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Publisher: Sage Publications   (Total: 1074 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 1074 Journals sorted alphabetically
AADE in Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Abstracts in Anthropology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Academic Pathology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Accounting History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.527, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Radiologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.754, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Radiologica Open     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Acta Sociologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36, SJR: 0.939, CiteScore: 2)
Action Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48, SJR: 0.308, CiteScore: 1)
Active Learning in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 320, SJR: 1.397, CiteScore: 2)
Adaptive Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.288, CiteScore: 1)
Administration & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.675, CiteScore: 1)
Adoption & Fostering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.313, CiteScore: 0)
Adsorption Science & Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.258, CiteScore: 1)
Adult Education Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 190, SJR: 0.566, CiteScore: 2)
Adult Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Advances in Dental Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.791, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Developing Human Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29, SJR: 0.614, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Mechanical Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 124, SJR: 0.272, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Methods and Practices in Psychological Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Structural Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 37, SJR: 0.599, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Tumor Virology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.108, CiteScore: 0)
AERA Open     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Affilia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.496, CiteScore: 1)
Agrarian South : J. of Political Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Air, Soil & Water Research     Open Access   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.214, CiteScore: 1)
Alexandria : The J. of National and Intl. Library and Information Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 62)
AlterNative : An Intl. J. of Indigenous Peoples     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.194, CiteScore: 0)
Alternative Law J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.176, CiteScore: 0)
Alternatives : Global, Local, Political     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.351, CiteScore: 1)
American Behavioral Scientist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.982, CiteScore: 2)
American Economist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
American Educational Research J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 188, SJR: 2.913, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.67, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Cosmetic Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
American J. of Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.646, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Health Promotion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 0.807, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Hospice and Palliative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40, SJR: 0.65, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Law & Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.204, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Lifestyle Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.431, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Medical Quality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.777, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Men's Health     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.595, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Rhinology and Allergy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.972, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Sports Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 180, SJR: 3.949, CiteScore: 6)
American Politics Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33, SJR: 1.313, CiteScore: 1)
American Review of Public Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 2.062, CiteScore: 2)
American Sociological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 284, SJR: 6.333, CiteScore: 6)
American String Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Analytical Chemistry Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.224, CiteScore: 1)
Angiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.849, CiteScore: 2)
Animation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.197, CiteScore: 0)
Annals of Clinical Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.634, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Otology, Rhinology & Laryngology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.807, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Pharmacotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50, SJR: 1.096, CiteScore: 2)
Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46, SJR: 1.225, CiteScore: 3)
Annals of the ICRP     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.548, CiteScore: 1)
Anthropocene Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 3.341, CiteScore: 7)
Anthropological Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41, SJR: 0.739, CiteScore: 1)
Antitrust Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Antiviral Chemistry and Chemotherapy     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.635, CiteScore: 2)
Antyajaa : Indian J. of Women and Social Change     Hybrid Journal  
Applied Biosafety     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.131, CiteScore: 0)
Applied Psychological Measurement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 1.17, CiteScore: 1)
Applied Spectroscopy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.489, CiteScore: 2)
Armed Forces & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.29, CiteScore: 1)
Arts and Humanities in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38, SJR: 0.305, CiteScore: 1)
Asia Pacific Media Educator     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.23, CiteScore: 0)
Asia-Pacific J. of Management Research and Innovation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Asia-Pacific J. of Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.558, CiteScore: 1)
Asian and Pacific Migration J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 89, SJR: 0.324, CiteScore: 1)
Asian Cardiovascular and Thoracic Annals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.305, CiteScore: 0)
Asian J. of Comparative Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Asian J. of Legal Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Asian J. of Management Cases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
ASN Neuro     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.534, CiteScore: 3)
Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.519, CiteScore: 3)
Assessment for Effective Intervention     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.578, CiteScore: 1)
Australasian Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.433, CiteScore: 1)
Australian & New Zealand J. of Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 1.801, CiteScore: 2)
Australian and New Zealand J. of Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 518, SJR: 0.612, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Career Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Australian J. of Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41, SJR: 0.403, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.497, CiteScore: 1)
Autism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 301, SJR: 1.739, CiteScore: 4)
Autism & Developmental Language Impairments     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Behavior Modification     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.877, CiteScore: 2)
Behavioral and Cognitive Neuroscience Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Bible Translator     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Biblical Theology Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.184, CiteScore: 0)
Big Data & Society     Open Access   (Followers: 46)
Biochemistry Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Bioinformatics and Biology Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.141, CiteScore: 2)
Biological Research for Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.685, CiteScore: 2)
Biomarker Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.81, CiteScore: 2)
Biomarkers in Cancer     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Biomedical Engineering and Computational Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Biomedical Informatics Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Bioscope: South Asian Screen Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.235, CiteScore: 0)
BMS: Bulletin of Sociological Methodology/Bulletin de Méthodologie Sociologique     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.226, CiteScore: 0)
Body & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 1.531, CiteScore: 3)
Bone and Tissue Regeneration Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Breast Cancer : Basic and Clinical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.823, CiteScore: 2)
British J. of Music Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
British J. of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 165, SJR: 0.323, CiteScore: 1)
British J. of Pain     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.579, CiteScore: 2)
British J. of Politics and Intl. Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 0.91, CiteScore: 2)
British J. of Visual Impairment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.337, CiteScore: 1)
British J.ism Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Building Acoustics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.215, CiteScore: 1)
Building Services Engineering Research & Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.583, CiteScore: 1)
Bulletin of Science, Technology & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Business & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Business and Professional Communication Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.348, CiteScore: 1)
Business Information Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.279, CiteScore: 0)
Business Perspectives and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Cahiers Élisabéthains     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.111, CiteScore: 0)
Calcutta Statistical Association Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription  
California Management Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 2.209, CiteScore: 4)
Canadian J. of Kidney Health and Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.007, CiteScore: 2)
Canadian J. of Nursing Research (CJNR)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Canadian J. of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 118, SJR: 0.626, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian J. of Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 1.769, CiteScore: 3)
Canadian J. of School Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.266, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian Pharmacists J. / Revue des Pharmaciens du Canada     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.536, CiteScore: 1)
Cancer Growth and Metastasis     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Informatics     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.64, CiteScore: 1)
Capital and Class     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.282, CiteScore: 1)
Cardiac Cath Lab Director     Full-text available via subscription  
Cardiovascular and Thoracic Open     Open Access  
Career Development and Transition for Exceptional Individuals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.44, CiteScore: 1)
Cartilage     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.889, CiteScore: 3)
Cell and Tissue Transplantation and Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cell Transplantation     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.023, CiteScore: 3)
Cephalalgia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 1.581, CiteScore: 3)
Child Language Teaching and Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31, SJR: 0.501, CiteScore: 1)
Child Maltreatment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.22, CiteScore: 3)
Child Neurology Open     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Childhood     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.894, CiteScore: 2)
Childhood Obesity and Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
China Information     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.767, CiteScore: 2)
China Report     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.221, CiteScore: 0)
Chinese J. of Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Christianity & Literature     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Chronic Illness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.672, CiteScore: 2)
Chronic Respiratory Disease     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.808, CiteScore: 2)
Chronic Stress     Open Access  
Citizenship, Social and Economics Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.145, CiteScore: 0)
Cleft Palate-Craniofacial J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.757, CiteScore: 1)
Clin-Alert     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis     Open Access   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.49, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Case Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.364, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43, SJR: 0.73, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical EEG and Neuroscience     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.552, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.296, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Arthritis and Musculoskeletal Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.537, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Blood Disorders     Open Access   (SJR: 0.314, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.686, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.283, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Circulatory, Respiratory and Pulmonary Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.425, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Ear, Nose and Throat     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Endocrinology and Diabetes     Open Access   (Followers: 32, SJR: 0.63, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Gastroenterology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.775, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.129, CiteScore: 3)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Pediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Reproductive Health     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.776, CiteScore: 0)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Therapeutics     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.172, CiteScore: 0)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Trauma and Intensive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Women's Health     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Nursing Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 0.471, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Pathology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Clinical Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.487, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Psychological Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 3.281, CiteScore: 5)
Clinical Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 68, SJR: 1.322, CiteScore: 3)
Clinical Risk     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.133, CiteScore: 0)
Clinical Trials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 2.399, CiteScore: 2)
Clothing and Textiles Research J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.36, CiteScore: 1)
Common Law World Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Communication & Sport     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.385, CiteScore: 1)
Communication and the Public     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Communication Disorders Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.458, CiteScore: 1)
Communication Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 2.171, CiteScore: 3)
Community College Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.451, CiteScore: 1)
Comparative Political Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 207, SJR: 3.772, CiteScore: 3)
Compensation & Benefits Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Competition & Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.843, CiteScore: 2)
Competition and Regulation in Network Industries     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.143, CiteScore: 0)
Concurrent Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.642, CiteScore: 2)
Conflict Management and Peace Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33, SJR: 2.441, CiteScore: 1)
Contemporary Drug Problems     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.609, CiteScore: 2)
Contemporary Education Dialogue     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.102, CiteScore: 0)
Contemporary Issues in Early Childhood     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.766, CiteScore: 1)
Contemporary Review of the Middle East     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Contemporary Sociology : A J. of Reviews     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 34, SJR: 0.195, CiteScore: 0)
Contemporary Voice of Dalit     Full-text available via subscription  
Contexts     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Contributions to Indian Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.376, CiteScore: 0)
Convergence The Intl. J. of Research into New Media Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50, SJR: 0.521, CiteScore: 1)
Cooperation and Conflict     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.945, CiteScore: 2)
Cornell Hospitality Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.198, CiteScore: 2)

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
American Journal of Sports Medicine
Journal Prestige (SJR): 3.949
Citation Impact (citeScore): 6
Number of Followers: 180  
 
Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal   * Containing 2 Open Access Open Access article(s) in this issue *
ISSN (Print) 0363-5465 - ISSN (Online) 1552-3365
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1074 journals]
  • Corrigendum
    • Abstract: The American Journal of Sports Medicine, Volume 47, Issue 7, Page NP39-NP39, June 2019.

      Citation: The American Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2019-05-30T04:56:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0363546519853538
       
  • Corrigendum
    • Abstract: The American Journal of Sports Medicine, Volume 47, Issue 7, Page NP40-NP40, June 2019.

      Citation: The American Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2019-05-30T04:56:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0363546519853539
       
  • The Shoulder Tap
    • Authors: Timothy E. Foster
      Pages: 1547 - 1549
      Abstract: The American Journal of Sports Medicine, Volume 47, Issue 7, Page 1547-1549, June 2019.

      Citation: The American Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2019-05-30T04:56:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0363546519853558
       
  • Secondary Meniscal Tears in Patients With Anterior Cruciate Ligament
           Injury: Relationship Among Operative Management, Osteoarthritis, and
           Arthroplasty at 18-Year Mean Follow-up
    • Authors: Michella H. Hagmeijer, Mario Hevesi, Vishal S. Desai, Thomas L. Sanders, Christopher L. Camp, Timothy E. Hewett, Michael J. Stuart, Daniel B.F. Saris, Aaron J. Krych
      Pages: 1583 - 1590
      Abstract: The American Journal of Sports Medicine, Volume 47, Issue 7, Page 1583-1590, June 2019.

      Citation: The American Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2019-05-30T04:56:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0363546519844481
       
  • Survivorship and Outcome of Hip Arthroscopy for Femoroacetabular
           Impingement Syndrome Performed With Modern Surgical Techniques
    • Authors: Shane J. Nho, Edward C. Beck, Benedict U. Nwachukwu, Gregory L. Cvetanovich, William H. Neal, Joshua D. Harris, Alexander E. Weber, Richard C. Mather
      Pages: 1662 - 1669
      Abstract: The American Journal of Sports Medicine, Volume 47, Issue 7, Page 1662-1669, June 2019.

      Citation: The American Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2019-05-30T04:55:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0363546519843936
       
  • Society News
    • Pages: 1763 - 1763
      Abstract: The American Journal of Sports Medicine, Volume 47, Issue 7, Page 1763-1763, June 2019.

      Citation: The American Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2019-05-30T04:55:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0363546519854680
       
  • Relationship Between Sports Participation After Revision Anterior Cruciate
           Ligament Reconstruction and 2-Year Patient-Reported Outcome Measures
    • Authors: John P. Bigouette, Erin C. Owen, Brett (Brick) A. Lantz, Rudolf G. Hoellrich, Laura J. Huston, Amanda K. Haas, Christina R. Allen, Allen F. Anderson, Daniel E. Cooper, Thomas M. DeBerardino, Warren R. Dunn, Barton Mann, Kurt P. Spindler, Michael J. Stuart, Rick W. Wright, John P. Albright, Annunziato (Ned) Amendola, Jack T. Andrish, Christopher C. Annunziata, Robert A. Arciero, Bernard R. Bach, Champ L. Baker, Arthur R. Bartolozzi, Keith M. Baumgarten, Jeffery R. Bechler, Jeffrey H. Berg, Geoffrey A. Bernas, Stephen F. Brockmeier, Robert H. Brophy, Charles A. Bush-Joseph, J. Brad Butler, John D. Campbell, James L. Carey, James E. Carpenter, Brian J. Cole, Jonathan M. Cooper, Charles L. Cox, R. Alexander Creighton, Diane L. Dahm, Tal S. David, David C. Flanigan, Robert W. Frederick, Theodore J. Ganley, Elizabeth A. Garofoli, Charles J. Gatt, Steven R. Gecha, James Robert Giffin, Sharon L. Hame, Jo A. Hannafin, Christopher D. Harner, Norman Lindsay Harris, Keith S. Hechtman, Elliott B. Hershman, Timothy M. Hosea, David C. Johnson, Timothy S. Johnson, Morgan H. Jones, Christopher C. Kaeding, Ganesh V. Kamath, Thomas E. Klootwyk, Bruce A. Levy, C. Benjamin Ma, G. Peter Maiers, Robert G. Marx, Matthew J. Matava, Gregory M. Mathien, David R. McAllister, Eric C. McCarty, Robert G. McCormack, Bruce S. Miller, Carl W. Nissen, Daniel F. O’Neill, Brett D. Owens, Richard D. Parker, Mark L. Purnell, Arun J. Ramappa, Michael A. Rauh, Arthur C. Rettig, Jon K. Sekiya, Kevin G. Shea, Orrin H. Sherman, James R. Slauterbeck, Matthew V. Smith, Jeffrey T. Spang, Steven J. Svoboda, Timothy N. Taft, Joachim J. Tenuta, Edwin M. Tingstad, Armando F. Vidal, Darius G. Viskontas, Richard A. White, James S. Williams, Michelle L. Wolcott, Brian R. Wolf, James J. York
      Abstract: The American Journal of Sports Medicine, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) revision cohorts continually report lower outcome scores on validated knee questionnaires than primary ACL cohorts at similar time points after surgery. It is unclear how these outcomes are associated with physical activity after physician clearance for return to recreational or competitive sports after ACL revision surgery.Hypotheses:Participants who return to either multiple sports or a singular sport after revision ACL surgery will report decreased knee symptoms, increased activity level, and improved knee function as measured by validated patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) and compared with no sports participation. Multisport participation as compared with singular sport participation will result in similar increased PROMs and activity level.Study Design:Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3.Methods:A total of 1205 patients who underwent revision ACL reconstruction were enrolled by 83 surgeons at 52 clinical sites. At the time of revision, baseline data collected included the following: demographics, surgical characteristics, previous knee treatment and PROMs, the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) questionnaire, Marx activity score, Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), and the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC). A series of multivariate regression models were used to evaluate the association of IKDC, KOOS, WOMAC, and Marx Activity Rating Scale scores at 2 years after revision surgery by sports participation category, controlling for known significant covariates.Results:Two-year follow-up was obtained on 82% (986 of 1205) of the original cohort. Patients who reported not participating in sports after revision surgery had lower median PROMs both at baseline and at 2 years as compared with patients who participated in either a single sport or multiple sports. Significant differences were found in the change of scores among groups on the IKDC (P < .0001), KOOS-Symptoms (P = .01), KOOS–Sports and Recreation (P = .04), and KOOS–Quality of Life (P < .0001). Patients with no sports participation were 2.0 to 5.7 times more likely than multiple-sport participants to report significantly lower PROMs, depending on the specific outcome measure assessed, and 1.8 to 3.8 times more likely than single-sport participants (except for WOMAC-Stiffness, P = .18), after controlling for known covariates.Conclusion:Participation in either a single sport or multiple sports in the 2 years after ACL revision surgery was found to be significantly associated with higher PROMs across multiple validated self-reported assessment tools. During follow-up appointments, surgeons should continue to expect that patients who report returning to physical activity after surgery will self-report better functional outcomes, regardless of baseline activity levels.
      Citation: The American Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2019-06-21T04:55:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0363546519856348
       
  • The Perioperative Continuation of Aspirin in Patients Undergoing
           Arthroscopic Surgery of the Knee
    • Authors: Ljiljana Bogunovic, Amanda K. Haas, Robert H. Brophy, Matthew J. Matava, Matthew V. Smith, Rick W. Wright
      Abstract: The American Journal of Sports Medicine, Ahead of Print.
      Background:The perioperative withdrawal of aspirin increases the risk of cardiac, neurologic, and vascular thromboembolic events. The safety of continuing aspirin in patients undergoing knee arthroscopy is unknown.Hypothesis:Perioperative continuation of aspirin does not increase surgical complications or worsen outcomes in patients 50 years of age and older undergoing knee arthroscopy.Study Design:Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3.Methods:This is a single-center, institutional review board–approved, prospective matched dual-cohort study comparing the surgical complication rates and postoperative outcomes of patients taking daily aspirin with those of unmedicated controls. Ninety patients who were 50 years of age or older and taking 81 mg or 325 mg daily aspirin were matched to 90 controls. Patients were matched on age, surgery type, and the use of a tourniquet. A complication was defined as bleeding, wound dehiscence, or wound infection requiring reoperation. Postoperative outcome measures including hematoma formation, extent of ecchymosis (mm), visual analog scale (VAS) scores for pain and swelling, and the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) were collected preoperatively and postoperatively (10-14 days and 4-6 weeks).Results:There were no complications (0%) in either cohort. There was no difference in hematoma formation (aspirin, 1.8%; controls, 2.4%; P = .79), incidence of ecchymosis (aspirin, 17%; controls, 21%; P = .70), or the average extent of ecchymosis (aspirin, 124.6 mm; controls, 80.3 mm; P = .36) between patients taking aspirin and controls. There was no significant difference in pre- or postoperative knee range of motion between controls and patients taking aspirin. The KOOS subscores and VAS pain scores were similar between patients taking aspirin and controls at baseline and at follow-up.Conclusion:The perioperative continuation of daily aspirin in patients 50 years of age and older undergoing arthroscopic procedures of the knee is safe and does not result in an increased rate of bleeding or wound complications requiring reoperation. Continued aspirin use in patients 50 years of age and older had no significant effect on postoperative physical examination measures or patient-rated outcome scores.
      Citation: The American Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2019-06-21T04:36:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0363546519855643
       
  • Frontal Plane Loading Characteristics of Medial Collateral Ligament Strain
           Concurrent With Anterior Cruciate Ligament Failure
    • Authors: Nathan D. Schilaty, Nathaniel A. Bates, Aaron J. Krych, Timothy E. Hewett
      Abstract: The American Journal of Sports Medicine, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Both the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and the medial collateral ligament (MCL) bear load during athletic tasks of landing, cutting, pivoting, and twisting. As dynamic knee valgus is a purported mechanism for ACL injury, the MCL should bear significant strain load with valgus force.Hypothesis:The intact MCL will demonstrate a significant increase in strain upon failure of the ACL at 25° of knee flexion.Study Design:Controlled laboratory study.Methods:In vivo kinetics/kinematics of 44 healthy athletic participants were measured to determine stratification of injury risk (ie, low, medium, and high) in 3 degrees of knee forces/moments (knee abduction moment, anterior tibial shear, and internal tibial rotation). These stratified kinetic values were input into a cadaveric impact simulator to assess ligamentous strain during a simulated landing task. Uniaxial and multiaxial load cells and differential variable reluctance transducer strain sensors were utilized to collect mechanical data for analysis. Conditions of external loads applied to the cadaveric limbs were varied and randomized.Results:ACL strain increased with increased dynamic knee abduction moment (χ2[5] = 14.123, P = .0148). The most extreme dynamic knee abduction moment condition demonstrated significantly higher ACL strain compared with lower loaded trials (P≤ .0203). Similarly, MCL strain increased with dynamic knee abduction moment (χ2[5] = 36.578, P < .0001). Matched-pairs analysis compared ACL strain with MCL strain (maximum ACL strain – maximum MCL strain) and demonstrated high strain for the ACL versus the MCL (S177 = 6223.5, P < .0001).Conclusion:Although significant, MCL strain had minimal increase with increased dynamic knee abduction moment, and the event of ACL failure did not significantly increase MCL strain when compared with high dynamic knee abduction moment conditions in the cadaveric model. The ACL bears more strain than the MCL at increasing amounts of dynamic knee abduction moment at 25° of knee flexion, which may explain the limited concomitant MCL injury rate that can occur during a dynamic valgus collapse of the knee.Clinical Relevance:These characteristics of ACL and MCL strain are important to understand the mechanisms that drive these injuries at the knee and will improve rehabilitation and injury prevention techniques.
      Citation: The American Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2019-06-20T07:53:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0363546519854286
       
  • High Rate of Failure After Matrix-Assisted Autologous Chondrocyte
           Transplantation in Osteoarthritic Knees at 15 Years of Follow-up
    • Authors: Luca Andriolo, Davide Reale, Alessandro Di Martino, Stefano Zaffagnini, Francesca Vannini, Alberto Ferruzzi, Giuseppe Filardo
      Abstract: The American Journal of Sports Medicine, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Chondral and osteochondral lesions in osteoarthritic knees of young patients remain challenging for orthopaedic surgeons, due to a combination of high functional demands and limited indications for joint replacement in this population. The possibility of extending the indication of cartilage regenerative procedures to these patients may allow the delay of metal resurfacing.Purpose:To analyze the potential of a cartilage regenerative approach to provide clinical benefits in young patients with osteoarthritic knees, documenting outcomes in terms of clinical improvement as well as failures, in particular regarding knee replacement, at long-term follow-up.Study Design:Case series; Level of evidence, 4.Methods:A total of 41 patients (mean ± SD age, 43 ± 9 years) who had cartilage lesions (4 ± 2 cm2) in osteoarthritic knees (Kellgren-Lawrence grade 2 or 3) underwent matrix-assisted autologous chondrocyte transplantation (MACT) as a salvage procedure. Patients were evaluated with International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC), EuroQol visual analog scale (EQ-VAS), and Tegner scores before surgery; at 1, 2, 5, and 9 years after surgery; and at a final follow-up at a mean of 15 years after surgery (range, 14-18 years). Failures were also recorded.Results:An improvement was observed in all scores after surgery, but a progressive worsening over time was noted. The mean ± SD IKDC score improved from 38.6 ± 16.2 to a maximum of 66.0 ± 18.6 at 2 years (P < .0005), with a subsequent deterioration until the final evaluation at 56.2 ± 21.7 (P = .024). A similar trend was confirmed by EQ-VAS scores. Tegner scores improved at all follow-up points but did not reach the preinjury level. Patients who underwent combined surgery obtained significantly lower results. Only 13 patients (32%) had an IKDC score higher than 70. During the follow-up period, 21 patients underwent reoperation (18 with knee replacement) and 3 more patients experienced clinical failure, for a total surgical and clinical failure rate of 59% at 15 years.Conclusion:The use of cartilage regenerative surgical procedures, such as MACT, as salvage procedures for young, active patients affected by chondral and osteochondral lesions in osteoarthritic knees led to a limited improvement, with the majority of patients experiencing failure at long-term follow-up. Although a minor subpopulation experienced favorable and stable improvement, the use of MACT for such a challenging indication remains questionable until responding patients can be profiled.
      Citation: The American Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2019-06-18T04:51:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0363546519855029
       
  • Contribution of Additional Anterolateral Structure Augmentation to
           Controlling Pivot Shift in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction
    • Authors: Hiroko Ueki, Hiroki Katagiri, Koji Otabe, Yusuke Nakagawa, Toshiyuki Ohara, Mikio Shioda, Yuji Kohno, Takashi Hoshino, Ichiro Sekiya, Hideyuki Koga
      Abstract: The American Journal of Sports Medicine, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Several types of anterolateral structure (ALS) augmentation procedures in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction have been reported. However, information is limited regarding the effect of additional ALS augmentation on rotatory stability in a clinical setting.Purpose/Hypothesis:This study aimed to investigate the contribution of additional ALS augmentation in ACL reconstruction in cases with a high risk of residual pivot shift. The 2 hypotheses were as follows. First, additional ALS augmentation would improve rotatory stability as compared with solely reconstructing the ACL. Second, graft tension changes would be different between the ACL and ALS during knee range of motion and against anterior or rotatory loads.Study Design:Controlled laboratory study.Methods:Fifteen patients who met at least 1 of the following criteria were included: (1) revision ACL reconstruction, (2) preoperative high-grade pivot shift, or (3) hyperextended knee. The pivot-shift test was performed preoperatively and during surgery after ACL reconstruction and after additional ALS augmentation with acceleration measurements from a triaxial accelerometer. The tension changes of the ACL and ALS grafts were also measured during knee range of motion and against manual maximum anterior tibial translation, internal rotation, and external rotation.Results:After ACL reconstruction, the pivot-shift acceleration was still greater than that of the uninjured knee. However, additional ALS augmentation further reduced acceleration when compared with ACL reconstruction alone in both primary and revision cases (P < .05 vs preoperative, P < .05 vs ACL). During knee flexion-extension, the tension of the ACL increased as the knee was extended, whereas that of the ALS did not change. Graft tension of the ACL and ALS became higher with internal rotation and lower with external rotation as compared with the neutral position. Tension of the ACL was significantly increased against anterior tibial translational loads, whereas that of the ALS was not.Conclusion:Additional ALS augmentation further improved the rotatory stability during ACL reconstruction in patients with a high risk of residual pivot shift at the time of surgery. Significant differences in graft tension changes were also observed between the ACL and ALS against different loads. Additional ALS augmentation may be considered to eliminate the pivot shift in patients with a high risk of residual pivot shift.
      Citation: The American Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2019-06-18T04:23:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0363546519854101
       
  • Substantial Biomechanical Improvement by Extracorporeal Shockwave Therapy
           After Surgical Repair of Rodent Chronic Rotator Cuff Tears
    • Authors: Xaver Feichtinger, Xavier Monforte, Claudia Keibl, David Hercher, Jakob Schanda, Andreas H. Teuschl, Christian Muschitz, Heinz Redl, Christian Fialka, Rainer Mittermayr
      Abstract: The American Journal of Sports Medicine, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Characteristics of chronic rotator cuff tears include continuous loss of tendon structure as well as tendon elasticity, followed by a high failure rate after surgical reconstruction. Several studies have already shown the beneficial effect of extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) on tissue regeneration in tendon pathologies.Hypothesis:ESWT improves biomechanical tendon properties as well as functional shoulder outcomes in chronic rotator cuff reconstruction in rodents.Study Design:Controlled laboratory study.Methods:After tendon detachment and 3 weeks of degeneration, a subsequent transosseous reattachment of the supraspinatus tendon was performed in 48 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 16 per group). Rodents were randomly assigned to 3 study groups: no ESWT/control group, intraoperative ESWT (IntraESWT), and intra- and postoperative ESWT (IntraPostESWT). Shoulder joint function, as determined by gait analysis, was assessed repeatedly during the observation period. Eight weeks after tendon reconstruction, the rats were euthanized, and biomechanical and gene expression analyses were performed.Results:Macroscopically, all repairs were intact at the time of euthanasia, with no ruptures detectable. Biomechanical analyses showed significantly improved load-to-failure testing results in both ESWT groups in comparison with the control group (control, 0.629; IntraESWT, 1.102; IntraPostESWT, 0.924; IntraESWT vs control, P≤ .001; IntraPostESWT vs control, P≤ .05). Furthermore, functional gait analyses showed a significant enhancement in intensity measurements for the IntraPostESWT group in comparison with the control group (P≤ .05). Gene expression analysis revealed no significant differences among the 3 groups.Conclusion:Clearly improved biomechanical results were shown in the single-application and repetitive ESWT groups. Furthermore, functional evaluation showed significantly improved intensity measurements for the repetitive ESWT group.Clinical Relevance:This study underpins a new additional treatment possibility to prevent healing failure. Improved biomechanical stability and functionality may enable faster remobilization as well as an accelerated return to work and sports activities. Furthermore, as shockwave therapy is a noninvasive, easy-to-perform, cost-effective treatment tool with no undesired side effects, this study is of high clinical relevance in orthopaedic surgery. Based on these study results, a clinical study has already been initiated to clinically confirm the improved functionality by ESWT.
      Citation: The American Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2019-06-17T04:38:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0363546519854760
       
  • Repair of an Osteochondral Defect With Minced Cartilage Embedded in
           Atelocollagen Gel: A Rabbit Model
    • Authors: Ryosuke Matsushita, Tomoyuki Nakasa, Masakazu Ishikawa, Yusuke Tsuyuguchi, Norimasa Matsubara, Shigeru Miyaki, Nobuo Adachi
      Abstract: The American Journal of Sports Medicine, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) is often performed for large cartilage defects. Because this technique has several disadvantages, including the need for second-stage surgery, cartilage repair using minced cartilage has been suggested. However, this technique could be improved using 3-dimensional scaffolds.Purpose:To examine the ability of chondrocyte migration and proliferation from minced cartilage in atelocollagen gel in vitro and evaluate the repairable potential of minced cartilage embedded in atelocollagen gel covered with a periosteal flap in a rabbit model.Study Design:Controlled laboratory study.Methods:Minced cartilage or isolated chondrocytes from rabbits were embedded in atelocollagen gel and cultured for 3 weeks. Chondrocyte proliferation and matrix production were evaluated in vitro. An osteochondral defect at the trochlear groove was created in 56 rabbits, which were divided into 4 groups. The defect was left empty (defect group), filled with allogenic minced cartilage (minced cartilage group), filled with isolated allogenic chondrocytes embedded in atelocollagen gel (ACI group), or filled with atelocollagen gel (atelocollagen with periosteal flap group). At 4, 12, and 24 weeks after surgery, repair of the defect was evaluated in these 4 groups.Results:In vitro, the number of chondrocytes and abundant matrix on the surface of the gel significantly increased in the minced cartilage group compared with the ACI group (P < .05). In vivo, the minced cartilage and ACI groups showed good cartilage repair compared with the empty defect and atelocollagen/periosteal flap groups (P < .05); there was no significant difference in the Pineda score between the minced cartilage and ACI groups.Conclusion:Minced cartilage in atelocollagen gel had good chondrocyte migration and proliferation abilities in vitro, and osteochondral defects were well repaired by implanting minced cartilage embedded in the atelocollagen gel in vivo. Implantation of minced cartilage embedded in atelocollagen gel showed good cartilage repair equivalent to ACI.Clinical Relevance:Implantation of minced cartilage embedded in atelocollagen gel as a 1-step procedure has outcomes similar to those of ACI but is cheaper and more convenient than ACI.
      Citation: The American Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2019-06-17T04:04:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0363546519854372
       
  • Subsequent Injury Risk Is Elevated Above Baseline After Return to Play: A
           5-Year Prospective Study in Elite Australian Football
    • Authors: Jordan J. Stares, Brian Dawson, Peter Peeling, Jarryd Heasman, Brent Rogalski, Jack Fahey-Gilmour, Gregory Dupont, Michael K. Drew, Marijke Welvaert, Liam Toohey
      Abstract: The American Journal of Sports Medicine, Ahead of Print.
      Background:The risk of sustaining a subsequent injury is elevated in the weeks after return to play (RTP) from an index injury. However, little is known about the magnitude, duration, and nature by which subsequent injury risk is increased.Purpose:To quantify and describe the risk of injury in a 12-week period after RTP from an index injury in Australian football players.Study Design:Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2.Methods:Injury data were collected from 79 players over 5 years at 1 Australian Football League club. Injuries were classified with the Orchard Sports Injury Classification System and by side of the body. Furthermore, injury severity was classified as time loss (resulting in ≥1 matches being missed) or non–time loss (no matches missed). Subsequent injury was categorized with the SIC-2.0 model and applied to the data set via an automated script. The probability of a time loss subsequent injury was calculated for in-season index injuries for each week of a 12-week period after RTP via a mixed effect logistic regression model.Results:Subsequent injury risk was found to be highest in the week of RTP for both time loss injuries (9.4%) and non–time loss injuries (6.9%). Risk decreased with each week survived after RTP; however, it did not return to baseline risk of participation (3.6%).Conclusion:These findings demonstrate that athletes returning to play are at an increased risk of injury for a number of weeks, thus indicating the requirement for tertiary prevention strategies to ensure that they survive this period.
      Citation: The American Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2019-06-14T04:48:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0363546519852622
       
  • High Risk of Tunnel Convergence in Combined Anterior Cruciate Ligament
           Reconstruction and Lateral Extra-articular Tenodesis
    • Authors: Vera Jaecker, Philip Ibe, Christoph H. Endler, Thomas R. Pfeiffer, Mirco Herbort, Sven Shafizadeh
      Abstract: The American Journal of Sports Medicine, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Lateral extra-articular tenodesis (LET) is being increasingly added to primary and revision anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction to address residual anterolateral rotatory instability. However, currently there is a lack of knowledge on how close the femoral tunnels are when combining these procedures.Purpose/Hypotheses:To assess the risk of tunnel convergence in combined ACL and LET procedures using 2 different surgical techniques (Lemaire and MacIntosh). It was hypothesized that the risk of tunnel convergence would be greater when using the more distally located Lemaire position. The authors further hypothesized that tunnel proximity would be influenced by knee size.Study Design:Controlled laboratory study.Methods:Ten fresh-frozen cadaveric knees were used for this study. In each specimen, an anatomic ACL femoral tunnel and 2 LET tunnels were drilled using the Lemaire and MacIntosh positions, respectively. After knee dissection, minimal distances between each ACL and LET tunnel were directly measured on the lateral femoral cortex. Furthermore, computed tomography scans were obtained to measure intertunnel convergence and lateral femoral condyle (LFC) width. On the basis of the average LFC width, knees were divided into large and small knees to determine a relationship between knee size and tunnel convergence.Results:Convergence of ACL and LET tunnels occurred in 7 of 10 cases (70%) using the Lemaire attachment position. All tunnel collisions occurred directly on the lateral femoral cortex, while intertunnel (intramedullary) conflicts were not observed. Collisions emerged in both small (n = 4) and large (n = 3) knees. Critical tunnel convergence did not occur using the MacIntosh position. The mean minimal distance between the LET and ACL tunnel using the Lemaire and MacIntosh positions was 3.1 ± 4.6 mm and 9.8 ± 5.4 mm, respectively.Conclusion:Tunnel convergence was more frequently observed in combined ACL and LET reconstruction using the Lemaire technique, independent of the knee size. LET femoral tunnel positioning according to the MacIntosh reconstruction was not associated with tunnel collision.Clinical Relevance:These findings help to raise the awareness for the risk of tunnel convergence in combined ACL and LET procedures. Surgeons may contemplate adjustments on the ACL femoral tunnel drilling technique or fixation device when applying an additional Lemaire procedure. However, in the absence of clinical outcome studies comparing different LET techniques, it remains unclear which technique is superior in a clinical setting.
      Citation: The American Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2019-06-13T07:40:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0363546519854220
       
  • Chondrogenic Progenitor Cells Exhibit Superiority Over Mesenchymal Stem
           Cells and Chondrocytes in Platelet-Rich Plasma Scaffold-Based Cartilage
           Regeneration
    • Authors: Ketao Wang, Ji Li, Zhongli Li, Bin Wang, Yuanyuan Qin, Ning Zhang, Hao Zhang, Xiangzheng Su, Yuxing Wang, Heng Zhu
      Abstract: The American Journal of Sports Medicine, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been considered a promising tool for cartilage regeneration. However, increasing evidence has demonstrated the controversial effects of PRP on tissue regeneration, partially due to the unsatisfactory cell source. Chondrogenic progenitor cells (CPCs) have gained increasing attention as a potential cell source due to their self-renewal and multipotency, especially toward the chondrogenic lineage, and, thus, may be an appropriate alternative for cartilage engineering.Purpose:To compare the effects of PRP on CPC, mesenchymal stem cell (MSC), and chondrocyte proliferation, chondrogenesis, and cartilage regeneration.Study Design:Controlled laboratory study.Methods:Whole blood samples were obtained from 5 human donors to create PRPs (0, 1000 × 109, and 2000 × 109 platelets per liter). The proliferation and chondrogenesis of CPCs, bone marrow–derived MSCs (BMSCs), and chondrocytes were evaluated via growth kinetic and CCK-8 assays. Immunofluorescence, cytochemical staining, and gene expression analyses were performed to assess chondrogenic differentiation and cartilaginous matrix formation. The in vivo effects of CPCs, BMSCs, and chondrocytes on cartilage regeneration after PRP treatment were measured by use of histopathological, biochemical, and biomechanical techniques in a cartilage defect model involving mature male New Zealand White rabbits (critical size, 5 mm).Results:The CPCs possessed migration abilities and proliferative capacities superior to those of the chondrocytes, while exhibiting a chondrogenic predisposition stronger than that of the BMSCs. The growth kinetic, CCK-8, cytochemical staining, and biochemical analyses revealed that the CPCs simultaneously displayed a higher cell density than the chondrocytes and stronger chondrogenesis than the BMSCs after PRP stimulation. In addition, the in vivo study demonstrated that the PRP+CPC construct yielded better histological (International Cartilage Repair Society [ICRS] score, mean ± SEM, 1197.2 ± 163.2) and biomechanical (tensile modulus, 1.523 ± 0.194) results than the PRP+BMSC (701.1 ± 104.9, P < .05; 0.791 ± 0.151, P < .05) and PRP+chondrocyte (541.6 ± 98.3, P < .01; 0.587 ± 0.142, P < .01) constructs at 12 weeks after implantation.Conclusion:CPCs exhibit superiority over MSCs and chondrocytes in PRP scaffold-based cartilage regeneration, and PRP+CPC treatment may be a favorable strategy for cartilage repair.Clinical Relevance:These findings provide evidence highlighting the preferable role of CPCs as a cell source in PRP-mediated cartilage regeneration and may help researchers address the problem of unsatisfactory cell sources in cartilage engineering.
      Citation: The American Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2019-06-13T07:24:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0363546519854219
       
  • Dynamic Stabilization of Syndesmosis Injuries Reduces Complications and
           Reoperations as Compared With Screw Fixation: A Meta-analysis of
           Randomized Controlled Trials
    • Authors: Alberto Grassi, Kristian Samuelsson, Pieter D’Hooghe, Matteo Romagnoli, Massimiliano Mosca, Stefano Zaffagnini, Annunziato Amendola
      Abstract: The American Journal of Sports Medicine, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Several devices for obtaining dynamic fixation of the syndesmosis have been introduced in recent years, but their efficacy has been tested in only a few randomized controlled trials (RCTs), without demonstrating any clear benefit over the traditional static fixation with screws.Purpose:To perform a level 1 meta-analysis of RCTs to investigate the complications, subjective outcomes, and functional results after dynamic or static fixation of acute syndesmotic injuries.Study Design:Meta-analysis of RCTs.Methods:A systematic literature search was performed of the Medline/PubMed, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Embase electronic databases, as well as ClinicalTrials.gov for unpublished studies. Eligible studies were RCTs comparing dynamic fixation and static fixation of acute syndesmosis injuries. A meta-analysis was performed, while bias and quality of evidence were rated according to the Cochrane Database questionnaire and the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation guidelines.Results:Dynamic fixation had a significantly reduced relative risk (RR = 0.55, P = .003) of complications—in particular, the presence of inadequate reduction at the final follow-up (RR = 0.36, P = .0008) and the clinical diagnosis of recurrent diastasis or instability (RR = 0.10, P = .03). The effect was more evident when compared with permanent screws (RR = 0.10, P = .0001). The reoperation rate was similar between the groups (RR = 0.64, P = .07); however, the overall risk was reduced after dynamic fixation as compared with static fixation with permanent screws (RR = 0.24, P = .007). The American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society score was significantly higher among patients treated with dynamic fixation—6.06 points higher (P = .005) at 3 months, 5.21 points (P = .03) at 12 months, and 8.60 points (P < .00001) at 24 months—while the Olerud-Molander score was similar. The visual analog scale for pain score was reduced at 6 months (–0.73 points, P = .003) and 12 months (–0.52 points, P = .005), and ankle range of motion increased by 4.36° (P = .03) with dynamic fixation. The overall quality of evidence ranged from “moderate” to “very low,” owing to a substantial risk of bias, heterogeneity, indirectness of outcome reporting, and evaluation of a limited number of patients.Conclusion:The dynamic fixation of syndesmotic injuries was able to reduce the number of complications and improve clinical outcomes as compared with static screw fixation—especially malreduction and clinical instability or diastasis—at a follow-up of 2 years. A lower risk of reoperation was found with dynamic fixation as compared with static fixation with permanent screws. However, the lack of patients or personnel blinding, treatment heterogeneity, small samples, and short follow-up limit the overall quality of this evidence.
      Citation: The American Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2019-06-12T06:24:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0363546519849909
       
  • Increased Glenoid Retroversion Is Associated With Increased Rotator Cuff
           Strength in the Shoulder
    • Authors: Kenneth L. Cameron, MAJ David J. Tennent, COL (ret) Rodney X. Sturdivant, LTC Matthew A. Posner, Karen Y. Peck, COL Scot E. Campbell, Richard B. Westrick, Brett D. Owens
      Abstract: The American Journal of Sports Medicine, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: The American Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2019-06-07T04:02:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0363546519853591
       
  • Evaluation of Meniscal Regeneration in a Mini Pig Model Treated With a
           Novel Polyglycolic Acid Meniscal Scaffold
    • Authors: Shuhei Otsuki, Kosuke Nakagawa, Tomohiko Murakami, Shunsuke Sezaki, Hideki Sato, Masakazu Suzuki, Nobuhiro Okuno, Hitoshi Wakama, Kunihiro Kaihatsu, Masashi Neo
      Abstract: The American Journal of Sports Medicine, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: The American Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2019-06-07T03:44:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0363546519850578
       
  • Platelet-Rich Plasma Reduces Failure Risk for Isolated Meniscal Repairs
           but Provides No Benefit for Meniscal Repairs With Anterior Cruciate
           Ligament Reconstruction
    • Authors: Joshua S. Everhart, Parker A. Cavendish, Alex Eikenberry, Robert A. Magnussen, Christopher C. Kaeding, David C. Flanigan
      Abstract: The American Journal of Sports Medicine, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: The American Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2019-06-05T04:31:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0363546519852616
       
  • Changes in Cross-sectional Area and Signal Intensity of Healing Anterior
           Cruciate Ligaments and Grafts in the First 2 Years After Surgery
    • Authors: Ata M. Kiapour, Kirsten Ecklund, Martha M. Murray, Brett Flutie, Christina Freiberger, Rachael Henderson, Dennis Kramer, Lyle Micheli, Laura Thurber, Yi-Meng Yen, Braden C. Fleming
      Abstract: The American Journal of Sports Medicine, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: The American Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2019-06-05T04:01:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0363546519850572
       
  • Adaptation of Running Biomechanics to Repeated Barefoot Running: A
           Randomized Controlled Study

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Authors: Karsten Hollander, Dominik Liebl, Stephanie Meining, Klaus Mattes, Steffen Willwacher, Astrid Zech
      Abstract: The American Journal of Sports Medicine, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: The American Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2019-06-05T03:59:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0363546519849920
       
  • Hamstring Autograft Versus Hybrid Graft for Anterior Cruciate Ligament
           Reconstruction: A Systematic Review
    • Authors: Hong-De Wang, Shi-Jun Gao, Ying-Ze Zhang
      Abstract: The American Journal of Sports Medicine, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: The American Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2019-06-05T03:56:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0363546519849483
       
  • Efficacy of Platelet-Rich Plasma for the Treatment of Interstitial
           Supraspinatus Tears: A Double-Blinded, Randomized Controlled Trial
    • Authors: Adrien J. Schwitzguebel, Frank C. Kolo, Jérôme Tirefort, Abed Kourhani, Alexandra Nowak, Vincent Gremeaux, Mo Saffarini, Alexandre Lädermann
      Abstract: The American Journal of Sports Medicine, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: The American Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2019-06-04T04:09:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0363546519851097
       
  • Effect of Medial Open-Wedge High Tibial Osteotomy on the Patellofemoral
           Joint According to Postoperative Realignment
    • Authors: Tae-Hwan Yoon, Chong Hyuk Choi, Sung-Jae Kim, Sung-Hwan Kim, Nam-Hoo Kim, Min Jung
      Abstract: The American Journal of Sports Medicine, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: The American Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2019-06-03T04:37:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0363546519851096
       
  • Acute and Subacute Changes in Hip Strength and Range of Movement After
           Arthroscopy to Address Chondrolabral Pathology
    • Authors: Matthew D. Freke, Kay Crossley, Kevin Sims, Trevor Russell, Patrick Weinrauch, Gauguin Gamboa, Adam Semciw
      Abstract: The American Journal of Sports Medicine, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: The American Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2019-06-03T04:26:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0363546519850816
       
  • Prognostic Factors for Return to Sport After High Tibial Osteotomy: A
           Directed Acyclic Graph Approach

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Authors: Alexander Hoorntje, P. Paul F.M. Kuijer, Berbke T. van Ginneken, Koen L.M. Koenraadt, Rutger C.I. van Geenen, Gino M.M.J. Kerkhoffs, Ronald J. van Heerwaarden
      Abstract: The American Journal of Sports Medicine, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: The American Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2019-06-03T03:50:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0363546519849476
       
  • Pathoanatomy of Shoulder Instability in Collegiate Female Athletes
    • Authors: Jeanne C. Patzkowski, Jonathan F. Dickens, Kenneth L. Cameron, Steven L. Bokshan, E’Stephan J. Garcia, Brett D. Owens
      Abstract: The American Journal of Sports Medicine, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: The American Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2019-05-31T05:10:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0363546519850810
       
  • Evaluation of Healing Rates and Safety With a Bioinductive Collagen Patch
           for Large and Massive Rotator Cuff Tears: 2-Year Safety and Clinical
           Outcomes
    • Authors: Stephen G. Thon, Larry O’Malley, Michael J. O’Brien, Felix H. Savoie
      Abstract: The American Journal of Sports Medicine, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: The American Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2019-05-31T05:03:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0363546519850795
       
  • Baseball Pitchers’ Perceived Effort Does Not Match Actual Measured
           Effort During a Structured Long-Toss Throwing Program
    • Authors: Heath P. Melugin, Dirk R. Larson, Glenn S. Fleisig, Stan Conte, Stephen A. Fealy, Joshua S. Dines, John D’Angelo, Christopher L. Camp
      Abstract: The American Journal of Sports Medicine, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: The American Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2019-05-31T04:50:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0363546519850560
       
  • Multiplanar Loading of the Knee and Its Influence on Anterior Cruciate
           Ligament and Medial Collateral Ligament Strain During Simulated Landings
           and Noncontact Tears
    • Authors: Nathaniel A. Bates, Nathan D. Schilaty, Christopher V. Nagelli, Aaron J. Krych, Timothy E. Hewett
      Abstract: The American Journal of Sports Medicine, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: The American Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2019-05-31T04:45:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0363546519850165
       
  • Autologous Freeze-Dried, Platelet-Rich Plasma Carrying Icariin Enhances
           Bone-Tendon Healing in a Rabbit Model
    • Authors: Cheng Zheng, Hongbin Lu, Yifu Tang, Zhanwen Wang, Haozhe Ma, Haixia Li, Huabin Chen, Yang Chen, Can Chen
      Abstract: The American Journal of Sports Medicine, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: The American Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2019-05-31T04:31:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0363546519849657
       
  • Quantitative and Qualitative Assessment of Posterolateral Meniscal
           Anatomy: Defining the Popliteal Hiatus, Popliteomeniscal Fascicles, and
           the Lateral Meniscotibial Ligament
    • Authors: Zachary S. Aman, Nicholas N. DePhillipo, Hunter W. Storaci, Gilbert Moatshe, Jorge Chahla, Lars Engebretsen, Robert F. LaPrade
      Abstract: The American Journal of Sports Medicine, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: The American Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2019-05-28T04:14:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0363546519849933
       
  • Effect of Delayed Primary Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction on
           Medial Compartment Cartilage and Meniscal Health
    • Authors: Joshua S. Everhart, J. Caid Kirven, Moneer M. Abouljoud, Alex C. DiBartola, Christopher C. Kaeding, David C. Flanigan
      Abstract: The American Journal of Sports Medicine, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: The American Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2019-05-24T05:08:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0363546519849695
       
  • The Concentration of Plasma Provides Additional Bioactive Proteins in
           Platelet and Autologous Protein Solutions
    • Authors: Sean M. Muir, Natalie Reisbig, Michael Baria, Christopher Kaeding, Alicia L. Bertone
      Abstract: The American Journal of Sports Medicine, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: The American Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2019-05-24T04:52:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0363546519849671
       
  • Effects of Hip Arthroscopy Without a Perineal Post on Venous Blood Flow,
           Muscle Damage, Peripheral Nerve Conduction, and Perineal Injury: A
           Prospective Study
    • Authors: K. Linnea Welton, Tigran Garabekyan, Matthew J. Kraeutler, Laura A. Vogel-Abernathie, Daniel Raible, Jesse A. Goodrich, Omer Mei-Dan
      Abstract: The American Journal of Sports Medicine, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: The American Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2019-05-24T04:40:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0363546519849663
       
  • Lateral Posterior Tibial Slope in Male and Female Athletes Sustaining
           Contact Versus Noncontact Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tears: A Prospective
           Study
    • Authors: Nicholas N. DePhillipo, Connor G. Zeigler, Travis J. Dekker, W. Jeffrey Grantham, Zachary S. Aman, Mitchell I. Kennedy, Robert F. LaPrade
      Abstract: The American Journal of Sports Medicine, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: The American Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2019-05-24T04:29:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0363546519848424
       
  • Augmented Ligament Reconstruction Partially Restores Hindfoot and Midfoot
           Kinematics After Lateral Ligament Ruptures
    • Authors: Hannelore Boey, Stefaan Verfaillie, Tassos Natsakis, Jos Vander Sloten, Ilse Jonkers
      Abstract: The American Journal of Sports Medicine, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: The American Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2019-05-24T04:14:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0363546519848421
       
  • Two-Stage Revision Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: A Systematic
           Review of Bone Graft Options for Tunnel Augmentation
    • Authors: Hytham S. Salem, Derek P. Axibal, Michelle L. Wolcott, Armando F. Vidal, Eric C. McCarty, Jonathan T. Bravman, Rachel M. Frank
      Abstract: The American Journal of Sports Medicine, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: The American Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2019-05-22T10:38:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0363546519841583
       
  • Performance and Return to Sport After Open Reduction and Internal Fixation
           of the Olecranon in Professional Baseball Players
    • Authors: Brandon J. Erickson, Peter N. Chalmers, John D’Angelo, Kevin Ma, Christopher S. Ahmad, Anthony A. Romeo
      Abstract: The American Journal of Sports Medicine, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: The American Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2019-05-20T11:13:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0363546519844479
       
  • Properties and Function of the Medial Patellofemoral Ligament: A
           Systematic Review
    • Authors: Christian Huber, Qiang Zhang, William R. Taylor, Andrew A. Amis, Colin Smith, Seyyed Hamed Hosseini Nasab
      Abstract: The American Journal of Sports Medicine, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: The American Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2019-05-15T06:32:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0363546519841304
       
  • Comparative Effectiveness of Cartilage Repair With Respect to the Minimal
           Clinically Important Difference
    • Authors: Kristofer J. Jones, Benjamin V. Kelley, Armin Arshi, David R. McAllister, Peter D. Fabricant
      Abstract: The American Journal of Sports Medicine, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: The American Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2019-05-13T11:15:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0363546518824552
       
  • Hop Testing Lacks Strong Association With Key Outcome Variables After
           Primary Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: A Systematic Review
    • Authors: Justin M. Losciale, Garrett Bullock, Christina Cromwell, Leila Ledbetter, Laura Pietrosimone, Timothy C. Sell
      Abstract: The American Journal of Sports Medicine, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: The American Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2019-05-07T08:11:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0363546519838794
       
  • A Practical Guide for the Current Use of Biologic Therapies in Sports
           Medicine
    • Authors: Joseph D. Lamplot, Scott A. Rodeo, Robert H. Brophy
      Abstract: The American Journal of Sports Medicine, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: The American Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2019-04-30T08:11:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0363546519836090
       
  • Repair of Rotator Cuff Tears in the Elderly: Does It Make Sense' A
           Systematic Review
    • Authors: Burak Altintas, Nicole L. Anderson, Rafael Pitta, Patrick S. Buckley, Sanjeev Bhatia, Matthew T. Provencher, Peter J. Millett
      Abstract: The American Journal of Sports Medicine, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: The American Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2019-04-30T08:03:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0363546519834574
       
  • Return to Sport After Surgical Treatment for Anterior Shoulder
           Instability: A Systematic Review
    • Authors: Eoghan T. Hurley, Connor Montgomery, M. Shazil Jamal, Yoshiharu Shimozono, Zakariya Ali, Leo Pauzenberger, Hannan Mullett
      Abstract: The American Journal of Sports Medicine, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: The American Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2019-04-30T07:44:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0363546519831005
       
  • Cost-efficacy of Knee Cartilage Defect Treatments in the United States
    • Authors: Joshua S. Everhart, Andrew B. Campbell, Moneer M. Abouljoud, J. Caid Kirven, David C. Flanigan
      Abstract: The American Journal of Sports Medicine, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: The American Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2019-04-30T04:43:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0363546519834557
       
  • Characterization of Growth Factors, Cytokines, and Chemokines in Bone
           Marrow Concentrate and Platelet-Rich Plasma: A Prospective Analysis
    • Authors: Connor G. Ziegler, Rachel Van Sloun, Sabrina Gonzalez, Kaitlyn E. Whitney, Nicholas N. DePhillipo, Mitchell I. Kennedy, Grant J. Dornan, Thos A. Evans, Johnny Huard, Robert F. LaPrade
      Abstract: The American Journal of Sports Medicine, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: The American Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2019-04-29T05:42:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0363546519832003
       
  • Horizontal Instability of the Acromioclavicular Joint: A Systematic Review
    • Authors: Gianna M. Aliberti, Matthew J. Kraeutler, Jeffrey D. Trojan, Mary K. Mulcahey
      Abstract: The American Journal of Sports Medicine, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: The American Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2019-04-23T07:59:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0363546519831013
       
  • Current Workload Recommendations in Baseball Pitchers: A Systematic Review
    • Authors: Neil K. Bakshi, Paul M. Inclan, Jacob M. Kirsch, Asheesh Bedi, Cristine Agresta, Michael T. Freehill
      Abstract: The American Journal of Sports Medicine, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: The American Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2019-04-23T07:50:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0363546519831010
       
  • Return to Sport After Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair: Is There a
           Difference Between the Recreational and the Competitive Athlete'
    • Authors: Burak Altintas, Nicole Anderson, Grant J. Dornan, Robert E. Boykin, Catherine Logan, Peter J. Millett
      Abstract: The American Journal of Sports Medicine, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: The American Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2019-03-11T04:42:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0363546519825624
       
  • Midshaft Clavicle Fractures: Surgery Provides Better Results as Compared
           With Nonoperative Treatment: A Meta-analysis
    • Authors: Enrico Guerra, Davide Previtali, Simone Tamborini, Giuseppe Filardo, Stefano Zaffagnini, Christian Candrian
      Abstract: The American Journal of Sports Medicine, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: The American Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2019-03-05T04:38:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0363546519826961
       
  • Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: A Systematic Review and
           Meta-analysis of Outcomes for Quadriceps Tendon Autograft Versus
           Bone–Patellar Tendon–Bone and Hamstring-Tendon Autografts
    • Authors: Dany Mouarbes, Jacques Menetrey, Vincent Marot, Louis Courtot, Emilie Berard, Etienne Cavaignac
      Abstract: The American Journal of Sports Medicine, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: The American Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2019-02-21T10:12:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0363546518825340
       
  • Complications in the Management of Acute Achilles Tendon Rupture: A
           Systematic Review and Network Meta-analysis of 2060 Patients
    • Authors: Yahong Wu, Yuan Mu, Liangjun Yin, Zhuoqun Wang, Wenke Liu, Haimin Wan
      Abstract: The American Journal of Sports Medicine, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: The American Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2019-02-20T01:45:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0363546518824601
       
  • Efficacy of Pharmacological Therapies for Adhesive Capsulitis of the
           Shoulder: A Systematic Review and Network Meta-analysis
    • Authors: Dimitrios Kitridis, Konstantinos Tsikopoulos, Ilias Bisbinas, Paraskevi Papaioannidou, Panagiotis Givissis
      Abstract: The American Journal of Sports Medicine, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: The American Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2019-02-08T09:19:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0363546518823337
       
  • Age-Appropriate Pediatric Sports Patient-Reported Outcome Measures and
           Their Psychometric Properties: A Systematic Review
    • Authors: Joash R. Suryavanshi, Rie Goto, Bridget Jivanelli, Peter D. Fabricant, Jamila Aberdeen, Timothy Duer, Kenneth C. Lam, Corinna C. Franklin, James MacDonald, Kevin G. Shea
      Abstract: The American Journal of Sports Medicine, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: The American Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2019-01-16T07:44:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0363546518818822
       
  • Playing Performance After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Among
           Australian Football League Players From 1999 to 2013
    • Authors: Courtney C.H. Lai, Julian A. Feller, Kate E. Webster
      First page: 1550
      Abstract: The American Journal of Sports Medicine, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: The American Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2019-05-14T07:38:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0363546519843908
       
  • Knee Pathology in Young Adults After Pediatric Anterior Cruciate Ligament
           Injury: A Prospective Case Series of 47 Patients With a Mean 9.5-Year
           Follow-up
    • Authors: Guri Ranum Ekås, Marit Mjelde Laane, Arne Larmo, Håvard Moksnes, Hege Grindem, May Arna Risberg, Lars Engebretsen
      First page: 1557
      Abstract: The American Journal of Sports Medicine, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: The American Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2019-04-29T06:15:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0363546519837935
       
  • How Is Psychological Outcome Related to Knee Function and Return to Sport
           Among Adolescent Athletes After Anterior Cruciate Ligament
           Reconstruction'
    • Authors: Susanne Beischer, Eric Hamrin Senorski, Christoffer Thomeé, Kristian Samuelsson, Roland Thomeé
      First page: 1567
      Abstract: The American Journal of Sports Medicine, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: The American Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2019-05-16T05:34:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0363546519843073
       
  • Allograft Augmentation of Hamstring Anterior Cruciate Ligament Autografts
           Is Associated With Increased Graft Failure in Children and Adolescents
    • Authors: Crystal A. Perkins, Michael T. Busch, Melissa Christino, Mackenzie M. Herzog, S. Clifton Willimon
      First page: 1576
      Abstract: The American Journal of Sports Medicine, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: The American Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2019-05-16T08:21:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0363546519849607
       
  • Utilization of Transtibial Centralization Suture Best Minimizes Extrusion
           and Restores Tibiofemoral Contact Mechanics for Anatomic Medial Meniscal
           Root Repairs in A Cadaveric Model
    • Authors: Blake T. Daney, Zachary S. Aman, Joseph J. Krob, Hunter W. Storaci, Alex W. Brady, Gilberto Nakama, Grant J. Dornan, Matthew T. Provencher, Robert F. LaPrade
      First page: 1591
      Abstract: The American Journal of Sports Medicine, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: The American Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2019-05-15T07:34:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0363546519844250
       
  • Analysis of Defect Size and Ratio to Condylar Size With Respect to
           Outcomes After Isolated Osteochondral Allograft Transplantation
    • Authors: Simon Lee, Rachel M. Frank, David R. Christian, Brian J. Cole
      First page: 1601
      Abstract: The American Journal of Sports Medicine, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: The American Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2019-05-10T12:15:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0363546519841378
       
  • Osteochondral Allograft Transplantation of the Femoral Condyle Utilizing a
           Thin Plug Graft Technique
    • Authors: Luís E.P. Tírico, Julie C. McCauley, Pamela A. Pulido, William D. Bugbee
      First page: 1613
      Abstract: The American Journal of Sports Medicine, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: The American Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2019-05-17T04:40:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0363546519844212
       
  • Long-term Clinical Outcomes of One-Stage Cartilage Repair in the Knee With
           Hyaluronic Acid–Based Scaffold Embedded With Mesenchymal Stem Cells
           Sourced From Bone Marrow Aspirate Concentrate
    • Authors: Alberto Gobbi, Graeme P. Whyte
      First page: 1621
      Abstract: The American Journal of Sports Medicine, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: The American Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2019-05-16T06:02:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0363546519845362
       
  • Activity Modification and Load Management of Adolescents With
           Patellofemoral Pain: A Prospective Intervention Study Including 151
           Adolescents
    • Authors: Michael Skovdal Rathleff, Thomas Graven-Nielsen, Per Hölmich, Lukasz Winiarski, Kasper Krommes, Sinéad Holden, Kristian Thorborg
      First page: 1629
      Abstract: The American Journal of Sports Medicine, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: The American Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2019-05-16T05:48:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0363546519843915
       
  • Age at Time of Surgery but Not Sex Is Related to Outcomes After Medial
           Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction
    • Authors: Laurie A. Hiemstra, Sarah Kerslake
      First page: 1638
      Abstract: The American Journal of Sports Medicine, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: The American Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2019-05-07T10:04:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0363546519841371
       
  • The Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Is a Dynamic and Anisometric Structure:
           An In Vivo Study on Length Changes and Isometry
    • Authors: Willem A. Kernkamp, Cong Wang, Changzou Li, Hai Hu, Ewoud R.A. van Arkel, Rob G.H.H. Nelissen, Robert F. LaPrade, Samuel K. van de Velde, Tsung-Yuan Tsai
      First page: 1645
      Abstract: The American Journal of Sports Medicine, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: The American Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2019-05-09T05:08:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0363546519840278
       
  • Platelet-Rich Plasma for Patellar Tendinopathy: A Randomized Controlled
           Trial of Leukocyte-Rich PRP or Leukocyte-Poor PRP Versus Saline
    • Authors: Alex Scott, Robert F. LaPrade, Kimberly G. Harmon, Giuseppe Filardo, Elizaveta Kon, Stefano Della Villa, Roald Bahr, Havard Moksnes, Thomas Torgalsen, Jenny Lee, Jason L. Dragoo, Lars Engebretsen
      First page: 1654
      Abstract: The American Journal of Sports Medicine, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: The American Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2019-04-30T04:59:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0363546519837954
       
  • Is Microfracture Necessary' Acetabular Chondrolabral
           Debridement/Abrasion Demonstrates Similar Outcomes and Survival to
           Microfracture in Hip Arthroscopy: A Multicenter Analysis
    • Authors: Mario Hevesi, Christopher Bernard, David E. Hartigan, Bruce A. Levy, Benjamin G. Domb, Aaron J. Krych
      First page: 1670
      Abstract: The American Journal of Sports Medicine, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: The American Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2019-05-15T06:20:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0363546519845346
       
  • Autologous Matrix-Induced Chondrogenesis for Osteochondral Lesions of the
           Talus: A Clinical and Radiological 2- to 8-Year Follow-up Study
    • Authors: Lizzy Weigelt, Rebecca Hartmann, Christian Pfirrmann, Norman Espinosa, Stephan H. Wirth
      First page: 1679
      Abstract: The American Journal of Sports Medicine, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: The American Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2019-05-14T06:14:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0363546519841574
       
  • Posterior Labral Repairs of the Shoulder Among Baseball Players: Results
           and Outcomes With Minimum 2-Year Follow-up
    • Authors: James S. Kercher, Robert P. Runner, Timothy P. McCarthy, Xavier A. Duralde
      First page: 1687
      Abstract: The American Journal of Sports Medicine, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: The American Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2019-05-14T06:28:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0363546519843070
       
  • Is It Safe to Inject Corticosteroids Into the Glenohumeral Joint After
           Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair'
    • Authors: Yang-Soo Kim, Hong-Ki Jin, Hyo-Jin Lee, Hyung-Lae Cho, Wan-Seok Lee, Hyuk-Jin Jang
      First page: 1694
      Abstract: The American Journal of Sports Medicine, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: The American Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2019-05-14T07:50:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0363546519843910
       
  • Fibroblast Growth Factor 2 Enhances Tendon-to-Bone Healing in a Rat
           Rotator Cuff Repair of Chronic Tears
    • Authors: Ryuji Yonemitsu, Takuya Tokunaga, Chisa Shukunami, Katsumasa Ideo, Hitoshi Arimura, Tatsuki Karasugi, Eiichi Nakamura, Junji Ide, Yuji Hiraki, Hiroshi Mizuta
      First page: 1701
      Abstract: The American Journal of Sports Medicine, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: The American Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2019-04-30T04:57:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0363546519836959
       
  • Impaired Core Stability as a Risk Factor for the Development of Lower
           Extremity Overuse Injuries: A Prospective Cohort Study
    • Authors: Cedric De Blaiser, Roel De Ridder, Tine Willems, Luc Vanden Bossche, Lieven Danneels, Philip Roosen
      First page: 1713
      Abstract: The American Journal of Sports Medicine, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: The American Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2019-04-29T06:02:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0363546519837724
       
  • Single-Cell Profiles and Clinically Useful Properties of Human Mesenchymal
           Stem Cells of Adipose and Bone Marrow Origin
    • Authors: Wenyan Zhou, Junxin Lin, Kun Zhao, Kaixiu Jin, Qiulin He, Yejun Hu, Gang Feng, Youzhi Cai, Chen Xia, Hua Liu, Weiliang Shen, Xueqing Hu, Hongwei Ouyang
      First page: 1722
      Abstract: The American Journal of Sports Medicine, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: The American Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2019-05-17T04:25:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0363546519848678
       
 
 
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