was calculated via logistic regression in this case.Result:Predictive power of the algorithms was higher than those of the original tests. In particular, the algorithm based on the mSTS-MCI showed the highest positive-predictive value.Conclusion:The machine learning algorithms predicting MCI showed the comparable findings with the conventional screening tools.
      Citation: American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease & Other Dementiasr
      PubDate: 2020-06-30T10:05:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1533317520927163
      Issue No: Vol. 35 (2020)
       
  • Longitudinal Sensitivity of Alzheimer’s Disease Severity Staging
    • Authors: Julia S. Benoit, Wenyaw Chan, Linda Piller, Rachelle Doody
      Abstract: American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease & Other Dementiasr, Volume 35, Issue , January-December 2020.
      Understanding Alzheimer’s disease (AD) dynamics is essential in diagnosis and measuring progression for clinical decision-making; however, clinical instruments are imperfect at classifying true disease stages. This research evaluates sensitivity and determinants of AD stage changes longitudinally using current classifications of “mild,” “moderate,” and “severe” AD, using Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), Alzheimer’s Disease Assessment Scale–Cognitive subscale (ADAS-Cog), and the Clinical Dementia Rating–Sum of Boxes (CDR-SB) thresholds. Age and pre-progression rate were significant determinants of AD progression using MMSE alone to stage AD, and pre-progression was found to impact disease progression with CDR-SB. Sensitivity of these instruments for identifying clinical stages of AD to correctly staging a “moderate” level of disease severity for outcomes MMSE, CDR-SB, and ADAS-Cog was 92%, 78%, and 92%, respectively. This research derives longitudinal sensitivity of clinical instruments used to stage AD useful for clinical decision-making. The MMSE and ADAS-Cog provided adequate sensitivity to classify AD stages.
      Citation: American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease & Other Dementiasr
      PubDate: 2020-06-23T09:54:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1533317520918719
      Issue No: Vol. 35 (2020)
       
  • Study of the Risk and Preventive Factors for Progress of Mild Cognitive
           Impairment to Dementia
    • Authors: Chengping Hu, Ling Wang, Yi Guo, Zhicheng Cao, Ying Lu, Hongyun Qin
      Abstract: American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease & Other Dementiasr, Volume 35, Issue , January-December 2020.
      Objective:To evaluate the risk factors for progress of mild cognitive impairment to dementia.Methods:This study was based on the epidemiological survey in 2011 (No. PKJ2010-Y26) and contained 441 MCI individuals. Cognitive function was measured by the Mini-Mental Status Examination, clinical dementia rating, and montreal cognitive assessment. The association between demographic characteristics and MCI outcomes were evaluated using single-and multifactor ordered logistic regression analysis models.Results:Of the 441 MCI, 77 progressed to dementia (MCIp: 17.5%, 95% CI: 14.4%-21.6%), 356 remained stable (MCIs: 80.7%, 95% CI: 77.0%-88.4%), and 8 reverted to normal cognition (MCIr: 1.8%, 95% CI: 0.6%-3.0%) at follow-up in 2017. Univariate ordinal regression analysis showed that diabetes (P = .052), marriage (P = .028), worker (P = .069), and manager (P = .075) may be the risk factor for the status of MCI. Multiple ordinal regression results showed that diabetes (P = .049) and marriage (P = .04) significantly affected the cognitive function changes in the MCI patients.Conclusion:Nondiabetics and being married may prevent the progression from MCI to dementia.
      Citation: American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease & Other Dementiasr
      PubDate: 2020-06-22T09:41:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1533317520925324
      Issue No: Vol. 35 (2020)
       
  • Neuroprotective Properties and Therapeutic Potential of Bone
           Marrow–Derived Microglia in Alzheimer’s Disease
    • Authors: Chang Li, Yu-Hua Chen, Ke Zhang
      Abstract: American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease & Other Dementiasr, Volume 35, Issue , January-December 2020.
      Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia, which is characterized by a progressive cognitive decline and senile plaques formed by amyloid β (Aβ). Microglia are the immune cells of the central nervous system (CNS). Studies have proposed 2 types of microglia, namely, the resident microglia and bone marrow–derived microglia (BMDM). Recent studies suggested that BMDM, not the resident microglia, can phagocytose Aβ, which has a great therapeutic potential in AD. Bone marrow–derived microglia can populate the CNS in an efficient manner and their functions can be regulated by some genes. Thus, methods that increase their recruitment and phagocytosis could be used as a new tool that clears Aβ and ameliorates cognitive impairment. Herein, we review the neuroprotective functions of BMDM and their therapeutic potential in AD.
      Citation: American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease & Other Dementiasr
      PubDate: 2020-06-15T08:21:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1533317520927169
      Issue No: Vol. 35 (2020)
       
  • In Response to a Letter to the Editor “Frontotemporal Dementia and
           Suicide; Could Genetics be a Key Factor'”
    • Authors: Milena Zucca, Elisa Rubino, Alessandro Vacca, Flora Govone, Annalisa Gai, Paola De Martino, Silvia Boschi, Innocenzo Rainero
      Abstract: American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease & Other Dementiasr, Volume 35, Issue , January-December 2020.

      Citation: American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease & Other Dementiasr
      PubDate: 2020-06-15T08:19:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1533317520925980
      Issue No: Vol. 35 (2020)
       
  • Frontotemporal Dementia and Suicide; Could Genetics be a Key Factor'
    • Authors: Rachel Fremont, Jordan Grafman, Edward D. Huey
      Abstract: American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease & Other Dementiasr, Volume 35, Issue , January-December 2020.

      Citation: American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease & Other Dementiasr
      PubDate: 2020-06-10T10:56:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1533317520925982
      Issue No: Vol. 35 (2020)
       
  • “What” and “How”: A New Perspective for Understanding Unawareness
           in Alzheimer’s Disease Through a Combination of Two Perspectives
    • Authors: Amandine Mayelle, Mohamad El Haj, Pascal Antoine
      Abstract: American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease & Other Dementiasr, Volume 35, Issue , January-December 2020.
      Objectives:Assessments of unawareness in Alzheimer’s disease mainly focus on the objects (the “what”) of unawareness. A recent person-centered approach proposes to also assess the processes (the “how”). The present study combines 2 approaches to understand this heterogeneity in assessments of unawareness.Method:We recruited 46 participants from 8 nursing homes. They underwent a semi-structured interview and were assessed using a prediction–performance paradigm. Spearman correlations were calculated, and generalized additive models were established.Results:The 2 approaches are associated through cognitive deficits, confrontation with difficulties and identity changes. Objects (the what), mechanisms, and modes of expression (the how) explain at least 29.6% of the variance of unawareness.Conclusions:Unawareness is more than simply being unaware of something; it is a synergy between the objects and processes of arousal and expression. Moreover, unawareness extends beyond the disease to include the self. Considering the entire person seems to be necessary.
      Citation: American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease & Other Dementiasr
      PubDate: 2020-06-08T11:08:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1533317520925333
      Issue No: Vol. 35 (2020)
       
  • Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Events in Patients on Antidementia
           Medications
    • Authors: Meiqi He, James M. Stevenson, Yuting Zhang, Inmaculada Hernandez
      Abstract: American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease & Other Dementiasr, Volume 35, Issue , January-December 2020.
      Objective:To identify characteristics associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events in patients diagnosed with Alzheimer disease (AD) and treated with antidementia medications.Methods:Demographics, diagnoses, and medication usage of 30 433 Medicare patients were analyzed using 2006 to 2013 claims data and a combined model of screening, ranking and stepwise logistic regressions to evaluate factors associated with composite outcomes of 6 cardiovascular events.Results:Incidence rate of at least 1 cardiovascular event was 25.1%. Fifty-five factors were identified from the 10 381 candidate variables by the combined model with a c-statistic of 67% and an accuracy of 75%. Factors associated with increased risk of cardiovascular events include history of heart rhythm disorders, alteration of consciousness (odds ratio [OR]: 1.25; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.14-1.36), and usage of β-blockers (OR: 1.19; 95% CI: 1.13-1.27).Conclusions:Clinicians should consider the increased risk of cardiovascular events in patients with AD with heart rhythm disorders and on β-blockers.
      Citation: American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease & Other Dementiasr
      PubDate: 2020-05-08T09:35:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1533317520922380
      Issue No: Vol. 35 (2020)
       
  • Association Between Subjective Cognitive Decline and Social and Emotional
           Support in US Adults
    • Authors: Xingran Weng, Daniel R. George, Bibo Jiang, Li Wang
      Abstract: American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease & Other Dementiasr, Volume 35, Issue , January-December 2020.
      Subjective cognitive decline (SCD) has been linked to Alzheimer’s Disease in the literature. However, little is known about whether SCD is associated with social/emotional support (SES). To investigate this association, this study utilized the 2015 and 2016 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System data. A study population of 17206 participants aged 45 years and older who responded to both the Emotional Support and Life Satisfaction survey module and the Cognition Decline survey module were included. Of this study population, 11.22% had SCD, and 21.83% reported insufficient SES. A much higher percentage of those with insufficient SES experienced SCD compared to those with sufficient SES (21.15% vs 8.45%, P < .0001). Insufficient SES was significantly associated with SCD (odds ratio = 1.68, 95% confidence interval: 1.37-2.06), after controlling for other factors. Furthermore, this study found certain demographic groups such as female, white, or married groups were more likely to receive sufficient SES.
      Citation: American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease & Other Dementiasr
      PubDate: 2020-05-05T09:47:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1533317520922392
      Issue No: Vol. 35 (2020)
       
  • A Metabolic Imaging Study of Lexical and Phonological Naming Errors in
           Alzheimer Disease
    • Authors: Valeria Isella, Cristina Rosazza, Maria Gazzotti, Jessica Sala, Sabrina Morzenti, Cinzia Crivellaro, Ildebrando Marco Appollonio, Carlo Ferrarese, Claudio Luzzatti
      Abstract: American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease & Other Dementiasr, Volume 35, Issue , January-December 2020.
      Patients with Alzheimer disease (AD) produce a variety of errors on confrontation naming that indicate multiple loci of impairment along the naming process in this disease. We correlated brain hypometabolism, measured with 18fluoro-deoxy-glucose positron emission tomography, with semantic and formal errors, as well as nonwords deriving from phonological errors produced in a picture-naming test by 63 patients with AD. Findings suggest that neurodegeneration leads to: (1) phonemic errors, by interfering with phonological short-term memory, or with control over retrieval of phonological or prearticulatory representations, within the left supramarginal gyrus; (2) semantic errors, by disrupting general semantic or visual-semantic representations at the level of the left posterior middle and inferior occipitotemporal cortex, respectively; (3) formal errors, by damaging the lexical–phonological output interface in the left mid–anterior segment of middle and superior temporal gyri. This topography of semantic–lexical–phonological steps of naming is in substantial agreement with dual-stream neurocognitive models of word generation.
      Citation: American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease & Other Dementiasr
      PubDate: 2020-05-01T09:33:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1533317520922390
      Issue No: Vol. 35 (2020)
       
  • Evaluating Semantic Knowledge Through a Semantic Association Task in
           Individuals With Dementia
    • Authors: Claudio Luzzatti, Ilaria Mauri, Stefania Castiglioni, Marta Zuffi, Chiara Spartà, Francesco Somalvico, Massimo Franceschi
      Abstract: American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease & Other Dementiasr, Volume 35, Issue , January-December 2020.
      Conceptual knowledge is supported by multiple semantic systems that are specialized for the analysis of different properties associated with object concepts. Various types of semantic association between concrete concepts—categorical (CA), encyclopedic (EA), functional (FA), and visual-encyclopedic (VEA) associations—were tested through a new picture-to-picture matching task (semantic association task, SAT). Forty individuals with Alzheimer’s disease (AD), 13 with behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia (bv-FTD), 6 with primary progressive aphasia (PPA), and 37 healthy participants were tested with the SAT. Within-group comparisons highlighted a global impairment of all types of semantic association in bv-FTD individuals but a disproportionate impairment of EA and FA, with relative sparing of CA and VEA, in AD individuals. Single-case analyses detected dissociations in all dementia groups. Conceptual knowledge can be selectively impaired in various types of neurodegenerative disease on the basis of the specific cognitive process that is disrupted.
      Citation: American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease & Other Dementiasr
      PubDate: 2020-04-20T09:36:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1533317520917294
      Issue No: Vol. 35 (2020)
       
  • Whole-Blood Levels of MicroRNA-9 Are Decreased in Patients With Late-Onset
           Alzheimer Disease
    • Authors: Vinicius Carolino Souza, Gilberto Santos Morais, Adriane Dallanora Henriques, Wilcelly Machado-Silva, Diego Ignacio Valenzuela Perez, Ciro José Brito, Einstein Francisco Camargos, Clayton Franco Moraes, Otávio Toledo Nóbrega
      Abstract: American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease & Other Dementiasr, Volume 35, Issue , January-December 2020.
      Recent evidence suggests changes in circulating microRNA levels may be promising biomarkers for the clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer disease (AD). We hypothesized that whole-blood microRNAs may be useful to identify individuals with established AD. For this purpose, a sample of community-dwelling women (≥55 years old) carrying the ApoE ∊4 allele were clinically evaluated using the American Psychiatric Association/Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth edition and the Alzheimer Disease Assessment Scale–Cognitive Subscale criteria to diagnose probable AD, and the Clinical Dementia Rating scale to stage the dementia. A set of 25 mature microRNAs was rationally selected for evaluation based on experimental evidence of interaction with genes linked to the late-onset AD neuropathology. Whole-blood concentrations were determined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Compared to patients without dementia, a median 3-fold decrease in miR-9 levels was found among patients with AD (P = .001). Our findings support blood-borne miR-9 as a candidate biomarker for probable AD, embodied by evidence from the literature of its implication in amyloidogenesis.
      Citation: American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease & Other Dementiasr
      PubDate: 2020-04-17T09:25:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1533317520911573
      Issue No: Vol. 35 (2020)
       
  • Loneliness and Burden Perceived by Family Caregivers of Patients With
           Alzheimer Disease
    • Authors: Verena Bramboeck, Korbinian Moeller, Josef Marksteiner, Liane Kaufmann
      Abstract: American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease & Other Dementiasr, Volume 35, Issue , January-December 2020.
      Background:The present study aimed at investigating loneliness and burden experienced by family members caring for relatives diagnosed with Alzheimer disease.Methods:Participants were 40 caregivers of inpatients with Alzheimer disease. Correlation and multiple regression analyses were conducted to investigate whether caregivers’ loneliness (uni- and multidimensional) and burden are associated with and predicted by (1) specific caregiver characteristics and/or (2) patients’ dementia severity and neuropsychiatric symptoms.Results:Loneliness was significantly correlated with caregivers’ sex, age, and living circumstances, while burden was significantly correlated with caregivers’ education solely. Regression analyses revealed that caregivers’ sex and living circumstances contributed significantly to variance explanation of loneliness (but not burden), while the additional consideration of patient variables did not improve model fit.Conclusions:Loneliness reported by caregivers of relatives diagnosed with dementia is significantly modulated by caregiver (but not patient) characteristics. Notably, both uni- and multidimensional loneliness scales seem to be sensitive diagnostic tools.
      Citation: American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease & Other Dementiasr
      PubDate: 2020-04-13T10:54:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1533317520917788
      Issue No: Vol. 35 (2020)
       
  • Addressing Behavioral Symptoms of Dementia Through STAR-VA Implementation:
           Do Outcomes Vary by Behavior Type'
    • Authors: Jenefer M. Jedele, Kim Curyto, Brian M. Ludwin, Michele J. Karel
      Abstract: American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease & Other Dementiasr, Volume 35, Issue , January-December 2020.
      Objectives:The STAR-VA program in Veterans Health Administration Community Living Centers (CLCs, nursing home settings) trains teams to implement a psychosocial intervention with residents with behavioral symptoms of dementia (BSD).Methods:Across 71 CLCs, 302 residents selected as training cases had target behaviors categorized into one of 5 types: physically aggressive (PA), physically nonaggressive, verbally aggressive, verbally nonaggressive, and behavior deficit (BD).Results:Across all groups, there were significant declines in team-rated behavior frequency (36%) and severity (44%), agitation (10%), distress behaviors (42%), depression (17%), and anxiety (20%). The magnitude of changes varied across behavior category. For example, those with a PA target behavior experienced a greater percentage decline in agitation and distress behavior scores, and those with a BD target behavior experienced a greater percentage decline in depressive and anxiety symptoms.Conclusions:STAR-VA, a multicomponent intervention, is generally effective across various types of behavioral symptoms associated with dementia.
      Citation: American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease & Other Dementiasr
      PubDate: 2020-04-02T09:59:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1533317520911577
      Issue No: Vol. 35 (2020)
       
  • How Evidence-Based Practice (E3BP) Informs Speech-Language Pathology for
           Primary Progressive Aphasia
    • Authors: Leanne Ruggero, Karen Croot, Lyndsey Nickels
      Abstract: American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease & Other Dementiasr, Volume 35, Issue , January-December 2020.
      Amelioration of communication impairment in primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is an area of clinical importance and current research. Speech-language pathologists (SLPs) have a range of skills and interventions to support communication in PPA; however, underrecognition of their role and low referral rates is an ongoing concern. The E3BP conceptualization of evidence-based practice comprises 3 components: research-based evidence, practice-based evidence, and informed patient preferences. Here, we will describe how evidence for managing the communication difficulties experienced by individuals with PPA exists at all 3 levels of the (E3BP) model, highlighting how this allows SLP interventions to be both evidence based and patient centered. We encourage health professionals to value and utilize the wide range of services that SLPs can offer when working with individuals with PPA, to educate, remediate everyday linguistic skills, increase daily participation, and maximize overall quality of life.
      Citation: American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease & Other Dementiasr
      PubDate: 2020-03-30T09:25:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1533317520915365
      Issue No: Vol. 35 (2020)
       
  • Insulin Resistance Is Independently Associated With Enlarged Perivascular
           Space in the Basal Ganglia in Nondiabetic Healthy Elderly Population
    • Authors: Danhong Wu, Xiaoli Yang, Ping Zhong, Xiaofei Ye, Chen Li, Xueyuan Liu
      Abstract: American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease & Other Dementiasr, Volume 35, Issue , January-December 2020.
      Objectives:To investigate the association between insulin resistance (IR) and enlarged perivascular space (EPVS) in the basal gangliain nondiabetic healthy elderly population.Methods:A total of 235 nondiabetic healthy elderly population were recruited. A 3-level scale was used to evaluate the burden of EPVSs. The homeostasis model assessment–estimated insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR) was used for IR estimation. Correlation between IR and severity of EPVS was assessed using the regression model after adjusting demographics and cardiovascular risk factors.Results:The top quartile of HOMA-IR was 2.52, and 25.11% of patients showed IR. The proportion of patients with IR was higher in the moderate to severe EPVS group than in the mild group (36.51% vs 20.93%, P = .015). In multivariate logistic analysis, IR was positively correlated with the moderate to severe EPVS (adjusted odds ratio: 3.532, 95% confidence interval: 1.633-7.636, P = .001) after adjusting classical risk factors.Conclusions:Insulin resistance was independently correlated with EPVS in the basal ganglia in nondiabetic healthy elderly population.
      Citation: American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease & Other Dementiasr
      PubDate: 2020-03-17T10:26:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1533317520912126
      Issue No: Vol. 35 (2020)
       
  • BESI: Behavioral and Environmental Sensing and Intervention for Dementia
           Caregiver Empowerment—Phases 1 and 2
    • Authors: Azziza Bankole, Martha S. Anderson, Nutta Homdee, Ridwan Alam, Ashley Lofton, Nykesha Fyffe, Hilda Goins, Temple Newbold, Tonya Smith-Jackson, John Lach
      Abstract: American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease & Other Dementiasr, Volume 35, Issue , January-December 2020.
      Background and Objectives:Caregiver burden associated with dementia-related agitation is one of the commonest reasons a community-dwelling person with dementia (PWD) transitions to a care facility. Behavioral and Environmental Sensing and Intervention for Dementia Caregiver Empowerment (BESI) is a system of body-worn and in-home sensors developed to provide continuous, noninvasive agitation assessment and environmental context monitoring to detect early signs of agitation and its environmental triggers.Research Design and Methods:This mixed methods, remote ethnographic study is explored in a 3-phase, multiyear plan. In Phase 1, we developed and refined the BESI system and completed usability studies. Validation of the system and the development of dyad-specific models of the relationship between agitation and the environment occurred in Phase 2.Results:Phases 1 and 2 results facilitated targeted changes in BESI, thus improving its overall usability for the final phase of the study, when real-time notifications and interventions will be implemented.Conclusion:Our results show a valid relationship between the presence of dementia related agitation and environmental factors and that persons with dementia and their caregivers prefer a home-based monitoring system like BESI.
      Citation: American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease & Other Dementiasr
      PubDate: 2020-03-12T11:15:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1533317520906686
      Issue No: Vol. 35 (2020)
       
  • Combined Influences of Dementia Exposure and Personality on Self-Reported
           Memory Problems
    • Authors: Jacqueline Mogle, Nikki L. Hill, Tyler Reed Bell, Sakshi Bhargava, Emily Bratlee-Whitaker, Rachel K. Wion, Pooja Anushka Tiwari
      Abstract: American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease & Other Dementiasr, Volume 35, Issue , January-December 2020.
      The current study investigated whether having a first-degree relative with dementia influenced older adults’ self-reported memory, if personality traits moderated these associations, and whether these associations differed by the type of item asked (ie, frequency of memory problems vs perceived memory decline). Data drawn from the Einstein Aging study included 454 older adults (M age = 76.64, standard deviation = 4.77, 66.96% white, and 63% female). Multilevel modeling analyses showed participants who had a first-degree relative with dementia reported more frequent memory problems and were more likely to report memory decline over the past year. Among participants with a first-degree relative with dementia, higher levels of neuroticism were related to reports of more frequent memory problems at baseline, whereas higher levels of conscientiousness and lower levels of extraversion were related to reports of more frequent memory problems over time. Future research should consider personality traits and family history of dementia as potential contributors to self-reported memory problems.
      Citation: American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease & Other Dementiasr
      PubDate: 2020-03-12T11:10:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1533317519899792
      Issue No: Vol. 35 (2020)
       
  • Antidiabetic Drugs for the Risk of Alzheimer Disease in Patients With Type
           2 DM Using FAERS
    • Authors: Hayato Akimoto, Akio Negishi, Shinji Oshima, Haruna Wakiyama, Mitsuyoshi Okita, Norimitsu Horii, Naoko Inoue, Shigeru Ohshima, Daisuke Kobayashi
      Abstract: American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease & Other Dementiasr, Volume 35, Issue , January-December 2020.
      Alzheimer disease (AD) may develop after the onset of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and the risk of AD may depend on the antidiabetic drug administered. We compared the risk of AD among 66 085 patients (≥ 65 years) with T2DM (1250 having concomitant AD) who had been administered antidiabetic drug monotherapy for T2DM who had voluntarily reported themselves in the Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System. The risk of AD from the use of different antidiabetic drug monotherapies compared to that of metformin monotherapy was assessed by logistic regression. Rosiglitazone (adjusted reporting odds ratio [aROR] = 0.11; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.07-0.17; P < .001), exenatide (aROR = 0.22; 95% CI: 0.11-0.37; P < .001), liraglutide (aROR = 0.36; 95% CI: 0.19-0.62; P < .001), dulaglutide (aROR = 0.39; 95% CI: 0.17-0.77; P = .014), and sitagliptin (aROR = 0.75; 95% CI: 0.60-0.93; P = .011) were found to have a significantly lower associated risk of AD than that of metformin. Therefore, the administration of glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonists and rosiglitazone may reduce the risk of AD in patients with T2DM.
      Citation: American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease & Other Dementiasr
      PubDate: 2020-03-12T10:59:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1533317519899546
      Issue No: Vol. 35 (2020)
       
  • Primary Progressive Aphasia Education and Support Groups: A Clinical
           Evaluation

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Authors: Cathleen Taylor-Rubin, Lisa Azizi, Karen Croot, Lyndsey Nickels
      Abstract: American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease & Other Dementiasr, Volume 35, Issue , January-December 2020.
      Objectives:To evaluate the benefits of a primary progressive aphasia (PPA) education and support session for people with PPA (pwPPA) and their caregivers.Method:Thirty-eight individuals (20 pwPPA, 18 caregivers) were invited to participate in the study. Twenty-five individuals (12 pwPPA, 13 caregivers) completed questionnaires before and after an education and support group session provided by a speech pathologist and a clinical psychologist. Seven individuals (2 pwPPA, 5 caregivers) participated in follow-up interviews.Results:After one attendance, caregivers reported significant improvement in knowledge of PPA, strategies to manage worry and low mood, and opportunities to meet peers. Themes at interview were reduced feelings of isolation, increased feelings of support, increased knowledge of coping strategies, and improved understanding of PPA. Caregivers who had attended previous sessions reported increased feelings of well-being and support.Implications:Primary progressive aphasia education and support group sessions in the postdiagnostic period constitute a valuable component of comprehensive care for PPA.
      Citation: American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease & Other Dementiasr
      PubDate: 2020-02-25T02:40:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1533317519895638
      Issue No: Vol. 35 (2020)
       
  • Nutritional and Functional Indicators and Their Association With Mortality
           Among Older Adults With Alzheimer’s Disease

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Authors: O. Vicente de Sousa, J. Mendes, T. F. Amaral
      Abstract: American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease & Other Dementiasr, Volume 35, Issue , January-December 2020.
      This study investigated how different nutritional and functional status indicators are associated with mortality in patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). A prospective cohort study was conducted among 79 community-dwelling older adults with AD. Follow-up was 60 months. Undernutrition status was evaluated by Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA), body mass index, mid-arm muscle circumference (MAMC), calf circumference, and phase angle. Functional status was assessed by handgrip strength, and usual gait speed. Twenty-two participants died (27.8%). Results show that undernutrition (hazard ratio [HR] 5.69, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.21-14.61), weight loss (HR 3.82, 95% CI 1.37-10.63), underweight (HR 3.24, 95% CI 1.18-8.82), low MAMC (HR 4.54, 95% CI 1.65-12.48), calf circumference ≤ 31 (HR 4.27, 95% CI 1.63-11.16), low HGS (HR 3.11, 95% CI 1.18-8.17), and low gait speed (HR 4.73, 95% CI 1.68-13.27) were all associated with mortality. In conclusion, a poor nutritional and functional status was associated with a higher risk of mortality, regardless of sex, age, marital status, education, and cognitive function.
      Citation: American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease & Other Dementiasr
      PubDate: 2020-02-24T09:29:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1533317520907168
      Issue No: Vol. 35 (2020)
       
  • Caregiver Psychological Distress: Longitudinal Relationships With Physical
           Activity and Diet

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Authors: Shane A. Snyder, Peter P. Vitaliano
      Abstract: American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease & Other Dementiasr, Volume 35, Issue , January-December 2020.
      Given limited longitudinal research with caregivers (CGs, n = 122) of spouses with Alzheimer disease, and demographically matched noncaregivers (NCGs, n = 117), we compared these groups on psychological distress (anxiety, depression), burden, and health behaviors over 2 years. Analyses examined group differences in relationships of micronutrient recommended daily allowances (RDAs) and physical activity considering hours of care, psychological distress, and burden. Participants were measured and assessed on whether they met micronutrient intake and physical activity totaled over an average week. Regression analyses showed a total effect whereby NCGs had greater increases in meeting micronutrient allowances (RDAs) than CGs (b = 10.91, standard error [SE] = 4.74, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.56-20.26). Additionally, over time, NCGs had greater increases in physical activity, which was mediated by hours of care (b = 0.149, SE = 0.060, 95% CI: 0.034-0.270). These results suggest CGs may lack proper nutrients, and care hours may influence their health behaviors.
      Citation: American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease & Other Dementiasr
      PubDate: 2020-02-18T07:44:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1533317520904554
      Issue No: Vol. 35 (2020)
       
  • Anxiety and Depression Are Not Related to Increasing Levels of Burden and
           Stress in Caregivers of Patients With Alzheimer’s Disease

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Authors: Tiziana Tentorio, Sharon Dentali, Camilla Moioli, Marta Zuffi, Rosy Marzullo, Stefania Castiglioni, Massimo Franceschi
      Abstract: American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease & Other Dementias®, Volume 35, Issue , January-December 2020.
      Sixty-nine dyads of patients with Alzheimer’s disease and primary caregivers have been followed up for 1 year to evaluate cognitive (Mini-Mental State Examination), functional (Instrumental Activities of Daily Living), and behavioral (Neuropsychiatric Inventory) decline of patient in relation to burden (Caregiver Burden Inventory), stress (Relative Stress Scale), anxiety (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory Y), and depression (Beck Depression Inventory) reported by the caregivers. After 1 year of observation, cognitive and functional scores worsened while behavioral problems remained unchanged and relatively mild in patients. After 1 year, caregivers’ scores of scales of anxiety and depression decreased significantly, while stress scores remained unchanged and burden slightly increased. In our opinion, the unexpected improvement in psychological situation of caregivers may be mainly due to educational interventions focused on knowledge of the disease with a particular attention directed toward emotional support and individual needs.
      Citation: American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease & Other Dementias®
      PubDate: 2020-02-13T11:26:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1533317519899544
      Issue No: Vol. 35 (2020)
       
  • Disclosure of Amyloid Status for Risk of Alzheimer Disease to Cognitively
           Normal Research Participants With Subjective Cognitive Decline: A
           Longitudinal Study

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Authors: Taisei Wake, Hajime Tabuchi, Kei Funaki, Daisuke Ito, Bun Yamagata, Takahito Yoshizaki, Tadaki Nakahara, Masahiro Jinzaki, Haruo Yoshimasu, Iori Tanahashi, Hiroumi Shimazaki, Masaru Mimura
      Abstract: American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease & Other Dementias®, Volume 35, Issue , January-December 2020.
      This study aimed to investigate the long-term impacts of disclosing amyloid status for a risk of Alzheimer disease (AD) to cognitively normal research participants with subjective cognitive decline (SCD), which represents an initial manifestation of AD. Forty-two participants were classified as the amyloid-positive (n = 10) or amyloid-negative (n = 32) groups. We assessed symptoms of anxiety, depression, and test-related distress at 6, 24, and 52 weeks after results disclosure. No difference was found over time in anxiety, depression, and test-related distress in either group. Although no significant differences were observed between groups in anxiety or depression, the amyloid-negative group had a significantly higher level of test-related distress than the amyloid-positive group at 52 weeks. Disclosing amyloid status to cognitively healthy research participants with SCD did not cause significant long-term psychological risks. However, a theoretical spectrum of subjective concern may exist about cognitive decline in amyloid-negative individuals.
      Citation: American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease & Other Dementias®
      PubDate: 2020-02-13T11:00:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1533317520904551
      Issue No: Vol. 35 (2020)
       
  • Determining Middle-Aged and Older Adults’ Health Beliefs to Change
           Lifestyle and Health Behavior for Dementia Risk Reduction

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Authors: Merve Aliye Akyol, Lemye Zehirlioğlu, Merve Erünal, Hatice Mert, Nur Şehnaz Hatipoğlu, Özlem Küçükgüçlü
      Abstract: American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease & Other Dementias®, Volume 35, Issue , January-December 2020.
      Background:Global population is getting older and the prevalence of dementia continuously increases. Understanding the related health beliefs is bound to enable lifestyle-based interventions that maximize public engagement in dementia risk reduction behaviors. The aim of this study was to determine health beliefs on dementia prevention behaviors and lifestyle changes and to determine the factors influencing these beliefs among middle-aged and older people in Turkey.Materials and Methods:This descriptive and cross-sectional study was conducted with 284 individuals aged 40 years and older, using nonprobability convenience sampling. Data were collected using a demographic characteristic form and the Turkish version of the Motivation for Changing Lifestyle and Health Behavior for Reducing the Risk of Dementia scale. The study utilized the value, mean, percentage frequency distribution, correlation, independent t test, and the one-way analysis of variance test.Results:The mean age of the participants included in the study was 56.99 ± 12.05, 68.7% of individuals were males. The mean education years of the participants were 11.22 ± 4.55. The majority (72.2%) of participants expressed subjective memory complaints. Presence of family history of dementia was 28.2%. Age, gender, education years, subjective memory complaints, presence family history of dementia, prior experience as a caregiver of dementia, and willingness to know their own risk were determined as essential factors that influence several health belief factors related to dementia risk reduction.Conclusion:Our findings indicate that males, older adults, and lower-educated and income are priority groups that should be guided for lifestyle and behavioral changes regarding dementia risk reduction.
      Citation: American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease & Other Dementias®
      PubDate: 2020-02-12T03:29:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1533317519898996
      Issue No: Vol. 35 (2020)
       
  • Reduction of Amyloid in the Brain and Retina After Treatment With IVIG for
           Mild Cognitive Impairment

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Authors: Shawn Kile, William Au, Carol Parise, Jaideep Sohi, Tracy Yarbrough, Alan Czeszynski, Ken Johnson, Dan Redline, Tammy Donnel, Andrea Hankins, Kimberley Rose
      Abstract: American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease & Other Dementias®, Volume 35, Issue , January-December 2020.
      Objective:To assess whether intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) in subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) results in a reduction in amyloid in the central nervous system (CNS).Methods:Five subjects with MCI underwent baseline Florbetapir positron emission tomography and retinal autofluorescent imaging. All were administered IVIG (Octagam 10%) at 0.4 g/kg every 14 days for a total of 5 infusions. After 3 months, standard uptake value ratio (SUVR) and amyloid retinal deposits were reassessed.Results:Three subjects had a reduction in amyloid SUVR and all 5 subjects had a reduction in amyloid retinal deposits in at least 1 eye.Conclusions:A short course of IVIG over 2 months removes a measurable amount of amyloid from the CNS in persons with MCI.
      Citation: American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease & Other Dementias®
      PubDate: 2020-02-12T03:28:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1533317519899800
      Issue No: Vol. 35 (2020)
       
  • Reviewer Thank You List 2019
         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Abstract: American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease & Other Dementias®, Volume 35, Issue , January-December 2020.

      Citation: American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease & Other Dementias®
      PubDate: 2020-01-27T08:14:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1533317520903920
      Issue No: Vol. 35 (2020)
       
  • Effect of Self-Efficacy on Quality of Life in People With Mild Cognitive
           Impairment and Mild Dementia: The Mediating Roles of Depression and
           Anxiety

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Authors: Johanne B. Tonga, Dag-Erik Eilertsen, Ingrid K. Ledel Solem, Espen A. Arnevik, Maria S. Korsnes, Ingun D. Ulstein
      Abstract: American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease & Other Dementias®, Volume 35, Issue , January-December 2020.
      Objectives:To examine the mediating effects of depression and anxiety in the relationship between self-efficacy and quality of life among people with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or mild dementia.Method:A total of 196 patients diagnosed with MCI or dementia due to Alzheimer disease completed structured measures of self-efficacy, quality of life, and depressive and anxiety symptoms. We examined direct and mediated effects by fitting structural equation models to data.Results:Our analyses supported that the effects of self-efficacy on quality of life may be partially mediated by depression and anxiety. Both anxiety and depression had significant mediating effects, with depression showing a stronger effect.Conclusion:These results suggest that increased self-efficacy may have a positive effect on quality of life in people with MCI or dementia—partly by reducing depression and anxiety. These findings may have important practical implications for tailoring therapeutic interventions.
      Citation: American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease & Other Dementias®
      PubDate: 2020-01-01T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1533317519885264
      Issue No: Vol. 35 (2020)
       
  • Intermittent Hypoxia Training for Treating Mild Cognitive Impairment: A
           Pilot Study

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Authors: Hong Wang, Xiangrong Shi, Hannah Schenck, James R. Hall, Sarah E. Ross, Geoffrey P. Kline, Shande Chen, Robert T. Mallet, Peijie Chen
      Abstract: American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease & Other Dementias®, Volume 35, Issue , January-December 2020.
      Although intermittent hypoxia training (IHT) has proven effective against various clinical disorders, its impact on mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is unknown. This pilot study examined IHT’s safety and therapeutic efficacy in elderly patients with amnestic MCI (aMCI). Seven patients with aMCI (age 69 ± 3 years) alternately breathed 10% O2 and room-air, each 5 minutes, for 8 cycles/session, 3 sessions/wk for 8 weeks. The patients’ resting arterial pressures fell by 5 to 7 mm Hg (P < .05) and cerebral tissue oxygenation increased (P < .05) following IHT. Intermittent hypoxia training enhanced hypoxemia-induced cerebral vasodilation (P < .05) and improved mini-mental state examination and digit span scores from 25.7 ± 0.4 to 27.7 ± 0.6 (P = .038) and from 24.7 ± 1.2 to 26.1 ± 1.3 (P = .047), respectively. California verbal learning test score tended to increase (P = .102), but trail making test-B and controlled oral word association test scores were unchanged. Adaptation to moderate IHT may enhance cerebral oxygenation and hypoxia-induced cerebrovasodilation while improving short-term memory and attention in elderly patients with aMCI.
      Citation: American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease & Other Dementias®
      PubDate: 2020-01-01T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1533317519896725
      Issue No: Vol. 35 (2020)
       
 
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