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Publisher: Sage Publications   (Total: 1074 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 1074 Journals sorted alphabetically
AADE in Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Abstracts in Anthropology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Academic Pathology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Accounting History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.527, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Radiologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.754, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Radiologica Open     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Acta Sociologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36, SJR: 0.939, CiteScore: 2)
Action Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48, SJR: 0.308, CiteScore: 1)
Active Learning in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 320, SJR: 1.397, CiteScore: 2)
Adaptive Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.288, CiteScore: 1)
Administration & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.675, CiteScore: 1)
Adoption & Fostering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.313, CiteScore: 0)
Adsorption Science & Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.258, CiteScore: 1)
Adult Education Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 192, SJR: 0.566, CiteScore: 2)
Adult Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Advances in Dental Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.791, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Developing Human Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29, SJR: 0.614, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Mechanical Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 131, SJR: 0.272, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Methods and Practices in Psychological Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Structural Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 46, SJR: 0.599, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Tumor Virology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.108, CiteScore: 0)
AERA Open     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Affilia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.496, CiteScore: 1)
Agrarian South : J. of Political Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Air, Soil & Water Research     Open Access   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.214, CiteScore: 1)
Alexandria : The J. of National and Intl. Library and Information Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 63)
AlterNative : An Intl. J. of Indigenous Peoples     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.194, CiteScore: 0)
Alternative Law J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.176, CiteScore: 0)
Alternatives : Global, Local, Political     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.351, CiteScore: 1)
American Behavioral Scientist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.982, CiteScore: 2)
American Economist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
American Educational Research J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 191, SJR: 2.913, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.67, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Cosmetic Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
American J. of Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.646, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Health Promotion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 0.807, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Hospice and Palliative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40, SJR: 0.65, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Law & Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.204, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Lifestyle Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.431, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Medical Quality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.777, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Men's Health     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.595, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Rhinology and Allergy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.972, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Sports Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 181, SJR: 3.949, CiteScore: 6)
American Politics Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 1.313, CiteScore: 1)
American Review of Public Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 2.062, CiteScore: 2)
American Sociological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 288, SJR: 6.333, CiteScore: 6)
American String Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Analytical Chemistry Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.224, CiteScore: 1)
Angiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.849, CiteScore: 2)
Animation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.197, CiteScore: 0)
Annals of Clinical Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.634, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Otology, Rhinology & Laryngology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.807, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Pharmacotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50, SJR: 1.096, CiteScore: 2)
Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46, SJR: 1.225, CiteScore: 3)
Annals of the ICRP     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.548, CiteScore: 1)
Anthropocene Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 3.341, CiteScore: 7)
Anthropological Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41, SJR: 0.739, CiteScore: 1)
Antitrust Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Antiviral Chemistry and Chemotherapy     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.635, CiteScore: 2)
Antyajaa : Indian J. of Women and Social Change     Hybrid Journal  
Applied Biosafety     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.131, CiteScore: 0)
Applied Psychological Measurement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 1.17, CiteScore: 1)
Applied Spectroscopy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.489, CiteScore: 2)
Armed Forces & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.29, CiteScore: 1)
Arts and Humanities in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38, SJR: 0.305, CiteScore: 1)
Asia Pacific Media Educator     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.23, CiteScore: 0)
Asia-Pacific J. of Management Research and Innovation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Asia-Pacific J. of Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.558, CiteScore: 1)
Asian and Pacific Migration J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 91, SJR: 0.324, CiteScore: 1)
Asian Cardiovascular and Thoracic Annals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.305, CiteScore: 0)
Asian J. of Comparative Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Asian J. of Legal Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Asian J. of Management Cases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
ASN Neuro     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.534, CiteScore: 3)
Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.519, CiteScore: 3)
Assessment for Effective Intervention     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.578, CiteScore: 1)
Australasian Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.433, CiteScore: 1)
Australian & New Zealand J. of Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 1.801, CiteScore: 2)
Australian and New Zealand J. of Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 520, SJR: 0.612, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Career Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Australian J. of Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41, SJR: 0.403, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.497, CiteScore: 1)
Autism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 303, SJR: 1.739, CiteScore: 4)
Autism & Developmental Language Impairments     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Behavior Modification     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.877, CiteScore: 2)
Behavioral and Cognitive Neuroscience Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Bible Translator     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Biblical Theology Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.184, CiteScore: 0)
Big Data & Society     Open Access   (Followers: 47)
Biochemistry Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Bioinformatics and Biology Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.141, CiteScore: 2)
Biological Research for Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.685, CiteScore: 2)
Biomarker Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.81, CiteScore: 2)
Biomarkers in Cancer     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Biomedical Engineering and Computational Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Biomedical Informatics Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Bioscope: South Asian Screen Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.235, CiteScore: 0)
BMS: Bulletin of Sociological Methodology/Bulletin de Méthodologie Sociologique     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.226, CiteScore: 0)
Body & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 1.531, CiteScore: 3)
Bone and Tissue Regeneration Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Breast Cancer : Basic and Clinical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.823, CiteScore: 2)
British J. of Music Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
British J. of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 169, SJR: 0.323, CiteScore: 1)
British J. of Pain     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.579, CiteScore: 2)
British J. of Politics and Intl. Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31, SJR: 0.91, CiteScore: 2)
British J. of Visual Impairment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.337, CiteScore: 1)
British J.ism Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Building Acoustics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.215, CiteScore: 1)
Building Services Engineering Research & Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.583, CiteScore: 1)
Bulletin of Science, Technology & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Business & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Business and Professional Communication Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.348, CiteScore: 1)
Business Information Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.279, CiteScore: 0)
Business Perspectives and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Cahiers Élisabéthains     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.111, CiteScore: 0)
Calcutta Statistical Association Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription  
California Management Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 2.209, CiteScore: 4)
Canadian J. of Kidney Health and Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.007, CiteScore: 2)
Canadian J. of Nursing Research (CJNR)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Canadian J. of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 121, SJR: 0.626, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian J. of Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 1.769, CiteScore: 3)
Canadian J. of School Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.266, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian Pharmacists J. / Revue des Pharmaciens du Canada     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.536, CiteScore: 1)
Cancer Growth and Metastasis     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Informatics     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.64, CiteScore: 1)
Capital and Class     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.282, CiteScore: 1)
Cardiac Cath Lab Director     Full-text available via subscription  
Cardiovascular and Thoracic Open     Open Access  
Career Development and Transition for Exceptional Individuals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.44, CiteScore: 1)
Cartilage     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.889, CiteScore: 3)
Cell and Tissue Transplantation and Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cell Transplantation     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.023, CiteScore: 3)
Cephalalgia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 1.581, CiteScore: 3)
Child Language Teaching and Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31, SJR: 0.501, CiteScore: 1)
Child Maltreatment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.22, CiteScore: 3)
Child Neurology Open     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Childhood     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.894, CiteScore: 2)
Childhood Obesity and Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
China Information     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.767, CiteScore: 2)
China Report     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.221, CiteScore: 0)
Chinese J. of Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Christianity & Literature     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Chronic Illness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.672, CiteScore: 2)
Chronic Respiratory Disease     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.808, CiteScore: 2)
Chronic Stress     Open Access  
Citizenship, Social and Economics Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.145, CiteScore: 0)
Cleft Palate-Craniofacial J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.757, CiteScore: 1)
Clin-Alert     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis     Open Access   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.49, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Case Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.364, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43, SJR: 0.73, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical EEG and Neuroscience     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.552, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.296, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Arthritis and Musculoskeletal Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.537, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Blood Disorders     Open Access   (SJR: 0.314, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.686, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.283, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Circulatory, Respiratory and Pulmonary Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.425, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Ear, Nose and Throat     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Endocrinology and Diabetes     Open Access   (Followers: 32, SJR: 0.63, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Gastroenterology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.775, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.129, CiteScore: 3)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Pediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Reproductive Health     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.776, CiteScore: 0)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Therapeutics     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.172, CiteScore: 0)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Trauma and Intensive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Women's Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Clinical Nursing Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31, SJR: 0.471, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Pathology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Clinical Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.487, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Psychological Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 3.281, CiteScore: 5)
Clinical Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 68, SJR: 1.322, CiteScore: 3)
Clinical Risk     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.133, CiteScore: 0)
Clinical Trials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 2.399, CiteScore: 2)
Clothing and Textiles Research J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.36, CiteScore: 1)
Common Law World Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Communication & Sport     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.385, CiteScore: 1)
Communication and the Public     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Communication Disorders Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.458, CiteScore: 1)
Communication Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 2.171, CiteScore: 3)
Community College Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.451, CiteScore: 1)
Comparative Political Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 212, SJR: 3.772, CiteScore: 3)
Compensation & Benefits Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Competition & Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.843, CiteScore: 2)
Competition and Regulation in Network Industries     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.143, CiteScore: 0)
Concurrent Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.642, CiteScore: 2)
Conflict Management and Peace Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33, SJR: 2.441, CiteScore: 1)
Contemporary Drug Problems     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.609, CiteScore: 2)
Contemporary Education Dialogue     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.102, CiteScore: 0)
Contemporary Issues in Early Childhood     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.766, CiteScore: 1)
Contemporary Review of the Middle East     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Contemporary Sociology : A J. of Reviews     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 34, SJR: 0.195, CiteScore: 0)
Contemporary Voice of Dalit     Full-text available via subscription  
Contexts     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Contributions to Indian Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.376, CiteScore: 0)
Convergence The Intl. J. of Research into New Media Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50, SJR: 0.521, CiteScore: 1)
Cooperation and Conflict     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.945, CiteScore: 2)
Cornell Hospitality Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.198, CiteScore: 2)

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.225
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 46  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0002-7162 - ISSN (Online) 1552-3349
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1074 journals]
  • Debacles on the Border: Five Decades of Fact-Free Immigration Policy
    • Authors: Jorge Durand, Douglas S. Massey
      Pages: 6 - 20
      Abstract: The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, Volume 684, Issue 1, Page 6-20, July 2019.
      Since 1987, the Mexican Migration Project (MMP) has compiled extensive data on the characteristics and behavior of documented and undocumented migrants to the United States, and made them publicly available to users to test theories of international migration and evaluate U.S. immigration and border policies. Findings based on these data have been plentiful, but have also routinely been ignored by political leaders, who instead continue to pursue policies with widely documented, counterproductive effects. In this article, we review prior studies based on MMP data to document these effects. We also use official statistics to document circumstances on the border today, and draw on articles in this volume to underscore the huge gap between U.S. policies and the realities of immigration. Despite that net positive undocumented Mexican migration to the United States ended more than a decade ago, the Trump administration continues to demand the construction of a border wall and persists in treating Central American arrivals as criminals rather than asylum seekers, thus transforming what is essentially a humanitarian problem into an immigration crisis.
      Citation: The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science
      PubDate: 2019-07-08T09:42:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0002716219857647
       
  • Evolution of the Mexico-U.S. Migration System: Insights from the Mexican
           Migration Project
    • Authors: Jorge Durand, Douglas S. Massey
      Pages: 21 - 42
      Abstract: The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, Volume 684, Issue 1, Page 21-42, July 2019.
      Since 1987, the Mexican Migration Project (MMP) has collected and disseminated representative survey data on documented and undocumented migration to the United States. The MMP currently includes surveys of 161 communities, which together contain data on 27,113 households and 169,945 individuals, 26,446 of whom have U.S. migratory experience. These data are used here to trace the evolution of the Mexico-U.S. migration system from the late nineteenth to the early twenty-first century, revealing how shifts in U.S. immigration and border policies have been critical to the formation of different eras of migration characterized by distinctive patterns of migration, settlement, and return in different legal statuses. The current era is characterized by the repression of the large population of undocumented migrants and their U.S. citizen children by an ongoing regime of mass detention and deportation and the simultaneous recruitment of Mexican workers for exploitation on short-term temporary visas. As the dynamics of Mexican migration to the United States continue to change, they will be monitored and analyzed in subsequent waves of data collection by the MMP.
      Citation: The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science
      PubDate: 2019-07-08T09:42:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0002716219857667
       
  • Mexico-U.S. Migration and the Nation-State: A Transnational Perspective on
           Transformations since 1990
    • Authors: Judith A. Boruchoff
      Pages: 43 - 59
      Abstract: The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, Volume 684, Issue 1, Page 43-59, July 2019.
      This article examines Mexico-U.S. migration from a transnational perspective, explaining the implications of cross-border ties for the nation-state. It builds on 30 years of original research in Mexico and the United States, and contributions of the Mexican Migration Project and other research that show that conventional understandings of the nation-state have become inadequate. Focusing on relations between migrants and the Mexican government as well as their struggles for inclusion in the United States, it demonstrates how each nation-state is transformed as migrants maintain attachments and participate simultaneously in countries of origin and destination. It advances scholarship on this topic by specifying how, in each case, the connections among territory, state, and nation are changing in distinct ways. In the case of Mexico, the state framework is extended beyond geographical borders to encompass extraterritorial citizens within the nation. In the United States, a disjuncture between state and nation is emerging within the bounds of the national territory.
      Citation: The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science
      PubDate: 2019-07-08T09:42:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0002716219856584
       
  • Mexico-U.S. Migration in Time: From Economic to Social Mechanisms
    • Authors: Asad L. Asad, Filiz Garip
      Pages: 60 - 84
      Abstract: The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, Volume 684, Issue 1, Page 60-84, July 2019.
      This article adopts a mixed-methods approach to illustrate how economic, political, and social mechanisms work across time to shape individuals’ migration decisions. First, using large-scale survey data from the Mexican Migration Project, we show that economic, political, and social factors all matter for migration decisions but that social factors come to matter most for migration over time. Second, drawing on 120 in-depth interviews with migrants and their family members in four Mexican communities, we find that communities’ migration histories shape how economic, political, and social factors contribute to migration decisions at different points in time. In communities with limited migration histories, individuals migrate to relieve economic pressures on themselves or other household members. In communities with more established migration histories, information and assistance from current or returned migrants help to overcome potential barriers to making the journey. Finally, in communities with a high incidence of migration, social factors act as independent causes of migration—apart from economic needs. These findings provide a deeper understanding of the processes underlying Mexico-U.S. migration, which is crucial for anticipating future flows and crafting policy responses.
      Citation: The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science
      PubDate: 2019-07-08T09:42:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0002716219847148
       
  • Mexican Migrant Integration in the United States, 1965–2015
    • Authors: David P. Lindstrom
      Pages: 85 - 104
      Abstract: The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, Volume 684, Issue 1, Page 85-104, July 2019.
      This article uses 20 years of survey data from the Mexican Migration Project to describe how the experiences of Mexico-U.S. migrants have changed over time. I use survey questions about migrants’ experiences on their last U.S. trip to develop composite indices of six integration domains, and then estimate random intercept linear regression models with individual-, family-, and community-level characteristics to explain variations in Mexican migrant integration. I find that, over time, Mexican migrant linguistic and social integration has steadily increased, whereas integration in other family and economic domains changed little or not at all. Results from the multivariate models show the importance of human capital to integration across the multiple domains. Higher education, more time spent in the country of destination, and being male are all strongly associated with higher levels of integration. I also find evidence that both family and community migration networks facilitate integration.
      Citation: The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science
      PubDate: 2019-07-08T09:42:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0002716219856878
       
  • English Proficiency and Trust Networks among Undocumented Mexican Migrants
    • Authors: Nadia Y. Flores-Yeffal
      Pages: 105 - 119
      Abstract: The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, Volume 684, Issue 1, Page 105-119, July 2019.
      This study explores whether being a member of a migration-trust network (MTN; social structures that immigrants create to manage the challenges of undocumented status) affects the acquisition of English language proficiency among undocumented heads of household who migrate to the United States from Mexico. The analysis shows that human capital accumulation and interactions with non-Hispanic white Americans are important to learning English in this migrant population. But it also suggests that membership in an MTN can inhibit the acquisition of English language proficiency. I use Mexican Migration Project data and other accumulated research to argue that being undocumented and participating in MTNs can deter migrants from assimilating into American mainstream society: a lack of legal status among many first-generation Mexican immigrants pushes them toward survival strategies that rely on MTNs.
      Citation: The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science
      PubDate: 2019-07-08T09:42:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0002716219855024
       
  • Migration to the United States from Indigenous Communities in Mexico
    • Authors: Asad L. Asad, Jackelyn Hwang
      Pages: 120 - 145
      Abstract: The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, Volume 684, Issue 1, Page 120-145, July 2019.
      Research on Mexican migration to the United States has long noted how the characteristics of sending communities structure individuals’ opportunities for international movement. This literature has seldom considered the concentration of indigenous residents (those with origins in pre-Hispanic populations) in migrant-sending communities. Drawing on data from 143 communities surveyed by the Mexican Migration Project, and supplemented with data from the Mexican Census, this article uses multilevel models to describe how the share of indigenous residents in a migrant-sending community relates to different aspects of the migratory process. We focus on (1) the decision to migrate to the United States, and (2) the documentation used on migrants’ first U.S. trip. We do not find that the concentration of indigenous residents in a sending community is associated with the decision to migrate to the United States. However, we do find that people in communities with relatively high indigenous populations are more likely to migrate as undocumented rather than documented migrants. We conclude that the concentration of indigenous peoples in communities likely indicates economic and social disadvantage, which limits the residents’ possibilities for international movement.
      Citation: The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science
      PubDate: 2019-07-08T09:42:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0002716219848342
       
  • Who Goes Next' The Gendered Expansion of Mexican and Senegalese
           Migrant Sibling Networks in Space and Time
    • Authors: Fernando Riosmena, Mao-Mei Liu
      Pages: 146 - 164
      Abstract: The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, Volume 684, Issue 1, Page 146-164, July 2019.
      The migration literature shows that individuals whose siblings have migrated abroad are more likely to migrate, yet we know little about sibling migrant networks. We use MMP and MAFE-Senegal survey data to compare migration patterns in two very disparate contexts (Mexico and Senegal) in an attempt to assess the scope, manner, and generalizability of sibling network migration patterns. Our results show that while Senegalese families are likely to have one international migrant, Mexican families are likely to send two or more members abroad. Sibling migrations from Mexico fall closer together in time than do those from Senegal, suggesting joint sibling migration. Also, while Mexican sibling networks did not seem to contribute to the expansion of Mexican migrant destinations, Senegalese sibling networks did contribute (slightly) to the expansion of Senegalese migration. Sibling networks in both settings contributed considerably to the feminization of migration.
      Citation: The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science
      PubDate: 2019-07-08T09:42:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0002716219856544
       
  • Gender and Health in Mexico: Differences between Returned Migrants and
           Nonmigrants
    • Authors: Katharine M. Donato, Erin R. Hamilton, Anthony Bernard-Sasges
      Pages: 165 - 187
      Abstract: The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, Volume 684, Issue 1, Page 165-187, July 2019.
      This study considers gender differences in the health of Mexican migrants who return to Mexico from the United States, and Mexican nonmigrants. We use health data before and after migration to examine disparities in women’s and men’s childhood and adult health, comparing returned migrants and nonmigrants in Mexico. Using data on more than 14,000 household heads and their spouses interviewed between 2007 and 2016 in the Mexican Migration Project, we find evidence of only a few gendered patterns of health among migrants. Specifically, women migrants are more positively selected on height than are male migrants. We also find a stronger, positive association between migration and smoking among women: although women are less likely to smoke than men, the difference is smaller among returned migrants than among nonmigrants. In contrast, we find no evidence that the positive migrant selection on self-rated health at age 14, or negative migrant selection on emotional disorders, varies by gender, or that there is an association among migration and obesity, hypertension, diabetes, and heart disease.
      Citation: The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science
      PubDate: 2019-07-08T09:42:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0002716219857964
       
  • Gendered Patterns of Remitting and Saving among Mexican Families with U.S.
           Migration Experience
    • Authors: María Aysa-Lastra
      Pages: 188 - 211
      Abstract: The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, Volume 684, Issue 1, Page 188-211, July 2019.
      This article explores patterns of remittance sending among male and female migrants from Mexico to the United States, and patterns in the use of remittances among receiving households in Mexico. It also identifies variables that determine remittance sending and saving behaviors in migrants’ most recent U.S. trip. Results reveal gendered differences in the investment and consumption strategies adopted by families in communities of origin. Despite marked differences in the capacity of women to generate remittances and savings compared with men, patterns of remittance use by families in communities of origin are not substantially distinct, though female migrants are more likely to send remittances for investments in human capital than male migrants. In addition, remittances and savings sent by male migrants are more likely to be used in housing improvements and investments in productive capital than those sent by women. These differences do not necessarily reflect migrants’ preferences, but mirror the sociocultural contexts in which decision-making about remittances, savings, and spending take place.
      Citation: The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science
      PubDate: 2019-07-08T09:42:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0002716219853801
       
  • Continuities and Changes in the Processes of Mexican Migration and Return
    • Authors: Emilio A. Parrado, Angie N. Ocampo
      Pages: 212 - 226
      Abstract: The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, Volume 684, Issue 1, Page 212-226, July 2019.
      This article examines continuities and changes in the prevalence and determinants of first migration and return between Mexico and the United States. The results show a dramatic decline over time in the likelihood of migrants’ making a first trip. The empirical design distinguishes processes affecting migrating cohorts from those emanating from period conditions, paying particular attention to changes in educational selectivity and the legal status of the flows. The definition of cohort and period corresponds roughly to changes in U.S. migration policy and the American economy. We find that the likelihood of return migration also declined in conjunction with period conditions that are related to border enforcement. The drop in the likelihood of return was particularly sharp for undocumented migrants, and, over time, return flows increasingly consist of documented migrants. The implications of these findings for immigration policy in the United States and for the incorporation of returnees in Mexico are discussed.
      Citation: The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science
      PubDate: 2019-07-08T09:42:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0002716219857565
       
  • A Quick End to a Long Story: Networks and Mexican Migration during the
           Great Recession
    • Authors: Ricardo Mora Téllez
      Pages: 227 - 240
      Abstract: The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, Volume 684, Issue 1, Page 227-240, July 2019.
      During times of economic recession, migrants face long periods of unemployment or underemployment in destination countries. This information is transmitted to migrant-sending households via networks that link communities of origin and destination, letting potential migrants know that if they were to migrate they would likely experience low and unstable earnings, and that remittances normally expected from international migration might be placed at risk. In this event, there are few incentives for other household members to migrate. This study examines the effect that information sent through networks during recessionary times has in reducing the likelihood of out-migration, thereby explaining why Mexico-U.S. migration fell so suddenly with the onset of the Great Recession in the United States.
      Citation: The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science
      PubDate: 2019-07-08T09:42:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0002716219856562
       
  • Challenging Employer Control within the H-2A and H-2B Visa Programs
    • Authors: Bryan Moorefield
      Pages: 241 - 254
      Abstract: The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, Volume 684, Issue 1, Page 241-254, July 2019.
      Migrants holding H-2A and H-2B visas—contracted labor migrants—predominate in the new migration system that has emerged between Mexico and the United States. These migrants have been growing numerically in an era when net Mexico-U.S. migration has fallen to zero and undocumented migration is negative. These migrants are committed to contracts that require them to work for one employer, at a specified job, in a particular place, for a set duration of time, or risk loss of legal status and deportation. When visas were scarce, as they have been historically, this effectively gave employers monopoly over their contracted workers. This article describes the current system, particularly with respect to the U.S. labor market and the geography of both Mexico and the United States. With more employers now seeking H-2A and H-2B workers, the current moment may provide migrant workers with greater leverage to challenge the dominance of labor contractors and employers by moving among firms, industries, markets, and states from one contract to the next.
      Citation: The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science
      PubDate: 2019-07-08T09:42:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0002716219856854
       
  • Temporary Workers in the United States and Canada: Migrant Flows and Labor
           Outcomes
    • Authors: Karen A. Pren, Luis Enrique González-Araiza
      Pages: 255 - 276
      Abstract: The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, Volume 684, Issue 1, Page 255-276, July 2019.
      This article analyzes migratory flows and labor outcomes for temporary migrants from Mexico who participate in the H-2A visa program in the United States and the Seasonal Agricultural Worker Program in Canada. Using data from the Mexican Migration Project, we analyze the determinants of taking a first trip to each country with temporary work documents, the financial and labor circumstances that migrants experience while working abroad, and the factors that determine the likelihood and amount of money sent home to Mexico as remittances or held onto and brought home to Mexico as savings. We find that temporary agricultural workers migrating to both countries come from rural backgrounds, but those working in the United States earn higher wages and experience shorter workdays than those in Canada. Nevertheless, total annual work hours and earnings are quite similar for both groups of migrants. We observe few differences between the two groups in remittance amounts sent home, but find that temporary workers in the United States return home with more savings than do those working in Canada.
      Citation: The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science
      PubDate: 2019-07-08T09:42:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0002716219857700
       
 
 
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