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Publisher: Sage Publications   (Total: 1079 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 1079 Journals sorted alphabetically
AADE in Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Abstracts in Anthropology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Academic Pathology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Accounting History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.527, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Radiologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.754, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Radiologica Open     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Acta Sociologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37, SJR: 0.939, CiteScore: 2)
Action Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48, SJR: 0.308, CiteScore: 1)
Active Learning in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 335, SJR: 1.397, CiteScore: 2)
Adaptive Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.288, CiteScore: 1)
Administration & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.675, CiteScore: 1)
Adoption & Fostering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.313, CiteScore: 0)
Adsorption Science & Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.258, CiteScore: 1)
Adult Education Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 202, SJR: 0.566, CiteScore: 2)
Adult Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Advances in Dental Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 1.791, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Developing Human Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29, SJR: 0.614, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Mechanical Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 131, SJR: 0.272, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Methods and Practices in Psychological Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Structural Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 46, SJR: 0.599, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Tumor Virology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.108, CiteScore: 0)
AERA Open     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Affilia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.496, CiteScore: 1)
Agrarian South : J. of Political Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Air, Soil & Water Research     Open Access   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.214, CiteScore: 1)
Alexandria : The J. of National and Intl. Library and Information Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 63)
AlterNative : An Intl. J. of Indigenous Peoples     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.194, CiteScore: 0)
Alternative Law J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.176, CiteScore: 0)
Alternatives : Global, Local, Political     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.351, CiteScore: 1)
American Behavioral Scientist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.982, CiteScore: 2)
American Economist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
American Educational Research J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 198, SJR: 2.913, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.67, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Cosmetic Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
American J. of Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.646, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Health Promotion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31, SJR: 0.807, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Hospice and Palliative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41, SJR: 0.65, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Law & Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.204, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Lifestyle Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.431, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Medical Quality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.777, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Men's Health     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.595, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Rhinology and Allergy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.972, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Sports Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 185, SJR: 3.949, CiteScore: 6)
American Politics Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33, SJR: 1.313, CiteScore: 1)
American Review of Public Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 2.062, CiteScore: 2)
American Sociological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 296, SJR: 6.333, CiteScore: 6)
American String Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Analytical Chemistry Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.224, CiteScore: 1)
Angiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.849, CiteScore: 2)
Animation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.197, CiteScore: 0)
Annals of Clinical Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.634, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Otology, Rhinology & Laryngology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.807, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Pharmacotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51, SJR: 1.096, CiteScore: 2)
Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46, SJR: 1.225, CiteScore: 3)
Annals of the ICRP     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.548, CiteScore: 1)
Anthropocene Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 3.341, CiteScore: 7)
Anthropological Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41, SJR: 0.739, CiteScore: 1)
Antitrust Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Antiviral Chemistry and Chemotherapy     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.635, CiteScore: 2)
Antyajaa : Indian J. of Women and Social Change     Hybrid Journal  
Applied Biosafety     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.131, CiteScore: 0)
Applied Psychological Measurement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 1.17, CiteScore: 1)
Applied Spectroscopy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.489, CiteScore: 2)
Armed Forces & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.29, CiteScore: 1)
Arts and Humanities in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40, SJR: 0.305, CiteScore: 1)
Asia Pacific Media Educator     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.23, CiteScore: 0)
Asia-Pacific J. of Management Research and Innovation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Asia-Pacific J. of Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.558, CiteScore: 1)
Asian and Pacific Migration J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 99, SJR: 0.324, CiteScore: 1)
Asian Cardiovascular and Thoracic Annals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.305, CiteScore: 0)
Asian J. of Comparative Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Asian J. of Legal Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Asian J. of Management Cases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
ASN Neuro     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.534, CiteScore: 3)
Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.519, CiteScore: 3)
Assessment for Effective Intervention     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.578, CiteScore: 1)
Australasian Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.433, CiteScore: 1)
Australian & New Zealand J. of Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 1.801, CiteScore: 2)
Australian and New Zealand J. of Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 518, SJR: 0.612, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Career Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Australian J. of Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42, SJR: 0.403, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.497, CiteScore: 1)
Autism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 308, SJR: 1.739, CiteScore: 4)
Autism & Developmental Language Impairments     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Behavior Modification     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.877, CiteScore: 2)
Behavioral and Cognitive Neuroscience Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Bible Translator     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Biblical Theology Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.184, CiteScore: 0)
Big Data & Society     Open Access   (Followers: 47)
Biochemistry Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Bioinformatics and Biology Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.141, CiteScore: 2)
Biological Research for Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.685, CiteScore: 2)
Biomarker Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.81, CiteScore: 2)
Biomarkers in Cancer     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Biomedical Engineering and Computational Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Biomedical Informatics Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Bioscope: South Asian Screen Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.235, CiteScore: 0)
BMS: Bulletin of Sociological Methodology/Bulletin de Méthodologie Sociologique     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.226, CiteScore: 0)
Body & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 1.531, CiteScore: 3)
Bone and Tissue Regeneration Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Breast Cancer : Basic and Clinical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.823, CiteScore: 2)
British J. of Music Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
British J. of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 174, SJR: 0.323, CiteScore: 1)
British J. of Pain     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.579, CiteScore: 2)
British J. of Politics and Intl. Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31, SJR: 0.91, CiteScore: 2)
British J. of Visual Impairment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.337, CiteScore: 1)
British J.ism Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Building Acoustics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.215, CiteScore: 1)
Building Services Engineering Research & Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.583, CiteScore: 1)
Bulletin of Science, Technology & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Business & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Business and Professional Communication Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.348, CiteScore: 1)
Business Information Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.279, CiteScore: 0)
Business Perspectives and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Cahiers Élisabéthains     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.111, CiteScore: 0)
Calcutta Statistical Association Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription  
California Management Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 2.209, CiteScore: 4)
Canadian J. of Kidney Health and Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.007, CiteScore: 2)
Canadian J. of Nursing Research (CJNR)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Canadian J. of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 123, SJR: 0.626, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian J. of Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 1.769, CiteScore: 3)
Canadian J. of School Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.266, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian Pharmacists J. / Revue des Pharmaciens du Canada     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.536, CiteScore: 1)
Cancer Growth and Metastasis     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Informatics     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.64, CiteScore: 1)
Capital and Class     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.282, CiteScore: 1)
Cardiac Cath Lab Director     Full-text available via subscription  
Cardiovascular and Thoracic Open     Open Access  
Career Development and Transition for Exceptional Individuals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.44, CiteScore: 1)
Cartilage     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.889, CiteScore: 3)
Cell and Tissue Transplantation and Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cell Transplantation     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.023, CiteScore: 3)
Cephalalgia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 1.581, CiteScore: 3)
Child Language Teaching and Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31, SJR: 0.501, CiteScore: 1)
Child Maltreatment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.22, CiteScore: 3)
Child Neurology Open     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Childhood     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.894, CiteScore: 2)
Childhood Obesity and Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
China Information     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.767, CiteScore: 2)
China Report     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.221, CiteScore: 0)
Chinese J. of Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Christianity & Literature     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Chronic Illness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.672, CiteScore: 2)
Chronic Respiratory Disease     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.808, CiteScore: 2)
Chronic Stress     Open Access  
Citizenship, Social and Economics Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.145, CiteScore: 0)
Cleft Palate-Craniofacial J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.757, CiteScore: 1)
Clin-Alert     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis     Open Access   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.49, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Case Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.364, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44, SJR: 0.73, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical EEG and Neuroscience     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.552, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.296, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Arthritis and Musculoskeletal Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.537, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Blood Disorders     Open Access   (SJR: 0.314, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.686, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.283, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Circulatory, Respiratory and Pulmonary Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.425, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Ear, Nose and Throat     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Endocrinology and Diabetes     Open Access   (Followers: 32, SJR: 0.63, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.129, CiteScore: 3)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Pediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Reproductive Health     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.776, CiteScore: 0)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Therapeutics     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.172, CiteScore: 0)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Trauma and Intensive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Women's Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Clinical Nursing Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29, SJR: 0.471, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Pathology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.487, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Psychological Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 3.281, CiteScore: 5)
Clinical Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 69, SJR: 1.322, CiteScore: 3)
Clinical Risk     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.133, CiteScore: 0)
Clinical Trials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 2.399, CiteScore: 2)
Clothing and Textiles Research J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.36, CiteScore: 1)
Common Law World Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Communication & Sport     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.385, CiteScore: 1)
Communication and the Public     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Communication Disorders Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.458, CiteScore: 1)
Communication Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 2.171, CiteScore: 3)
Community College Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.451, CiteScore: 1)
Comparative Political Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 217, SJR: 3.772, CiteScore: 3)
Compensation & Benefits Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Competition & Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.843, CiteScore: 2)
Competition and Regulation in Network Industries     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.143, CiteScore: 0)
Concurrent Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.642, CiteScore: 2)
Conflict Management and Peace Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35, SJR: 2.441, CiteScore: 1)
Contemporary Drug Problems     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.609, CiteScore: 2)
Contemporary Education Dialogue     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.102, CiteScore: 0)
Contemporary Issues in Early Childhood     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.766, CiteScore: 1)
Contemporary Review of the Middle East     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Contemporary Sociology : A J. of Reviews     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 34, SJR: 0.195, CiteScore: 0)
Contemporary Voice of Dalit     Full-text available via subscription  
Contexts     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Contributions to Indian Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.376, CiteScore: 0)
Convergence The Intl. J. of Research into New Media Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50, SJR: 0.521, CiteScore: 1)
Cooperation and Conflict     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.945, CiteScore: 2)
Cornell Hospitality Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.198, CiteScore: 2)
Counseling Outcome Research and Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.279, CiteScore: 1)

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.49
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 16  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Print) 1076-0296 - ISSN (Online) 1938-2723
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1079 journals]
  • Evaluation of the DOAC-Stop Procedure by LC-MS/MS Assays for Determining
           the Residual Activity of Dabigatran, Rivaroxaban, and Apixaban

    • Authors: L. Slavik, J. Jacova, D. Friedecky, J. Ulehlova, Z. Tauber, J. Prochazkova, A. Hlusi, M. Palova
      Abstract: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis, Volume 25, Issue , January-December 2019.
      The effect of direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) on laboratory tests dependent on the production of their targets, factor IIa and factor Xa (FXa), is a well-known problem and can cause both false positive and negative results. Therefore, the correct interpretation of tests performed in patients receiving DOACs is necessary to avoid misclassification and subsequent clinical consequences. However, even with significant experience, there are situations where it is not possible to assess the influence of some methods. Particularly important is the situation in the diagnosis of lupus anticoagulants using the dilute Russell viper venom timetest, which is based on direct FXa activation. A very promising solution to this situation is offered by the DOAC laboratory balancing procedure DOAC-Stop. For evaluating the effectiveness of this procedure, 60 (20 apixaban, 20 dabigatran, and 20 rivaroxaban) patients treated with DOACs were enrolled. All patient samples were analyzed for the presence of individual DOAC types and subsequently subjected to the DOAC-Stop procedure.We evaluated its effectiveness by our own high-performance liquid chromatography-coupled tandem mass spectrometrymethod, which simultaneously sets all high-sensitivity DOACs. Unlike coagulation tests based on the determination of the residual effects of DOACs on target enzymes, which is complicated by extensive interindividual variation, this methodology is highly specific and sensitive.The DOAC-Stop procedure eliminated dabigatran from 99.5%, rivaroxaban from 97.9%, and apixaban from 97.1% of participants in our group. Residual amounts did not exceed 2.7 ng/mL for dabigatran, 10.9 ng/mL for rivaroxaban, or 13.03 ng/mL for apixaban, which are safe values that do not affect either screening or special coagulation tests.
      Citation: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis
      PubDate: 2019-09-16T11:58:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1076029619872556
       
  • The Effect of CYP2C19 and Nongenetic Factors on Clopidogrel Responsiveness
           in the MENA Region: A Systematic Review

    • Authors: Zainab Ali, Hazem Elewa
      Abstract: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis, Volume 25, Issue , January-December 2019.
      Clopidogrel is the cornerstone antiplatelet used in the treatment and prevention of thrombotic events. Some studies examined the effect of CYP2C19 polymorphism and nongenetic factors on clopidogrel response in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region. However, the consistency among these studies is yet unknown. This study aims to estimate the prevalence of CYP2C19 genetic variants in MENA region and to evaluate the effect of these variants as well as the nongenetic factors on clopidogrel responsiveness. A systematic literature search was performed to identify relevant articles. Only observational studies were included. A total of 20 studies in 8 different populations were included. The CYP2C19*2 variant is the most prevalent loss-of-function (LOF) allele in the MENA region (1.7%-35%). The frequency of CYP2C19*17 ranged from 5.3% to 26.9%. Of the 9 studies, 6 found an association between carriers of at least 1 LOF allele and clopidogrel resistance. Older age, high body mass index, females, and the use of calcium channel blockers were associated with clopidogrel resistance as well. Association between the CYP2C19*2 allele and clopidogrel resistance is common among MENA populations. Future studies should focus on having larger sample sizes to detect other minor variant alleles and their effect on bleeding and cardiovascular outcomes.
      Citation: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis
      PubDate: 2019-09-12T12:08:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1076029619875520
       
  • In Vitro Assessment of von Willebrand Factor in Cryoprecipitate,
           Antihemophilic Factor/VWF Complex (Human), and Recombinant von Willebrand
           Factor

    • Authors: Meaghan E. Colling, Kenneth D. Friedman, Walter H. Dzik
      Abstract: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis, Volume 25, Issue , January-December 2019.
      Patients with von Willebrand disease (VWD) often require treatment with supplemental von Willebrand factor (VWF) prior to procedures or to treat bleeding. Commercial VWF concentrates and more recently recombinant human VWF (rVWF) have replaced cryoprecipitate as the mainstay of therapy. In comparison with cryoprecipitate, the VWF content and multimer distribution under current manufacturing processes of these commercial products has not been reported. We measured the factor VIII (FVIII:C), VWF antigen (VWF:Ag), VWF collagen-binding activity (VWF:CB), VWF platelet-binding activity by GPIbM enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (VWF:GPIbM), and percentage of high-molecular-weight (HMWM) VWF in 3 pools of group A and O cryoprecipitate, 3 vials of VWF concentrate (Humate-P), and 1 lot of rVWF (Vonvendi). We found that both group O and group A cryoprecipitate have significantly higher ratios of VWF:GPIbM activity and FVIII:C activity relative to VWF:Ag and have better preservation of HMWM than Humate-P. Although not compared statistically, rVWF appears to have more HMWM VWF and a higher ratio of VWF:GPIbM to VWF:Ag than Humate-P and cryoprecipitate. The estimated acquisition cost for our hospital for treating one major bleeding episode was more than 4-fold higher with Humate-P and 7- to 10-fold higher with rVWF than with cryoprecipitate.
      Citation: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis
      PubDate: 2019-09-09T11:32:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1076029619873976
       
  • Differences in Clinical Presentation, Rate of Pulmonary Embolism, and Risk
           Factors Among Patients With Deep Vein Thrombosis in Unusual Sites

    • Authors: Angelo Porfidia, Enrica Porceddu, Daniela Feliciani, Marzia Giordano, Fabiana Agostini, Giulia Ciocci, Giulia Cammà, Igor Giarretta, Eleonora Gaetani, Paolo Tondi, Roberto Pola
      Abstract: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis, Volume 25, Issue , January-December 2019.
      Unusual site deep vein thrombosis (USDVT) is an uncommon form of venous thromboembolism with heterogeneous signs and symptoms, unknown rate of pulmonary embolism (PE), and poorly defined risk factors. We conducted a retrospective analysis of 107 consecutive cases of USDVTs, discharged from our University Hospital over a period of 2 years. Patients were classified based on the site of thrombosis and distinguished between patients with cerebral vein thrombosis, jugular vein thrombosis, thrombosis of the deep veins of the upper extremities, and abdominal vein thrombosis. We found statistically significant differences between groups in terms of age (P < .0001) and gender distribution (P < .05). We also found that the rate of symptomatic patients was significantly different between groups (P < .0001). Another interesting finding was the significant difference between groups in terms of rate of PE (P < .01). Finally, we found statistically significant differences between groups in terms of risk factors for thrombosis, in particular cancer (P < .01). Unprovoked cases were differently distributed among groups (P < .0001). This study highlights differences between patients with USDVT, which depend on the site of thrombosis, and provides data which might be useful in clinical practice.
      Citation: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis
      PubDate: 2019-09-09T11:28:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1076029619872550
       
  • Preemptive Dose Adjustment Effect on the Quality of Anticoagulation
           Management in Warfarin Patients With Drug Interactions: A Retrospective
           Cohort Study

    • Authors: Amr Mohamed Fahmi, Adham Mohamed, Hazem Elewa, Mohamed Omar Saad
      Abstract: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis, Volume 25, Issue , January-December 2019.
      One strategy to manage patients on warfarin starting an interacting drug is to increase the frequency of monitoring. Another strategy is to adjust warfarin dose around the time patient is started on an interacting medication, which is known as “preemptive warfarin dose adjustment.” The main objective of this study is to compare preemptive to nonpreemptive strategy and their impact on the quality of anticoagulation management. This is a retrospective cohort study performed at the pharmacist-managed anticoagulation clinic in a tertiary hospital in the State of Qatar. Over a 4-year period, 340 patients were evaluated, and 58 warfarin–drug interaction encounters were identified. Mean age of the patients was (57.7 ± 13.7), and 50% of them were females. Preemptive dose adjustment was used in 17 (29.3%) cases. Incidence of out-of-target international normalized ratio (INR) was statistically lower in the preemptive arm compared to the control group (41.2% [7/17] vs 69.2% [27/39], P = .048). Incidence of extreme out-of-target INR was numerically lower in the preemptive arm compared to the control but did not reach statistical significance (11.8% [2/17] vs 29.3% [12/41], P = .139). Change in frequency of INR monitoring was not different between the 2 groups. However, overall frequency of INR monitoring after onset/discontinuation of interacting medication increased compared to baseline (7 [9] vs 21 [16] days, P < .001). Preemptive strategy was shown in our study to decrease incidence of the out-of-target INR visits, although patients remained in need for close monitoring.
      Citation: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis
      PubDate: 2019-09-04T09:51:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1076029619872554
       
  • Clinical Risk Factors of Asymptomatic Deep Venous Thrombosis in Patients
           With Acute Stroke

    • Authors: Yi Wang, Yu Shi, Yi Dong, Qiang Dong, Ting Ye, Kun Fang
      Abstract: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis, Volume 25, Issue , January-December 2019.
      Background:Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) is a common complication after stroke. It is easy to identify the patients with symptomatic DVT; however, the tool for asymptomatic high-risk population needs to be further explored. Our aim was to explore the risk factors of acute stroke patients with asymptomatic DVT.Methods:We performed a prospective observation study among 452 patients with acute stroke who had a stroke within 14 days. Ultrasound examination of deep veins was repeatedly performed in each patient for DVT every 7 days during his admission. The dynamic rate of DVT in acute stroke was analyzed. Then risk factors were compared between DVT patients and non-DVT patients. The predictive model was explored based on thr cox proportion model.Results:Asymptomatic DVT was detected in 52 (11.5%) patients with stroke and 85.9% of thrombi were identified in their distal veins. Patients with longer length of stay (P = .004), more severe stroke (P = 0.001), higher level of D-dimer (P = .003), and higher blood glucose level were associated with higher risk of DVT, while patients with higher triglyceride level (P = .003) were less likely to have DVT, after adjusting age and sex. With the median of D-dimer (0.38 FEU mg/L) as cutoff value. Patients with higher level of D-dimer might have a higher risk of DVT with a significant statistical difference. Also, the severity of stroke differed DVT risk in Kaplan-Meier model. Using cox-proportion hazard regression model, asymptomatic DVT could be predicted (area under the curve 0.852).Conclusion:Our data showed that asymptomatic DVT was common in patients with acute stroke and most of thrombosis occurred in distal veins. Combination of clinical manifestation and laboratory results might be helpful predict DVT. DVT prophylaxis should be condisdered in high risk.
      Citation: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis
      PubDate: 2019-08-22T04:06:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1076029619868534
       
  • Fisetin Prolongs Therapy Window of Brain Ischemic Stroke Using Tissue
           Plasminogen Activator: A Double-Blind Randomized Placebo-Controlled
           Clinical Trial

    • Authors: Limin Wang, Di Cao, Huijun Wu, Hongning Jia, Chaoping Yang, Lihua Zhang
      Abstract: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis, Volume 25, Issue , January-December 2019.
      Recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) can be utilized to treat ischemic stroke with safety and effectiveness but limited by a narrow therapeutic window. In the present clinical trial among patients with stroke, we sought to evaluate the potential of fisetin to extend the therapeutic window of rt-PA treatment. Patients with stroke were divided based on their onset-to-treatment time (OTT) and then randomly assigned to receive the rt-PA treatment combined with fisetin or placebo. Primary outcome was evaluated using the National Institutes of Health Stroke scale (NIHSS), and secondary outcome was assessed by serum levels of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 2, MMP 9, and C-reactive protein (CRP). Fisetin dramatically improved the treatment outcomes of the patients with stroke in the delayed OTT strata, as revealed by lower NIHSS scores. The beneficial effect of fisetin was likely attributable to reduced levels of MMP-2, MMP-9, and CRP in the serum, as evidenced by strong linear correlations between serum levels of such markers with the NIHSS scores in all enrolled patients. Fisetin may possess the potential to supplement traditional rt-PA treatments among patients with stroke, particularly for those with delayed OTT, and thereby extend the otherwise narrow therapeutic window and improve the treatment outcomes.
      Citation: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis
      PubDate: 2019-08-22T04:06:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1076029619871359
       
  • Switching to Another Oral Anticoagulant and Drug Discontinuation Among
           Elderly Patients With Nonvalvular Atrial Fibrillation Treated With
           Different Direct Oral Anticoagulants

    • Authors: Christine L. Baker, Amol D. Dhamane, Jigar Rajpura, Jack Mardekian, Oluwaseyi Dina, Cristina Russ, Lisa Rosenblatt, Melissa Lingohr-Smith, Jay Lin
      Abstract: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis, Volume 25, Issue , January-December 2019.
      We compared the risks of switching to another oral anticoagulant (OAC) and discontinuation of direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) among elderly patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) who were prescribed rivaroxaban or dabigatran versus apixaban. Patients (≥65 years of age) with NVAF prescribed DOACs (January 1, 2013 to September 30, 2017) were identified from the Humana research database and grouped into DOAC cohorts. Cox regression analyses were used to evaluate whether the risk for switching to another OAC or discontinuing index DOACs differed among cohorts. Of the study population (N = 38 250), 55.9% were prescribed apixaban (mean age: 78.6 years; 49.8% female), 37.3% rivaroxaban (mean age: 77.4 years; 46.7% female), and 6.8% dabigatran (mean age: 77.0 years; 44.0% female). Compared to patients prescribed apixaban, patients prescribed rivaroxaban (hazard ratio [HR]: 2.08; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.92-2.25; P < .001) or dabigatran (HR: 3.74; 95% CI, 3.35-4.18, P < .001) had a significantly higher risk of switching to another OAC during the follow-up; compared to patients prescribed apixaban, the risks of discontinuation were also higher for patients treated with rivaroxaban (HR: 1.10; 95% CI, 1.07-1.13, P < .001) or dabigatran (HR: 1.29; 95% CI, 1.23-1.35, P < .001).
      Citation: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis
      PubDate: 2019-08-16T10:53:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1076029619870249
       
  • Analysis of Factors That Interrupt With INR Control in the First
           Anticoagulation Clinic Monitoring Jordanian Patients

    • Authors: Nairooz H. Al-Momany, Zeid M. Makahleh, Nadia A. Al-Omari, Hana A. Al-Sarayreh, Rawan O. Momani
      Abstract: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis, Volume 25, Issue , January-December 2019.
      Multiple factors such as vitamin K consumption, drug interactions, herbs interactions, disease states, and alcohol intake affect international normalized ratio (INR) values and thus warfarin dosing. These variables have been described in general and for all patients in the literature. In contrast, the factors that affect INR control in a specific population are rarely studied. Being aware of these factors contributes a lot in maintaining an INR control and avoiding the supratherapeutic or subtherapeutic anticoagulation and the associated risks of hemorrhage or thromboembolism. The aim of this study is to recognize the specific population factors in Jordanian patients that interrupt INR control. Such recognition provides clinical pharmacists managing the anti-coagulation clinic (ACC) with necessary tools and predictors of dose adjustment, nontarget INR handling, and points to add on to the educational session. A total of 2788 patients were referred to the first clinical pharmacists managed ACC at Queen Alia Heart Institute—the only official referral hospital for cardiac patients in Jordan—for education and monitoring between November 1, 2013, and November 1, 2016. We evaluated specific population factors that interrupt INR control using a pretested, structured clinical data collection form. The patients were followed up regularly for achieving target INR (TINR). For patients who were not achieving TINR, the possible cause was examined thoroughly by reviewing the patient’s medical file for recent medication intake, comorbidities, and laboratory results. Then the patients or their caregiver were asked direct questions regarding their diet, food supplements, cigarette smoking, shisha smoking, alcohol intake, herbs, and complementary medicine use and compliance, in addition to performing pharmacogenetic testing (polymorphisms of vitamin K–epoxide reductase complex [VKORC1] and cytochrome P450 2C9 [CYP2C9] genes) in special cases. For a total of 2788 patients, 89 488 INR values were included in the study. Of all, 20 365 (22.8%) were non-TINR values, 13 145 (14%) were subtherapeutic, and 7220 (8.1%) were supratherapeutic. All patients included in the study had a non-TINR at least 3 times (n = 65, 2.3%) and as frequent as 50 times (n = 21, 0.8%) during the study period. Non-TINR values ranged from 1 to 11. Serious side effects reported in 7 patients with uncontrolled INR, 6 were bleeding, which required hospitalization (2 upper gastrointestinal [GI] bleeding, 3 nasal bleeding, and 1 eye bleeding), 1 was cerebrovascular accident (CVA thrombolytic). Factors that interrupted INR control in our population, arranged in descending sequence, were concurrent medication use 46.9% (mainly Salicylates and Amiodarone), smoking cigarettes and shisha 17% (represented the most frequent single factor that caused non-TINR in the present study), a nonbalanced dietary vitamin K intake 16.88% caused changes in INR (lower) was related to an increase in the intake of vitamin K-rich food, were noticed to be much more in the spring season in Jordan (end of March and April mainly), herbal supplements 15.02%; Hawthorn (Crataegus, الزعرور) is an herb that lives widely in Jordan, and shockingly we found that it is used very commonly in our ACC patients and corresponded to an elevated INR
      Citation: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis
      PubDate: 2019-08-14T08:16:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1076029619870252
       
  • Patient Satisfaction With Venous Thromboembolism Treatment

    • Authors: David Webb, Kibum Kim, Casey R. Tak, Daniel M. Witt, Michael Feehan, Mark A. Munger
      Abstract: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis, Volume 25, Issue , January-December 2019.
      Venous thromboembolism (VTE) represents a major health-care problem. Understanding patient satisfaction with VTE care is an important health-care goal. A national online survey was administered to adults who had experienced a recent VTE event. The survey assessed patient satisfaction by: (1) satisfaction with VTE care provider; (2) likelihood to recommend VTE provider; and (3) satisfaction with communication between VTE care providers. Each question was correlated with patient demographics, patient care harms (ie, misdiagnosis, wrong treatment), patient beliefs concerning outcomes, and type of anticoagulant therapy. Respondents (907) were 52.4 ± 14.4 years, predominantly Caucasian, mostly women, and generally had health insurance. Most respondents were satisfied with VTE care providers, likely to recommend their VTE provider, and satisfied with communication between providers. Dissatisfaction was strongly associated with treatment mistakes, a wrong diagnosis or treatment, or delayed treatment. A national sample of VTE patients were generally satisfied with VTE care experiences. The VTE care dissatisfaction was strongly associated with perceived mistakes in VTE care. Interventions aimed at reducing, acknowledging, and communicating errors could be studied to improve VTE care satisfaction.
      Citation: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis
      PubDate: 2019-08-12T06:09:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1076029619864663
       
  • Rivaroxaban’s Impact on Renal Decline in Patients With Nonvalvular
           Atrial Fibrillation: A US MarketScan Claims Database Analysis

    • Authors: Craig I. Coleman, Reinhold Kreutz, Nitesh Sood, Thomas J. Bunz, Anna-Katharina Meinecke, Daniel Eriksson, William L. Baker
      Abstract: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis, Volume 25, Issue , January-December 2019.
      Warfarin has been associated with renovascular calcification and worsening renal function, whereas rivaroxaban may provide a degree of renopreservation by decreasing vascular inflammation. We sought to compare rivaroxaban and warfarin’s impact on renal decline in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) treated in routine practice. Using US MarketScan claims data from January 2012 to December 2017, we identified patients with NVAF newly initiated on rivaroxaban or warfarin with ≥12 months of continuous insurance coverage prior to initiation. Patients with stage 5 chronic kidney disease (CKD) or receiving hemodialysis at baseline were excluded. Outcomes included rates (events/100 person-years) of hospital or emergency department admission for acute kidney injury (AKI) or progression to stage 5 CKD or need for hemodialysis. Differences in baseline covariates between cohorts were adjusted using inverse probability-of-treatment weights based on propensity scores (absolute standardized differences
      Citation: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis
      PubDate: 2019-08-08T09:42:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1076029619868535
       
  • Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor–Associated Platelet Dysfunction: Does This
           Need to Have a Significant Clinical Impact'

    • Authors: Nurgul Ozgur Yurttas, Ahmet Emre Eskazan
      Abstract: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis, Volume 25, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis
      PubDate: 2019-08-02T11:33:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1076029619866925
       
  • Decreased eGFR Is Associated With Ischemic Stroke in Patients With Dilated
           Cardiomyopathy

    • Authors: Yuqing Deng, Zhiqing Chen, Lili Hu, Zhenyan Xu, Jinzhu Hu, Jianyong Ma, Jianhua Yu, Jianxin Hu, Juxiang Li, Qinmei Xiong, Kui Hong
      Abstract: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis, Volume 25, Issue , January-December 2019.
      Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is increasingly indicated as a cause of cardioembolic syndrome, in particular, cardioembolic ischemia stroke. However, the potential risk factors for stroke among DCM patients remain under investigated. DCM patients hospitalized from June 2011 to June 2016 were included. The cases were defined as the group of DCM patients with stroke compared with those without stroke. Clinical characteristic data were collected and compared between the two groups including demographic data, complicated diseases, echocardiography index, and laboratory parameters and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). A multivariate logistic regression analysis model adjusted by sex and age was used to explore the related risk factors for stroke in DCM patients. A total of 779 hospitalized patients with DCM were included. Of these, 55 (7.1%) had experienced a stroke. Significantly lower eGFR levels (68.03 ± 26.22 vs 79.88 ± 24.25 mL/min/1.73 m2, P = .001) and larger left atrial diameters (45.32 ± 7.79 vs 43.25 ± 7.11 mm, P = .04) were found in the group of patients having DCM with stroke compared to those without stroke. When the eGFR was categorized as eGFR>60, 30
      Citation: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis
      PubDate: 2019-08-02T11:33:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1076029619866909
       
  • Dabigatran Monitoring Was Influenced by Thrombin Time Reagent With
           Different Thrombin Concentrations

    • Authors: Xiaoping Xu, Qian Liang
      Abstract: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis, Volume 25, Issue , January-December 2019.
      To describe the effect of dabigatran on thrombin time (TT) reagents at different concentrations of thrombin. Pooled normal plasma enriched with dabigatran was dissolved in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) at concentrations of 0, 20, 50, 100, 200, 300, and 500 ng/mL. Samples with each concentration were evaluated using a semiautomatic coagulation analyzer to assess the effect of dabigatran on internal normalized ratio (INR), thromboplastin time (APTT), and TT, which were purchased from Instrument Laboratory (IL), Sysmex (SYS), and Stago (STA), respectively. Regarding INR, no reagent showed good sensitivity to increasing concentration of dabigatran, despite all reagents showing good linear response curves (P = .012). Regarding APTT, all reagents had low sensitivity to increasing dabigatran concentration, but SYS-APTT showed a better linear response curve (P = .001). Regarding TT, all reagents had a good linear response to the concentration of dabigatran; however, SYS-TT was very sensitive at low concentrations of dabigatran (0-100 ng/mL), while IL (TT-5 mL) and STA-TT were sensitive at medium concentrations of dabigatran (0-300 ng/mL), and IL (TT-2 mL) was less sensitive for a wide concentration of dabigatran (0-500 ng/mL; P = .007). Internal normalized ratio and APTT showed low sensitivity and SYS-TT showed high sensitivity to concentrations of dabigatran that were unsuitable to monitor. Both IL (TT-5 mL) and STA-TT were useful at medium concentrations of dabigatran by semiautomatic coagulation analyzer, which calculated results using the end point method of coagulation. Instrument Laboratory (TT-2 mL), which contains a higher concentration of thrombin, had better sensitivity to the concentration of dabigatran than APTT and was suitable for routine monitoring by an automatic analyzer.
      Citation: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis
      PubDate: 2019-07-31T09:39:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1076029619867137
       
  • Bleeding Symptoms and von Willebrand Factor Levels: 30-Year Experience in
           a Tertiary Care Center

    • Authors: Chatphatai Moonla, Benjaporn Akkawat, Yaowaree Kittikalayawong, Autcharaporn Sukperm, Mukmanee Meesanun, Noppacharn Uaprasert, Darintr Sosothikul, Ponlapat Rojnuckarin
      Abstract: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis, Volume 25, Issue , January-December 2019.
      Correlations between bleeding symptoms and von Willebrand factor (VWF) levels may help to predict hemorrhagic severity in the Westerners with von Willebrand disease (VWD), but data in Asians are lacking. In this study, Thai patients with VWF levels
      Citation: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis
      PubDate: 2019-07-30T09:57:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1076029619866916
       
  • Thrombin Generation in Chinese Pregnant Women and the Effect of Insulin
           Use on Thrombin Generation in Patients with GDM

    • Authors: Feng Dong, Longhao Wang, Chengbin Wang
      Abstract: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis, Volume 25, Issue , January-December 2019.
      Pregnancy is a hypercoagulable state associated with an increased risk of venous thrombosis. Calibrated automated thrombogram (CAT) is a test to monitor the thrombin generation (TG), a laboratory marker of thrombosis risk, and increases during normal pregnancy, but it is still unclear whether TG is related to the use of insulin in pregnant women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). We performed thrombin generation by CAT on 135 normal pregnant women, including 43 in first trimester, 32 in second trimester, 60 in third trimester, respectively; 68 pregnant women with GDM were also enrolled, 19 patients with GDM using insulin to control blood glucose and 49 patients control their blood glucose through diet and exercise with noninsulin treatment. The overall CAT parameters were calculated using descriptive statistics method with mean ± standard deviation. Mean endogenous thrombin potential, peak thrombin generation, and StartTail time increased significantly with the pregnancy. There was no significant difference in TG test parameters except StartTail time(P = .003) in insulin-treated GDM group when compared to those without insulin in the GDM group. The normal ranges for CAT parameters in pregnant women were determined. Thrombin generation increased significantly in first trimester and remains stable in second and third trimester. The use of insulin in patient with GDM did not affect thrombin generation test. Our study helps to establish the reference range of thrombin generation in Chinese normal pregnant population and provide more basis to predict the risk of thrombus complicating during pregnancy.
      Citation: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis
      PubDate: 2019-07-17T06:25:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1076029619863492
       
  • Reversal of Factor Xa Inhibitors by Andexanet Alfa May Increase
           Thrombogenesis Compared to Pretreatment Values

    • Authors: Fakiha Siddiqui, Alfonso Tafur, Lorenzo Storino Ramacciotti, Walter Jeske, Debra Hoppensteadt, Eduardo Ramacciotti, Omer Iqbal, Jawed Fareed
      Abstract: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis, Volume 25, Issue , January-December 2019.
      Recombinant coagulation factor Xa (FXa), inactivated Zh-zo, also known as andexanet alfa (AA), is a modified version of human FXa that has been developed to neutralize FXa inhibitors. We studied the reversal effect of AA for these inhibitors in various anticoagulant and thrombin generation (TG) assays. Individual aliquots of normal human plasma containing 1 µg/mL of apixaban, betrixaban, edoxaban, and rivaroxaban, were supplemented with saline or AA at a concentration of 100 µg/mL. Clotting profiles include prothrombinase-induced clotting time, activated partial thromboplastin time, and prothrombin time. Factor Xa activity was measured using an amidolytic method. Thrombin generation was measured using a calibrated automated thrombogram. Differential neutralization of all 4 anticoagulants was noted in the activated clotting time and other clotting tests. The FXa activity reversal profile varied with an observed decrease in apixaban (22%), betrixaban (56%), edoxaban (28%), and rivaroxaban (49%). Andexanet alfa also led to an increased TG in comparison to saline. The peak thrombin was higher (40%), area under the curve (AUC) increased (15%), whereas the lag time (LT) decreased (17%). Andexanet alfa added at 100 µg/mL to various FXa supplemented systems resulted in reversal of the inhibitory effects, restoring the TG profile; AUC, LT, and peak thrombin levels were comparable to those of unsupplemented samples. Andexanet alfa is capable of reversing anti-Xa activity of different oral FXa inhibitors but overshoots thrombogenesis in both the saline and FXa inhibitor supplemented systems. The degree of neutralization of Xa inhibitor is specific to each agent.
      Citation: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis
      PubDate: 2019-07-12T12:02:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1076029619863493
       
  • D-Dimer Predicts Disease Severity but Not Long-Term Prognosis in Acute
           Pulmonary Embolism

    • Authors: Fabian Geissenberger, Florian Schwarz, Michael Probst, Sabine Haberl, Stefanie Gruetzner, Thomas Kroencke, Wolfgang von Scheidt, Thomas M. Berghaus
      Abstract: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis, Volume 25, Issue , January-December 2019.
      D-dimer might be correlated with prognosis in pulmonary embolism (PE). The predictive value of plasma D-dimer for disease severity and survival was investigated in the lowest and highest D-dimer quartile among 200 patients with PE. Patients with high D-dimers were significantly more often hypotensive (P = .001), tachycardic (P = .016), or hypoxemic (P = .001). Pulmonary arterial obstruction index (PAOI) values were significantly higher in the high D-dimer quartile (P < .001). Elevated troponin I (TNI) levels (P < .001), simplified PE severity indices ≥1 (P < .001), right-to-left ventricular (RV/LV) diameter ratios ≥1 (P < .001), and thrombolysis (P = .001) were more frequent in the high D-dimer quartile. D-dimer was associated with RV/LV ratios ≥1 (P = .021), elevated PAOI (P < .001) or TNI levels (P < .001), hypotension (P < .001), tachycardia (P = .003), and hypoxemia (P < .001), but not with long-term all-cause mortality. D-dimer predicts disease severity but not long-term prognosis in acute PE, possibly due to a more aggressive treatment strategy in severely affected patients.
      Citation: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis
      PubDate: 2019-07-12T12:02:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1076029619863495
       
  • Joint Bleeding Tendencies in Adult Patients With Hemophilia: It’s
           Not All Pharmacokinetics

    • Authors: Jenny Y. Zhou, Richard F. W. Barnes, Gary Foster, Alfonso Iorio, Thomas J. Cramer, Annette von Drygalski
      Abstract: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis, Volume 25, Issue , January-December 2019.
      Hemophilic arthropathy from joint bleeding remains a complication with major morbidity in the increasingly aging patients with hemophilia. Prophylactic clotting factor infusions, based on pharmacokinetic dosing to reduce bleeding rates, are being explored more and more. However, there is little evidence on the benefits of pharmacokinetic dosing in direct association with bleeding events. Here, we prospectively followed a cohort of adult patients with hemophilia A and B (n = 26) and arthropathic joints on various clotting factor products over a period of 2 years with clinical and radiographic joint health assessments, frequent joint ultrasound, and pharmacokinetic studies. Joint bleeds and synovitis with synovial vascularity changes were objectively diagnosed by musculoskeletal ultrasound and power Doppler and analyzed in relation to pharmacokinetic, joint- and patient-specific parameters. Results revealed that, contrary to common beliefs, bleeding episodes were not readily explained by pharmacokinetic features, as they were not associated with more time spent below certain clotting factor thresholds. Joint bleeding was found to be associated with prominent vascularity changes, suggesting that vascular remodeling and leakiness may contribute to joint bleeding that cannot be prevented by clotting factor replacement alone.
      Citation: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis
      PubDate: 2019-07-12T12:02:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1076029619862052
       
  • Osteoporosis in Patients With Hemophilia: Single-Center Results From a
           Middle-Income Country

    • Authors: Serdar Sahin, Sevil Sadri, Zafer Baslar, Muhlis Cem Ar
      Abstract: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis, Volume 25, Issue , January-December 2019.
      Increased number of patients with hemophilia have been identified to have osteoporosis at early ages. Low bone mineral density in the setting of hemophilia has been associated with decreased mobility, sedentary life style, on demand treatment or delayed prophylaxis, low body weight and viral infections. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of hemophilia on bone health of adult patients living in a middle income country. A total of 61 adult patients with hemophilia who were followed at the Hematology Department of Cerrahpaşa Medical Faculty, Istanbul University-Cerrahpaşa were consecutively included in this study. Bone health of the patients was assessed using the bone mineral density (BMD) and vitamin D levels. Z and t scores are used for evaluation of BMD in patients with hemophilia aged < 50 and ≥ 50 years, respectively. Information on treatment and co-morbidities including viral diseases were obtained from the medical files of the recruited patients. Bone mineral density was found normal in 30, and low in 29 patients. Vitamin D levels were below 20 ng/ml in 46 patients. No significant relationship was found between the severity of hemophilia and bone density. Vitamin D levels were significantly lower in patients who had a history of joint intervention. Neither annual bleeding rate nor the treatment modality (on demand versus prophylaxis) were associated with the bone mineral density and vitamin D levels. Annual factor consumption was higher in patients whose bone mineral densities was low both in femoral and lumbar regions. The results of this study depicting the situation of adult hemophilia population from a middle income country show that bone mineral density and vitamin D levels were decreased in a considerable amount of patients at early ages.
      Citation: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis
      PubDate: 2019-07-08T11:33:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1076029619861689
       
  • Concentrations of the Selected Biomarkers of Endothelial Dysfunction in
           Response to Antiepileptic Drugs: A Literature Review

    • Authors: Beata Sarecka-Hujar, Izabela Szołtysek-Bołdys, Ilona Kopyta, Barbara Dolińska, Andrzej Sobczak
      Abstract: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis, Volume 25, Issue , January-December 2019.
      Epilepsy is a disease arising from morphological and metabolic changes in the brain. Approximately 60% of patients with seizures can be controlled with 1 antiepileptic drug (AED), while in others, polytherapy is required. The AED treatment affects a number of biochemical processes in the body, including increasing the risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). It is indicated that the duration of AED therapy with some AEDs significantly accelerates the process of atherosclerosis. Most of AEDs increase levels of homocysteine (HCys) as well as may affect concentrations of new, nonclassical risk factors for atherosclerosis, that is, asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) and homoarginine (hArg). Because of the role of these parameters in the pathogenesis of CVD, knowledge of HCys, ADMA, and hArg concentrations in patients with epilepsia treated with AED, both pediatric and adult, appears to be of significant importance.
      Citation: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis
      PubDate: 2019-06-26T08:32:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1076029619859429
       
  • Direct Oral Anticoagulants and Cancer-Associated Thrombosis Management.
           Where Do We Stand in 2019'

    • Authors: Eduardo Ramacciotti, Leandro B. Agati, Roberto Augusto Caffaro, Giuliano G. Volpiani, Renato D. Lopes, Anthony J. Comerota, Jawed Fareed
      Abstract: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis, Volume 25, Issue , January-December 2019.
      Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) are now widely used for the management of venous thromboembolism (VTE) that now includes cancer-associated thrombosis. This review summarizes recent data on VTE prophylaxis and treatment, new challenges, guidelines, and updates as well as the current place for DOACs on the emerging cancer-associated VTE management landscape.
      Citation: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis
      PubDate: 2019-06-25T08:31:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1076029619856433
       
  • TKI-Related Platelet Dysfunction Does Not Correlate With Bleeding in
           Patients With Chronic Phase-Chronic Myeloid Leukemia With Complete
           Hematological Response

    • Authors: Yigit Sener, Mufide Okay, Seda Aydin, Yahya Buyukasik, Filiz Akbiyik, Zeliha Gunnur Dikmen
      Abstract: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis, Volume 25, Issue , January-December 2019.
      Bleeding has been reported in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) using tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). In this study, we aimed to evaluate platelet functions and associated bleeding symptoms in patients with CML using TKIs. A standardized questionnaire that was developed for inherited bleeding disorders (ISTH/SSC Bleeding Assessment Tool) was used to score bleeding symptoms in 68 chronic phase patients with CML receiving imatinib (n = 47), dasatinib (n = 15), or nilotinib (n = 6). Light transmission aggregometry was used for platelet function testing. None of the patients had major bleeding (score> 3). Minor bleeding was observed in 25.6% and 20% of the patients in imatinib and dasatinib treatment groups. Impaired/decreased platelet aggregation was observed in 29.8% of imatinib treatment group, 50% of nilotinib group, and 40% of dasatinib group. A secondary aggregation abnormality compatible with the release defect was observed in 26% of patients with CML; 25.5%, 33.3%, and 16.7% of patients receiving imatinib, dasatinib, and nilotinib, respectively. No correlation was found between bleeding symptoms and the impaired platelet function. We can conclude that TKIs may impair in vitro platelet aggregation but this impairment is not associated with bleeding diathesis.
      Citation: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis
      PubDate: 2019-06-20T11:27:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1076029619858409
       
  • Influence of Interleukin-6 (IL-6) Promoter Gene Polymorphisms (−174G>C,
           −572G>C, and −597G>A) on IL-6 Plasma Levels and Their Impact in the
           Development of Acute Ischemic Stroke in Young Indians

    • Authors: Mohammad Suhail Akhter, Arijit Biswas, Saleh Mohammed Abdullah, Yahya Hobani, Ravi Ranjan, Madhuri Behari, Renu Saxena
      Abstract: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis, Volume 25, Issue , January-December 2019.
      This study aimed to determine whether there is an influence of interleukin 6 (IL-6) gene promoter polymorphisms on IL-6 plasma levels and its role in the development of ischemic stroke in young Indians. One hundred young patients with ischemic stroke (age ≥ 45 years) and equal number of age- and sex-matched controls were genotyped for 174G>C, −572G>C, and −597G>A promoter polymorphisms by polymerase chain reaction–restriction fragment length polymorphism. Plasma IL-6 levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Plasma IL-6 levels were significantly higher in patients as compared to controls (patients: 28.61 ± 8.61 pg/mL, controls: 7.60 ± 4.10 pg/mL, P = .001). Both −174G>C (allelic χ2/P value: 4.79/.028, genotypic χ2/P value: 5.3/.021) and −572G>C (allelic χ2/P value: 9.63/.00113 Genotypic χ2/P value: 74/.0002) polymorphisms exhibited genotypic as well as allelic significant association with the disease phenotype. Comparison was made between patients and controls for all 3 polymorphisms using a recessive model with respect to plasma IL-6 levels; no polymorphism showed any significant correlative association with the increased IL-6 levels (P = .31, .51, .32). Interleukin 6 is an inflammatory marker that is considerably influenced by nongenetic factors and is not a good candidate gene for studying genetic components associated with ischemic stroke. It seems that the variability in IL-6 levels is an integrated effect of nongenetic influences and the inflammatory events that follow ischemic stroke instead of being its cause. It is suggested that there is no direct association between −174G>C, −572G>C, and −597G>A polymorphisms and elevated IL-6 levels in the development of ischemic stroke.
      Citation: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis
      PubDate: 2019-06-19T11:37:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1076029619854136
       
  • Prognostic Value of the PARIS Thrombotic Risk Score for 2-Year Mortality
           After Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

    • Authors: Xueyan Zhao, Jianxin Li, Xiaofang Tang, Ying Xian, Lin Jiang, Jue Chen, Lijian Gao, Zhan Gao, Shubin Qiao, Yuejin Yang, Runlin Gao, Bo Xu, Jinqing Yuan
      Abstract: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis, Volume 25, Issue , January-December 2019.
      The Patterns of non-Adherence to Anti-Platelet Regimen in Stented Patients (PARIS) thrombotic risk score is a novel score for predicting the risk of coronary thrombotic events after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). We assessed the prognostic value of this score for mortality in patients with PCI. In this prospective, observational study, we enrolled 10 724 consecutive patients underwent PCI. The primary end point was all-cause death and the secondary end point was major adverse cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events (MACCE) as a composite of all-cause death, myocardial infarction, revascularization, stent thrombosis, or stroke. Among 9782 patients without in-hospital events, a total of 97 deaths and 1002 MACCE occurred during the 2-year follow-up. The mortality risk of patients in the high-risk group was 2.31 times higher than that in the low-risk group (hazard ratio, 2.31; P = .001). This risk score showed prognostic value in evaluating mortality (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve [AUROC], 0.607; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.551-0.663) and MACCE (AUROC, 0.544; 95% CI, 0.526-0.563; both P < .001). The prognostic value of mortality was higher than that of MACCE (Z = 2.09, P = .04). The PARIS thrombotic risk score shows modest prognostic value for mortality and MACCE, and the prognostic value of mortality is better than that of MACCE.
      Citation: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis
      PubDate: 2019-06-19T11:37:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1076029619853638
       
  • Receptor GP IIb/IIIa as an Indicator of Risk in Vascular Events

    • Authors: Żanna Fiodorenko-Dumas, Ilias Dumas, Krzysztof Mastej, Urszula Jakobsche-Policht, Jadwiga Bittner, Rajmund Adamiec
      Abstract: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis, Volume 25, Issue , January-December 2019.
      Type 2 diabetes causes a significant risk of cardiovascular diseases, leading to 70% of deaths in patients with diabetes. The effective treatment of diabetes significantly reduces the risk of requiring the involvement of specialists from various fields of medicine. This research aimed to assess the risk of cardiovascular events based on selected biochemical parameters (glycoprotein [GP] IIb/IIIa, von Willebrand factor [vWf], fibrinogen) and their changes in response to physical exercise. The research group consisted of 52 patients with type 2 diabetes with micro- or macro-angiopathy at a mean age of 63.80 years (8.79). The control group consisted of 50 healthy volunteers (17 women and 33 men) at a mean age of 51.16 years (6.39). All the patients consented to have their venous blood tested to measure complete blood counts. Activated GP IIb/IIIa receptors were labeled and analyzed by flow cytometry. Mean values of vWF factor were higher when compared with the control group (196.59% [80.32%] vs 148.06% [90.34%], respectively). The GP IIb/IIIa receptor expression was much higher in test patients than in the control group (3.91% [2.91%] vs 2.79% [2.51%]). Physical exercise had a positive influence on GP IIb/IIIa receptor expression and vWF, decreasing their baseline percentage values.
      Citation: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis
      PubDate: 2019-06-12T04:28:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1076029619845056
       
  • Diagnosis, Treatment and Follow Up of Acute Pulmonary Embolism: Consensus
           Practice from the PERT Consortium

    • Authors: Belinda Rivera-Lebron, Michael McDaniel, Kamran Ahrar, Abdulah Alrifai, David M. Dudzinski, Christina Fanola, Danielle Blais, David Janicke, Roman Melamed, Kerry Mohrien, Elizabeth Rozycki, Charles B. Ross, Andrew J. Klein, Parth Rali, Nicholas R. Teman, Leoara Yarboro, Eugene Ichinose, Aditya M. Sharma, Jason A. Bartos, Mahir Elder, Brent Keeling, Harold Palevsky, Soophia Naydenov, Parijat Sen, Nancy Amoroso, Josanna M. Rodriguez-Lopez, George A. Davis, Rachel Rosovsky, Kenneth Rosenfield, Christopher Kabrhel, James Horowitz, Jay S. Giri, Victor Tapson, Richard Channick
      Abstract: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis, Volume 25, Issue , January-December 2019.
      Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a life-threatening condition and a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. There have been many advances in the field of PE in the last few years, requiring a careful assessment of their impact on patient care. However, variations in recommendations by different clinical guidelines, as well as lack of robust clinical trials, make clinical decisions challenging. The Pulmonary Embolism Response Team Consortium is an international association created to advance the diagnosis, treatment, and outcomes of patients with PE. In this consensus practice document, we provide a comprehensive review of the diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up of acute PE, including both clinical data and consensus opinion to provide guidance for clinicians caring for these patients.
      Citation: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis
      PubDate: 2019-06-12T04:27:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1076029619853037
       
  • Application of Indirect Linkage Analysis for Carrier Detection of
           Hemophilia A in Kurdistan Region of Iraq: Usefulness of Intron 18 BclI
           T>A, Intron 19 HindIII C>T, and IVS7 nt27 G>A Markers

    • Authors: Aveen M. Raouf Abdulqader, Shwan Rachid, Ali Ibrahim Mohammed, Sarwar Noori Mahmood
      Abstract: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis, Volume 25, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis
      PubDate: 2019-06-10T05:41:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1076029619854545
       
  • Platelet Apoptosis Can Be Triggered Bypassing the Death Receptors

    • Authors: Valery Leytin, Armen V. Gyulkhandanyan, John Freedman
      Abstract: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis, Volume 25, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis
      PubDate: 2019-06-06T08:21:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1076029619853641
       
  • Dynamics of Soluble Thrombomodulin and Circulating miRNAs in Patients with
           Atrial Fibrillation Undergoing Radiofrequency Catheter Ablation

    • Authors: Fuminori Namino, Munekazu Yamakuchi, Yasuhisa Iriki, Hideki Okui, Hitoshi Ichiki, Ryuichi Maenosono, Naoya Oketani, Izumi Masamoto, Masaaki Miyata, Masahisa Horiuchi, Teruto Hashiguchi, Mitsuru Ohishi, Ikuro Maruyama
      Abstract: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis, Volume 25, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis
      PubDate: 2019-05-29T10:27:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1076029619851570
       
  • Endothelial Dysfunction Is Associated with Mortality and Severity of
           Coagulopathy in Patients with Sepsis and Disseminated Intravascular
           Coagulation

    • Authors: Amanda Walborn, Matthew Rondina, Michael Mosier, Jawed Fareed, Debra Hoppensteadt
      Abstract: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis, Volume 25, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis
      PubDate: 2019-05-29T10:27:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1076029619852163
       
  • Efficacy and Safety of Direct Oral Anticoagulants for Risk of
           Cancer-Associated Venous Thromboembolism

    • Authors: Jie Zeng, Xuhui Zhang, Gregory Y. H. Lip, Xiaochen Shu, Lehana Thabane, Junzhang Tian, Guowei Li
      Abstract: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis, Volume 25, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis
      PubDate: 2019-05-28T08:33:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1076029619853629
       
  • Symptomatic Deep Vein Thrombosis Following Elective Knee Arthroscopy Over
           the Age of 40

    • Authors: Mert Özcan, Murat Erem, Fatma Nesrin Turan
      Abstract: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis, Volume 25, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis
      PubDate: 2019-05-22T10:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1076029619852167
       
  • Corrigendum

    • Abstract: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis, Volume 25, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis
      PubDate: 2019-05-17T11:57:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1076029619851962
       
  • Cost-effectiveness Evaluations Among the Direct Oral Anticoagulants for
           

    • Authors: Mohammad Al Mukdad, Daoud Al-Badriyeh, Hazem Fathy Elewa
      Abstract: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis, Volume 25, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis
      PubDate: 2019-05-15T11:22:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1076029619849103
       
  • Proportion of US Hospitalized Medically Ill Patients Who May Qualify for
           Extended Thromboprophylaxis

    • Authors: Benjamin Miao, Bhavana Chalupadi, Brendan Clark, Alexis Descoteaux, Daniel Huang, Sabrina Ilham, Brian Ly, Alex C. Spyropoulos, Craig I. Coleman
      Abstract: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis, Volume 25, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis
      PubDate: 2019-05-15T10:08:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1076029619850897
       
  • Hemopericardium and Cardiac Tamponade as a Complication of Vena Caval
           Filters: Systematic Review of the Published Literature and the MAUDE
           Database

    • Authors: Behnood Bikdeli, Ajay J. Kirtane, David Jimenez, Philip Green, Frederick A. Spencer, William T. Kuo, Harlan M. Krumholz, Sahil A. Parikh
      Abstract: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis, Volume 25, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis
      PubDate: 2019-05-15T04:54:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1076029619849111
       
  • Factor Xa Inhibitory Profile of Apixaban, Betrixaban, Edoxaban, and
           Rivaroxaban Does Not Fully Reflect Their Biologic Spectrum

    • Authors: Fakiha Siddiqui, Debra Hoppensteadt, Walter Jeske, Omer Iqbal, Alfonso Tafur, Jawed Fareed
      Abstract: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis, Volume 25, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis
      PubDate: 2019-05-15T04:54:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1076029619847524
       
  • Quality Appraisal of Guidelines on Cancer-Associated Thrombosis Using
           AGREE II Instrument and Analysis of Current Status of New Oral
           Anticoagulants

    • Authors: Jiuxing Zhang, Juan Xu, Wenlong Zhang, Meiting Jiang, Juan Liu, Lei Xu, Gaofeng Liu, Zhigang Zhao
      Abstract: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis, Volume 25, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis
      PubDate: 2019-04-26T11:48:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1076029619846562
       
  • The Role of Factor V Leiden, Prothrombin G20210A, and MTHFR C677T
           Mutations in Neonatal Cerebral Sinovenous Thrombosis

    • Authors: Maria Garrido-Barbero, Juan Arnaez, Begoña Loureiro, Gemma Arca, Thais Agut, Alfredo Garcia-Alix
      Abstract: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis, Volume 25, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis
      PubDate: 2019-04-26T11:48:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1076029619834352
       
  • Incidence and Risk Factors of Deep Vein Thrombosis in Patients With Pelvic
           and Acetabular Fractures

    • Authors: Pengfei Wang, Utku Kandemir, Binfei Zhang, Baohui Wang, Jiahao Li, Yan Zhuang, Hu Wang, Hong Zhang, Ping Liu, Kun Zhang
      Abstract: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis, Volume 25, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis
      PubDate: 2019-04-24T07:05:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1076029619845066
       
  • Markers of Inflammation and Infection in Sepsis and Disseminated
           Intravascular Coagulation

    • Authors: Priya Patel, Amanda Walborn, Matthew Rondina, Jawed Fareed, Debra Hoppensteadt
      Abstract: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis, Volume 25, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis
      PubDate: 2019-04-17T07:11:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1076029619843338
       
  • Comparison of Low-Molecular-Weight Heparins Prepared From Ovine Heparins
           With Enoxaparin

    • Authors: Jianle Chen, Yanlei Yu, Jawed Fareed, Debra Hoppensteadt, Walter Jeske, Ahmed Kouta, Caijuan Jin, Yongsheng Jin, Yiming Yao, Ke Xia, Fuming Zhang, Shiguo Chen, Xingqian Ye, Robert J. Linhardt
      Abstract: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis, Volume 25, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis
      PubDate: 2019-04-16T07:12:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1076029619840701
       
  • Primary Thrombophilia in Mexico XIII: Localization of the Thrombotic
           Events in Mexican Mestizos With the Sticky Platelet Syndrome

    • Authors: Brizeida Azamar-Solis, Yahveth Cantero-Fortiz, Juan Carlos Olivares-Gazca, Jesús Mauricio Olivares-Gazca, Gisela Berenice Gómez-Cruz, Iván Murrieta-Álvarez, Guillermo J. Ruiz-Delgado, Guillermo J. Ruiz-Argüelles
      Abstract: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis, Volume 25, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis
      PubDate: 2019-04-10T09:58:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1076029619841700
       
  • The Dysprothrombinemias due to Arg596 Mutations: A Conundrum With No
           Bleeding Tendency and Venous Thrombosis due to Antithrombin Resistance

    • Authors: Antonio Girolami, Silvia Ferrari, Elisabetta Cosi, Maria Luigia Randi
      Abstract: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis, Volume 25, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis
      PubDate: 2019-04-10T09:58:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1076029619841701
       
  • Evi Kalodiki, MD, PhD October 1, 1956 – December 31, 2018 A Memorium

    • Abstract: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis, Volume 25, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis
      PubDate: 2019-04-10T09:58:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1076029619842677
       
  • Implementation and Validation of the 2013 Caprini Score for Risk
           Stratification of Arthroplasty Patients in the Prevention of Venous
           Thrombosis

    • Authors: Eugene S. Krauss, Ayal Segal, MaryAnne Cronin, Nancy Dengler, Martin L. Lesser, Seungjun Ahn, Joseph A. Caprini
      Abstract: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis, Volume 25, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis
      PubDate: 2019-04-03T08:32:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1076029619838066
       
  • Completion of the Updated Caprini Risk Assessment Model (2013 Version)

    • Authors: MaryAnne Cronin, Nancy Dengler, Eugene S. Krauss, Ayal Segal, Nicole Wei, Madison Daly, Frank Mota, Joseph A. Caprini
      Abstract: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis, Volume 25, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis
      PubDate: 2019-04-03T08:32:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1076029619838052
       
  • The Risk of Venous Thromboembolism is Not Equal for all Patients Who
           Undergo Total Joint Replacement

    • Authors: Alfonso Tafur, Jawed Fareed
      Abstract: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis, Volume 25, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis
      PubDate: 2019-04-03T08:28:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1076029619838062
       
  • The Treatment Intensity of Anticoagulant Therapy for Patients With
           Sepsis-Induced Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation and Outcomes: A
           Multicenter Cohort Study

    • Authors: Daisuke Kudo, Mineji Hayakawa, Hiroaki Iijima, Kazuma Yamakawa, Shinjiro Saito, Shigehiko Uchino, Yusuke Iizuka, Masamitsu Sanui, Kohei Takimoto, Toshihiko Mayumi
      Abstract: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis, Volume 25, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis
      PubDate: 2019-03-28T10:26:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1076029619839154
       
  • Comparison of Venous Thrombosis Complications in Midlines Versus
           Peripherally Inserted Central Catheters: Are Midlines the Safer
           Option'

    • Authors: Amit Bahl, Patrick Karabon, David Chu
      Abstract: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis, Volume 25, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis
      PubDate: 2019-03-26T07:21:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1076029619839150
       
  • Development of Multidisciplinary Anticoagulation Management Guidelines for
           Patients Receiving Durable Mechanical Circulatory Support

    • Authors: Amy A. Levesque, Andrea R. Lewin, Jessica Rimsans, Katelyn W. Sylvester, Lara Coakley, Frank Melanson, Hari Mallidi, Mandeep Mehra, Michael M. Givertz, Jean M. Connors
      Abstract: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis, Volume 25, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis
      PubDate: 2019-03-25T06:29:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1076029619837362
       
  • Routine Coagulation Tests in Patients With Nonvalvular Atrial Fibrillation
           Under Dabigatran and Rivaroxaban Therapy: An Affordable and Reliable
           Strategy'

    • Authors: Vanessa M. Silva, Maurício Scanavacca, Francisco Darrieux, Cyrillo Cavalheiro, Celia C. Strunz
      Abstract: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis, Volume 25, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis
      PubDate: 2019-03-25T06:28:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1076029619835053
       
  • Evaluation of Global Hemostatic Assays in Response to Factor VIII
           Inhibitors

    • Authors: Ping Chen, Jayesh Jani, Michael B. Streiff, Gang Zheng, Thomas S. Kickler
      Abstract: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis, Volume 25, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis
      PubDate: 2019-03-18T11:21:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1076029619836171
       
  • Anticoagulation Management With Coumarinic Drugs in Chilean Patients

    • Authors: Elena Nieto, Marcelo Suarez, Ángela Roco, Juan Carlos Rubilar, Francisca Tamayo, Mario Rojo, Gabriel Verón, Juliana Sepúlveda, Fanny Mejías, Patricio Salas, María Góngora, Patricio Andrade, Alicia Canales, Jorge Carabantes, Daniela Cruz, Emma Contreras, Daniela Pavez, Paulina Charo, Gabriela Bravo, Juan Calderón, Carlos Gallardo, Patricia Vega, Luis A. Quiñones
      Abstract: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis, Volume 25, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis
      PubDate: 2019-03-18T05:32:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1076029619834342
       
  • Relationship Between the Reciprocal Change in Inflammation-Related
           Biomarkers (Fibrinogen-to-Albumin and hsCRP-to-Albumin Ratios) and the
           Presence and Severity of Coronary Slow Flow

    • Authors: Osman Kayapinar, Cem Ozde, Adnan Kaya
      Abstract: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis, Volume 25, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis
      PubDate: 2019-03-12T05:07:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1076029619835383
       
  • Plasma Levels of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor and Selected
           Hemostatic Parameters in Association With Treatment Response in Multiple
           Myeloma

    • Authors: Juraj Sokol, Matej Hrncar, Frantisek Nehaj, Jan Stasko
      Abstract: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis, Volume 25, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis
      PubDate: 2019-03-08T07:27:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1076029618823280
       
  • Optimal Timing and Early Intervention With Anticoagulant Therapy for
           Sepsis-Induced Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation

    • Authors: Kazuma Yamakawa, Yutaka Umemura, Shuhei Murao, Mineji Hayakawa, Satoshi Fujimi
      Abstract: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis, Volume 25, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis
      PubDate: 2019-03-07T07:11:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1076029619835055
       
  • Derivation and Validation of Age- and Body Mass Index-Adjusted
           Weight-Based Unfractionated Heparin Dosing

    • Authors: James W. Schurr, Anne-Marie Muske, Craig A. Stevens, Sarah E. Culbreth, Katelyn W. Sylvester, Jean M. Connors
      Abstract: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis, Volume 25, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis
      PubDate: 2019-03-07T07:11:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1076029619833480
       
  • Impact of Antithrombin Supplementation and Concomitant Anticoagulation
           

    • Authors: Hiroyuki Nagafuchi, Yutaka Eguchi, Toshiaki Ikeda
      Abstract: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis, Volume 25, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis
      PubDate: 2019-03-06T08:34:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1076029619834350
       
  • Effect of Active and Passive Mechanical Thromboprophylaxis and Consensual
           Effect on the Venous Blood Flow Velocity Among Hemiparetic Patients

    • Authors: Gabriella Kiss, Béla Faludi, Brigitta Szilágyi, Alexandra Makai, Anita Velényi, Pongrác Ács, Péter Tardi, Adrienn Pallag, Viktória Bors, Patrícia Sekk, Melinda Járomi
      Abstract: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis, Volume 25, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis
      PubDate: 2019-02-28T06:28:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1076029619832111
       
  • Reviewer List

    • Abstract: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis, Volume 25, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis
      PubDate: 2019-02-22T08:53:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1076029619834177
       
  • Circulating Endothelial Cells, Circulating Endothelial Progenitor Cells,
           and Circulating Microparticles in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

    • Authors: Asmaa M. Zahran, Ismail L. Mohamed, Osama M. El Asheer, Deiaaeldin M. Tamer, Mohamed G. M. Abo-ELela, Mona H. Abdel-Rahim, Omnia H. B. El-Badawy, Khalid I. Elsayh
      Abstract: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis, Volume 25, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis
      PubDate: 2019-02-14T04:38:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1076029618825311
       
  • Matrix Metalloproteinases and Their Inhibitors and Proteoglycan 4 in
           Patients Undergoing Total Joint Arthroplasty

    • Authors: Chase Thorson, Kevin Galicia, Andrew Burleson, Olivia Bouchard, Debra Hoppensteadt, Jawed Fareed, William Hopkinson
      Abstract: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis, Volume 25, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis
      PubDate: 2019-02-13T09:19:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1076029619828113
       
  • The Diagnostic Efficacy of Age-Adjusted D-Dimer Cutoff Value and Pretest
           Probability Scores for Deep Venous Thrombosis

    • Authors: Junxun Li, Fan Zhang, Chujia Liang, Zhuangjian Ye, Shaoqian Chen, Jing Cheng
      Abstract: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis, Volume 25, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis
      PubDate: 2019-02-13T04:13:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1076029619826317
       
  • Utilization of Anticoagulants in Nonvalvular Atrial Fibrillation Before
           and After Catheter Ablation at Shanghai, China

    • Authors: Chen Tingting, Wang Yuzhu, Zhang Lin, Li Ran, Li Jing, Wu Yi, Li Xiaoyu, Lv Qianzhou
      Abstract: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis, Volume 25, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis
      PubDate: 2019-02-13T04:12:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1076029619826260
       
  • Circulating Microparticles in Children With Sickle Cell Anemia in a
           Tertiary Center in Upper Egypt

    • Authors: Asmaa M. Zahran, Khalid I. Elsayh, Khaled Saad, Mostafa M. Embaby, Mervat A. M. Youssef, Yasser F. Abdel-Raheem, Shaban M. Sror, Shereen M. Galal, Helal F. Hetta, Mohamed Diab Aboul-Khair, Mohamd A. Alblihed, Amira Elhoufey
      Abstract: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis, Volume 25, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis
      PubDate: 2019-02-11T07:37:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1076029619828839
       
  • Contact System Activation and Neutrophil Extracellular Trap Markers: Risk
           Factors for Portal Vein Thrombosis in Patients With Hepatocellular
           Carcinoma

    • Authors: Jong Do Seo, Ja-Yoon Gu, Hye Soo Jung, Yoon Jun Kim, Hyun Kyung Kim
      Abstract: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis, Volume 25, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis
      PubDate: 2019-01-30T05:44:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1076029618825310
       
  • Comparison of the Long-Term Remission of Rituximab and Conventional
           Treatment for Acquired Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura: A Systematic
           Review and Meta-Analysis

    • Authors: Weerapat Owattanapanich, Chompunut Wongprasert, Wannaphorn Rotchanapanya, Natthida Owattanapanich, Theera Ruchutrakool
      Abstract: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis, Volume 25, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis
      PubDate: 2019-01-30T04:54:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1076029618825309
       
  • Pharmacomechanical Thrombectomy Versus Catheter-Directed Thrombolysis for
           Iliofemoral Deep Vein Thrombosis: A Meta-Analysis of Clinical Trials

    • Authors: Tao Tang, Linyi Chen, Jinhui Chen, Tong Mei, Yongming Lu
      Abstract: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis, Volume 25, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis
      PubDate: 2019-01-30T04:53:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1076029618821190
       
  • Relationship Between C-Reactive Protein to Albumin Ratio and Thrombus
           Burden in Patients With Acute Coronary Syndrome

    • Authors: Hakan Duman, Göksel Çinier, Eftal Murat Bakırcı, Handan Duman, Ziya Şimşek, Hikmet Hamur, Hüsnü Değirmenci, Nadir Emlek
      Abstract: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis, Volume 25, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis
      PubDate: 2019-01-30T04:53:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1076029618824418
       
  • Comments to: An Evaluation of Hemostatic Abnormalities in Patients With
           Hemophilia by APTT Waveform, Peak Heights of APTT Waveform Are Useful for
           Diagnosing Hemophilia or Inhibitor

    • Authors: Takeshi Matsumoto, Hideo Wada, Kohshi Ohishi, Yoshiki Yamashita, Makoto Ikejiri, Naoyuki Katayama
      Abstract: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis, Volume 25, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis
      PubDate: 2019-01-30T04:52:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1076029618824419
       
  • Usefulness of Measuring Changes in SOFA Score for the Prediction of 28-Day
           Mortality in Patients With Sepsis-Associated Disseminated Intravascular
           Coagulation

    • Authors: Toshiaki Iba, Makoto Arakawa, Katsunori Mochizuki, Osamu Nishida, Hideo Wada, Jerrold H. Levy
      Abstract: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis, Volume 25, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis
      PubDate: 2019-01-30T04:52:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1076029618824044
       
  • Effects of Obesity on Warfarin Reversal With Vitamin K

    • Authors: Stanley A. Luc, Maegan M. Whitworth, Shawna E. King
      Abstract: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis, Volume 25, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis
      PubDate: 2019-01-29T04:35:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1076029618824042
       
  • Venous Thromboembolism Prophylaxis and Risk for Acutely Medically Ill
           Patients Stratified by Different Ages and Renal Disease Status

    • Authors: Alpesh Amin, W. Richey Neuman, Melissa Lingohr-Smith, Brandy Menges, Jay Lin
      Abstract: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis, Volume 25, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis
      PubDate: 2019-01-29T04:34:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1076029618823287
       
  • The Antithrombin Effect of Ankaferd Hemostat (ABS) Is Related to the High
           Iron Content of the Medicine

    • Authors: Mufide Okay, Yusuf Ozturk, Ibrahim C. Haznedaroglu
      Abstract: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis, Volume 25, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis
      PubDate: 2019-01-29T04:33:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1076029618824416
       
  • Influence of Tumor Thrombus on Occurrence of Distant Venous
           Thromboembolism and Survival in Patients With Renal Cell Carcinoma After
           Surgery

    • Authors: Hyunkyung Park, Chang Wook Jeong, Hyeongdong Yuk, Ja Hyeon Ku, Hyeon Hoe Kim, Cheol Kwak, Inho Kim
      Abstract: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis, Volume 25, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis
      PubDate: 2019-01-29T04:31:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1076029618823288
       
  • Inherited Thrombocytopenias: Combining High-Throughput Sequencing With
           Other Relevant Data

    • Authors: Kanjaksha Ghosh, Parizad Patel, Kanchan Mishra, Kinjalka Ghosh
      Abstract: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis, Volume 25, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis
      PubDate: 2019-01-29T04:29:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1076029618820164
       
  • Changes in Mannose-Binding Lectin and Collectin Kidney 1 Levels in Sepsis
           Patients With and Without Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation

    • Authors: Mineji Hayakawa, Katsuki Ohtani, Nobutaka Wakamiya
      Abstract: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis, Volume 25, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis
      PubDate: 2019-01-29T04:28:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1076029618821189
       
  • Zika and Chikungunya Virus and Risk for Venous Thromboembolism

    • Authors: Eduardo Ramacciotti, Leandro B. Agati, Valéria C. R. Aguiar, Nelson Wolosker, João C. Guerra, Roque P. de Almeida, Juliana Cardoso Alves, Renato D. Lopes, Thomas W. Wakefield, Anthony J. Comerota, Jeanine Walenga, Jawed Fareed
      Abstract: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis, Volume 25, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis
      PubDate: 2019-01-29T04:27:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1076029618821184
       
  • Dynamic Analysis of Perioperative Hidden Blood Loss in Intertrochanteric
           Fractures

    • Authors: Shuwei Tian, Hui Li, Meiyu Liu, Yanlong Zhang, Aqin Peng
      Abstract: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis, Volume 25, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis
      PubDate: 2019-01-28T10:12:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1076029618823279
       
  • Thromboprophylaxis for Hip Revision Arthroplasty: Can We Use the
           Recommendations for Primary Hip Surgery' A Cohort Study

    • Authors: Maria Bautista, Meilyn Muskus, Daniela Tafur, Guillermo Bonilla, Adolfo Llinás, Daniel Monsalvo
      Abstract: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis, Volume 25, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis
      PubDate: 2019-01-28T09:40:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1076029618820167
       
 
 
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