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Publisher: Sage Publications   (Total: 1079 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 1079 Journals sorted alphabetically
AADE in Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Abstracts in Anthropology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Academic Pathology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Accounting History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.527, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Radiologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.754, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Radiologica Open     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Acta Sociologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37, SJR: 0.939, CiteScore: 2)
Action Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48, SJR: 0.308, CiteScore: 1)
Active Learning in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 335, SJR: 1.397, CiteScore: 2)
Adaptive Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.288, CiteScore: 1)
Administration & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.675, CiteScore: 1)
Adoption & Fostering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.313, CiteScore: 0)
Adsorption Science & Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.258, CiteScore: 1)
Adult Education Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 202, SJR: 0.566, CiteScore: 2)
Adult Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Advances in Dental Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 1.791, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Developing Human Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29, SJR: 0.614, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Mechanical Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 131, SJR: 0.272, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Methods and Practices in Psychological Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Structural Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 46, SJR: 0.599, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Tumor Virology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.108, CiteScore: 0)
AERA Open     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Affilia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.496, CiteScore: 1)
Agrarian South : J. of Political Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Air, Soil & Water Research     Open Access   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.214, CiteScore: 1)
Alexandria : The J. of National and Intl. Library and Information Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 63)
AlterNative : An Intl. J. of Indigenous Peoples     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.194, CiteScore: 0)
Alternative Law J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.176, CiteScore: 0)
Alternatives : Global, Local, Political     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.351, CiteScore: 1)
American Behavioral Scientist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.982, CiteScore: 2)
American Economist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
American Educational Research J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 198, SJR: 2.913, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.67, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Cosmetic Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
American J. of Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.646, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Health Promotion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31, SJR: 0.807, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Hospice and Palliative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41, SJR: 0.65, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Law & Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.204, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Lifestyle Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.431, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Medical Quality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.777, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Men's Health     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.595, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Rhinology and Allergy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.972, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Sports Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 185, SJR: 3.949, CiteScore: 6)
American Politics Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33, SJR: 1.313, CiteScore: 1)
American Review of Public Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 2.062, CiteScore: 2)
American Sociological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 296, SJR: 6.333, CiteScore: 6)
American String Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Analytical Chemistry Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.224, CiteScore: 1)
Angiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.849, CiteScore: 2)
Animation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.197, CiteScore: 0)
Annals of Clinical Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.634, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Otology, Rhinology & Laryngology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.807, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Pharmacotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51, SJR: 1.096, CiteScore: 2)
Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46, SJR: 1.225, CiteScore: 3)
Annals of the ICRP     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.548, CiteScore: 1)
Anthropocene Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 3.341, CiteScore: 7)
Anthropological Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41, SJR: 0.739, CiteScore: 1)
Antitrust Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Antiviral Chemistry and Chemotherapy     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.635, CiteScore: 2)
Antyajaa : Indian J. of Women and Social Change     Hybrid Journal  
Applied Biosafety     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.131, CiteScore: 0)
Applied Psychological Measurement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 1.17, CiteScore: 1)
Applied Spectroscopy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.489, CiteScore: 2)
Armed Forces & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.29, CiteScore: 1)
Arts and Humanities in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40, SJR: 0.305, CiteScore: 1)
Asia Pacific Media Educator     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.23, CiteScore: 0)
Asia-Pacific J. of Management Research and Innovation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Asia-Pacific J. of Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.558, CiteScore: 1)
Asian and Pacific Migration J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 99, SJR: 0.324, CiteScore: 1)
Asian Cardiovascular and Thoracic Annals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.305, CiteScore: 0)
Asian J. of Comparative Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Asian J. of Legal Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Asian J. of Management Cases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
ASN Neuro     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.534, CiteScore: 3)
Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.519, CiteScore: 3)
Assessment for Effective Intervention     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.578, CiteScore: 1)
Australasian Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.433, CiteScore: 1)
Australian & New Zealand J. of Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 1.801, CiteScore: 2)
Australian and New Zealand J. of Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 518, SJR: 0.612, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Career Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Australian J. of Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42, SJR: 0.403, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.497, CiteScore: 1)
Autism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 308, SJR: 1.739, CiteScore: 4)
Autism & Developmental Language Impairments     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Behavior Modification     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.877, CiteScore: 2)
Behavioral and Cognitive Neuroscience Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Bible Translator     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Biblical Theology Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.184, CiteScore: 0)
Big Data & Society     Open Access   (Followers: 47)
Biochemistry Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Bioinformatics and Biology Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.141, CiteScore: 2)
Biological Research for Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.685, CiteScore: 2)
Biomarker Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.81, CiteScore: 2)
Biomarkers in Cancer     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Biomedical Engineering and Computational Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Biomedical Informatics Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Bioscope: South Asian Screen Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.235, CiteScore: 0)
BMS: Bulletin of Sociological Methodology/Bulletin de Méthodologie Sociologique     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.226, CiteScore: 0)
Body & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 1.531, CiteScore: 3)
Bone and Tissue Regeneration Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Breast Cancer : Basic and Clinical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.823, CiteScore: 2)
British J. of Music Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
British J. of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 174, SJR: 0.323, CiteScore: 1)
British J. of Pain     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.579, CiteScore: 2)
British J. of Politics and Intl. Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31, SJR: 0.91, CiteScore: 2)
British J. of Visual Impairment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.337, CiteScore: 1)
British J.ism Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Building Acoustics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.215, CiteScore: 1)
Building Services Engineering Research & Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.583, CiteScore: 1)
Bulletin of Science, Technology & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Business & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Business and Professional Communication Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.348, CiteScore: 1)
Business Information Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.279, CiteScore: 0)
Business Perspectives and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Cahiers Élisabéthains     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.111, CiteScore: 0)
Calcutta Statistical Association Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription  
California Management Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 2.209, CiteScore: 4)
Canadian J. of Kidney Health and Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.007, CiteScore: 2)
Canadian J. of Nursing Research (CJNR)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Canadian J. of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 123, SJR: 0.626, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian J. of Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 1.769, CiteScore: 3)
Canadian J. of School Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.266, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian Pharmacists J. / Revue des Pharmaciens du Canada     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.536, CiteScore: 1)
Cancer Growth and Metastasis     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Informatics     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.64, CiteScore: 1)
Capital and Class     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.282, CiteScore: 1)
Cardiac Cath Lab Director     Full-text available via subscription  
Cardiovascular and Thoracic Open     Open Access  
Career Development and Transition for Exceptional Individuals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.44, CiteScore: 1)
Cartilage     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.889, CiteScore: 3)
Cell and Tissue Transplantation and Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cell Transplantation     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.023, CiteScore: 3)
Cephalalgia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 1.581, CiteScore: 3)
Child Language Teaching and Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31, SJR: 0.501, CiteScore: 1)
Child Maltreatment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.22, CiteScore: 3)
Child Neurology Open     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Childhood     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.894, CiteScore: 2)
Childhood Obesity and Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
China Information     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.767, CiteScore: 2)
China Report     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.221, CiteScore: 0)
Chinese J. of Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Christianity & Literature     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Chronic Illness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.672, CiteScore: 2)
Chronic Respiratory Disease     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.808, CiteScore: 2)
Chronic Stress     Open Access  
Citizenship, Social and Economics Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.145, CiteScore: 0)
Cleft Palate-Craniofacial J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.757, CiteScore: 1)
Clin-Alert     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis     Open Access   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.49, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Case Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.364, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44, SJR: 0.73, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical EEG and Neuroscience     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.552, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.296, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Arthritis and Musculoskeletal Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.537, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Blood Disorders     Open Access   (SJR: 0.314, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.686, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.283, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Circulatory, Respiratory and Pulmonary Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.425, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Ear, Nose and Throat     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Endocrinology and Diabetes     Open Access   (Followers: 32, SJR: 0.63, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.129, CiteScore: 3)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Pediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Reproductive Health     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.776, CiteScore: 0)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Therapeutics     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.172, CiteScore: 0)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Trauma and Intensive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Women's Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Clinical Nursing Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29, SJR: 0.471, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Pathology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.487, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Psychological Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 3.281, CiteScore: 5)
Clinical Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 69, SJR: 1.322, CiteScore: 3)
Clinical Risk     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.133, CiteScore: 0)
Clinical Trials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 2.399, CiteScore: 2)
Clothing and Textiles Research J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.36, CiteScore: 1)
Common Law World Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Communication & Sport     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.385, CiteScore: 1)
Communication and the Public     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Communication Disorders Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.458, CiteScore: 1)
Communication Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 2.171, CiteScore: 3)
Community College Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.451, CiteScore: 1)
Comparative Political Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 217, SJR: 3.772, CiteScore: 3)
Compensation & Benefits Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Competition & Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.843, CiteScore: 2)
Competition and Regulation in Network Industries     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.143, CiteScore: 0)
Concurrent Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.642, CiteScore: 2)
Conflict Management and Peace Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35, SJR: 2.441, CiteScore: 1)
Contemporary Drug Problems     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.609, CiteScore: 2)
Contemporary Education Dialogue     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.102, CiteScore: 0)
Contemporary Issues in Early Childhood     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.766, CiteScore: 1)
Contemporary Review of the Middle East     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Contemporary Sociology : A J. of Reviews     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 34, SJR: 0.195, CiteScore: 0)
Contemporary Voice of Dalit     Full-text available via subscription  
Contexts     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Contributions to Indian Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.376, CiteScore: 0)
Convergence The Intl. J. of Research into New Media Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50, SJR: 0.521, CiteScore: 1)
Cooperation and Conflict     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.945, CiteScore: 2)
Cornell Hospitality Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.198, CiteScore: 2)
Counseling Outcome Research and Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.279, CiteScore: 1)

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Chronic Respiratory Disease
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.808
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 6  
 
Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal   * Containing 27 Open Access Open Access article(s) in this issue *
ISSN (Print) 1479-9723 - ISSN (Online) 1479-9731
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1079 journals]
  • The de Morton mobility index is a feasible and valid mobility assessment
           tool in hospitalized patients with an acute exacerbation of chronic
           obstructive pulmonary disease

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Authors: Pat G Camp, Carmen A Sima, Ashley Kirkham, Jessica A Inskip, Beena Parappilly
      Abstract: Chronic Respiratory Disease, Volume 16, Issue , January-December 2019.
      There is no accepted standard for measuring mobility in hospitalized patients with an acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD). The objective of this study was to assess convergent, discriminant, and known-group validity and floor/ceiling effects of the de Morton Mobility Index (DEMMI) in hospitalized patients with AECOPD. Individuals with AECOPD (n = 22) admitted to an acute care hospital medical ward were recruited. Data on the DEMMI, gait speed, daytime energy expenditure, step counts, 6-minute walk distance (6MWD), dyspnea, respiratory and heart rates, quality of life, and oxygen supplementation were collected on day 3 of admission. The DEMMI demonstrated convergent validity with the 6MWD and gait velocity measures (Spearman’s ρ 0.69 and 0.61, respectively; p < 0.003) but not with measures of physical activity or respiratory impairment. Discriminant validity was present, with no correlation between the DEMMI and quality of life and resting heart rate. Known-group validity (gait aids vs. no gait aids) was demonstrated (p = 0.009). There was no floor effect but there was evidence of a possible ceiling effect (14% of participants received a perfect score). The DEMMI is feasible and showed moderate to strong validity with measures of observed physical function in hospitalized patients with AECOPD.
      Citation: Chronic Respiratory Disease
      PubDate: 2019-09-17T01:50:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1479973119872979
       
  • Outcome measures in a combined exercise rehabilitation programme for
           adults with COPD and chronic heart failure: A preliminary stakeholder
           consensus event

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Authors: Amy V Jones, Rachael A Evans, William D-C Man, Charlotte E Bolton, Samantha Breen, Patrick J Doherty, Nikki Gardiner, Linzy Houchen-Wolloff, John R Hurst, Kate Jolly, Matthew Maddocks, Jennifer K Quint, Olivia Revitt, Lauren B Sherar, Rod S Taylor, Amye Watt, Jennifer Wingham, Janelle Yorke, Sally J Singh
      Abstract: Chronic Respiratory Disease, Volume 16, Issue , January-December 2019.
      Combined exercise rehabilitation for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and chronic heart failure (CHF) is potentially attractive. Uncertainty remains as to the baseline profiling assessments and outcome measures that should be collected within a programme. Current evidence surrounding outcome measures in cardiac and pulmonary rehabilitation were presented by experts at a stakeholder consensus event and all stakeholders (n = 18) were asked to (1) rank in order of importance a list of categories, (2) prioritise outcome measures and (3) prioritise baseline patient evaluation measures that should be assessed in a combined COPD and CHF rehabilitation programme. The tasks were completed anonymously and related to clinical rehabilitation programmes and associated research. Health-related quality of life, exercise capacity and symptom evaluation were voted as the most important categories to assess for clinical purposes (median rank: 1, 2 and 3 accordingly) and research purposes (median rank; 1, 3 and 4.5 accordingly) within combined exercise rehabilitation. All stakeholders agreed that profiling symptoms at baseline were ‘moderately’, ‘very’ or ‘extremely’ important to assess for clinical and research purposes in combined rehabilitation. Profiling of frailty was ranked of the same importance for clinical purposes in combined rehabilitation. Stakeholders identified a suite of multidisciplinary measures that may be important to assess in a combined COPD and CHF exercise rehabilitation programme.
      Citation: Chronic Respiratory Disease
      PubDate: 2019-09-17T01:49:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1479973119867952
       
  • Improving acceptance and uptake of pulmonary rehabilitation after acute
           exacerbation of COPD: Acceptability, feasibility, and safety of a PR
           “taster” session delivered before hospital discharge

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Authors: Siobhan Camille Milner, Jean Bourbeau, Sara Ahmed, Tania Janaudis-Ferreira
      Abstract: Chronic Respiratory Disease, Volume 16, Issue , January-December 2019.
      The objectives of this study were to (1) assess the acceptability, feasibility, and safety of delivering a pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) “taster” session to patients hospitalized with acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; (2) evaluate the changes in patient knowledge and readiness to commence PR; and (3) make recommendations for future intervention iterations. Acceptability was measured by the proportion of patients that accepted to participate. Feasibility was measured by the proportion of eligible participants. Knowledge was evaluated using the modified versions of the Understanding COPD (UCOPD) and Bristol COPD Knowledge (BCKQ) questionnaires. Readiness to commence PR was measured by a modified version of the Readiness to Change Exercise Questionnaire. All measures were delivered pre- and post-intervention. Thirty-one of 34 eligible individuals were able to be approached. Prospective acceptability was low, with 24 individuals declining the intervention, 1 being discharged without making a decision, and only 6 participating. Positive median change was recorded in the modified UCOPD questionnaire (+8), but not the BCKQ (0). Three of the patients were already in the action phase pre-intervention, with all but one in that phase post-intervention. The delivery of a PR “taster” session was not prospectively acceptable to a large portion of patients and only feasible with modifications to the original protocol.
      Citation: Chronic Respiratory Disease
      PubDate: 2019-09-11T03:13:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1479973119872517
       
  • The minimal important difference for the endurance shuttle walk test in
           individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease following a course
           of pulmonary rehabilitation

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Authors: Jakub Zatloukal, Sarah Ward, Linzy Houchen-Wolloff, Theresa Harvey-Dunstan, Sally Singh
      Abstract: Chronic Respiratory Disease, Volume 16, Issue , January-December 2019.
      The endurance shuttle walk test (ESWT) is frequently used as an outcome measure for pulmonary rehabilitation (PR). The minimal important difference (MID) for the ESWT after a course of rehabilitation has not been conclusively confirmed in the literature. The aim was to establish the MID for the ESWT following the 6-week PR programme in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Following the completion of the 6-week PR programme, data from 531 participants were included in the analysis to estimate the MID for the ESWT using both anchor-based and distribution-based methods. Mean age (standard deviation (SD)) was 69.4 (9.1) years, 303 male, FEV1/FVC 0.51 (0.16). The baseline incremental shuttle walk test (ISWT) was 217.7 (SD 139.8) metres and ESWT 195.8 (SD 118.8) seconds, which increased to 279.6 (SD 149.5) metres and 537.4 (SD 378.3) seconds, respectively, following PR. The mean change was 61.8 (95% confidence interval (CI) 56.0–67.5) metres for the ISWT and 342.0 (95% CI 312.4–371.6) seconds for the ESWT. The distribution method (0.5 × SD) yielded an MID of 173.7 seconds, the global rating of change scale method yielded a value of 279.2 (95% CI 244.9–313.5) seconds for those rating themselves as ‘slightly improved’ and the ROC method 207 seconds. There was no agreement between the approaches employed. However, we propose that the MID for the ESWT in COPD following a 6-week PR programme is between 174 and 279 seconds.
      Citation: Chronic Respiratory Disease
      PubDate: 2019-09-06T07:40:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1479973119853828
       
  • Eradication of Pseudomonas aeruginosa with inhaled colistin in adults with
           non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Authors: Marina Blanco-Aparicio, Jesús Luis Saleta Canosa, Paz Valiño López, María Teresa Martín Egaña, Iria Vidal García, Carmen Montero Martínez
      Abstract: Chronic Respiratory Disease, Volume 16, Issue , January-December 2019.
      The persistent isolation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the airways of non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis (NCFB) patients is associated with a worsening of the symptoms, increase of exacerbations, poor quality of life and functional impairment. The objective of this study was the analysis of the eradication rate of P. aeruginosa in the sputum of patients with NCFB treated with inhaled colistin and the effects of the treatment in the exacerbations. This was a prospective, cohort, study of 67 NCFB patients treated with inhaled colistin at the Hospital of A Coruña (Spain). We recorded dyspnoea, exacerbations, lung function and sputum cultures of P. aeruginosa in the patients. The mean age of the patients was 67.25 ± 14.6 years (59.7% male). The percentages of eradication of P. aeruginosa in sputum at 3, 6, 9 and 12 months were 61.2%, 50.7%, 43.3% and 40.3%, respectively. We observed a significant decrease in exacerbations after 1 year of colistin treatment (1.98 ± 3.62) versus the previous year (3.40 ± 4.21, p < 0.001). We conclude that treatment with inhaled colistin in patients with NCFB and P. aeruginosa in sputum can achieve high rates of eradication even in patients with several previous positive cultures, as well as a significant decrease of exacerbations and hospital admissions.
      Citation: Chronic Respiratory Disease
      PubDate: 2019-09-04T03:12:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1479973119872513
       
  • The lay health worker–patient relationship in promoting pulmonary
           rehabilitation (PR) in COPD: What makes it work'

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Authors: Gill Gilworth, Simon Lewin, Alison J Wright, Stephanie JC Taylor, Rachel Tuffnell, Lauren Hogg, Nicholas S Hopkinson, Sally J Singh, Patrick White
      Abstract: Chronic Respiratory Disease, Volume 16, Issue , January-December 2019.
      Lay health workers (LHWs) can improve access to services and adherence to treatment, as well as promoting self-care and prevention. Their effect in promoting uptake and adherence in pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has not been tested. PR is the most effective treatment for the symptoms and disability of COPD, but this effectiveness is undermined by poor rates of completion. Trained LHWs with COPD, who also have first-hand experience of PR, are well placed to help overcome the documented barriers to its completion. The relationship between LHWs and patients may be one of the keys to their effectiveness but it has been little explored. Semi-structured qualitative interviews were used with the aim of examining the LHW-patient partnership in a feasibility study of trained PR-experienced LHWs used to support COPD patients referred to PR. Twelve volunteers with COPD who completed LHW training supported 66 patients referred for PR. All 12 of these LHWs gave end-of-study interviews, 21 COPD patients supported by LHWs were also interviewed. Patients reported that the LHWs were keen to share their experiences of PR, and that this had a positive impact. The enthusiasm of the LHWs for PR was striking. The common bond between LHWs and patients of having COPD together with the LHWs positive, first-hand experience of PR were dominant and recurring themes in their relationship.
      Citation: Chronic Respiratory Disease
      PubDate: 2019-08-27T02:42:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1479973119869329
       
  • Acute exacerbations of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: Does clinical
           stratification or steroid treatment matter'

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Authors: Sandra Cuerpo, Jorge Moisés, Fernanda Hernández-González, Mariana Benegas, Jose Ramirez, Marcelo Sánchez, Àlvar Agustí, Jacobo Sellares
      Abstract: Chronic Respiratory Disease, Volume 16, Issue , January-December 2019.
      Acute exacerbation (AE) of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is defined as a sudden acceleration of the disease with the appearance of pulmonary infiltrates superimposed on the characteristic pattern of IPF that leads to a significant decline in lung function. It has high in-hospital mortality rates, despite medical treatment with systematic steroids. We sought to investigate whether there were in-hospital mortality differences according to clinical stratification (AE, suspected AE, or AE of known cause) and/or treatment with systemic steroids. We reviewed the clinical characteristics and outcomes of patients with IPF admitted to our hospital during the years 2003–2014 due to a worsening of their clinical status. We identified 50 IPF patients, 9 with AE (18%), 12 with suspected exacerbation (24%), and 29 with AE of known cause (58%), mostly respiratory infections. In-hospital mortality was similar in the three groups (33% vs. 17% vs. 34%, respectively). Likewise, we did not find differences between them with respect to the use of systemic steroids (length of treatment duration or total dose). Nevertheless, there was an independent association between in-hospital mortality and high average daily steroid dose. We did not observe significant differences in prognosis or use of systemic steroids according to current diagnostic stratification groups in patients hospitalized because of an exacerbation of IPF.
      Citation: Chronic Respiratory Disease
      PubDate: 2019-08-21T04:53:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1479973119869334
       
  • COPD patients prescribed inhaled corticosteroid in general practice: Based
           on disease characteristics according to guidelines'

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Authors: Osman Savran, Nina Godtfredsen, Torben Sørensen, Christian Jensen, Charlotte Suppli Ulrik
      Abstract: Chronic Respiratory Disease, Volume 16, Issue , January-December 2019.
      In a primary care setting, our aim was to investigate characteristics of patients classified as having chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and currently being prescribed inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs). The electronic patient record system in each participating general practice was searched for patients coded as COPD (ICPC, Second Edition code R95) and treated with ICS (ACT code R03AK and R03BA, that is, ICS in combination with a long-acting β2-agonist) or ICS as monotherapy. Data, if available, on demographics, smoking habits, spirometry, COPD medication, symptom score, blood eosinophils, co-morbidity and exacerbation history were retrieved from the medical records for all identified cases. Of all patients registered in the 138 participating general practices, 12.560 (3%) were coded as COPD, of whom 32% were prescribed ICS. The final study sample comprised 2.289 COPD patients currently prescribed ICS (98% also prescribed long-acting β2-agonist), with 24% being coded as both COPD and asthma. Post-bronchodilator spirometry was available in 79% (mean forced expiratory volume in 1 second 60% pred (standard deviation (SD) 23.3)), symptom severity score in 53% (mean Medical Research Council score 2.7 (SD 1.1)) and 56% of the COPD patients had had no exacerbation in the previous year (and 45% not within the 2 previous years). Blood eosinophils were measured in 67% of the patients. Information on severity of airflow limitation was missing in 15% of the patients, and the combined information on symptom severity and exacerbation history was missing in in 46%. Most of the patients (74%) were managed only by their general practitioner. Although only one-third of the COPD patients were prescribed ICSs, our findings from this study of a large cohort of patients prescribed ICSs for COPD in general practice suggest that more detailed assessment of diagnosis and disease characteristics is likely to improve the risk–benefit ratio of maintenance therapy with ICSs in COPD patients managed in primary care.
      Citation: Chronic Respiratory Disease
      PubDate: 2019-08-21T04:53:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1479973119867949
       
  • Treatable traits in acute exacerbations of chronic airway diseases
         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Authors: Vanessa M McDonald, Christian R Osadnik, Peter G Gibson
      Abstract: Chronic Respiratory Disease, Volume 16, Issue , January-December 2019.
      Acute exacerbations of chronic airway disease are common occurrences that cause a major burden of illness. Acute exacerbations are associated with impaired health status, increased lung function decline, hospitalization and increased risk of death. Exacerbation avoidance is a major priority. Despite this goal, exacerbations continue to occur and the need for effective models of care that optimize patient outcomes are urgently needed. ‘Treatable Traits’ is an approach to personalized medicine that has been proposed for the management of airway diseases. The treatable traits approach allows for the recognition of clinically important, identifiable and treatable disease characteristics, followed by targeted and individualized treatment interventions to address each trait. We review the literature relating to treatable traits in airway diseases; in particular, those traits that can predict exacerbations and approaches to management that aim to prevent exacerbations by using a treatable traits model of care. We propose this approach as a potentially useful model of care to both prevent and manage acute exacerbations.
      Citation: Chronic Respiratory Disease
      PubDate: 2019-08-14T03:01:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1479973119867954
       
  • The similarities and differences between pleuroparenchymal fibroelastosis
           and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Authors: Hiroshi Ishii, Yoshiaki Kinoshita, Hisako Kushima, Nobuhiko Nagata, Kentaro Watanabe
      Abstract: Chronic Respiratory Disease, Volume 16, Issue , January-December 2019.
      The idiopathic form of pleuroparenchymal fibroelastosis (PPFE) is categorized as a rare idiopathic interstitial pneumonia in the current classification. The majority of PPFE cases are idiopathic, but many predisposing factors or comorbidities have been reported. Although histological PPFE is predominantly located in the upper lobes, which are less often affected by fibrosis in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), the clinical course of PPFE is seemingly similar to that of IPF. However, upper lobe fibroelastosis has various clinical and physiological characteristics that differ from those of IPF, including a flattened thoracic cage and a marked decrease in the forced vital capacity (FVC) but with a preserved residual volume. Compared with IPF, the decrease in the walking distance is mild despite the markedly decreased FVC in PPFE, and chest radiograph more frequently shows the elevation of bilateral hilar opacities with or without tracheal deviation. The prognosis may be related to the development of fibrosing interstitial pneumonia in the lower lobes with elevated levels of serum Krebs von den Lungen-6; however, there is marked variation in the pathogenesis and clinical features in PPFE. A proposal of the diagnostic criteria for idiopathic PPFE with and without surgical lung biopsy, which has recently been published, may be useful.
      Citation: Chronic Respiratory Disease
      PubDate: 2019-08-07T02:43:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1479973119867945
       
  • Use of the Oxford Participation and Activities Questionnaire in chronic
           obstructive pulmonary disease

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Authors: David Morley, Crispin Jenkinson
      Abstract: Chronic Respiratory Disease, Volume 16, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: Chronic Respiratory Disease
      PubDate: 2019-07-31T02:22:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1479973119862218
       
  • Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: Educational needs of health-care providers,
           patients, and caregivers

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Authors: Deepa Ramadurai, Stephanie Corder, Tara Churney, Bridget Graney, Andrea Harshman, Sarah Meadows, Jeffrey J Swigris
      Abstract: Chronic Respiratory Disease, Volume 16, Issue , January-December 2019.
      Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a progressive disease associated with poor quality of life. Debilitating symptoms and the reality of shortened survival impact patients’ physical and emotional well-being and constrain the lives of patients’ caregivers. This study assessed the informational needs of medical providers who care for patients with IPF, IPF patients themselves, and their caregivers. Tailored surveys were sent electronically to providers, patients with IPF, and caregivers of patients with IPF collected on a rolling basis in March of 2017. Providers answered questions regarding their own informational needs and what information they believed patients needed. Patients and caregivers identified their own informational needs and the perceived needs for each other. About 2636 surveys were sent to providers, including 2041 to physicians, of whom 156 completed it. One hundred sixty patients and 29 caregivers responded to the survey via a link on a website. Eighty-six percent of providers described themselves as physicians who diagnose and treat IPF patients themselves. Providers ranked information on “making the diagnosis of IPF” as their top informational need. Patients and caregivers chose “disease progression/what to expect” as the most important informational need for themselves and for each other. Providers want to make a correct diagnosis when IPF is in the differential diagnosis. Patients and caregivers desire clarity around how IPF will behave over time and what their futures with IPF will look like. Resources for patients and their caregivers should include information on disease natural history in empathically worded, clear, and easily accessible formats.
      Citation: Chronic Respiratory Disease
      PubDate: 2019-07-10T03:21:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1479973119858961
       
  • Airway clearance techniques for patients with acute exacerbations of
           chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: Physical therapy practice in Sweden
           

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Authors: Elisabeth Westerdahl, Christian Osadnik, Margareta Emtner
      Abstract: Chronic Respiratory Disease, Volume 16, Issue , January-December 2019.
      There is considerable global variability in clinical practice regarding the prescription of airway clearance techniques (ACTs) for patients with acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD). Little is known about the physical therapy practice, and no international guidelines are available. The aim of this survey was to identify current physical therapy practice regarding ACT prescription for patients with AECOPD in Sweden. A cross-sectional, descriptive study was conducted via a Web-based questionnaire, sent to all (n = 70) hospitals that offer physical therapy service for patients with AECOPD in Sweden. Responses were received from 117 physical therapists (76%) across all sites. ACTs were prescribed for more than half of all patients with an AECOPD by 75% of physical therapists. The most frequently used ACTs were positive expiratory pressure (PEP) devices (90%), directed huffing (88%) and cough (71%). Most physical therapists (89%) perceived sputum clearance to be an important aspect of the overall management of patients with AECOPD. The main factors influencing choice of ACT were the ‘degree of dyspnoea or work of breathing’ and ‘access to resources/equipment’. Physical therapists prescribe predominantly PEP-based ACTs for patients with AECOPD in Sweden. Several factors come into consideration that influences the choice of treatment technique.
      Citation: Chronic Respiratory Disease
      PubDate: 2019-06-21T02:32:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1479973119855868
       
  • Perceptions of COPD patients of the proposed withdrawal of inhaled
           corticosteroids prescribed outside guidelines: A qualitative study

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Authors: Gill Gilworth, Timothy Harries, Chris Corrigan, Mike Thomas, Patrick White
      Abstract: Chronic Respiratory Disease, Volume 16, Issue , January-December 2019.
      Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease guidelines support the prescription of fixed combination inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) and long-acting β-agonists in symptomatic COPD patients with frequent or severe exacerbations, with the aim of preventing them. ICS are frequently also prescribed to COPD patients with mild or moderate airflow limitation, outside guidelines, with the risk of unwanted effects. No investigation to date has addressed the views of these milder COPD patients on ICS withdrawal. The objective is to assess the views of COPD patients with mild or moderate airflow limitation on the staged withdrawal of ICS prescribed outside guidelines. One-to-one semi-structured qualitative interviews exploring COPD patients’ views about ICS use and their attitudes to proposed de-prescription were conducted. Interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. Thematic analysis was completed. Seventeen eligible COPD patients were interviewed. Many participants were not aware they were using an ICS. None was aware that prevention of exacerbations was the indication for ICS therapy or the risk of associated side effects. Some were unconcerned by what they perceived as low individual risk. Others expressed fears of worsening symptoms on withdrawal. Most with mild or moderate airflow limitation would have been willing to attempt withdrawal or titration to a lower dosage of ICS if advised by their clinician, particularly if a reasoned explanation were offered. Attitudes in this study to discontinuing ICS use varied. Knowledge of the drug itself, the indications for its prescription in COPD and potential for side effects, was scant. The proposed withdrawal of ICS is likely to be challenging and requires detailed conversations between patients and respiratory healthcare professionals.
      Citation: Chronic Respiratory Disease
      PubDate: 2019-06-14T03:07:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1479973119855880
       
  • Setting up home noninvasive ventilation
         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Authors: Jean-Michel Arnal, Charles-Philippe Thevenin, Benoit Couzinou, Joelle Texereau, Aude Garnero
      Abstract: Chronic Respiratory Disease, Volume 16, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: Chronic Respiratory Disease
      PubDate: 2019-06-10T04:37:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1479973119844090
       
  • A long-term retrospective study of patients with biopsy-proven cryptogenic
           organizing pneumonia

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Authors: Ying Zhou, Lei Wang, Mei Huang, Jingjing Ding, Hanyi Jiang, Kefeng Zhou, Fanqing Meng, Yonglong Xiao, Hourong Cai, Jinghong Dai
      Abstract: Chronic Respiratory Disease, Volume 16, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: Chronic Respiratory Disease
      PubDate: 2019-06-04T02:59:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1479973119853829
       
  • Predictors of accelerated FEV1 decline in adults with airflow
           limitation—Findings from the Health2006 cohort

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Authors: Camilla Boslev Baarnes, Betina H Thuesen, Allan Linneberg, Amalie S Ustrup, Signe Knag Pedersen, Charlotte Suppli Ulrik
      Abstract: Chronic Respiratory Disease, Volume 16, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: Chronic Respiratory Disease
      PubDate: 2019-06-04T02:57:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1479973119838278
       
  • The meaning of the name of ‘pulmonary rehabilitation’ and its
           influence on engagement with individuals with chronic lung disease

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Authors: Rebecca Oxley, Samantha L. Harrison, Arthur Rose, Jane Macnaughton
      Abstract: Chronic Respiratory Disease, Volume 16, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: Chronic Respiratory Disease
      PubDate: 2019-05-29T03:16:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1479973119847659
       
  • Sex differences in COPD-related quadriceps muscle dysfunction and fibre
           abnormalities

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Authors: Adithya Sharanya, Margherita Ciano, Shirmila Withana, Paul Richard Kemp, Michael Iain Polkey, Samantha Amanda Sathyapala
      Abstract: Chronic Respiratory Disease, Volume 16, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: Chronic Respiratory Disease
      PubDate: 2019-05-27T02:41:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1479973119843650
       
  • Validation of the brief international classification of functioning,
           disability, and health core set for obstructive pulmonary disease in the
           Chinese context

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Authors: Jingwen Huang, Jan D Reinhardt, Ranran Dai, Pu Wang, Min Zhou
      Abstract: Chronic Respiratory Disease, Volume 16, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: Chronic Respiratory Disease
      PubDate: 2019-05-06T01:23:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1479973119843648
       
  • An observational cohort study of exercise and education for people with
           chronic obstructive pulmonary disease not meeting criteria for formal
           pulmonary rehabilitation programmes

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Authors: A Lewis, D Dullaghan, H Townes, A Green, J Potts, Jennifer K Quint
      Abstract: Chronic Respiratory Disease, Volume 16, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: Chronic Respiratory Disease
      PubDate: 2019-04-17T03:42:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1479973119838283
       
  • Health-care utilization and expenditures among patients with comorbid
           bronchiectasis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in US clinical
           practice

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Authors: Frederic Douglas Seifer, Gary Hansen, Derek Weycker
      Abstract: Chronic Respiratory Disease, Volume 16, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: Chronic Respiratory Disease
      PubDate: 2019-04-09T04:34:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1479973119839961
       
  • Mortality and vertebral fracture risk associated with long-term oral
           steroid use in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: A
           systemic review and meta-analysis

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Authors: Yu-Ping Chang, Chien-Hao Lai, Chiung-Yu Lin, Ya-Chun Chang, Meng-Chih Lin, Inn-Wen Chong, Chau-Chyun Sheu, Yu-Feng Wei, Kuo-An Chu, Jong-Rung Tsai, Cheng-Hung Lee, Yung-Che Chen
      Abstract: Chronic Respiratory Disease, Volume 16, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: Chronic Respiratory Disease
      PubDate: 2019-04-03T04:24:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1479973119838280
       
  • Promoting chronic disease management in persons with complex social needs:
           A qualitative descriptive study

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Authors: Donna Goodridge, Thilina Bandara, Darcy Marciniuk, Shelly Hutchinson, Lois Crossman, Brittany Kachur, Dana Higgins, Andrew Bennett
      Abstract: Chronic Respiratory Disease, Volume 16, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: Chronic Respiratory Disease
      PubDate: 2019-03-06T03:17:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1479973119832025
       
  • Reviewer List
         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Abstract: Chronic Respiratory Disease, Volume 16, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: Chronic Respiratory Disease
      PubDate: 2019-02-04T04:51:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1479973119829631
       
  • Effectiveness of early rehabilitation on patients with chronic obstructive
           lung disease and acute respiratory failure in intensive care units: A
           case–control study

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Authors: Willy Chou, Chih-Cheng Lai, Kuo-Chen Cheng, Kuo-Shu Yuan, Chin-Ming Chen, Ai-Chin Cheng
      Abstract: Chronic Respiratory Disease, Volume 16, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: Chronic Respiratory Disease
      PubDate: 2019-01-04T04:25:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1479973118820310
       
  • Unravelling the mystery of the ‘minimum important difference’ using
           practical outcome measures in chronic respiratory disease

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Authors: Linzy Houchen-Wolloff, Rachael A Evans
      Abstract: Chronic Respiratory Disease, Volume 16, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: Chronic Respiratory Disease
      PubDate: 2019-01-04T04:24:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1479973118816491
       
 
 
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