Publisher: Sage Publications   (Total: 1086 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 1086 Journals sorted alphabetically
AADE in Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Abstracts in Anthropology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Academic Pathology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Accounting History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.527, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Radiologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.754, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Radiologica Open     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Acta Sociologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37, SJR: 0.939, CiteScore: 2)
Action Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51, SJR: 0.308, CiteScore: 1)
Active Learning in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 350, SJR: 1.397, CiteScore: 2)
Adaptive Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.288, CiteScore: 1)
Administration & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.675, CiteScore: 1)
Adoption & Fostering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.313, CiteScore: 0)
Adsorption Science & Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.258, CiteScore: 1)
Adult Education Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 229, SJR: 0.566, CiteScore: 2)
Adult Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Advances in Dental Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.791, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Developing Human Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 0.614, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Mechanical Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 138, SJR: 0.272, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Methods and Practices in Psychological Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Advances in Structural Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 46, SJR: 0.599, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Tumor Virology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.108, CiteScore: 0)
AERA Open     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Affilia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.496, CiteScore: 1)
Agrarian South : J. of Political Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Air, Soil & Water Research     Open Access   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.214, CiteScore: 1)
Alexandria : The J. of National and Intl. Library and Information Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 65)
Allergy & Rhinology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
AlterNative : An Intl. J. of Indigenous Peoples     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.194, CiteScore: 0)
Alternative Law J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.176, CiteScore: 0)
Alternatives : Global, Local, Political     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.351, CiteScore: 1)
American Behavioral Scientist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.982, CiteScore: 2)
American Economist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
American Educational Research J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 221, SJR: 2.913, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.67, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Cosmetic Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
American J. of Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.646, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Health Promotion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 0.807, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Hospice and Palliative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43, SJR: 0.65, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Law & Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.204, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Lifestyle Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.431, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Medical Quality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.777, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Men's Health     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.595, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Rhinology and Allergy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.972, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Sports Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 207, SJR: 3.949, CiteScore: 6)
American Politics Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33, SJR: 1.313, CiteScore: 1)
American Review of Public Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 2.062, CiteScore: 2)
American Sociological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 318, SJR: 6.333, CiteScore: 6)
American String Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Analytical Chemistry Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.224, CiteScore: 1)
Angiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.849, CiteScore: 2)
Animation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.197, CiteScore: 0)
Annals of Clinical Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.634, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Otology, Rhinology & Laryngology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.807, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Pharmacotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53, SJR: 1.096, CiteScore: 2)
Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46, SJR: 1.225, CiteScore: 3)
Annals of the ICRP     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.548, CiteScore: 1)
Anthropocene Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 3.341, CiteScore: 7)
Anthropological Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42, SJR: 0.739, CiteScore: 1)
Antitrust Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Antiviral Chemistry and Chemotherapy     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.635, CiteScore: 2)
Antyajaa : Indian J. of Women and Social Change     Hybrid Journal  
Applied Biosafety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.131, CiteScore: 0)
Applied Psychological Measurement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 1.17, CiteScore: 1)
Applied Spectroscopy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.489, CiteScore: 2)
Armed Forces & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.29, CiteScore: 1)
Arts and Humanities in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42, SJR: 0.305, CiteScore: 1)
Asia Pacific Media Educator     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.23, CiteScore: 0)
Asia-Pacific J. of Management Research and Innovation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Asia-Pacific J. of Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.558, CiteScore: 1)
Asian and Pacific Migration J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 106, SJR: 0.324, CiteScore: 1)
Asian Cardiovascular and Thoracic Annals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.305, CiteScore: 0)
Asian J. of Comparative Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Asian J. of Legal Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Asian J. of Management Cases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
ASN Neuro     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.534, CiteScore: 3)
Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 1.519, CiteScore: 3)
Assessment for Effective Intervention     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.578, CiteScore: 1)
Australasian Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.433, CiteScore: 1)
Australian & New Zealand J. of Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29, SJR: 1.801, CiteScore: 2)
Australian and New Zealand J. of Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 527, SJR: 0.612, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Career Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Australian J. of Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42, SJR: 0.403, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.497, CiteScore: 1)
Autism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 327, SJR: 1.739, CiteScore: 4)
Autism & Developmental Language Impairments     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Behavior Modification     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.877, CiteScore: 2)
Behavioral and Cognitive Neuroscience Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Bible Translator     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Biblical Theology Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.184, CiteScore: 0)
Big Data & Society     Open Access   (Followers: 50)
Biochemistry Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Bioinformatics and Biology Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.141, CiteScore: 2)
Biological Research for Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.685, CiteScore: 2)
Biomarker Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.81, CiteScore: 2)
Biomarkers in Cancer     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Biomedical Engineering and Computational Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Biomedical Informatics Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Bioscope: South Asian Screen Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.235, CiteScore: 0)
BMS: Bulletin of Sociological Methodology/Bulletin de Méthodologie Sociologique     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.226, CiteScore: 0)
Body & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 1.531, CiteScore: 3)
Bone and Tissue Regeneration Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Brain and Neuroscience Advances     Open Access  
Breast Cancer : Basic and Clinical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.823, CiteScore: 2)
British J. of Music Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
British J. of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 202, SJR: 0.323, CiteScore: 1)
British J. of Pain     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.579, CiteScore: 2)
British J. of Politics and Intl. Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32, SJR: 0.91, CiteScore: 2)
British J. of Visual Impairment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.337, CiteScore: 1)
British J.ism Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
BRQ Business Review Quarterly     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Building Acoustics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.215, CiteScore: 1)
Building Services Engineering Research & Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.583, CiteScore: 1)
Bulletin of Science, Technology & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Business & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Business and Professional Communication Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.348, CiteScore: 1)
Business Information Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.279, CiteScore: 0)
Business Perspectives and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Cahiers Élisabéthains     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.111, CiteScore: 0)
Calcutta Statistical Association Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
California Management Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31, SJR: 2.209, CiteScore: 4)
Canadian J. of Kidney Health and Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.007, CiteScore: 2)
Canadian J. of Nursing Research (CJNR)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Canadian J. of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 139, SJR: 0.626, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian J. of Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 1.769, CiteScore: 3)
Canadian J. of School Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.266, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian Pharmacists J. / Revue des Pharmaciens du Canada     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.536, CiteScore: 1)
Cancer Control     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Growth and Metastasis     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Informatics     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.64, CiteScore: 1)
Capital and Class     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.282, CiteScore: 1)
Cardiac Cath Lab Director     Full-text available via subscription  
Cardiovascular and Thoracic Open     Open Access  
Career Development and Transition for Exceptional Individuals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.44, CiteScore: 1)
Cartilage     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.889, CiteScore: 3)
Cell and Tissue Transplantation and Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cell Transplantation     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.023, CiteScore: 3)
Cephalalgia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 1.581, CiteScore: 3)
Child Language Teaching and Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35, SJR: 0.501, CiteScore: 1)
Child Maltreatment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.22, CiteScore: 3)
Child Neurology Open     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Childhood     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.894, CiteScore: 2)
Childhood Obesity and Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
China Information     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.767, CiteScore: 2)
China Report     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.221, CiteScore: 0)
Chinese J. of Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Chronic Illness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.672, CiteScore: 2)
Chronic Respiratory Disease     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.808, CiteScore: 2)
Chronic Stress     Open Access  
Citizenship, Social and Economics Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.145, CiteScore: 0)
Cleft Palate-Craniofacial J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.757, CiteScore: 1)
Clin-Alert     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis     Open Access   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.49, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical and Translational Neuroscience     Open Access  
Clinical Case Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.364, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45, SJR: 0.73, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical EEG and Neuroscience     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.552, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.296, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Arthritis and Musculoskeletal Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.537, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Blood Disorders     Open Access   (SJR: 0.314, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.686, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.283, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Circulatory, Respiratory and Pulmonary Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.425, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Ear, Nose and Throat     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Endocrinology and Diabetes     Open Access   (Followers: 33, SJR: 0.63, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.129, CiteScore: 3)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Pediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Reproductive Health     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.776, CiteScore: 0)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Therapeutics     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.172, CiteScore: 0)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Trauma and Intensive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Women's Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Clinical Nursing Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 0.471, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Pathology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.487, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Psychological Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 3.281, CiteScore: 5)
Clinical Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 75, SJR: 1.322, CiteScore: 3)
Clinical Risk     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.133, CiteScore: 0)
Clinical Trials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 2.399, CiteScore: 2)
Clothing and Textiles Research J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.36, CiteScore: 1)
Common Law World Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Communication & Sport     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.385, CiteScore: 1)
Communication and the Public     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Communication Disorders Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.458, CiteScore: 1)
Communication Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 2.171, CiteScore: 3)
Community College Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.451, CiteScore: 1)
Comparative Political Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 246, SJR: 3.772, CiteScore: 3)
Compensation & Benefits Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Competition & Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.843, CiteScore: 2)
Competition and Regulation in Network Industries     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.143, CiteScore: 0)
Concurrent Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.642, CiteScore: 2)
Conflict Management and Peace Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38, SJR: 2.441, CiteScore: 1)
Contemporary Drug Problems     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.609, CiteScore: 2)
Contemporary Education Dialogue     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.102, CiteScore: 0)
Contemporary Issues in Early Childhood     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.766, CiteScore: 1)
Contemporary Review of the Middle East     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Contemporary Sociology : A J. of Reviews     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 34, SJR: 0.195, CiteScore: 0)
Contemporary Voice of Dalit     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Contexts     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Contributions to Indian Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.376, CiteScore: 0)

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.801
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 29  
 
Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal   * Containing 1 Open Access Open Access article(s) in this issue *
ISSN (Print) 0004-8674 - ISSN (Online) 1440-1614
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1086 journals]
  • The delay in response to antidepressant therapy: A window of
           opportunity'
    • Authors: Gin S Malhi, Erica Bell, Grace Morris, Amber Hamilton
      Pages: 127 - 129
      Abstract: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Volume 54, Issue 2, Page 127-129, February 2020.

      Citation: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2020-01-30T05:40:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0004867419900313
      Issue No: Vol. 54, No. 2 (2020)
       
  • ‘Vaping psychosis’: Ultra-acute onset of severe, persisting and
           unusual psychotic symptoms following first-time cannabis vaping in a
           previously well individual
    • Authors: David R Alchin
      Abstract: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2020-02-07T09:21:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0004867419900320
       
  • A call for mental health illiteracy
    • Authors: Ben Samuel
      Abstract: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2020-02-06T11:15:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0004867420903806
       
  • Mental health during and after protests, riots and revolutions: A
           systematic review
    • Authors: Michael Y Ni, Yoona Kim, Ian McDowell, Suki Wong, Qiu Hong, Irene OL Wong, Sandro Galea, Gabriel M Leung
      Abstract: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Objectives:Protests, riots and revolutions have long been a part of human history and are increasing globally, yet their impact on mental health remains largely unknown. We therefore systematically reviewed studies on collective actions and mental health.Method:We searched PubMed, Web of Science, PsycINFO and CINAHL Plus for published studies from their inception until 1 January 2018. Study quality was rated using the Newcastle–Ottawa Scale.Results:We identified 52 studies (n = 57,487 participants) from 20 countries/regions. The prevalence of post-traumatic stress disorder ranged from 4% to 41% in riot-affected areas. Following a major protest, the prevalence of probable major depression increased by 7%, regardless of personal involvement in the protests, suggestive of community spillover effects. Risk factors for poorer mental health included female sex, lower socioeconomic status, exposure to violence, interpersonal conflicts, frequent social media use and lower resilience and social support. Nevertheless, two studies suggested that collective actions may reduce depression and suicide, possibly due to a collective cathartic experience and greater social cohesion within subpopulations.Conclusion:We present the first systematic review of collective actions and mental health, showing compelling evidence that protests even when nonviolent can be associated with adverse mental health outcomes. Health care professionals therefore need to be vigilant to the mental and psychological sequelae of protests, riots and revolutions. Further research on this emerging sociopolitical determinant of mental health is warranted.
      Citation: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2020-01-28T10:23:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0004867419899165
       
  • The efficacy, safety and acceptability of emergency embedded Psychiatry
           Assessment and Planning Units: An evaluation of Psychiatry Assessment and
           Planning Units in close proximity to their associated emergency
           departments
    • Authors: DA Mitchell, N Crawford, BJ Newham, JR Newton
      Abstract: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:To determine the efficacy, safety and acceptability as well as the patient demographics of three newly developed emergency department–embedded Psychiatric Assessment and Planning Units located in Metropolitan Melbourne at Austin, Peninsula and Eastern Health Services.Methods:The evaluation reviewed a 12-month period of service activity from 1 September 2017 to 31 August 2018, when all three Psychiatric Assessment and Planning Units services were operational. A 12-month period from 1 September 2014 to 31 August 2015 was compared as the pre-Psychiatric Assessment and Planning Units period. Mixed qualitative and quantitative methods were used. This included semi-structured interviews of 30 Psychiatric Assessment and Planning Units patients and 30 emergency department staff (10 of each for all 3 sites), patient survey, statistical analysis of Client Management Interface data for the emergency department and related Psychiatric Assessment and Planning Units as well as audit of RISKMAN registers.Results:There were 365 Austin, 567 Eastern and 791 Peninsula Psychiatric Assessment and Planning Units admissions. Psychiatric Assessment and Planning Units were generally well accepted by patients and emergency department staff, relatively safe, operating within the Key Performance Indicators with mixed effect on emergency department flow. Austin emergency department processing times improved post-Psychiatric Assessment and Planning Units (4 hours 57 minutes to 4 hours 19 minutes; p 
      Citation: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2020-01-24T06:27:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0004867419899717
       
  • Human leukocyte antigen DRB1*04:05 and clozapine-induced
           agranulocytosis/granulocytopenia
    • Authors: Takeo Saito, Masashi Ikeda, Taisei Mushiroda, Nakao Iwata
      Abstract: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2020-01-23T06:50:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0004867419900296
       
  • Third ventricular colloid cyst and chronic mania
    • Authors: NA Uvais, Kurian Jose
      Abstract: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2020-01-23T06:47:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0004867419900306
       
  • Neurochemical and brain functional changes in the ventromedial prefrontal
           cortex of first-episode psychosis patients: A combined functional magnetic
           resonance imaging—proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy study
    • Authors: Haixin Cen, Jiale Xu, Zhilei Yang, Li Mei, Tianyi Chen, Kaiming Zhuo, Qiong Xiang, Zhenghua Song, Yingchan Wang, Xiaoyun Guo, Jinhong Wang, Kaida Jiang, Yifeng Xu, Yao Li, Dengtang Liu
      Abstract: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:Previous studies showed alterations of brain function in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex of schizophrenia patients. Also, neurochemical changes, especially GABA level alteration, have been found in the medial prefrontal cortex of schizophrenia patients. However, the relationship between GABA level in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex and brain functional activity in schizophrenia patients remains unexplored.Methods:In total, 23 drug-naïve, first-episode psychosis patients and 26 matched healthy controls completed the study. The single voxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy data were acquired in ventromedial prefrontal cortex region, which was used as the seed region for resting-state functional connectivity analysis. The proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy data were processed to quantify the concentrations of GABA+, glutamine and glutamate, and N-acetylaspartate in ventromedial prefrontal cortex. Spearman correlation analysis was used to examine the relationship between metabolite concentration, functional connectivity and clinical variables. Pearson correlation analysis was used to examine the relationship between GABA+ concentration and functional connectivity value.Results:In first-episode psychosis patients, GABA+ level in ventromedial prefrontal cortex was higher and was positively correlated with ventromedial prefrontal cortex-left middle orbital frontal cortex functional connectivity. N-acetylaspartate level was positively correlated with positive symptoms, and the functional connectivity between ventromedial prefrontal cortex and left precuneus was negatively associated with negative symptoms of first-episode psychosis patients.Conclusion:Our results indicated that ventromedial prefrontal cortex functional connectivity changes were positively correlated with higher local GABA+ level in first-episode psychosis patients. The altered neurochemical concentration and functional connectivity provide insights into the pathology of schizophrenia.
      Citation: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2020-01-21T04:43:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0004867419898520
       
  • Reduced activation of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex during
           self-referential processing in individuals at ultra-high risk for
           psychosis
    • Authors: Hye Yoon Park, Kyoungri Park, Eunchong Seo, Se Jun Koo, Minji Bang, Jin Young Park, Jee In Kang, Eun Lee, Seung-Koo Lee, Suk Kyoon An
      Abstract: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:Defects in self-referential processing and perspective-taking are core characteristics that may underlie psychotic symptoms and impaired social cognition in schizophrenia. Here, we investigated the neural correlates of self-referential processing regardless of the perspective taken and third-person perspective-taking regardless of the target person to judge relevance in individuals at ultra-high risk for psychosis. We also explored relationships between alterations in neural activity and neurocognitive function and basic self (‘ipseity’) disorder.Methods:Twenty-two ultra-high-risk individuals and 28 healthy controls completed a functional magnetic resonance imaging task. While being scanned, participants were asked to take a first-person perspective or to put themselves in their close relative’s place thereby adopting a third-person perspective during judgments of the relevance of personality trait adjectives to one’s self and a close relative.Results:For self-referential (vs other-referential) processing, ultra-high-risk individuals showed less neural activity in the left ventromedial prefrontal cortex/medial orbitofrontal cortex, which was correlated with poor working memory performance. When taking a third-person perspective (vs first-person perspective), ultra-high-risk individuals showed more activity in the middle occipital gyrus.Conclusion:Taken together, our findings suggest that ultra-high-risk individuals already show aberrant neural activity during self-referential processing which may possibly be related to engagement of working memory resources.
      Citation: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2020-01-20T11:05:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0004867419898529
       
  • Systematic review and meta-analysis of rates of clozapine-associated
           myocarditis and cardiomyopathy
    • Authors: Dan Siskind, Ashneet Sidhu, John Cross, Yee-Tat Chua, Nicholas Myles, Dan Cohen, Steve Kisely
      Abstract: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Clozapine is the most effective medication for treatment refractory schizophrenia, but is associated with cardiac adverse drug reactions. Myocarditis and cardiomyopathy are the most serious cardiac adverse drug reactions although reported rates of these conditions vary in the literature. We systematically reviewed and meta-analysed the event rates, the absolute death rates and case fatality rates of myocarditis and cardiomyopathy associated with clozapine.Methods:PubMed, EMBASE and PsycINFO were searched for studies that reported on the incidence of cardiomyopathy or myocarditis in people exposed to clozapine. Data were meta-analysed using a random effects model, with subgroup analysis on study size, time frame, region, quality, retrospective vs prospective, and diagnostic criteria of myocarditis or cardiomyopathy.Results:28 studies of 258,961 people exposed to clozapine were included. The event rate of myocarditis was 0.007 (95% confidence interval [CI] = [0.003, 0.016]), absolute death rate was 0.0004 (95% CI = [0.0002, 0.0009]) and case fatality rate was 0.127 (95% CI = [0.034, 0.377]). The cardiomyopathy event rate was 0.006 (95% CI = [0.002, 0.023]), absolute death rate was 0.0003 (95% CI = [0.0001, 0.0012]) and case fatality rate was 0.078 (95% CI = [0.018, 0.285]). Few included studies provided information on criteria for diagnosis of myocarditis and cardiomyopathy. Event rates of cardiomyopathy and myocarditis were higher in Australia.Conclusion:Clarity of diagnostic criteria for myocarditis remains a challenge. Observation bias may, in part, influence higher reported rates in Australia. Monitoring for myocarditis is warranted in the first 4 weeks, and treatment of comorbid metabolic syndrome and diabetes may reduce the risk of cardiomyopathy. The risks of myocarditis and cardiomyopathy are low and should not present a barrier to people with treatment refractory schizophrenia being offered a monitored trial of clozapine.
      Citation: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2020-01-20T11:04:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0004867419898760
       
  • Antidepressant treatment for primary care patients with depressive
           symptoms: Data from the diamond longitudinal cohort study
    • Authors: Sandra K Davidson, Helena Romaniuk, Patty Chondros, Christopher Dowrick, Jane Pirkis, Helen Herrman, Susan Fletcher, Jane Gunn
      Abstract: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Background:In light of emerging evidence questioning the safety of antidepressants, it is timely to investigate the appropriateness of antidepressant prescribing. This study estimated the prevalence of possible over- and under-treatment with antidepressants among primary care attendees and investigated the factors associated with potentially inappropriate antidepressant use.Methods:In all, 789 adult primary care patients with depressive symptoms were recruited from 30 general practices in Victoria, Australia, in 2005 and followed up every 3 months in 2006 and annually from 2007 to 2011. For this study, we first assessed appropriateness of antidepressant use in 2007 at the 2-year follow-up to enable history of depression to be taken into account, providing 574 (73%) patients with five yearly assessments, resulting in a total of 2870 assessments. We estimated the prevalence of use of antidepressants according to the adapted National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidelines and used regression analysis to identify factors associated with possible over- and under-treatment.Results:In 41% (243/586) of assessments where antidepressants were indicated according to adapted National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidelines, patients reported not taking them. Conversely in a third (557/1711) of assessments where guideline criteria were unlikely to be met, participants reported antidepressant use. Being female and chronic physical illness were associated with antidepressant use where guideline criteria were not met, but no factors were associated with not taking antidepressants where guideline criteria were met.Conclusions:Much antidepressant treatment in general practice is for people with minimal or mild symptoms, while people with moderate or severe depressive symptoms may miss out. There is considerable scope for improving depression care through better allocation of antidepressant treatment.
      Citation: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2020-01-20T11:03:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0004867419898761
       
  • Cognitive behavioral therapy for perinatal anxiety: A randomized
           controlled trial
    • Authors: Sheryl M Green, Eleanor Donegan, Randi E McCabe, David L Streiner, Arela Agako, Benicio N Frey
      Abstract: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Up to one in five women meet diagnostic criteria for an anxiety disorder during the perinatal period (i.e. pregnancy and up to 1 year postpartum). While psychotropic medications are effective, they are associated with risks for mothers and babies. There is a growing demand for evidence-based non-pharmacological treatments for perinatal anxiety.Objective:To evaluate the effectiveness of a cognitive behavioral group therapy protocol for perinatal anxiety.Methods:In total, 96 women were randomized to cognitive behavioral group therapy or waitlist at a clinic specializing in women’s mental health. Participants were 22–41 years of age, pregnant or up to 6 months postpartum and had an anxiety disorder with or without comorbid depression.Results:Compared to waitlist, participants in cognitive behavioral group therapy reported significantly greater reductions in the primary outcome of anxiety (State-Trait Inventory of Cognitive and Somatic Anxiety, η2p = .19; Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale, η2p = .16), as well as in secondary outcomes including worry (Penn State Worry Questionnaire, η2p = .29), perceived stress (Perceived Stress Scale, η2p = .33) and depressive symptoms (Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale, η2p = .27; Montgomery–Åsberg Depression Rating Scale, η2p = .11). Maternal status (pregnant, postpartum) and medication use were unrelated to treatment outcomes. All gains were maintained, or continued to improve, at 3-month follow-up.Conclusion:Cognitive behavioral group therapy was effective in improving anxiety and related symptoms among women with anxiety disorders in the perinatal period.
      Citation: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2020-01-20T10:20:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0004867419898528
       
  • Hospital-treated deliberate self-poisoning in the older adult: Identifying
           specific clinical assessment needs
    • Authors: Mariann Jackson, Katie McGill, Terry J Lewin, Jenifer Bryant, Ian Whyte, Gregory Carter
      Abstract: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Hospital-treated deliberate self-poisoning is common, with a median patient age of around 33 years. Clinicians are less familiar with assessing older adults with self-poisoning and little is known about their specific clinical requirements.Objective:To identify clinically important factors in the older-age population by comparing older adults (65+ years) with middle-aged adults (45–64 years) during an index episode of hospital-treated deliberate self-poisoning.Methods:A prospective, longitudinal, cohort study of people presenting to a regional referral centre for deliberate self-poisoning (Calvary Mater Newcastle, Australia) over a 10-year period (2003–2013). We compared older-aged adults with middle-aged adults on demographic, toxicological and psychiatric variables and modelled independent predictors of referral for psychiatric hospitalisation on discharge with logistic regression.Results:There were (n = 157) older-aged and (n = 925) middle-aged adults. The older-aged group was similar to the middle-aged group in several ways: proportion living alone, reporting suicidal ideation/planning, prescribed antidepressant and antipsychotic drugs, and with a psychiatric diagnosis. However, the older-aged group were also different in several ways: greater proportion with cognitive impairment, higher medical morbidity, longer length of stay, and greater prescription and ingestion of benzodiazepines in the deliberate self-poisoning event. Older age was not a predictor of referral for psychiatric hospitalisation in the multivariate model.Conclusion:Older-aged patients treated for deliberate self-poisoning have a range of clinical needs including ones that are both similar to and different from middle-aged patients. Individual clinical assessment to identify these needs should be followed by targeted interventions, including reduced exposure to benzodiazepines.
      Citation: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2020-01-20T10:15:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0004867419897818
       
  • Reducing barriers to the diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnoea in patients
           with severe mental illness
    • Authors: Megan J Kalucy, Jamie R Hardman, Jennifer Twomey, Nadia Hiji, Andreas Johansson, Maryanne O’Donnell, William Lugg
      Abstract: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2020-01-17T06:45:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0004867419896410
       
  • And much to enjoy!
    • Authors: Scott Henderson
      First page: 121
      Abstract: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2020-01-13T08:46:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0004867419898822
       
  • Healthcare utilization, psychiatric medication and risk of
           rehospitalization in suicide-attempting patients with common mental
           disorders
    • Authors: Thomas Niederkrotenthaler, Ellenor Mittendorfer-Rutz, Stefan Thurner, Gottfried Endel, Peter Klimek
      Abstract: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:Common mental disorders are strong risk factors for suicide attempt. We compared common mental disorder patients with and without suicide attempt regarding health care utilization and psychiatric medication, assessed gender differences and identified how psychotropic medication of attempters is associated with subsequent rehospitalization.Methods:We used administrative claims data of 22,276 common mental disorder patients with inpatient care in Lower Austria between 1 January 2006 and 31 December 2011. Suicide attempters (cases, n = 615) and non-attempters (controls, n = 21,661) were compared regarding specific healthcare utilization by calculating mean differences of time-dependent contact probabilities and psychiatric medication (i.e. prescribed defined daily doses) ± 0.5 years around their suicide attempt (cases)/common mental disorder diagnosis (controls). Cluster analysis was used to group suicide attempters according to their psychiatric medication. The risk of rehospitalization 0.5–3 years after the attempt was calculated with regression analysis controlling for sex, age and morbidity-related factors.Results:Contacts with general practitioners were lower for attempters than non-attempters (mean difference of contact probabilities over observation period, males = −0.05, 95% confidence interval = [−0.07, −0.03]; females: mean difference = −0.04, 95% confidence interval = [−0.05, −0.03]). Regarding psychiatrists, female attempters had markedly higher contact probabilities after the attempt compared to female non-attempters (mean difference = 0.02, 95% confidence interval = [0.007, 0.04]); male attempters had lower contact probabilities before the attempt compared to male non-attempters (mean difference = −0.01, 95% confidence interval = [−0.004, −0.02]). Attempters had higher dosages of psychiatric medication across the entire period. Antidepressant and antipsychotic medication peaked at the time of common mental disorder diagnosis/attempt. Benzodiazepine prescriptions were considerably higher for male attempters than their female counterparts and were constantly elevated for male attempters across the observation period. A cluster of attempters with long-term benzodiazepine prescriptions had an increased risk of rehospitalization (adjusted odds ratio = 2.4, 95% confidence interval = [1.1, 5.5]).Conclusion:Despite lower contact probabilities, common mental disorder patients with suicide attempt are prescribed more psychiatric medication, particularly benzodiazepines, with an elevated risk of rehospitalization. Strong sex differences were found.
      Citation: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2019-12-19T09:39:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0004867419895112
       
  • Lithium vs valproate in the maintenance treatment of bipolar I disorder: A
           post- hoc analysis of a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial
    • Authors: Mehar G Kang, Hong Qian, Kamyar Keramatian, Trisha Chakrabarty, Gayatri Saraf, Raymond W Lam, Hubert Wong, Lakshmi N Yatham
      Abstract: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:Lithium and valproate are commonly used either in monotherapy or in combination with atypical antipsychotics in maintenance treatment of bipolar I disorder; however, their comparative efficacy is not well understood. This study aimed to compare the efficacy of valproate and lithium on mood stability either in monotherapy or in combination with atypical antipsychotics.Methods:We performed a post hoc analysis using data from a 52-week randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, that recruited 159 patients with recently remitted mania during treatment with lithium or valproate and adjunctive atypical antipsychotic therapy. Patients were randomized to discontinue adjunctive atypical antipsychotic at 0, 24 or 52 weeks.Results:No significant differences in efficacy were observed between valproate and lithium (hazard ratio: 0.99; 95% confidence interval: [0.66, 1.48]) in time to any mood event. Valproate with 24 weeks of atypical antipsychotic was significantly superior to valproate monotherapy in preventing any mood relapse (hazard ratio: 0.46; 95% confidence interval: [0.22, 0.97]) while lithium with 24 weeks of atypical antipsychotic was superior to lithium monotherapy in preventing mania (hazard ratio: 0.27; 95% confidence interval: [0.09, 0.85]) but not depression.Conclusion:Overall, this study did not find significant differences in efficacy between the two mood-stabilizing agents when used as monotherapy or in combination with atypical antipsychotics. However, study design and small sample size might have precluded from detecting an effect if true difference in efficacy existed. Further head-to-head investigations with stratified designs are needed to evaluate maintenance therapies.
      Citation: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2019-12-17T01:23:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0004867419894067
       
  • Meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials with N-acetylcysteine in the
           treatment of schizophrenia
    • Authors: Caitlin OB Yolland, Donal Hanratty, Erica Neill, Susan L Rossell, Michael Berk, Olivia M Dean, David J Castle, Eric J Tan, Andrea Phillipou, Anthony WF Harris, Ana Rita Barreiros, Abigail Hansen, Dan Siskind
      Abstract: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:There is accumulating evidence that adjunctive treatment with N-acetylcysteine may be effective for schizophrenia. This study aimed to conduct a comprehensive meta-analysis examining the efficacy of randomised control trials investigating N-acetylcysteine as an adjunct treatment for schizophrenia and the first to investigate cognition as an outcome.Methods:We systematically reviewed Medline, EmCare, PsycINFO, Embase, CINAHL Complete, China Knowledge Resource Integrated Database and the Cochrane Clinical Trials online registry for randomised control trials of N-acetylcysteine for schizophrenia. We undertook pairwise meta-analyses of N-acetylcysteine vs placebo for psychosis symptoms and cognition.Results:Seven studies, including n = 220 receiving N-acetylcysteine and n = 220 receiving placebo, met inclusion criteria for the pairwise meta-analyses. Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale negative and total scores were significantly improved in the N-acetylcysteine group after 24 weeks of treatment. The cognitive domain of working memory improved with N-acetylcysteine supplementation.Conclusion:Evidence supports the notion that N-acetylcysteine may be a useful adjunct to standard treatment for the improvement of schizophrenia symptoms, as well as the cognitive domain of working memory. Treatment effects were observed at the later time point (⩾24 weeks), suggesting that longer interventions are required for the success of N-acetylcysteine treatment.
      Citation: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2019-12-12T06:32:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0004867419893439
       
  • Cerebrospinal fluid neurofilament light chain is elevated in
           Niemann–Pick type C compared to psychiatric disorders and healthy
           controls and may be a marker of treatment response
    • Authors: Dhamidhu Eratne, Samantha M Loi, Qiao-Xin Li, Shiji Varghese, Amelia McGlade, Steven Collins, Colin L Masters, Dennis Velakoulis, Mark Walterfang
      Abstract: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2019-12-11T12:32:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0004867419893431
       
  • Lower plasma vascular endothelial growth factor A in major depressive
           disorder not normalized after antidepressant treatment: A case control
           study
    • Authors: Adrien Rigal, Romain Colle, Khalil El Asmar, Séverine Trabado, Emanuel Loeb, Séverine Martin, Walid Choucha, Florence Gressier, Jean-Francois Costemale-Lacoste, Delphine de Larminat, Eric Deflesselle, Bruno Fève, Philippe Chanson, Laurent Becquemont, Céline Verstuyft, Emmanuelle Corruble
      Abstract: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:Vascular endothelial growth factor A is a growth factor with pro-angiogenic and neurotrophic properties. Anti-vascular endothelial growth factor A treatments, used to treat cancers and opthalmic diseases, are known to induce depressive symptoms. Thus, we hypothesized that vascular endothelial growth factor A plasma levels are low in patients experiencing a major depressive episode in the context of major depressive disorder, which consequently increase after antidepressant treatment. The aim of this study was to compare plasma vascular endothelial growth factor A levels in patients with major depressive episode-major depressive disorder before and after antidepressant treatment.Methods:Vascular endothelial growth factor A fasting plasma levels of 469 major depressive episode-major depressive disorder patients were compared with healthy controls. Depressed patients were assessed for remission after 3 and 6 months of antidepressant treatment. Bivariate and multivariate analyses adjusted for sex, age, body mass index and tobacco use were performed.Results:As compared to healthy controls, major depressive episode patients had lower vascular endothelial growth factor A, 66.0 (38.3) pg/mL (standard deviation) vs 83.2 (49.2) pg/mL, p 
      Citation: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2019-12-11T12:30:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0004867419893433
       
  • Screening for postpartum depression and borderline personality disorder:
           Food for thought
    • Authors: Ester di Giacomo, Fabrizia Colmegna, Antonios Dakanalis, Rodolfo Pessina, Valeria Placenti, Francesca Pescatore, Massimo Clerici
      Abstract: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2019-12-09T05:45:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0004867419893425
       
  • Kava for generalised anxiety disorder: A 16-week double-blind, randomised,
           placebo-controlled study
    • Authors: Jerome Sarris, Gerard J Byrne, Chad A Bousman, Lachlan Cribb, Karen M Savage, Oliver Holmes, Jenifer Murphy, Patricia Macdonald, Anika Short, Sonia Nazareth, Emma Jennings, Stuart R Thomas, Edward Ogden, Suneel Chamoli, Andrew Scholey, Con Stough
      Abstract: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:Previous randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies have shown that Kava (a South Pacific medicinal plant) reduced anxiety during short-term administration. The objective of this randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was to perform a larger, longer-term trial assessing the efficacy and safety of Kava in the treatment of generalised anxiety disorder and to determine whether gamma-aminobutyric acid transporter (SLC6A1) single-nucleotide polymorphisms were moderators of response.Methods:The trial was a phase III, multi-site, two-arm, 16-week, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study investigating an aqueous extract of dried Kava root administered twice per day in tablet form (standardised to 120 mg of kavalactones twice/day) in 171 currently non-medicated anxious participants with diagnosed generalised anxiety disorder. The trial took place in Australia.Results:An analysis of 171 participants revealed a non-significant difference in anxiety reduction between the Kava and placebo groups (a relative reduction favouring placebo of 1.37 points; p = 0.25). At the conclusion of the controlled phase, 17.4% of the Kava group were classified as remitted (Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale score < 7) compared to 23.8% of the placebo group (p = 0.46). No SLC6A1 polymorphisms were associated with treatment response, while carriers of the rs2601126 T allele preferentially respond to placebo (p = 0.006). Kava was well tolerated aside from poorer memory (Kava = 36 vs placebo = 23; p = 0.044) and tremor/shakiness (Kava = 36 vs placebo = 23; p = 0.024) occurring more frequently in the Kava group. Liver function test abnormalities were significantly more frequent in the Kava group, although no participant met criteria for herb-induced hepatic injury.Conclusion:While research has generally supported Kava in non-clinical populations (potentially for more ‘situational’ anxiety as a short-term anxiolytic), this particular extract was not effective for diagnosed generalised anxiety disorder.
      Citation: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2019-12-09T05:39:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0004867419891246
       
  • Amphetamine-type stimulant use in acute psychiatric inpatients with
           delusions
    • Authors: Christine Van Winssen, Emily Walters, Vlasios Brakoulias
      Abstract: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2019-12-09T05:37:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0004867419893447
       
  • Response to: Media depictions of possible suicide contagion among
           celebrities: A cause for concern and potential opportunities for
           prevention – The role of grief
    • Authors: M Monique O’Connor
      Abstract: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2019-12-07T12:22:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0004867419893430
       
  • Response to: Stimulating dangerous argument'
    • Authors: Paul B Fitzgerald, Saxby Pridmore
      Abstract: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2019-12-06T02:07:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0004867419891248
       
  • What the highest rated movie of all time may teach us about portraying
           suicide in film
    • Authors: Mark Sinyor, Steven Stack, Thomas Niederkrotenthaler
      Abstract: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2019-12-03T01:44:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0004867419891247
       
  • Differential biomarker signatures in unipolar and bipolar depression: A
           machine learning approach
    • Authors: Bianca Wollenhaupt-Aguiar, Diego Librenza-Garcia, Giovana Bristot, Laura Przybylski, Laura Stertz, Renan Kubiachi Burque, Keila Mendes Ceresér, Lucas Spanemberg, Marco Antônio Caldieraro, Benicio N Frey, Marcelo P Fleck, Marcia Kauer-Sant’Anna, Ives Cavalcante Passos, Flavio Kapczinski
      Abstract: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:This study used machine learning techniques combined with peripheral biomarker measurements to build signatures to help differentiating (1) patients with bipolar depression from patients with unipolar depression, and (2) patients with bipolar depression or unipolar depression from healthy controls.Methods:We assessed serum levels of interleukin-2, interleukin-4, interleukin-6, interleukin-10, tumor necrosis factor-α, interferon-γ, interleukin-17A, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, lipid peroxidation and oxidative protein damage in 54 outpatients with bipolar depression, 54 outpatients with unipolar depression and 54 healthy controls, matched by sex and age. Depressive symptoms were assessed using the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale. Variable selection was performed with recursive feature elimination with a linear support vector machine kernel, and the leave-one-out cross-validation method was used to test and validate our model.Results:Bipolar vs unipolar depression classification achieved an area under the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve (AUC) of 0.69, with 0.62 sensitivity and 0.66 specificity using three selected biomarkers (interleukin-4, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and interleukin-10). For the comparison of bipolar depression vs healthy controls, the model retained five variables (interleukin-6, interleukin-4, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, carbonyl and interleukin-17A), with an AUC of 0.70, 0.62 sensitivity and 0.7 specificity. Finally, unipolar depression vs healthy controls comparison retained seven variables (interleukin-6, Carbonyl, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, interleukin-10, interleukin-17A, interleukin-4 and tumor necrosis factor-α), with an AUC of 0.74, a sensitivity of 0.68 and 0.70 specificity.Conclusion:Our findings show the potential of machine learning models to aid in clinical practice, leading to more objective assessment. Future studies will examine the possibility of combining peripheral blood biomarker data with other biological data to develop more accurate signatures.
      Citation: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2019-12-02T12:50:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0004867419888027
       
  • Seasonal and temperature effect on serum lithium concentrations
    • Authors: Sonia Cheng, Nicholas A Buckley, William Siu, Angela L Chiew, Elia Vecellio, Betty S Chan
      Abstract: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Lithium remains the gold standard treatment for bipolar disorder. However, it has a very narrow therapeutic index (0.6–0.8 mmol/L). It has been suggested that high environmental temperature can lead to dehydration, elevated plasma lithium concentration and then lithium toxicity.Objectives:We aimed to investigate the effect of seasonal and short-term changes in temperature on serum lithium concentrations in Sydney, Australia.Methods:We retrospectively analysed data from all patients who had serum lithium concentrations taken from the Prince of Wales and Sutherland Hospitals between 2008 and 2018. Temperature data came from the Bureau of Meteorology. We examined correlations between lithium concentrations and the preceding 5 days maximum temperatures, month and season. We also performed a longitudinal analysis of the effect of temperature and seasons within selected patients who had repeated levels.Results:A total of 11,912 serum lithium concentrations from 2493 patients were analysed. There was no significant association between higher lithium concentration and preceding higher temperatures (r = –0.008, p = 0.399). There was also no important seasonal or monthly variation, across all patients or in the smaller cohort with longitudinal data (n = 123, r = 0.008, 95% confidence interval: [–0.04, 0.06]).Conclusion:There were no clinically important differences in serum lithium concentration related to seasons, months or temperatures, which suggests that patients on lithium are able to adequately maintain hydration during hot weather in Sydney.
      Citation: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2019-11-29T11:25:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0004867419889160
       
  • Impact of childhood exogenous hormones on mood
    • Authors: Lana Sturm, Jayashri Kulkarni
      Abstract: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2019-11-29T11:24:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0004867419889407
       
  • Deep brain stimulation removal after successful treatment for heroin
           addiction
    • Authors: Chencheng Zhang, Jun Li, Dianyou Li, Bomin Sun
      Abstract: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2019-11-29T11:23:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0004867419890671
       
  • Temporal effects of bitemporal electroconvulsive therapy
    • Authors: Gordon Parker, Colleen Loo
      Abstract: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2019-11-27T10:29:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0004867419889408
       
  • A tale of two cities: Suicide rates in Sydney and Melbourne are
           consistently lower than the rest of Australia
    • Authors: Stephen Allison, Tarun Bastiampillai, Jeffrey CL Looi, Andrew Tavella
      Abstract: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2019-11-27T10:28:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0004867419889157
       
  • Psilocybin-assisted therapy for depression: How do we advance the
           field'
    • Authors: Sally E Meikle, Paul Liknaitzky, Susan L Rossell, Margaret Ross, Nigel Strauss, Neil Thomas, Greg Murray, Martin Williams, David J Castle
      Abstract: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      In the quest for new treatment options for depression, attention is being paid to the potential role of psychedelic drugs. Psilocybin is of particular interest given its mechanism of action, its benefits in early trials and its relatively low side effects burden. This viewpoint outlines a number of key issues that remain to be elucidated about its potential use in the clinical environment, including clarification of the profile of people most likely to benefit and those who might experience adverse effects, longer-term outcomes and the role of psychotherapeutic input alongside the drug itself. There are also opportunities to understand better, the neurobiology underpinning its effects.
      Citation: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2019-11-22T08:44:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0004867419888575
       
  • Age, sex and period estimates of Australia’s mental health over the
           last 17 years
    • Authors: Richard A Burns, Peter Butterworth, Dimity A Crisp
      Abstract: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:Describing the long-term mental health of Australians is limited as many reports rely on cross-sectional studies which fail to account for within-person changes and age-related developmental processes which may bias estimates which ignore these phenomena. We examined the 17-year trajectories of mental health in 27,519 Australian adults.Methods:Household panel data of 27,519 participants aged 18 years and over from the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia Survey provided at least one observation of mental health over a 17-year period from 2001. On average, participants reported 7.6 observations. Mental Health was assessed annually using the Short-Form Health Survey-36 mental health scale.Results:Over time, there were only very small changes in mental health and only for the youngest and oldest adults. Over time, there was consistent evidence for better metal health with increasing age, although for the very old, there appear to be substantial declines. These patterns were consistent between sex. In line with an existing literature, males reported better mental health over life span, although the declines of mental health in very-late-life are particularly pronounced for males.Conclusion:Decline in mental health was only reported by the youngest and oldest respondents, and was notable only in the last 4–5 years. However, the magnitude of the decline was small and further follow-up will be needed to determine whether this is a trend of substantive declining mental health for these specific age cohorts. In contrast, the more consistent finding is that there has been no substantive change in the level of mental health in Australia over the last 17 years. Analysis of the mental health trajectories of baseline age-cohorts confirmed that age differences are consistent over time.
      Citation: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2019-11-21T10:12:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0004867419888289
       
  • Depression in the medically ill
    • Authors: Joshua D Rosenblat, Paul Kurdyak, Fiammetta Cosci, Michael Berk, Michael Maes, Andre R Brunoni, Madeline Li, Gary Rodin, Roger S McIntyre, Andre F Carvalho
      Abstract: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Depressive disorders are significantly more common in the medically ill compared to the general population. Depression is associated with worsening of physical symptoms, greater healthcare utilization and poorer treatment adherence. The present paper provides a critical review on the assessment and management of depression in the medically ill.Methods:Relevant articles pertaining to depression in the medically ill were identified, reviewed and synthesized qualitatively. A systematic review was not performed due to the large breadth of this topic, making a meaningful summary of all published and unpublished studies not feasible. Notable studies were reviewed and synthesized by a diverse set of experts to provide a balanced summary.Results:Depression is frequently under-recognized in medical settings. Differential diagnoses include delirium, personality disorders and depressive disorders secondary to substances, medications or another medical condition. Depressive symptoms in the context of an adjustment disorder should be initially managed by supportive psychological approaches. Once a mild to moderate major depressive episode is identified, a stepped care approach should be implemented, starting with general psychoeducation, psychosocial interventions and ongoing monitoring. For moderate to severe symptoms, or mild symptoms that are not responding to low-intensity interventions, the use of antidepressants or higher intensity psychotherapeutic interventions should be considered. Psychotherapeutic interventions have demonstrated benefits with small to moderate effect sizes. Antidepressant medications have also demonstrated benefits with moderate effect sizes; however, special caution is needed in evaluating side effects, drug–drug interactions as well as dose adjustments due to impairment in hepatic metabolism and/or renal clearance. Novel interventions for the treatment of depression and other illness-related psychological symptoms (e.g. death anxiety, loss of dignity) are under investigation.Limitations:Non-systematic review of the literature.Conclusion:Replicated evidence has demonstrated a bidirectional interaction between depression and medical illness. Screening and stepped care using pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions is merited.
      Citation: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2019-11-21T10:09:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0004867419888576
       
  • Wnt receptor gene FZD1 was associated with schizophrenia in genome-wide
           SNP analysis of the Australian Schizophrenia Research Bank cohort
    • Authors: Xiaoman Liu, Siew-Kee Low, Joshua R Atkins, Jing Qin Wu, William R Reay, Heath M Cairns, Melissa J Green, Ulrich Schall, Assen Jablensky, Bryan Mowry, Patricia T Michie, Stan V Catts, Frans Henskens, Christos Pantelis, Carmel Loughland, Alan V Boddy, Paul A Tooney, Rodney J Scott, Vaughan J Carr, Murray J Cairns
      Abstract: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Objectives:Large-scale genetic analysis of common variation in schizophrenia has been a powerful approach to understanding this complex but highly heritable psychotic disorder. To further investigate loci, genes and pathways associated more specifically in the well-characterized Australian Schizophrenia Research Bank cohort, we applied genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism analysis in these three annotation categories.Methods:We performed a case–control genome-wide association study in 429 schizophrenia samples and 255 controls. Post-genome-wide association study analyses were then integrated with genomic annotations to explore the enrichment of variation at the gene and pathway level. We also examine candidate single-nucleotide polymorphisms with potential function within expression quantitative trait loci and investigate overall enrichment of variation within tissue-specific functional regulatory domains of the genome.Results:The strongest finding (p = 2.01 × 10−6, odds ratio = 1.82, 95% confidence interval = [1.42, 2.33]) in genome-wide association study was with rs10252923 at 7q21.13, downstream of FZD1 (frizzled class receptor 1). While this did not stand alone after correction, the involvement of FZD1 was supported by gene-based analysis, which exceeded the threshold for genome-wide significance (p = 2.78 × 10−6).Conclusion:The identification of FZD1, as an independent association signal at the gene level, supports the hypothesis that the Wnt signalling pathway is altered in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia and may be an important target for therapeutic development.
      Citation: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2019-11-16T09:48:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0004867419885443
       
  • Improvement in cognitive function in young people with bipolar disorder:
           Results from participants in an 18-month randomised controlled trial of
           adjunctive psychotherapy
    • Authors: Richard J Porter, Maree Inder, Katie M Douglas, Stephanie Moor, Janet D Carter, Christopher MA Frampton, Marie Crowe
      Abstract: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:To examine the effects of 18 months of intensive stabilisation with medication management and Interpersonal and Social Rhythm Therapy or Non-specific Supportive Clinical Management on cognitive function in young people with bipolar disorder. Determinants of change in cognitive function over the 18 months of the trial were also examined.Method:Patients aged 15–36 years with Bipolar I Disorder, Bipolar II Disorder and Bipolar Not Otherwise Specified were recruited. From a battery of cognitive tests, change scores for pre-defined domains of cognitive function were created based on performance at baseline and follow-up. Change was compared between the two therapy groups. Regression analysis was used to determine the impact of a range of clinical variables on change in cognitive performance between baseline and follow-up.Results:One hundred participants were randomised to Interpersonal and Social Rhythm Therapy (n = 49) or Non-specific Supportive Clinical Management (n = 51). Seventy-eight patients underwent cognitive testing at baseline and 18 months. Across both groups, there were significant improvements in a Global Cognitive Composite score, Executive Function and Psychomotor Speed domains from baseline to 18 months. Lower scores at baseline on all domains were associated with greater improvement over 18 months. Overall, there was no difference between therapies in change in cognitive function, either in a global composite score or change in domains.Conclusion:While there was no difference between therapy groups, intensive stabilisation with psychological therapy was associated with improved cognitive function, particularly in those patients with poorer cognitive function at baseline. However, this was not compared with treatment as usual so cannot be attributed necessarily to the therapies.
      Citation: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2019-11-16T09:46:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0004867419887794
       
  • Waiting 40 years for the correct diagnosis: A complex case of comorbid
           narcolepsy and ADHD
    • Authors: David Weiß, Michael Kluge
      Abstract: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2019-11-13T01:08:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0004867419887795
       
  • Human leukocyte antigen-DRB1*04:05 might be associated with the
           development of clozapine-induced agranulocytosis in a Japanese patient
           with schizophrenia
    • Authors: Hirofumi Hirakawa, Takeshi Terao, Masaaki Muronaga, Nobuyoshi Ishii
      Abstract: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2019-11-13T01:07:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0004867419887798
       
  • It could get better: A response to reports of Sexual Minorities’ life
           satisfaction in New Zealand
    • Authors: Anthony Surace, Benjamin C Riordan
      Abstract: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2019-11-13T01:06:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0004867419887801
       
  • Clozapine-related gastrointestinal perforation: four case reports
    • Authors: Nozomi Nakajima, Fuminari Misawa, Yasuo Fujii, Hiroyoshi Takeuchi
      Abstract: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2019-11-13T01:02:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0004867419887231
       
  • teen Mental Health First Aid as a school-based intervention for improving
           peer support of adolescents at risk of suicide: Outcomes from a cluster
           randomised crossover trial
    • Authors: Laura M Hart, Penny Cropper, Amy J Morgan, Claire M Kelly, Anthony F Jorm
      Abstract: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Objectives:The aims of this study were to assess evidence for a novel, universal mental health literacy programme in the school setting (teen Mental Health First Aid) as an intervention to improve peer support towards adolescents at risk of suicide and to examine whether participation in a school-based programme dealing with suicide was distressing to participants.Method:In a cluster randomised crossover trial, Australian high school students aged 15–17 years (N = 1605, 44.74% female, Mage = 15.87) received either teen Mental Health First Aid or a matched control physical first aid course. Data were collected before, immediately after and 12 months after training through online surveys assessing correct recognition of suicidality and intentions to help a fictional peer (John) who was depicted as experiencing depressive symptoms and suicidal thoughts in a vignette. Students were also asked whether any information in the training or surveys was found distressing and completed a validated measure of psychological distress (the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale).Results:Students receiving teen Mental Health First Aid training were much more likely to report an increase from pre- to post-training in recognition of suicidality (OR = 1.97, 95% CI = [1.14, 3.39], p = 0.02) and appropriate first aid intentions towards a peer at risk of suicide than students receiving physical first aid (OR = 35.40, 95% CI = [19.86, 63.14], p 
      Citation: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2019-11-09T12:20:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0004867419885450
       
  • Resting-state functional connectivity of the striatum predicts improvement
           in negative symptoms and general functioning in patients with
           first-episode psychosis: A 1-year naturalistic follow-up study
    • Authors: Sanghoon Oh, Minah Kim, Taekwan Kim, Tae Young Lee, Jun Soo Kwon
      Abstract: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:The persistent disease burden of psychotic disorders often comes from negative symptoms; however, prognostic biomarkers for negative symptoms have not been fully understood. This study investigated whether the altered functional connectivity of the striatum predicts improvement in negative symptoms and functioning after 1 year of usual treatment in patients with first-episode psychosis.Methods:Resting-state functional magnetic imaging was obtained from 40 first-episode psychosis patients and 40 age- and sex-matched healthy control subjects. Whole-brain functional connectivity maps were generated with subdivisions of the striatum as seed regions and compared between first-episode psychosis patients and healthy controls. In 22 patients with first-episode psychosis, follow-up assessments of negative symptom severity and general functional status were conducted after 1 year of usual treatment. Multiple regression analyses were performed to examine factors predictive of symptomatic or functional improvements over the 1-year period.Results:First-episode psychosis patients showed greater functional connectivity between the left dorsal caudate and left primary motor cortex, as well as between the left ventral rostral putamen and right temporal occipital fusiform cortex, than healthy controls. Lower functional connectivity between the right dorsal rostral putamen and anterior cingulate cortex was observed in the first-episode psychosis patients than in healthy controls. In multiple regression analyses, lower functional connectivity of the left dorsal caudate–left primary motor cortex/right dorsal rostral putamen–anterior cingulate cortex predicted improvement in negative symptoms. In addition, lower right dorsal rostral putamen–anterior cingulate cortex functional connectivity predicted improvement in general functioning.Conclusion:These results suggest that altered striatal functional connectivity can be a potent neurobiological marker in the prognosis prediction of first-episode psychosis. Furthermore, altered striatal functional connectivity may provide a potential target in developing treatments for negative symptoms.
      Citation: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2019-11-08T02:01:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0004867419885452
       
  • Cortical thinning in dementia with Lewy bodies and Parkinson disease
           dementia
    • Authors: Sean J Colloby, Rosie Watson, Andrew M Blamire, John T O’Brien, John-Paul Taylor
      Abstract: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Background:We investigated the structural changes associated with Alzheimer’s disease, dementia with Lewy bodies and Parkinson disease dementia by means of cortical thickness analysis.Methods:Two hundred and forty-five participants: 76 Alzheimer’s disease, 65 dementia with Lewy bodies, 29 Parkinson disease dementia and 76 cognitively normal controls underwent 3-T T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and clinical and cognitive assessments. We implemented FreeSurfer to obtain cortical thickness estimates to contrast patterns of cortical thinning across groups and their clinical correlates.Results:In Alzheimer’s disease and dementia with Lewy bodies, a largely similar pattern of regional cortical thinning was observed relative to controls apart from a more severe loss within the entorhinal and parahippocampal structures in Alzheimer’s disease. In Parkinson disease dementia, regional cortical thickness was indistinguishable from controls and dementia with Lewy bodies, suggesting an ‘intermediate’ pattern of regional cortical change. In terms of global cortical thickness, group profiles were controls > Parkinson disease dementia > dementia with Lewy bodies > Alzheimer’s disease (F3, 241 ⩽ 123.2, p 
      Citation: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2019-11-07T12:11:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0004867419885165
       
  • Psychopathological outcomes of adolescent borderline personality disorder
           symptoms
    • Authors: Catherine Winsper, Dieter Wolke, Jan Scott, Carla Sharp, Andrew Thompson, Steven Marwaha
      Abstract: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:Despite considerable morbidity and functional losses associated with adolescent borderline personality disorder, little is known about psychopathological outcomes. This study examined associations between adolescent borderline personality disorder symptoms and subsequent depressive, psychotic and hypomanic symptoms.Methods:We used data from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children. Participants were adolescents living in the community who had data for all longitudinal outcomes (N = 1758). We used logistic regression and path analysis to investigate associations between borderline personality disorder (five or more probable/definite symptoms) reported at age 11–12 years and depressive and psychotic symptoms reported at age 12 and 18, and lifetime hypomanic symptoms reported at age 22–23 years.Results:Adolescent borderline personality disorder symptoms were associated with psychotic symptoms (odds ratio: 2.36, confidence interval: [1.82, 3.06]), diagnosis of depression at age 18 years (odds ratio: 1.30, confidence interval: [1.03, 1.64]) and hypomanic symptoms (odds ratio: 2.89, confidence interval: [2.40, 3.48]) at 22–23 years. Path analysis controlling for associations between all outcomes indicated that borderline personality disorder symptoms were independently associated with depressive symptoms (β = 0.97, p 
      Citation: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2019-10-24T12:39:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0004867419882494
       
  • Validity, functional impairment and complications related to Internet
           gaming disorder in the DSM-5 and gaming disorder in the ICD-11
    • Authors: Chih-Hung Ko, Huang-Chi Lin, Pai-Cheng Lin, Ju-Yu Yen
      Abstract: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Many concerns have been raised regarding the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (5th ed.; DSM-5) criteria for Internet gaming disorder and International Classification of Diseases, 11th Revision (ICD-11) criteria for gaming disorder.Aims:In this study, we demonstrated the diagnostic validity of each criterion for Internet gaming disorder in the DSM-5 in terms of their intensity and frequency thresholds and evaluated functional impairments, unhealthy behaviors and complications among adults with Internet gaming disorder and gaming disorder.Methods:We recruited 69 subjects with Internet gaming disorder, 69 regular gamers and 69 controls without regular gaming based on diagnostic interviewing conducted by a psychiatrist according to the DSM-5 Internet gaming disorder criteria.Results:Except for the ‘deceiving’ and ‘escapism’ criteria, all criteria for Internet gaming disorder had a diagnostic accuracy ranging from 84.7% to 93.5% in differentiating between adults with Internet gaming disorder and regular gamers. A total of 44 participants with Internet gaming disorder (63.8%) fulfilled the gaming disorder criteria. In addition, 89% and 100% of the Internet gaming disorder and gaming disorder groups, respectively, had academic, occupational or social functional impairment. Both the Internet gaming disorder and gaming disorder groups had higher rates of delayed sleep phase syndrome and insomnia. The gaming disorder group also had a higher obesity proportion.Conclusion:The ‘deceiving’ and ‘escapism’ criteria had relatively lower diagnostic accuracy. Both the Internet gaming disorder and gaming disorder groups demonstrated functional impairments and unhealthy behaviors. They also exhibited complications, such as obesity and sleep disorders. These results support the utility of the DSM-5 Internet gaming disorder and ICD-11 gaming disorder criteria in identifying individuals who need treatment for both gaming addiction symptoms and complications resulting from the addiction.
      Citation: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2019-10-21T10:47:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0004867419881499
       
  • Evaluating the differential effectiveness of social influence and
           personality-targeted alcohol prevention on mental health outcomes among
           high-risk youth: A novel cluster randomised controlled factorial design
           trial
    • Authors: Nicola C Newton, Lexine Stapinski, Maree Teesson, Tim Slade, Katrina E Champion, Emma L Barrett, Louise Birrell, Erin Kelly, Marius Mather, Patricia J Conrod
      Abstract: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:This study examined the secondary mental health outcomes of two contrasting alcohol prevention approaches, whereby one intervention targets common underlying personality risk for alcohol use and mental health problems (Preventure) and the other targets alcohol- and drug-related behaviours and cognitions (Climate Schools).Methods:A 2 × 2 cluster randomised controlled factorial design trial was conducted in 26 Australian schools randomised to the following 4 conditions: Climate Schools (n = 6), Preventure (n = 7), combined Climate Schools and Preventure (CAP; n = 6) or treatment as usual (TAU; n = 7). Participants completed questionnaires at baseline, 6, 12, 24 and 36 months post-baseline including the Brief Symptom Inventory anxiety and depression scales and hyperactivity and conduct scales of the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire. Analyses focused on students who were at high-risk based on personality traits (n = 947; Mage = 13.3). The effectiveness of each approach in reducing symptoms of internalising and externalising problems was assessed using multi-level mixed effects analysis.Results:Main effects for each intervention relative to not receiving that intervention revealed significant main effects of Preventure in reducing anxiety symptoms (d = −0.27, 95% confidence interval [CI] = [−0.53, −0.01], p 
      Citation: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2019-09-28T06:48:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0004867419877948
       
  • Clinical subtypes that predict conversion to psychosis: A canonical
           correlation analysis study from the ShangHai At Risk for Psychosis program
           
    • Authors: TianHong Zhang, XiaoChen Tang, HuiJun Li, Kristen A Woodberry, Emily R Kline, LiHua Xu, HuiRu Cui, YingYing Tang, YanYan Wei, ChunBo Li, Li Hui, Margaret A Niznikiewicz, Martha E Shenton, Matcheri S Keshavan, William S Stone, JiJun Wang
      Abstract: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:Since only 30% or fewer of individuals at clinical high risk convert to psychosis within 2 years, efforts are underway to refine risk identification strategies to increase their predictive power. The clinical high risk is a heterogeneous syndrome presenting with highly variable clinical symptoms and cognitive dysfunctions. This study investigated whether subtypes defined by baseline clinical and cognitive features improve the prediction of psychosis.Method:Four hundred clinical high-risk subjects from the ongoing ShangHai At Risk for Psychosis program were enrolled in a prospective cohort study. Canonical correlation analysis was applied to 289 clinical high-risk subjects with completed Structured Interview for Prodromal Syndromes and cognitive battery tests at baseline, and at least 1-year follow-up. Canonical variates were generated by canonical correlation analysis and then used for hierarchical cluster analysis to produce subtypes. Kaplan–Meier survival curves were constructed from the three subtypes to test their utility further in predicting psychosis.Results:Canonical correlation analysis determined two linear combinations: (1) negative symptom and functional deterioration-related cognitive features, and (2) Positive symptoms and emotional disorganization-related cognitive features. Cluster analysis revealed three subtypes defined by distinct and relatively homogeneous patterns along two dimensions, comprising 14.2% (subtype 1, n = 41), 37.4% (subtype 2, n = 108) and 48.4% (subtype 3, n = 140) of the sample, and each with distinctive features of clinical and cognitive performance. Those with subtype 1, which is characterized by extensive negative symptoms and cognitive deficits, appear to have the highest risk for psychosis. The conversion risk for subtypes 1–3 are 39.0%, 11.1% and 18.6%, respectively.Conclusion:Our results define important subtypes within clinical high-risk syndromes that highlight clinical symptoms and cognitive features that transcend current diagnostic boundaries. The three different subtypes reflect significant differences in clinical and cognitive characteristics as well as in the risk of conversion to psychosis.
      Citation: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2019-09-05T12:18:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0004867419872248
       
  • Somatic symptoms: A form of grandiose delusions in manic disorder'
    • Authors: Mary Fang, Jayashri Kulkarni
      Abstract: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2019-08-22T07:19:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0004867419872254
       
  • Passing the baton: Getting to grips with after-hours handovers
    • Authors: Diana McKay
      Abstract: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2019-07-29T09:26:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0004867419865618
       
  • The Sydney Lindt café siege: The role of the consultant psychiatrist
    • Authors: Russ Scott
      Abstract: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Background:In December 2014, after a 16-hour siege of the Lindt café in Sydney, Iranian-born gunman Man Haron Monis shot dead a hostage precipitating the police action which broke the siege.Objective:This paper reviews the demographic and other factual details of Monis as documented by the NSW Coroner’s Inquest and critically analyses the published findings of the Coroner particularly in relation to the role of the psychiatrist who advised senior police and negotiators during the siege.Results:At the time of the siege, there was no formal protocol that delineated the role of a psychiatrist in hostage negotiations. Despite the psychiatrist’s credentials including his extensive experience with siege-hostage incidents and his counter-terrorist training, the Coroner was unfairly critical of the psychiatrist.Conclusion:The Coroner’s censure of the psychiatrist was clearly prejudiced by hindsight bias. During the siege, the psychiatrist properly considered and evaluated all the available intelligence and other information known about the gunman. As the psychiatrist advised, Monis was a narcissist and the siege was not an Islamic State-inspired terrorist attack. Given that he announced he was armed with a bomb, Monis represented a ‘credible threat’ to the hostages. The psychiatrist’s endorsement of the police strategy to ‘contain and negotiate’ was prudent in the circumstances. The Coroner’s disparagement of the senior psychiatrist may have the unintended consequence that psychiatrists may be reluctant to assist in hostage-sieges or other critical incidents.
      Citation: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2019-06-13T08:38:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0004867419853886
       
  • Machine learning probability calibration for high-risk clinical
           decision-making
    • Authors: Micah Cearns, Tim Hahn, Scott Clark, Bernhard T Baune
      First page: 123
      Abstract: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2019-11-09T12:07:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0004867419885448
       
  • Criticising psychiatry is still not ‘anti-psychiatry’
    • Authors: Niall McLaren
      First page: 130
      Abstract: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2019-11-13T01:07:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0004867419887797
       
  • Is haematological monitoring actually needed with clozapine treatment'
    • Authors: Olav Nielssen
      First page: 132
      Abstract: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2019-06-18T12:05:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0004867419856693
       
  • Who controls your future: The convention on the rights of persons with
           disabilities from a service user focused perspective
    • Authors: Giles Newton-Howes, Sarah Gordon
      First page: 134
      Abstract: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Although notions of personal autonomy are increasingly enshrined as the primary principle of ethical medical practice, psychiatry appears to have real difficulty in applying this. Notions such as compulsory treatment and mental health legislation serve to reinforce paternalism. This may not be in the interests of either the patient or the doctor. The Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), although providing no new rights to mental health patients, has led to guidance as to what existing rights entail and how they should be applied. While service users were involved in the drafting of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, what is lacking is service user focused perspectives in the critique and debate that has ensued in response to the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities committee’s informed guidance as to the correct interpretation of the rights. Furthermore, consideration of how to translate the rights into practice is also lacking. This co-produced viewpoint aims to contribute to this debate and provides a brief overview of a novel educational approach to translating the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities committee’s guidance into clinical practice.
      Citation: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2019-12-11T12:30:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0004867419893443
       
  • Trust and the city: Linking urban upbringing to neural mechanisms of trust
           in psychosis

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Authors: Imke LJ Lemmers-Jansen, Anne-Kathrin J Fett, Jim van Os, Dick J Veltman, Lydia Krabbendam
      First page: 138
      Abstract: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:Elevated prevalence of non-affective psychotic disorders is often found in densely populated areas. This functional magnetic resonance imaging study investigates if reduced trust, a component of impaired social functioning in patients with psychotic disorder, is associated with urban upbringing.Methods:In total, 39 patients (22 first episode and 17 clinical high risk) and 30 healthy controls, aged 16–29, performed two multi-round trust games, with a cooperative and unfair partner during functional magnetic resonance imaging scanning. Baseline trust was operationalized as the first investment made, and changes of trust as changes in investments made over the 20 trials during the games. Urban exposure during upbringing (0–15 years) was defined as higher urban (≥2500 inhabitants/km2) or lower urban (
      Citation: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2019-08-14T08:20:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0004867419865939
       
  • Epidemiological characteristics of subsyndromal depression in late life
    • Authors: Dae Jong Oh, Ji Won Han, Tae Hui Kim, Kyung Phil Kwak, Bong Jo Kim, Shin Gyeom Kim, Jeong Lan Kim, Seok Woo Moon, Joon Hyuk Park, Seung-Ho Ryu, Jong Chul Youn, Dong Young Lee, Dong Woo Lee, Seok Bum Lee, Jung Jae Lee, Jin Hyeong Jhoo, Ki Woong Kim
      First page: 150
      Abstract: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Objectives:Subsyndromal depression is prevalent and associated with poor outcomes in late life, but its epidemiological characteristics have barely been investigated. The aim of this prospective cohort study is to compare the prevalence, incidence and risk factors of subsyndromal depression with those of syndromal depression including major and minor depressive disorders in community-dwelling elderly individuals.Methods:In a nationwide community-based study of randomly sampled Korean elderly population aged 60 years or older (N = 6640), depression was assessed with standardized diagnostic interviews. At baseline and at 2-year and 4-year follow-ups, the authors diagnosed subsyndromal depression by the operational criteria and syndromal depression by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed.) diagnostic criteria. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted to identify the risk factors for incident depression.Results:The age- and gender-adjusted prevalence rate of subsyndromal depression was 9.24% (95% confidence interval = [8.54, 9.93]), which was 2.4-fold higher than that of syndromal depression. The incidence rate of subsyndromal depression was 21.70 per 1000 person-years (95% confidence interval = [19.29, 24.12]), which was fivefold higher than that of syndromal depression. The prevalence to incidence ratio of subsyndromal depression was about half that of syndromal depression. The risk for subsyndromal depression was associated with female gender, low socioeconomic status, poor social support and poor sleep quality, while that of syndromal depression was associated with old age and less exercise.Conclusion:Subsyndromal depression should be validated as a clinical diagnostic entity, at least in late life, since it has epidemiological characteristics different from those of syndromal depression.
      Citation: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2019-10-09T09:05:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0004867419879242
       
  • Diet quality, dietary inflammatory index and body mass index as predictors
           of response to adjunctive N-acetylcysteine and mitochondrial agents in
           adults with bipolar disorder: A sub-study of a randomised
           placebo-controlled trial
    • Authors: Melanie M Ashton, Olivia M Dean, Wolfgang Marx, Mohammadreza Mohebbi, Michael Berk, Gin S Malhi, Chee H Ng, Sue M Cotton, Seetal Dodd, Jerome Sarris, Malcolm Hopwood, Keshav Faye-Chauhan, Yesul Kim, Sarah R Dash, Felice N Jacka, Nitin Shivappa, James R Hebert, Alyna Turner
      First page: 159
      Abstract: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Aims:We aimed to explore the relationships between diet quality, dietary inflammatory potential or body mass index and outcomes of a clinical trial of nutraceutical treatment for bipolar depression.Methods:This is a sub-study of a randomised controlled trial of participants with bipolar depression who provided dietary intake data (n = 133). Participants received 16 weeks adjunctive treatment of either placebo or N-acetylcysteine-alone or a combination of mitochondrial-enhancing nutraceuticals including N-acetylcysteine (combination treatment). Participants were followed up 4 weeks post-treatment discontinuation (Week 20). Diet was assessed by the Cancer Council Victoria Dietary Questionnaire for Epidemiological Studies, Version 2, converted into an Australian Recommended Food Score to measure diet quality, and energy-adjusted dietary inflammatory index score to measure inflammatory potential of diet. Body mass index was also measured. Generalised estimating equation models were used to assess whether diet quality, energy-adjusted dietary inflammatory index score and/or body mass index were predictors of response to significant outcomes of the primary trial: depression symptoms, clinician-rated improvement and functioning measures.Results:In participants taking combination treatment compared to placebo, change in depression scores was not predicted by Australian Recommended Food Score, dietary inflammatory index or body mass index scores. However, participants with better diet quality (Australian Recommended Food Score) reported reduced general depression and bipolar depression symptoms (p = 0.01 and p = 0.03, respectively) and greater clinician-rated improvement (p = 0.02) irrespective of treatment and time. Participants who had a more anti-inflammatory dietary inflammatory index had less impairment in functioning (p = 0.01). Combination treatment may attenuate the adverse effects of pro-inflammatory diet (p = 0.03) on functioning. Participants with lower body mass index who received combination treatment (p = 0.02) or N-acetylcysteine (p = 0.02) showed greater clinician-rated improvement.Conclusion:These data support a possible association between diet (quality and inflammatory potential), body mass index and response to treatment for bipolar depression in the context of a nutraceutical trial. The results should be interpreted cautiously because of limitations, including numerous null findings, modest sample size and being secondary analyses.
      Citation: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2019-10-30T06:00:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0004867419882497
       
  • A clinical staging approach to improving diagnostics in anxiety disorders:
           Is it the way to go'
    • Authors: Wicher A Bokma, Neeltje M Batelaan, Adriaan W Hoogendoorn, Brenda WJH Penninx, Anton JLM van Balkom
      First page: 173
      Abstract: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Clinical staging is a paradigm in which stages of disease progression are identified; these, in turn, have prognostic value. A staging model that enables the prediction of long-term course in anxiety disorders is currently unavailable but much needed as course trajectories are highly heterogenic. This study therefore tailored a heuristic staging model to anxiety disorders and assessed its validity.Methods:A clinical staging model was tailored to anxiety disorders, distinguishing nine stages of disease progression varying from subclinical stages (0, 1A, 1B) to clinical stages (2A–4B). At-risk subjects and subjects with anxiety disorders (n = 2352) from the longitudinal Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety were assigned to these nine stages. The model’s validity was assessed by comparing baseline (construct validity) and 2-year, 4-year and 6-year follow-up (predictive validity) differences in anxiety severity measures across stages. Differences in depression severity and disability were assessed as secondary outcome measures.Results:Results showed that the anxiety disorder staging model has construct and predictive validity. At baseline, differences in anxiety severity, social avoidance behaviors, agoraphobic avoidance behaviors, worrying, depressive symptoms and levels of disability existed across all stages (all p-values 
      Citation: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2019-12-03T01:42:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0004867419887804
       
  • The impact of childhood trauma on psychosocial functioning and physical
           health in a non-clinical community sample of young adults
    • Authors: Jessica Elise Beilharz, Marlee Paterson, Scott Fatt, Chloe Wilson, Alexander Burton, Erin Cvejic, Andrew Lloyd, Uté Vollmer-Conna
      First page: 185
      Abstract: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:Given the fundamental emotional, social and physical development that occurs during the early years of life, childhood experiences are formative in shaping a person’s life trajectory. Childhood trauma is a prevalent, multifaceted issue with well-documented long-term adverse health effects in clinical populations however; the impact of childhood trauma in the community is less clear. To address this, this study investigated how childhood trauma may impact physical and psychological health, sleep quality and autonomic function in a non-clinical community sample of adults.Method:Participants completed questionnaires, an in-laboratory autonomic assessment (including stress reactivity to mental and physical stressors) and overnight autonomic and sleep monitoring. Overall childhood trauma and its subtypes (e.g. physical abuse, emotional neglect) were defined using the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire.Results:We identified 22 childhood trauma cases (total score > 36) and, of the 89 non-childhood trauma cases, some individuals also experienced significant levels of trauma in one or more of the childhood trauma subtypes. Childhood trauma and some trauma subtypes were significantly correlated with a myriad of negative physiological and physical health outcomes including elevated psychological distress, increased sleep disturbances, reduced emotional wellbeing and lower perceived social support. Autonomic dysregulation was found in those with high levels of childhood trauma, which was reflected in an increased stress response to laboratory tasks. Notably, the experience of physical abuse in childhood was significantly associated with alterations in nocturnal heart rate and heart rate variability.Conclusion:Together, these results highlight that childhood trauma can have lasting detrimental consequences on an individual’s emotional and physical health, sleep quality and stress reactivity.
      Citation: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2019-10-21T10:53:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0004867419881206
       
  • Comparison of homeless clinic attenders with and without psychotic illness
    • Authors: Olav Nielssen, Naidene Jones, Hayden Foung, Amelia Nielssen, Lauren Staples, Matthew Large
      First page: 195
      Abstract: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Aim:To compare the characteristics of clinic attenders in inner city homeless hostels with and without a diagnosed psychotic illness.Method:A cross-sectional study of homeless people attending psychiatric clinics in three inner city homeless hostels over a period of 8 years. The demographic characteristics, comorbid conditions, pathway to homelessness and pattern of homelessness of clinic attenders with a diagnosis of psychosis were compared with those who were not known to have psychotic illness.Results:2389 homeless people attended one or more of the clinics in the 8 years of the study, of whom 1222 (51.2%) had a diagnosed psychotic illness, mostly schizophrenia. Those with psychosis were less likely to have been married (23.2% vs 45.5%), were less likely to have worked for more than a year (47.4% vs 74%) and were more likely to have been discharged from hospital to homelessness, to receive the Disability Support Pension (72.2% vs 38.3%), or be under financial management orders (12.0% vs 2.6%). Homeless people with psychosis were also more likely to have been homeless for more than a year, sleep in the open, and were less likely to have a current substance use disorder, problem gambling or a history of early life or recent trauma. A high proportion of those with psychosis (29.5%) had been released from prison to homelessness and a surprising number (22%) reported the loss of public housing tenancy.Conclusion:The results demonstrate the homeless with psychotic illness are particularly disabled and disadvantaged, often have multiple comorbid conditions, and many have been unable to maintain public housing tenancy. The inability of many of the homeless mentally ill to maintain public housing tenancy suggests the need for more supported housing to help the chronically homeless with psychotic illness maintain tenancy.
      Citation: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2019-12-11T12:33:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0004867419893426
       
  • A biopsychosocial proposal to progress the field of anorexia nervosa
    • Authors: Janice Russell
      First page: 202
      Abstract: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2019-11-19T06:13:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0004867419887792
       
  • Identifying the barriers to implementing cognitive remediation therapy for
           mood disorders
    • Authors: Susan Lee Rossell
      First page: 203
      Abstract: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2019-11-13T01:03:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0004867419887233
       
  • Pareto’s law of the vital few: Patient requirements for hospital
           based non-acute care
    • Authors: Stephen Allison, Tarun Bastiampillai, Jeffrey CL Looi, David Copolov
      First page: 205
      Abstract: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2019-11-21T10:07:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0004867419889147
       
  • Ketamine and esketamine for suicidal ideation: Recent progress and
           practical issues
    • Authors: Francesco Bartoli, Samuel T Wlkinson
      First page: 206
      Abstract: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2019-12-13T06:11:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0004867419894064
       
  • Encounter mental health in Tuvalu: The prior study
    • Authors: Chun-Ya Kuo
      First page: 208
      Abstract: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2019-09-09T06:47:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0004867419872804
       
  • Science needs better reporting to improve translational mental health
           research
    • Authors: Helen M Stallman
      First page: 209
      Abstract: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2019-09-19T06:27:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0004867419876693
       
  • Benign ethnic neutropenia and clozapine treatment protocol in Australia
    • Authors: Srinivasan Tirupati, Omkar Nagesh, Sachal Gulati
      First page: 210
      Abstract: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2019-10-21T10:46:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0004867419883024
       
  • Having schizophrenia is not being ‘schizophrenic’: Your words
           matter
    • Authors: Eric J Tan
      First page: 210
      Abstract: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2019-09-25T09:10:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0004867419877958
       
 
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