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Publisher: Oxford University Press   (Total: 396 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 396 Journals sorted alphabetically
ACS Symposium Series     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.189, CiteScore: 0)
Acta Biochimica et Biophysica Sinica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.79, CiteScore: 2)
Adaptation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.143, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44, SJR: 2.196, CiteScore: 5)
Aesthetic Surgery J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.434, CiteScore: 1)
African Affairs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 63, SJR: 1.869, CiteScore: 2)
Age and Ageing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 88, SJR: 1.989, CiteScore: 4)
Alcohol and Alcoholism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 1.376, CiteScore: 3)
American Entomologist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
American Historical Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 147, SJR: 0.467, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Agricultural Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40, SJR: 2.113, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Clinical Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 143, SJR: 3.438, CiteScore: 6)
American J. of Epidemiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 166, SJR: 2.713, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Hypertension     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 1.322, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Jurisprudence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.281, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Legal History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.116, CiteScore: 0)
American Law and Economics Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 1.053, CiteScore: 1)
American Literary History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.391, CiteScore: 0)
Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 1.038, CiteScore: 1)
Animal Frontiers     Hybrid Journal  
Annals of Behavioral Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.423, CiteScore: 3)
Annals of Botany     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35, SJR: 1.721, CiteScore: 4)
Annals of Oncology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42, SJR: 5.599, CiteScore: 9)
Annals of the Entomological Society of America     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.722, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Work Exposures and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33, SJR: 0.728, CiteScore: 2)
AoB Plants     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.28, CiteScore: 3)
Applied Economic Perspectives and Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.858, CiteScore: 2)
Applied Linguistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56, SJR: 2.987, CiteScore: 3)
Applied Mathematics Research eXpress     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.241, CiteScore: 1)
Arbitration Intl.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Arbitration Law Reports and Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 0.731, CiteScore: 2)
Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Arthropod Management Tests     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Astronomy & Geophysics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42, SJR: 0.146, CiteScore: 0)
Behavioral Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52, SJR: 1.871, CiteScore: 3)
Bioinformatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 294, SJR: 6.14, CiteScore: 8)
Biology Methods and Protocols     Hybrid Journal  
Biology of Reproduction     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.446, CiteScore: 3)
Biometrika     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 3.485, CiteScore: 2)
BioScience     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 2.754, CiteScore: 4)
Bioscience Horizons : The National Undergraduate Research J.     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.146, CiteScore: 0)
Biostatistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 1.553, CiteScore: 2)
BJA : British J. of Anaesthesia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 161, SJR: 2.115, CiteScore: 3)
BJA Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 64)
Brain     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 67, SJR: 5.858, CiteScore: 7)
Briefings in Bioinformatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47, SJR: 2.505, CiteScore: 5)
Briefings in Functional Genomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 2.15, CiteScore: 3)
British J. for the Philosophy of Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 2.161, CiteScore: 2)
British J. of Aesthetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.508, CiteScore: 1)
British J. of Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 581, SJR: 1.828, CiteScore: 3)
British J. of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 87, SJR: 1.019, CiteScore: 2)
British Medical Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 1.355, CiteScore: 3)
British Yearbook of Intl. Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Bulletin of the London Mathematical Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.376, CiteScore: 1)
Cambridge J. of Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 61, SJR: 0.764, CiteScore: 2)
Cambridge J. of Regions, Economy and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 2.438, CiteScore: 4)
Cambridge Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.104, CiteScore: 0)
Capital Markets Law J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.222, CiteScore: 0)
Carcinogenesis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 2.135, CiteScore: 5)
Cardiovascular Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 3.002, CiteScore: 5)
Cerebral Cortex     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45, SJR: 3.892, CiteScore: 6)
CESifo Economic Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.483, CiteScore: 1)
Chemical Senses     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.42, CiteScore: 3)
Children and Schools     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.246, CiteScore: 0)
Chinese J. of Comparative Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.412, CiteScore: 0)
Chinese J. of Intl. Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.329, CiteScore: 0)
Chinese J. of Intl. Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.392, CiteScore: 2)
Christian Bioethics: Non-Ecumenical Studies in Medical Morality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.183, CiteScore: 0)
Classical Receptions J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
Clean Energy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Infectious Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 64, SJR: 5.051, CiteScore: 5)
Clinical Kidney J.     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.163, CiteScore: 2)
Communication Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 2.424, CiteScore: 3)
Communication, Culture & Critique     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.222, CiteScore: 1)
Community Development J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.268, CiteScore: 1)
Computer J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.319, CiteScore: 1)
Conservation Physiology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.818, CiteScore: 3)
Contemporary Women's Writing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.121, CiteScore: 0)
Contributions to Political Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.906, CiteScore: 1)
Critical Values     Full-text available via subscription  
Current Developments in Nutrition     Open Access  
Current Legal Problems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Current Zoology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.164, CiteScore: 2)
Database : The J. of Biological Databases and Curation     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.791, CiteScore: 3)
Digital Scholarship in the Humanities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.259, CiteScore: 1)
Diplomatic History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.45, CiteScore: 1)
DNA Research     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 2.866, CiteScore: 6)
Dynamics and Statistics of the Climate System     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Early Music     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.139, CiteScore: 0)
Economic Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 3.584, CiteScore: 3)
ELT J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.942, CiteScore: 1)
English Historical Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51, SJR: 0.612, CiteScore: 1)
English: J. of the English Association     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Environmental Entomology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.818, CiteScore: 2)
Environmental Epigenetics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Environmental History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.408, CiteScore: 1)
EP-Europace     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 2.748, CiteScore: 4)
Epidemiologic Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 4.505, CiteScore: 8)
ESHRE Monographs     Hybrid Journal  
Essays in Criticism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.113, CiteScore: 0)
European Heart J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57, SJR: 9.315, CiteScore: 9)
European Heart J. - Cardiovascular Imaging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 3.625, CiteScore: 3)
European Heart J. - Cardiovascular Pharmacotherapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
European Heart J. - Quality of Care and Clinical Outcomes     Hybrid Journal  
European Heart J. : Case Reports     Open Access  
European Heart J. Supplements     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.223, CiteScore: 0)
European J. of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.681, CiteScore: 2)
European J. of Intl. Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 179, SJR: 0.694, CiteScore: 1)
European J. of Orthodontics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.279, CiteScore: 2)
European J. of Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 1.36, CiteScore: 2)
European Review of Agricultural Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.172, CiteScore: 2)
European Review of Economic History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.702, CiteScore: 1)
European Sociological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40, SJR: 2.728, CiteScore: 3)
Evolution, Medicine, and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Family Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.018, CiteScore: 2)
Fems Microbiology Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.492, CiteScore: 4)
Fems Microbiology Letters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.79, CiteScore: 2)
Fems Microbiology Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 7.063, CiteScore: 13)
Fems Yeast Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.308, CiteScore: 3)
Food Quality and Safety     Open Access  
Foreign Policy Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 1.425, CiteScore: 1)
Forest Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.89, CiteScore: 2)
Forestry: An Intl. J. of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.133, CiteScore: 3)
Forum for Modern Language Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.104, CiteScore: 0)
French History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32, SJR: 0.118, CiteScore: 0)
French Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.148, CiteScore: 0)
French Studies Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.152, CiteScore: 0)
Gastroenterology Report     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Genome Biology and Evolution     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 2.578, CiteScore: 4)
Geophysical J. Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35, SJR: 1.506, CiteScore: 3)
German History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.161, CiteScore: 0)
GigaScience     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 5.022, CiteScore: 7)
Global Summitry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Glycobiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.493, CiteScore: 3)
Health and Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56, SJR: 0.388, CiteScore: 1)
Health Education Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.854, CiteScore: 2)
Health Policy and Planning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 1.512, CiteScore: 2)
Health Promotion Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.812, CiteScore: 2)
History Workshop J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29, SJR: 1.278, CiteScore: 1)
Holocaust and Genocide Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.105, CiteScore: 0)
Human Communication Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 2.146, CiteScore: 3)
Human Molecular Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 3.555, CiteScore: 5)
Human Reproduction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 71, SJR: 2.643, CiteScore: 5)
Human Reproduction Open     Open Access  
Human Reproduction Update     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 5.317, CiteScore: 10)
Human Rights Law Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60, SJR: 0.756, CiteScore: 1)
ICES J. of Marine Science: J. du Conseil     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50, SJR: 1.591, CiteScore: 3)
ICSID Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
ILAR J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.732, CiteScore: 4)
IMA J. of Applied Mathematics     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.679, CiteScore: 1)
IMA J. of Management Mathematics     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.538, CiteScore: 1)
IMA J. of Mathematical Control and Information     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.496, CiteScore: 1)
IMA J. of Numerical Analysis - advance access     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 1.987, CiteScore: 2)
Industrial and Corporate Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.792, CiteScore: 2)
Industrial Law J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35, SJR: 0.249, CiteScore: 1)
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43, SJR: 2.511, CiteScore: 4)
Information and Inference     Free  
Integrative and Comparative Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 1.319, CiteScore: 2)
Interacting with Computers     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.292, CiteScore: 1)
Interactive CardioVascular and Thoracic Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.762, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. Affairs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58, SJR: 1.505, CiteScore: 3)
Intl. Data Privacy Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Intl. Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.851, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. Immunology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 2.167, CiteScore: 4)
Intl. J. for Quality in Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 1.348, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Constitutional Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 63, SJR: 0.601, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Epidemiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 209, SJR: 3.969, CiteScore: 5)
Intl. J. of Law and Information Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.202, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Law, Policy and the Family     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31, SJR: 0.223, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Lexicography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.285, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Low-Carbon Technologies     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.403, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Neuropsychopharmacology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.808, CiteScore: 4)
Intl. J. of Public Opinion Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.545, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Refugee Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35, SJR: 0.389, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Transitional Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.724, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. Mathematics Research Notices     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 2.168, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. Political Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36, SJR: 1.465, CiteScore: 3)
Intl. Relations of the Asia-Pacific     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.401, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. Studies Perspectives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.983, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. Studies Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44, SJR: 2.581, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. Studies Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 1.201, CiteScore: 1)
ISLE: Interdisciplinary Studies in Literature and Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.15, CiteScore: 0)
ITNOW     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.103, CiteScore: 0)
J. of African Economies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.533, CiteScore: 1)
J. of American History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45, SJR: 0.297, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Analytical Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.065, CiteScore: 2)
J. of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.419, CiteScore: 4)
J. of Antitrust Enforcement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
J. of Applied Poultry Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.585, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42, SJR: 1.226, CiteScore: 2)
J. of Burn Care & Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.768, CiteScore: 2)
J. of Chromatographic Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.36, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Church and State     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.139, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50, SJR: 4.411, CiteScore: 5)
J. of Competition Law and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35, SJR: 0.33, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Complex Networks     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.05, CiteScore: 4)
J. of Computer-Mediated Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 26, SJR: 2.961, CiteScore: 6)
J. of Conflict and Security Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.402, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Consumer Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 41, SJR: 5.856, CiteScore: 5)

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Journal Cover
Annals of Oncology
Journal Prestige (SJR): 5.599
Citation Impact (citeScore): 9
Number of Followers: 42  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0923-7534 - ISSN (Online) 1569-8041
Published by Oxford University Press Homepage  [396 journals]
  • LBA-001Ramucirumab as second-line treatment in patients with advanced
           hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and elevated alpha-fetoprotein (AFP)
           following first-line sorafenib: Pooled efficacy and safety across two
           global randomized Phase 3 studies (REACH-2 and REACH)
    • Authors: Zhu A; Finn R, Galle P, et al.
      Abstract: Background: Ramucirumab (RAM), a human IgG1 monoclonal antibody, inhibits ligand activation of VEGFR2. REACH and REACH-2 were two global, randomized, double-blind, placebo (PBO)-controlled multicenter, phase 3 studies of RAM vs PBO in patients with HCC after prior sorafenib. REACH-2 was designed to confirm the ramucirumab treatment benefit for patients with baseline AFP ≥400 ng/mL first observed in the prespecified subgroup of patients in REACH with AFP ≥400 ng/mL. The primary endpoint of REACH-2 was met demonstrating an improved overall survival (OS) compared to PBO, a result consistent with that in patients with AFP ≥400 ng/mL in REACH. Pooled analyses of patients from REACH-2 and REACH with baseline AFP ≥400 ng/mL was performed.
      PubDate: Sun, 24 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy208
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • LBA-002Overall survival results from a phase III trial of
           trifluridine/tipiracil versus placebo in patients with metastatic gastric
           cancer refractory to standard therapies (TAGS)
    • Authors: Tabernero J; Shitara K, Dvorkin M, et al.
      Abstract: Background: Trifluridine/tipiracil (FTD/TPI), an orally administered combination agent approved for patients with refractory metastatic colorectal cancer, demonstrated promising clinical activity in a refractory gastric cancer Japanese Phase II trial. Therefore, we initiated the TAGS study (NCT02500043) to evaluate the efficacy and safety of FTD/TPI in patients with heavily pretreated metastatic gastric cancer (mGC).
      PubDate: Sun, 24 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy208.001
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • LBA-003Withdrawn
    • PubDate: Sun, 24 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy208.002
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • LBA-004Efficacy and safety results from IMblaze370, a randomised Phase III
           study comparing atezolizumab+cobimetinib and atezolizumab monotherapy vs
           regorafenib in chemotherapy-refractory metastatic colorectal cancer
    • Authors: Bendell J; Ciardiello F, Tabernero J, et al.
      Abstract: Background: Patients with chemotherapy-refractory microsatellite stable (MSS) metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) are a population with limited treatment options and relatively short survival. Atezolizumab (an anti–PD-L1 mAb) inhibits the binding of PD-L1 to its receptors PD-1 and B7.1, leading to the re-invigoration of tumour-specific T-cell immunity. Cobimetinib inhibits MEK1/MEK2 in the MAPK pathway, and blocking the MAPK pathway has been shown to favourably alter the tumour, tumour microenvironment and T-cell responses to promote anti-tumour immune activity. We hypothesized that combining atezolizumab with cobimetinib may allow better immune recognition and generate greater anti-tumour effects than either agent alone in MSS/microsatellite instability-low (MSI-L) metastatic CRC. Here we report the primary analysis results from IMblaze370 (NCT02788279), a global, multi-centre, open-label, randomised Phase III trial comparing atezolizumab+cobimetinib and atezolizumab monotherapy with standard-of-care regorafenib in patients with previously treated, unresectable locally advanced or metastatic CRC.
      PubDate: Sun, 24 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy208.003
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • LBA-005KEYNOTE-061: Phase 3 study of pembrolizumab vs paclitaxel for
           previously treated advanced gastric or gastroesophageal junction (G/GEJ)
           cancer
    • Authors: Shitara K; Özgüroğlu M, Bang Y, et al.
      Abstract: Background: Pembrolizumab showed promising antitumor activity and a manageable safety profile in patients with pretreated G/GEJ cancer in KEYNOTE-012 and KEYNOTE-059. KEYNOTE-061 (NCT02370498) was a global, open-label phase 3 study of pembrolizumab vs paclitaxel for previously treated advanced G/GEJ adenocarcinoma that progressed after first-line chemotherapy containing platinum and fluoropyrimidine.
      PubDate: Sun, 24 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy208.004
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • O-001Efficacy of TAS-120, an irreversible fibroblast growth factor
           receptor (FGFR) inhibitor, in cholangiocarcinoma patients with FGFR
           pathway alterations who were previously treated with chemotherapy and
           other FGFR inhibitors
    • Authors: Meric-Bernstam F; Arkenau H, Tran B, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: TAS-120, an oral and highly selective, irreversible FGFR1-4 tyrosine kinase inhibitor, has demonstrated inhibition of cancer cell growth in human xenografts of tumors bearing FGFR aberrations. TAS-120 inhibited mutant and wild-type FGFR2 with similar IC50 (wild-type FGFR2, 0.9 nM; V5651, 1-3 nM; N550H, 3.6 nM; E566G, 2.4 nM) and has shown efficacy in cell lines with acquired resistance to FGFR inhibitors. In this Phase I study in patients with advanced solid tumors, TAS-120 was evaluated at 8-24 mg once daily (QD). 20 mg QD was determined as the maximum tolerated dose/recommended Phase II dose, while 24 mg QD had dose-limiting toxicity. Here we report results from cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) patients enrolled in this Phase I study.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy149
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • O-002Geographic variation in systemic treatment of metastatic pancreatic
           adenocarcinoma (mPAC) patients in real world across Europe
    • Authors: Taieb J; Carrato A, àMellbring , et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: mPAC remains associated with poor outcomes. While new compounds/combinations continue to be explored, treatment options are still limited. Data on systemic treatment choices in mPAC and outcomes outside clinical trials are scarce. The goal of this pan-European project was to generate data on diagnosis, treatment patterns and outcomes from the records of patients who completed first-line mPAC treatment across Europe.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy149.001
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • O-003Gemcitabine with nab-paclitaxel in patients with locally advanced or
           metastatic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC): A quality of life
           randomized cross-over study (QOLINPAC)
    • Authors: Chiritescu G; Dumon K, Verslype C, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Nab-paclitaxel added to standard gemcitabine significantly improves overall survival, progression-free survival and response rates when compared to gemcitabine alone in metastatic PDAC. Baseline quality of life (QOL) indicators such as global health status (GHS) may be predictive for survival in this disease setting, together with clinical variables and tumour markers.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy149.002
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • O-004Selected subgroup analyses of liposomal irinotecan (nal-IRI) in
           patients with metastatic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (mPDAC) in the
           global NAPOLI-1 phase III trial
    • Authors: Mercadé T; Lee K, Lakatos G, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: NAPOLI1 (NCT01494506; Wang-Gillam et al., Lancet 2016;387:545-57) was a global phase 3 study of patients with mPDAC who progressed following gemcitabine-based therapy. In patients receiving nalIRI+5FU/LV, median overall survival (mOS) was significantly higher (6.1 months) compared with 5FU/LV (4.2 months; unstratified HR = 0.67; P = 0.012). Here, we summarise four separate NAPOLI-1 subgroup analyses investigating the effect of selected baseline parameters.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy149.003
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • O-005A multicentre, prospective clinical evaluation study for analyzing
           RAS mutational status utilizing plasma circulating tumor DNA in patients
           with metastatic colorectal cancer
    • Authors: Kagawa Y; Kato T, Bando H, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Liquid biopsy has emerged as an excellent molecular diagnostic tool for assessing predominant spatial and temporal intratumoral heterogeneity with minimal invasiveness. The OncoBEAM RAS kit is a circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) test intended for detecting plasma RAS mutational status in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). We conducted multicentre, prospective clinical evaluation study investigating the concordance of RAS mutational status between plasma ctDNA and tumor tissue DNA in patients with mCRC.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy149.004
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • O-006Ultra-selection of metastatic colorectal cancer patients using next
           generation sequencing platform to improve clinical efficacy of anti-EGFR
           therapy
    • Authors: Vidal J; Dalmeses A, Vivas C, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Extended RAS and BRAF analysis is mandatory in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients to establish the best therapeutic strategy. Recent studies aimed to determine the optimal threshold of RAS mutated subclones to identify patients most likely to benefit from anti-EGFR treatment (Laurent-Puig, CCR 2015; Santos C. Molec Can Ther 2017). Our aim is to assess the clinical relevance of highly sensitive Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technology to detect point mutations in KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, and EGFR S492R in tissue tumor samples and its correlation with clinical outcome in terms of progression-free survival (PFS), overall response rate (ORR) and overall survival (OS) in mCRC patients treated with chemotherapy plus anti-EGFR or anti-VEGF therapy.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy149.005
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • O-007Liquid biopsy allows predicting benefit from rechallenge with
           cetuximab(cet)+irinotecan(iri) in RAS/BRAF wild-type mCRC patients(pts)
           with resistance to 1st-line cet+iri: Final results and translational
           analyses of the CRICKET study by GONO
    • Authors: Rossini D; Cremolini C, Conca E, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: CRICKET (NCT02296203) was designed to investigate the activity of the rechallenge with cet and iri as 3 rd -line treatment in RAS/BRAF wild-type mCRC pts with acquired resistance to 1st-line cet- and iri-based therapy. The role of liquid biopsies as a tool to identify pts more likely to benefit from this strategy was investigated.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy149.006
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • O-008The prognostic role of microsatellite status, tumor mutational burden
           and protein expression in CRC
    • Authors: Lam J; Kim Y, Cecchi F, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Comprehensive molecular profiling of CRC can inform treatment decisions by identifying patient subgroups at varying risks of death. Microsatellite instability (MSI) is prognostic in CRC and is used to select patients for immunotherapy. High tumor mutational burden (TMB) is associated with genomic instability and is prognostic in melanoma. Expression of p16 protein is prognostic in many tumor types. We used proteomic and genomic profiling to measure MSI, TMB and p16 in CRC tumors and to assess associations with patient survival. The global proteome data was also used to identify potentially prognostic protein biomarkers. 
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy149.007
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • O-009A Phase II multi institutional study of nivolumab in patients with
           advanced refractory biliary tract cancers (BTC)
    • Authors: Kim R; Kim D, Alese O, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Biliary tract cancers (BTC) typically include intra and extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and cancers of the gallbladder. There is no established second line option for patients with advanced BTC who have failed one prior systemic therapy. There are pre-clinical and small series of clinical data which supports the usage of immune modulatory agents in BTC. Therefore we propose to evaluate the anti-PD1 agent nivolumab in advanced, refractory BTC.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy149.008
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • O-010Cisplatin/5-fluorouracil +/- panitumumab for patients with
           non-resectable, advanced or metastatic esophageal squamous cell cancer: A
           randomized phase III AIO/EORTC trial with an extensive biomarker program
    • Authors: Moehler M; Maderer A, Thuss-Patience P, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Most esophageal squamous cell cancer (ESCC) patients (pts) have advanced disease at time of diagnosis. Chemotherapy (CTX) improved overall survival (OS), but still with limited impact. Prior studies suggested increased efficacy of EGFR antibodies (AB) combined with cisplatin (C) / 5-fluorouracil (F).
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy149.009
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • O-011Assessment of tumor response, AFP response, and time to progression
           in the phase 3 CELESTIAL trial of cabozantinib versus placebo in advanced
           hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)
    • Authors: Merle P; Rimassa L, Ryoo B, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Cabozantinib inhibits tyrosine kinases including MET, vascular endothelial growth factor receptors, and AXL. In the CELESTIAL trial (NCT01908426), cabozantinib improved overall survival and progression-free survival compared with placebo in patients with previously treated advanced HCC. The study met the primary end point, with a median overall survival of 10.2 months with cabozantinib versus 8.0 months with placebo (hazard ratio [HR], 0.76; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.63–0.92; P = 0.0049). Median progression-free survival was 5.2 months with cabozantinib versus 1.9 months with placebo (HR, 0.44; 95% CI, 0.36–0.52; P < 0.0001), and the objective response rate was 4% with cabozantinib versus 0.4% with placebo (P = 0.0086) per Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors v1.1. Here, we report a secondary analysis of tumor response including the best percentage change at any timepoint in tumor target lesion size, the best percentage change at any timepoint in serum alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) levels, and time to progression (TTP).
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy149.010
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • O-012Safety and effectiveness of regorafenib in patients with metastatic
           colorectal cancer (mCRC) in routine clinical practice: Final analysis from
           the prospective, observational CORRELATE study
    • Authors: Ducreux M; Petersen L, Öhler L, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: In the randomized, phase 3 CORRECT and CONCUR trials, regorafenib significantly improved overall survival (OS) versus placebo in patients with mCRC who progressed on standard therapies. The approved dose of regorafenib is 160 mg daily administered 3 weeks on/1 week off. The aims of CORRELATE (NCT02042144) were to characterize the safety and effectiveness of regorafenib for the treatment of mCRC in real-world clinical practice. Here we present the results of the final analysis.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy149.011
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • O-013Safety and efficacy of trifluridine/tipiracil in previously treated
           metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC): Preliminary results from the phase
           IIIb, international, open-label, early-access PRECONNECT study
    • Authors: Falcone A; André T, Edeline J, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Trifluridine/tipiracil (FTD/TPI) was approved following the results of the RECOURSE study (Mayer et al. N Engl J Med 2015;372:1909-19 ), which demonstrated that FTD/TPI significantly improved overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) versus placebo. FTD/TPI is approved for treatment of previously treated mCRC patients, in the same setting as regorafenib. In October 2016, a phase IIIb PRECONNECT study was set up in mCRC patients to assess safety and efficacy of FTD/TPI in daily practice (NCT03306394).
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy149.012
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • O-014Regorafenib Dose Optimization Study (ReDOS): Randomized phase II
           trial to evaluate escalating dosing strategy and pre-emptive topical
           steroids for regorafenib in refractory metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC)
           – An ACCRU Network study
    • Authors: Bekaii-Saab T; Ou F, Anderson D, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Regorafenib (Rego) confers a survival benefit in refractory mCRC patients (pts). Toxicities such as palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia syndrome (PPES) have limited its use. Despite absence of supportive data, various dosing variations are used in clinical practice.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy149.013
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • O-015A two arm phase II study of FOLFIRI in combination with standard or
           escalating dose of cetuximab as first line treatment for metastatic
           colorectal cancer: Everest 2 final results
    • Authors: Chiritescu G; Dumon K, Mercadé T, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Adding cetuximab to first-line FOLFIRI improves clinical and surgical outcomes in RAS wild-type metastatic colorectal (mCRC) patients. Skin-toxicity secondary to cetuximab has been reported to be related to the activity of the cetuximab-based regimens.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy149.014
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • O-016First-line FOLFOX plus panitumumab followed by 5-FU/LV plus
           panitumumab or single-agent panitumumab as maintenance therapy in patients
           with RAS wild-type metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC): The VALENTINO
           study
    • Authors: Pietrantonio F; Morano F, Corallo S, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Since mCRC registration first-line trials scheduled the continuation of doublets plus anti-EGFRs until progressive disease (PD), there is still no evidence if de-escalating treatment intensity after an anti-EGFR-based induction phase might be not inferior in terms of disease control, while reducing toxicity burden and improving quality of life. The MACRO-2 trial suggested that maintenance with cetuximab alone after mFOLFOX + cetuximab achieved a progression-free survival (PFS)% not inferior than mFOLFOX + cetuximab until PD in KRAS exon 2 wild-type patients.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy149.015
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • O-017FOLFOXIRI plus bevacizumab (bev) followed by maintenance with bev
           alone or bev plus metronomic chemotherapy (metroCT) in mCRC: Final results
           of the phase II randomized MOMA trial by GONO
    • Authors: Marmorino F; Cremolini C, Bergamo F, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: The MOMA study investigated whether the addition of metroCT to bev as maintenance treatment following 4 months of upfront therapy with FOLFOXIRI plus bev could improve PFS of mCRC patients. From May 2012 to March 2015, 232 patients, mostly RAS (65%) or BRAF (9%) mutant, were randomized in 16 Italian centers. The primary endpoint was not met. Here we provide final clinical results of the study including OS findings, subgroup analyses and treatments after progression.  
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy149.016
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • O-018Plasma miRNAs signature validation for early detection of colorectal
           cancer
    • Authors: Herreros-Villanueva M; Durán-Sanchón S, Martín A, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Specific miRNA signatures in biological fluids can facilitate earlier detection of the tumors being then minimally invasive diagnostic biomarkers. Circulating miRNAs have also emerged as promising diagnostic biomarkers for CRC screening. In this study we investigated the performance of a specific signature of miRNA in plasma samples in order to design a robust predictive model able to distinguish healthy individuals from those with Colorectal cancer and Advanced Adenomas.  
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy149.017
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • O-019PETACC-6: Preop chemoradiation and postop chemotherapy (capecitabine
           +/- oxaliplatin) in locally advanced rectal cancer: Overall survival after
           long term follow-up
    • Authors: Schmoll H; Haustermans K, Price T, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: The PETACC-6 trial investigated the role of oxaliplatin in combination with preoperative capecitabine-based chemoradiation (CRT) and postoperative capecitabine (CT) to improve disease-free and overall survival (DFS, OS) in locally advanced rectal cancer.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy149.018
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • O-020Activity of larotrectinib in patients with TRK fusion GI malignancies
    • Authors: Nathenson M; Demetri G, Lassen U, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: TRK fusions arise from aberrant rearrangements of neurotrophic receptor kinase genes NTRK1-3 with a variety of gene partners; these are constitutively active ligand-independent oncogenic drivers in a broad range of solid tumors. The highly selective TRK inhibitor larotrectinib achieved objective responses of 75% by independent review (80% by investigator assessment) in patients with a wide variety of TRK fusion cancers (Drilon et al., NEJM, 378:731-739, 2018). We report here on the activity and safety of larotrectinib in the treatment of GI malignancies from three separate studies (NCT02122913, NCT02637687, and NCT02576431).
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy149.019
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • O-021Safety and antitumor activity of pembrolizumab in patients with
           advanced microsatellite instability–high (MSI-H) colorectal cancer:
           KEYNOTE-164
    • Authors: Le D; Kavan P, Kim T, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Approval of pembrolizumab as treatment for adult and pediatric patients with unresectable or metastatic previously treated MSI-H or mismatch repair–deficient cancer, regardless of tumor type or site, was partly based on data from cohort A of the phase 2 KEYNOTE-164 (NCT02460198) study of patients with MSI-H colorectal cancer (CRC) after ≥2 prior lines of standard therapy. Data are presented herein from cohort B of KEYNOTE-164, which was conducted to evaluate pembrolizumab in patients with metastatic MSI-H CRC previously treated with ≥1 line of therapy.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy149.020
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • O-022Phase II study evaluating trifluridine/tipiracil + bevacizumab and
           capecitabine + bevacizumab in first-line unresectable metastatic
           colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients who are non-eligible for intensive
           therapy (TASCO1): Results of the primary analysis
    • Authors: Lesniewski-Kmak K; Moiseenko V, Saunders M, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Trifluridine/tipiracil, also known as TAS-102, is a novel chemotherapy approved in patients with mCRC refractory to, or not candidates for standard therapies. A phase I/II study evaluated the combination of trifluridine/tipiracil and bevacizumab in mCRC patients who were refractory to standard therapies and showed encouraging antitumor activity with manageable toxicity (C-TASK FORCE) (Kuboki Y et al. Lancet Oncology, 2017). These promising results led to the initiation of a global non-comparative phase 2 study, TASCO1, to evaluate the efficacy and safety of trifluridine/tipiracil + bevacizumab (TT-B) and capecitabine + bevacizumab (C-B) in first-line unresectable mCRC patients who are non-eligible for standard first-line therapy.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy149.021
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • O-023FOLFOX/bevacizumab +/- irinotecan in advanced colorectal cancer
           (CHARTA): Long term outcome
    • Authors: Schmoll H; Garlipp B, Junghanß C, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: FOLFOXIRI/bevacizumab (Bev) was superior to FOLFIRI/Bev in the TRIBE trial. However the comparison with FOLFOX/Bev as the alternative standard was not proven. The CHARTA trial was developed in parallel to TRIBE, but with FOLFOX/Bev as control arm; for comparison reasons TRIBE and CHARTA used the same dose and schedule.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy149.022
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • O-024mFOLFOXIRI + Panitumumab versus FOLFOXIRI as first-line treatment in
           patients with RAS wild- type metastatic colorectal cancer m(CRC): a
           randomized phase II VOLFI trial of the AIO (AIO- KRK0109)
    • Authors: Geissler M; Klingler T, Riera-Knorrenschield J, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Triple chemotherapy with an anti-EGFR reported promising activity with some safety concerns in single arm phase II trials. This trial evaluated activity and safety of mFOLFOXIRI + panitumumab vs FOLFOXIRI in ECOG 0-1, primarily non-resectable mCRC patients. 
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy149.023
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • O-025Association between tumor mutation burden (TMB) and MLH1, PMS2, MSH2,
           and MSH6 alterations in 395 microsatellite instability-high (MSI-High)
           gastrointestinal (GI) tumors
    • Authors: Salem M; Grothey A, Goldberg R, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Correlation between TMB and objective response to checkpoint inhibitors has been shown. MSI-High tumors usually exhibit high TMB. Relationship between the level of TMB and alterations in the four-mismatch repair deficiency (MMR) genes in gastrointestinal tumors has not been comprehensively studied.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy149.024
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • O-026Total circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) as a prognostic biomarker in
           metastatic colorectal cancer prior to first-line oxaliplatin-based
           chemotherapy
    • Authors: Hamfjord J; Guren T, Dajani O, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Small fragments of circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) can be detected in blood from cancer patients. Previous studies have shown a prognostic value mainly prior to second and subsequent lines of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). We aimed to analyze the prognostic value of total plasma cfDNA in a patient population prior to first-line oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy for non-resectable mCRC in the NORDIC-VII study.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy149.025
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • O-027BEACON CRC study safety lead-in: Assessment of the BRAF inhibitor
           encorafenib + MEK inhibitor binimetinib + anti–epidermal growth factor
           receptor antibody cetuximab for BRAFV600E metastatic colorectal cancer
    • Authors: Van Cutsem E; Cuyle P, Huijberts S, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: The BRAFV600E mutation, which occurs in 10%–15% of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC), confers a poor prognosis. After failure of first-line approaches, standard therapies in such patients provide limited benefits, with objective response rates (ORRs) <10%, progression-free survival (PFS) of ∼2 months, and overall survival (OS) of 4–6 months. BEACON CRC (NCT02928224) is an ongoing phase 3 trial with a primary endpoint of OS for the BRAF inhibitor encorafenib (ENCO) + MEK inhibitor binimetinib (BINI) + anti–epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antibody cetuximab (CETUX) vs control arm (irinotecan/CETUX or FOLFIRI/CETUX) in patients with BRAFV600E mCRC with disease progression after 1–2 previous regimens. To assess the safety and efficacy of the ENCO + BINI + CETUX triplet, a safety lead-in (SLI) was conducted in the BEACON CRC trial.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy149.026
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • O-028Long-term effect of peripheral sensory neuropathy (PSN) of 3 or 6
           months oxaliplatin-based adjuvant chemotherapy for stage III colon cancer:
           ACHIEVE as part of the IDEA collaboration
    • Authors: Takeuchi S; Yoshino T, Yamanaka T, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: ACHIEVE, a part of the IDEA collaboration, was a multicenter study randomizing patients with stage III resected colon cancer to either 3 or 6 months of mFOLFOX6/CAPOX. Previous our report showed that the frequency of PSN during the treatment was markedly lower in the 3 months arm. As many patients undergoing adjuvant chemotherapy are cured and will survive long-term, irreversible PSN is a significant issue. The present study thus aimed to evaluate the frequency of long-lasting PSN in the 3 months arm as compared to the 6 months arm.  
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy149.027
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • O-029The impact of combining Selective Internal Radiation Therapy (SIRT)
           with sorafenib on overall survival in patients with advanced
           hepatocellular carcinoma: The SORAMIC trial palliative cohort
    • Authors: Ricke J; Sangro B, Amthauer H, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: SORAMIC is an RCT comprising diagnostic, local ablation and palliative studies. Based on the result of the diagnostic study patients were assigned to either the local ablation or palliative cohort. The palliative cohort (reported here) was designed to determine the efficacy and safety of combining SIRT (Selective Internal Radiation Therapy) with sorafenib in patients with advanced HCC.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy149.028
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • O-030Randomized trial of irinotecan and cetuximab (IC) versus irinotecan,
           cetuximab and ramucirumab (ICR) as 2nd line therapy of advanced colorectal
           cancer (CRC) following oxaliplatin and bevacizumb based therapy: Result of
           E7208
    • Authors: Hochster H; Catalano P, O'Dwyer P, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: While both anti-VEGF(R) and EGFR antibodies have activity in metastatic RAS wild type CRC, the combination of the two appeared to be detrimental when combined with chemotherapy in unselected CRC patients. We undertook this study to determine whether the anti-VEGFR antibody, ramucirumab, improved activity of Irinotecan and Cetuximab as 2nd line therapy in KRASwt CRC patients, who previously received FOLFOX or CAPOX with bevacizumab (bev) first line therapy, and were now progressing.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy149.029
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-001Factors influencing late presentation for health care among men with
           cancer esophagus attending Hospice Africa Uganda (HAU)
    • Authors: Bandese N.
      Abstract: Introduction: Late presentation for health care among patients with Cancer Esophagus is a major problem in Uganda. Cancer of Esophagus is one of the curable cancers if caught in its early stages. World Health Organization (2010) reports that esophageal cancer is the second most common cancer among men and was responsible for over 25000 deaths in 2010, approximately 80% occurred in developing countries. It was projected that it will increase by 25% over the next 10 years if nothing is done like putting prevention measures of adequate screening and treatment into place.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-002A novel patient derived orthotopic xenograft model of
           gastro-esophageal junction cancer: Key platform for translational
           discoveries
    • Authors: Veeranki O; Tong Z, Mejia A, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Mouse models of gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) cancer strive to recapitulate the intratumoral heterogeneity and cellular crosstalk within patient tumors to improve clinical translation. GEJ cancers remain to be a therapeutic challenge due to a lack of reliable mouse model for preclinical drug testing.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.001
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-003Targeted-sequencing and comprehensive molecular profiling of gastric
           signet ring cell carcinoma
    • Authors: Wei J; Wu N, Wang Y, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Gastric cancer is a heterogeneous disease with various molecular subtypes. Signet ring cell carcinoma is characterized by a highly malignant phenotype of gastric cancer with no known effective molecularly targeted therapies. The limited knowledge of the molecular mechanisms underlying signet ring cell carcinoma hinders the development of therapeutic strategies.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.002
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-004MicroRNAs and CDH1 regulation in intestinal-type gastric cancer
    • Authors: Molinari C; Rossi T, Abou Khouzam R, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Gastric cancer (GC) remains a major source of cancer morbidity and mortality worldwide. The most commonly accepted histologic classification of this disease separates it into two main subtypes: intestinal (IGC) and diffuse (DGC). The cadherin family is a cell adhesion-related protein family largely implicated in carcinogenesis of both histotypes, with the best-known member being E-cadherin. This calcium-dependent transmembrane adhesion protein is encoded by CDH1 tumor suppressor gene. While complete loss of E-cadherin is predominant in DGC, more subtle factors can be involved in its modulation in IGC, in which some level of protein is often retained. Such factors include miRNAs that play a role in gene expression dosage either directly by interacting with the CDH1 transcript, or indirectly by acting on genes that are part of its regulatory network. Aim of the study was to evaluate the levels of specific miRNAs involved in the regulation of CDH1 expression in IGC.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.003
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-005Retrospective analysis of the frequency of the ALK translocation
           obtained by immunohistochemistry in gastric adenocarcinomas in a single
           Costa Rican hospital
    • Authors: Corrales-Rodriguez L; Porras J, Araya M, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Gastric cancer is now the fourth most common malignancy worldwide, and the second cause of mortality, with 738,000 deaths per year (10% of cancer deaths). This tumour encompasses a heterogeneous collection of histologic, anatomic, epidemiologic subtypes associated with a variety of known and unknown environmental and genetic factors. Numerous receptors such as mesenchymal epithelial transition (MET) receptor, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), fibroblastic growth factor receptor (FGFR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER 2) have been shown potential to target specific pathways for tumour cell growth. Hence, more active searching of novel targets in gastric cancer is essential. The anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) tyrosine kinase receptor has emerged recently as a potentially relevant biomarker and therapeutic target. The EML4-alk translocation has been analyzed in other types of cancer. The frequency of this translocation in gastric cancer has not been widely evaluated.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.004
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-006Personalization of treatment for patients with stomach cancer using
           molecular genetic markers
    • Authors: Bykov I; Mikerova M, Nemtsova M, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Surgical treatment is the most effective method of treatment of gastric cancer, however this method gives good results only at early stage of the disease. One way to improve the results of a gastric cancer patient’s treatment is the strategy of personalization based on implication of gastric cancer molecular genetic markers.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.005
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-007Neoadjuvant FLOT: Real world toxicity from a specialist UK centre
    • Authors: Kordatou Z; Papaxoinis G, Waddell T, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Perioperative FLOT (5FU/leucovorin, oxaliplatin, docetaxel) improved all efficacy endpoints in resectable gastroesophageal adenocarcinoma (GOA), compared to ECF/X. This analysis aims to assess the tolerability of patients of our institution, and to compare with the reported toxicity rates of the AIO-FLOT4 trial.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.006
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-008Treatment decisions in adolescents and young adults with gastric
           cancer in North Estonia Medical Centre from 2007-2016
    • Authors: Lõhmus M; Lepik K, Kütt T, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: According to the Estonian National Cancer Registry, approximately 400 new GC cases are diagnosed in Estonia annually, among them 18 patients under the age of 45 years. The present study aimed to characterize the diagnosis and treatment of GC in young Estonian patients. The current work is a single institution experience of the last 10–year data from 2007 to 2016.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.007
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-009Epidemiology and overall survival of gastric carcinoma patients
           (about 210 cases) experience of medical oncology department of CHU Hassan
           II Fez
    • Authors: Erraichi H; Benbrahim Z, Berrad S, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer mortality in men and the fourth on women, due to its aggressiveness it represents a challenging oncology session. It is usually late-onset discovery, which leads to poor prognosis despite advances in surgery and therapeutic oncology.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.008
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-010Berberine inhibits the migration and invasion depending on HNF4αvia
           Wnt/beta-catenin pathway in gastric cancer
    • Authors: Hu Q Yi P.
      Abstract: Introduction: Metastasis and invasion of cancer cells are important features of advanced gastric cancer. WNT/β-catenin signaling plays an important role in the metastasis and invasion of tumor cells. Previous studies found the relationship between the expression of HNF4α and gastric cancer invasion and metastasis, berberine can down-regulate the expression of HNF4α in gastric cancer cells. Therefore, this study attempts to explain the anti-tumor effect of berberine by inhibiting the metastasis and invasion of gastric cancer cells.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.009
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-011Estrone and prolactin can be markers of risk of metastasis and
           pre-metastatic niche in patients with stomach cancer
    • Authors: Kit O; Frantsiyants E, Bandovkina V, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: The tumor ability to metastasize can be determined by the characteristics of the tumor itself and of surrounding tissues. Together with the formation of the pre-metastatic niche, the tumor niche formation takes place in the primary tumor, and changes in hormonal profile are important. The peritoneum, including the greater omentum, is the most common site of stomach cancer (SC) metastasis, while it is not a metastatic niche for colorectal cancer (CRC). Our purpose was to study changes in the hormonal profile of pre-metastatic niches – the peritoneum and omentum, and to determine parameters for predicting the stomach cancer progression and metastasis.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.010
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-013Redox forms of glutathione mark the aggressiveness of stomach cancer
    • Authors: Goroshinskaya I; Surikova E, Frantsiyants E, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: The redox status is important for the gastric epithelium function. The purpose of the study was to compare levels of reduced and oxidized glutathione and thiol status in stomach tumors of various histological types and grades.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.012
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-014Diagnostic and therapeutic efficacy of endoscopic enucleation for
           subepithelial tumors originating from muscularis propria layer
    • Authors: Bang B; Ko E, Kwon K, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Gastric subepithelial tumors originated from the muscularis propria (MP) are partly benign tumors, but some MP tumors have malignant potential, especially gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). Therefore, accurate diagnosis of MP tumor is essential. The aim of this study was to evaluate the utility of endoscopic enucleation for the diagnosis and treatment of MP tumors.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.013
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-015Patient derived xenografts from American minority gastric cancer
           patients
    • Authors: Wang S; Zhu M, Hammer S, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: In the United States, race and ethnicity are associated with different gastric cancer epidemiology and outcomes with Black and Hispanic/Latino patients having worse outcomes than White and Asian patients. Notably, Black and Hispanic/Latino patients are significantly underrepresented in large gastric cancer clinical trials and thus it is unclear if currently defined treatment algorithms for gastric cancer are optimized for these patients. Patient derived xenografts (PDX) can be a useful surrogate to model human disease.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.014
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-016Impact of HIF-1alpha and PKM1 expression on acquisition of paclitaxel
           resistance in gastric cancer
    • Authors: Fushida S; Okazaki M, Kinoshita J, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: In gastric cancer patients, one of the greatest obstacles to effective chemotherapy is the development of chemoresistance. It has been previously noted that HIF-1α was concerned with chemoresistance acquisition, and it was recently noted about the association of PKM1 and chemoresistance. The purpose of this study was to identify the effect of HIF-1α and PKM1 expression in leading to acquired chemoresistance using established paclitaxel-resistant gastric cancer cell line.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.015
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-017Overall survival of patients with HCC treated with sorafenib versus
           patients treated with supportive therapy in evidence in Oncology Cabinet
           of Municipal Hospital of Pascani in session 2013-2018
    • Authors: Bosteanu E; Hincu V.
      Abstract: Introduction: Sorafenib is a standard systemic therapy in patients with advanced HCC and well preserved hepatic function (stage C BCLC)and the patients with HCC in intermediate stage who showing progression after TACE. In the case of the progression of the disease or the intolerance to sorafenib is preferred the administration of the BSC. In the patients with terminal disease and with sever diminished function and a poor performance status is recommended just BSC because the survival of these patients is 6 months maximum.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.016
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-018The role of endothelial filtration for locoregional targeting of
           hepatic tumours with endothelium-specific antibodies and nanoparticles
    • Authors: Winkler N; Strübing F, Kyuno D, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Tumour targeting using the microvascular system represents a highly promising approach for therapy of hepatic tumours. The aim of this study was to assess the role of endothelial filtration for locoregional targeting of hepatic tumours using endothelium-specific antibodies (Abs) and nanoparticles (NP).
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.017
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-019Clinic-pathological pattern of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in
           Egypt
    • Authors: Elghazaly H; Gaballah A, Eldin N.
      Abstract: Introduction: The incidence of liver cancer is one of the highest in the world. HCC represents up to 90% of all liver malignancies. In Egypt, HCC constitutes a significant public health problem. Where it is responsible for 33.63% and 13.54% of all cancers in males and females respectively. Hepatocellular carcinoma occurs in a number of preexisting conditions that commonly includes hepatitis C and B, alcoholic and nonalcoholic cirrhosis. It has a poor prognosis after discovery, which is usually at a late stage of disease. This had been strongly linked to the hepatitis C virus epidemic that affected around 10-15% of the Egyptian population during the last 3 decades, and was reported as the highest prevalence of HCV in the world.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.018
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-020Immunohistochemical study of KRAS, NRAS, BRAF and MSI phenotype in
           small bowel adenocarcinoma
    • Authors: Michalaki V; Frangulidis G, Poydorou A, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Small-bowel adenocarcinomas (SBAs) are rare cancers with a significantly lower incidence, later stage at diagnosis, and worse overall survival than other intestinal-derived cancers. Activating KRAS and/or BRAF mutations have been identified as predictors of resistance to anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) The aim of this study was to perform a comprehensive immunohistochemical analysis of KRAS, NRAS, V600E BRAF mutations and microsatellite instability using a cohort of surgically resected cases in our institution.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.019
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-021Molecular profiling of gastrointestinal cancer
    • Authors: Apostolou P; Papadimitriou M, Parsonidis P, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Gastro-intestinal cancer (GI) include a variety of cancers that affect esophagus, gallbladder, liver, pancreas, stomach, intestine and other organs involved in digestive system. The above types of cancers appear higher mortality rates in comparison with cancers in other systems. Therefore, it is essential the optimization of treatment management. Even though great achievements have been performed the last years in prediction of cancer therapy, treatment is based in specific markers, avoiding genes that affect or affected through signaling transduction pathways. The present study aimed to analyze the gene expression in cancer cells, representing different GI cancer types and compare them with circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from patients and cells from normal donors.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.020
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-022Clinico epidemiological and therapeutic profile of GIST: Oran
           center's experience
    • Authors: Boudinar F; Sara Z, Larbaoui B.
      Abstract: Introduction: A gastro-intestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is one of the most common mesenchymal tumors of the gastro-intestinal tract (1-3% of all gastro intestinal malignancies). Gastro intestinal stromal tumors are Kit – expressing and Kit (tyrosine kinase receptor – CD117) – signaling driven mesenchymal tumors. The most common location of GIST is stomach (50 – 60%) and small intestine (30 – 40%). Surgical resection of the local disease is the gold standard therapy, the mitotic count is a reliable parameter of prognosis. Imatinib mesylate has shown in main studies tumor control about 80% on metastatic GIST.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.021
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-023Gastrointestinal stromal tumours: Retrospective review of an
           institution
    • Authors: Silva A; Magalhães H, Vieira C, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST) are rare tumours, accounting 1-3% of all gastrointestinal (GI) cancers. Our purpose was to review the experience of a single institution in advanced GIST, aiming on demographics, treatment and outcomes.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.022
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-024Varying distribution of tissue plasminogen activators in
           gastrointestinal adenocarcinoma
    • Authors: Kit O; Frantsiyants E, Kozlova L, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: The purpose of the study was to compare the activity of urokinase (uPA) and tissue (tPA) plasminogen activators and the content of their proenzyme forms (pro-uPA, pro-tPA) in adenocarcinoma of the esophagus (EA), stomach (SA), pancreatic head (PHA), sigmoid colon (SCA) and rectum (RA).
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.023
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-026Tumor-associated universal inhibitors and free plasmin in
           adenocarcinoma of stomach and pancreatic head
    • Authors: Frantsiyants E; Kit O, Kozlova L, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Plasminogen, plasmin, α1 proteinase inhibitor (α1PI), and α2 macroglobulin (α2M) are mainly products of gastrobiliopancreatoduodenal organs (the liver, pancreas), so they are directly involved in the pathology of these organs. Plasmin provides the autolysis initiation both indirectly (through the activation of growth factor zymogens and matrix metalloproteinases) and directly, by participating in the hydrolysis of proteins and in the lysis of membrane and cellular structures. Physiological processes require a strict balance between the precursor, the enzyme and the inhibitors, as overactive proteolysis will lead to the destruction of the intercellular matrix and cells. The purpose of the study was to determine the levels of plasminogen, plasmin, α1PI and α2M in adenocarcinoma of the stomach (AS) and pancreatic head (APH) and in adjacent tissues.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.025
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-027Polymer hydrogels as innovative carriers for anticancer therapy
    • Authors: Kędzierska M; Drabczyk A, Kudłacik–Kramarczyk S, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Battle with cancer diseases is currently one of the greatest challenges of medicine. Recently, the number of cancer cases has doubled, that contributed to the fact that scientists are searching for new solutions that will help to deal with these illnesses. In the standard methods of administering cancer drugs, their therapeutic effect is not fully exploited. Traditional methods of treatment often cause undesirable side effects in the body of the patient. Additionally, introduced drug affects negatively not only diseased cells but also healthy ones. Therefore, numerous studies are currently conducted to develop materials used as carriers of such drugs. Such a carrier will enable the delivery of the drug directly to the place affected by the disease and after the completing its function it will biodegrade without affecting negatively the body of the patient.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.026
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-028Lipoxin A4 inhibits the paracrine of Nodal in CAFs by suppressing
           FPRL1/ROS/NF-κB signaling to attenuate invasion and metastasis of
           gallbladder carcinoma
    • Authors: Shi Y; Fan Y, Hu Y, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Gallbladder carcinoma is a lethal disease in part because of its potential for aggressive invasion and metastasis, and cancer associated fibroblasts (CAFs) in gallbladder carcinoma exerts crucial role in this process. Lipoxin A4 (LXA4), an anti-inflammatory lipid mediator derived from the endogenous arachidonic acid metabolite, has recently been demonstrated to exhibit anti-cancer effects. However, the role of LXA4 in gallbladder carcinoma remains to be elucidated.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.027
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-029The therapeutic effect of newly developed endoscopic irreversible
           electroporation ablative device in gastrointestinal tract: Application to
           live porcine esophagus, stomach and rectum
    • Authors: Lee J; Choi S, Kim S, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is known to remove undesired cells by affecting the cell membrane without thermally destructing connective tissues. Clinically IRE ablation is just performed recently on the target of pancreas and liver but not in gastrointestinal(GI) tract yet. We developed IRE ablative device that can be deployed through the channel of endoscopy and applied it to live porcine GI tract to study effectiveness and feasibility.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.028
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-030Epidemiological profile and factors associated with mortality among
           patients with gastrointestinal cancers in a Haitian cancer program
    • Authors: Bernard J; DeGennaro V.
      Abstract: Introduction: Gastrointestinal (GI) cancers are among the neoplasms with high burden in the low and middle-income countries. According to GLOBOCAN 2012, GI cancers are among the most common and the most lethal cancers in Haiti. A ten-year epidemiologic study on cancers in Haiti showed that GI cancers were the second most common cancer type (FD Jacques et al, 2017). Despite these data the epidemiology of GI cancers in Haiti remains poorly studied. The aim of this study was to describe the epidemiology and outcome of GI cancers in Haiti and to determine risk factors associated with mortality.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.029
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-031Morbidity trends for selected gastrointestinal cancers in Poland and
           the costs of treatment
    • Authors: Jarosz M; Rychlik E.
      Abstract: Introduction: Gastrointestinal cancers are very prevalent in Poland, although in the last over 20 years there has been a favorable tendency of a decrease in the incidence of most of them. The costs of their treatment are very expensive. The decrease in morbidity allowed to reduce them. The aim of the study was to analyze the dynamics of selected gastrointestinal cancers in Poland and to estimate its influence on the costs of treatment.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.030
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-032FOLFIRINOX versus gemcitabine-cisplatin combination as first line
           therapy in treatment of pancreatic cancer
    • Authors: Ozet A; Satış N, Satış H.
      Abstract: Introduction: To purpose of this study was to compare efficacy and safety of a combination chemotherapy regimen consisting of oxaliplatin, irinotecan, fluorouracil, and leucovorin (FOLFIRINOX) and gemcitabine-cisplatin as first-line therapy in patients with pancreatic cancer.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.031
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-033Longitudinal assessment of neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) from
           diagnosis until death reveals a biphasic trend in metastatic pancreatic
           adenocarcinoma patients
    • Authors: Morelli C; Formica V, Pellicori S, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Baseline NLR has been found to have a significant prognostic value in metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma (mPA) patients. However, NLR assessment during the entire course of mPA disease has never been reported.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.032
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-034Austrian real world data in elderly and younger metastatic pancreatic
           cancer patients: Interim results of a multicenter non-interventional study
           with nab-paclitaxel/gemcitabine
    • Authors: Eisterer W; Gerger A, Öhler L, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Pancreatic cancer is the 4th leading cause of cancer-related death while accounting for only 3% of newly diagnosed cancer cases.[1] Nab-paclitaxel (Abraxane®, Celgene) plus gemcitabine (nab-P/G) has proven tolerability and superior efficacy as first-line treatment for metastatic pancreatic cancer (mPCa) compared to gemcitabine alone in the MPACT randomized phase III trial.[2] Real-life clinical practice, however, is comprised of diverse treatment conditions and heterogenous patient populations. Here we report on prospective, non-interventional real-world data regarding the use of nab-paclitaxel in mPCa patients (pts) in the Austrian clinical routine.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.033
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-035Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) activating HSF1-mediated COMP secretion
           promote liver metastasis of pancreatic cancer through CD36/AKT/FOXM1
           signaling
    • Authors: Sun L; Wang Y, Li Q, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Previous studies demonstrated that primary pancreatic cancer cells can release circulating factors or exosomes into the liver to form premetastatic niches. HSCs are important in forming premetastatic niches because they can transdifferentiate into the tumor-associated myofibroblasts, and then promote metastasis and growth of pancreatic cancer cells. The transcriptional regulator heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) is frequently activated in tumor stroma, and Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) is a 524 kDa soluble glycoprotein particularly expressed in fibrotic conditions. However, the role of HSF1 and COMP in activated HSCs of premetastatic niches to facilitate metastasis and growth of pancreatic cancer remains to be elucidated.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.034
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-036High proliferation is independently associated with disease
           progression in metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma
    • Authors: Temraz S; Hammoud M, Makki I, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive disease with a 5-year survival rate below 5%. It involves genomic alterations like mutated tumor suppressor gene p53 (TP53) and overexpressed Ki-67. We investigated the expression of Ki67 and p53 in metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinomas and analyzed their relationship with progression free survival (PFS).We also correlated their expression with PFS in two different groups of patients: gemcitabine-based treated patients (GT) versus FOLFIRINOX treated (FT) patients.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.035
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-037Pancreatic cancer in Morocco: A retrospective review
    • Authors: Haimer A; Habib F, Soulaymani A, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Pancreatic cancer is an uncommon and aggressive cancer in Northern Africa. It is the 14th most commonly diagnosed cancer in men and women and the 11th leading cause of cancer-related death, with about 4 034 new cases of pancreatic cancer and 3 915 cancer deaths estimated to have occurred in 2012 (GLOBOCAN 2012). The aim of this study is to determine the epidemiological profile of pancreatic cancer in Morocco.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.036
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-038Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for locally advanced
           pancreatic cancer (LAPC)
    • Authors: Merino M; de Guzmán C, Schutte D, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: SBRT would allow local control for LAPC with acceptable toxicity in a short time. The purpose of this work is to assess early and late toxicities and clinical response in patients treated with SBRT.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.037
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-039Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) splice isoforms may hold
           the key to targeting tumour angiogenesis in oesophageal cancer
    • Authors: Mehedi F.
      Abstract: Introduction: Angiogenesis is principally induced by Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A (VEGF-A); however, the use of VEGF-A inhibitors in the treatment of oesophageal cancer (e.g. Bevacizumab) has not proven efficacious in clinical trials. It has subsequently been shown that splicing of the terminal exon of VEGF-A pre-mRNA generates two separate isoforms: pro-angiogenic VEGF165a and anti-angiogenic VEGF165b. These isoforms are balanced to regulate angiogenesis by the splicing factor SRSF1, phosphorylated by serine–arginine protein kinase 1 (SRPK1). The aim of this study was to investigate expression of VEGF-A, its isoforms, and SRPK1 in oesophageal cancer and their association with micro vessel density (MVD) and patient survival. Understanding the role of SRPK1 and VEGF-A splice isoforms in the regulation of oesophageal cancer angiogenesis may provide a new and potentially efficacious target for anti-angiogenic therapy. Angiogenesis is principally induced by Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A (VEGF-A); however, the use of VEGF-A inhibitors in the treatment of oesophageal cancer (e.g. Bevacizumab) has not proven efficacious in clinical trials. It has subsequently been shown that splicing of the terminal exon of VEGF-A pre-mRNA generates two separate isoforms: pro-angiogenic VEGF165a and anti-angiogenic VEGF165b. These isoforms are balanced to regulate angiogenesis by the splicing factor SRSF1, phosphorylated by serine–arginine protein kinase 1 (SRPK1). The aim of this study was to investigate expression of VEGF-A, its isoforms, and SRPK1 in oesophageal cancer and their association with micro vessel density (MVD) and patient survival. Understanding the role of SRPK1 and VEGF-A splice isoforms in the regulation of oesophageal cancer angiogenesis may provide a new and potentially efficacious target for anti-angiogenic therapy.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.038
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-040Biochemical and radiological inflammatory markers in oesophageal
           squamous cell carcinoma treated with radical chemoradiation
    • Authors: Khin N; Peh W, Tham W, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Inflammatory markers have been shown to be associated with poor prognosis in various solid tumours. We aimed to evaluate the role of biochemical and radiological inflammatory markers in oesophageal SCC treated with radical chemoradiation (CRT).
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.039
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-041Prognostic impact of C-reactive protein/albumin ratio in locally
           advanced esophageal cancer
    • Authors: Simões J; Tavares N, Ribeiro M, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Currently, esophageal cancer remains one of the cancers most associated with morbidity and mortality. In recent studies, the C-reactive protein/albumin ratio (CAR) has been described as an important marker of prognosis associated with the inflammatory status that influences the carcinogenic process.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.040
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-042Definitive chemoradiation in esophageal squamous-cell carcinoma:
           Carboplatin/paclitaxel versus cisplatin/5-FU
    • Authors: Tavares N; Ribeiro M, Meireles S, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Patients with Esophageal squamous-cell carcinoma (ESCC) carry a bad prognosis. Definitive chemoradiation (dQRT) is a curative intent treatment for inoperable or unresectable tumors. Data suggests that treatment with carboplatin/paclitaxel (CP) is less toxic than cisplatin/5FU (CF) but it is currently unknown if there is any survival difference between these protocols. This study tried to compare overall survival (OS) and toxicity profiles in ESCC patients submitted to dQRT with CP or CF.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.041
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-043Oncologic outcomes of elderly patients with localized esophageal
           cancer who underwent curative surgery compared with younger patients
    • Authors: Choi H; Sung S.
      Abstract: Introduction: The management of older patients with esophageal cancer can be quite challenging because they have multiple comorbidities and physiological changes associated with aging that may hinder their ability to receive and tolerate combined modality therapy. We investigated this study to determine the toxicity and oncologic outcome of elderly patients (> 65 years) with localized esophageal cancer who underwent curative surgery compared to younger patients (≤ 65 years).
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.042
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-044Long term survival in advanced esophageal cancer, treated with a
           French modality of hypofractionated radiotherapy + chemotherapy with or
           without surgery, the experience at the Instituto Nacional de
           Cancerología, México
    • Authors: Moreno J; Aiello-Crocifoglio V, Pantoja B, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Esophageal cancer, it is an aggressive malignancy with an increasing incidence. Its virulence, in terms of symptoms, mortality, and its geographic variation with a worst prognostic in developing countries, justifies a continued search for optimal therapy. In our country more of the 80% of the patients presents at first time with an advanced disease and a large proportion of them abandon the conventional treatment due to its toxicity. The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate the efficiency and toxicity of an hypofractionated radiotherapy regime, concurrent with a basic scheme of chemotherapy.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.043
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-045Analysis of global factors associated with survival in esophageal
           squamous cell carcinoma: Our experience at Ramon y Cajal Hospital
    • Authors: García A; Domingo J, Serrano C, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Rates for esophageal squamous carcinomas (ESCC) have been steadily decreasing because of long-term reductions in tobacco use and alcohol consumption. However, ESCC is still a highly lethal malignancy and distant metastases to the liver, bone, and lung are seen in nearly 30% of patients. Moreover, the prognosis is poor, with al 5-year overall survival (OS) of 10 - 20%. In patients treated with curative intent, the cure rate currently approaches 40%, with the majority of recurrences develop within one year. Nevertheless, it seems that there are no clear prognostic factors or biomarkers established to date.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.044
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-047Feasibility of docetaxel, cisplatin and S-1 chemotherapy in elderly
           patients: Comparison with younger
    • Authors: Nakamura Y; Nishimaki T, Shimoji H, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Choice of the therapy for esophageal cancer(EC) is often decided on a consideration of patient’s age as well as performance status. Elderly patients sometimes tend to be undertreated for safety reasons, therefore the best practice for them is unknown. Standard therapy for unresectable EC in Japan is any of chemotherapy, radiotherapy or concurrent chemoradiotherapy. But the clinical outcome is still limited. Recently, some study showed the effectiveness of triplet induction chemotherapy with docetaxel, cisplatin and fluorouracil(DCF). By taking those results, we have treated EC patients with docetaxel, cisplatin and oral fluorouracil prodrug S-1(DCS) chemotherapy since 2010. In this study, we retrospectively assess the efficacy and safety of this triplet regimen for unresectable EC patients, especially for the elderly.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.046
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-048Neoadjuvant chemotherapy for locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma
           of esophagus: Clinical profile and outcomes from tertiary care cancer
           centre
    • Authors: Kumar N; Deo S, Shukla N, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Esophageal cancer is the sixth most common malignancy in India. Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is the most common histology in the Indian subcontinent. Despite recent advances in the curative treatment of esophageal cancers, the benefit of neoadjuvant chemotherapy is quite limited and a definitive statement on the optimum perioperative treatment in terms of survival is still absent. Results from most of the trials from developed world would not be extrapolated in all patients. The multimodality approach for the carcinoma esophagus needs to be rethinking in the perspective of cost-effectiveness, regional biological and economic. In this study, we analyzed clinical profiles and both surgical and pathological outcomes of patients treated with curative surgery after neoadjuvant chemotherapy in our institute.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.047
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-049Liver metastases from esophageal carcinoma
    • Authors: Kostov D.
      Abstract: Introduction: Hepatectomy for liver metastases from esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (LMESCC) remains controversial. We aimed at assessing the surgical results, clinicopathological features of LMEC and prognostic factors.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.048
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-050Outcomes of minimal invasive three stage esophagectomy from a cancer
           centre in Pakistan
    • Authors: Ali H; Nasir I, Anwer A.
      Abstract: Introduction: Management of esophageal cancer has evolved over the last two decades with esophagectomy staying as the main treatment modality for early stage or post neoadjuvant resectable esophageal cancer. Minimal invasive three stage esophagectomy is becoming the routine procedure for resectable mid and lower esophageal cancer in our institution. The aim of this study is to evaluate the surgical and initial oncological outcomes after curative minimal invasive threes stage esophagectomy at our institution and to compare our results with current literature. Management of esophageal cancer has evolved over the last two decades with esophagectomy staying as the main treatment modality for early stage or post neoadjuvant resectable esophageal cancer. Minimal invasive three stage esophagectomy is becoming the routine procedure for resectable mid and lower esophageal cancer in our institution. The aim of this study is to evaluate the surgical and initial oncological outcomes after curative minimal invasive threes stage esophagectomy at our institution and to compare our results with current literature.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.049
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-052A phase 3 study of chemotherapy + pembrolizumab versus chemotherapy +
           placebo as first-line therapy for patients with advanced esophageal or
           esophagogastric junction (E/EGJ) cancer: KEYNOTE-590 - Trial in progress
    • Authors: Kato K; Shah M, Enzinger P, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Preferred first-line chemotherapy for advanced E/EGJ cancer is fluoropyrimidine in combination with cisplatin; however, no chemotherapy regimen has shown consistent benefit. In the phase 1b KEYNOTE-028 study, pembrolizumab monotherapy demonstrated manageable safety and durable antitumor activity in heavily pretreated patients with programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1)–positive advanced esophageal carcinoma. Combining chemotherapy with pembrolizumab may be a potential therapeutic strategy for esophageal cancer. KEYNOTE-590 (ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT03189719) is a phase 3, randomized, double-blind, multicenter study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil plus pembrolizumab versus cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil plus placebo in patients with previously untreated advanced E/EGJ carcinoma.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.051
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-053Pre-treatment peripheral neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio as a prognostic
           factor in gastric cancer
    • Authors: Gaballah A; Hussein T, Ezzat A, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Gastric cancer is the fifth common cancer worldwide. Systemic inflammatory response increases metastasis through apoptosis inhibition and angiogenesis augmentation. The neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) which is a balance between pro-cancer inflammatory response and anti-cancer immune response was proved as prognostic marker in malignancies. Peripheral NLR is a good reflection of tumor microenvironment.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.052
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-054Predicting HER2 status in esophagogastric cancer: Development and
           validation of an easy-to-use nomogram
    • Authors: Fornaro L; Parnofiello A, Ugolini C, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: HER2 currently represents the only available predictive biomarker in advanced esophagogastric cancer. Trastuzumab plus chemotherapy is the standard of care in tumors carrying HER2 protein overexpression by immunohistochemistry (IHC) or gene amplification by in situ hybridization (ISH). However, heterogeneity in protein expression, lack of adequate tumor samples for analyses and the need for rapid target assessment for patient management underline the need for a pre-test screening tool in order to anticipate the probability of carrying a HER2-positive disease.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.053
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-055Prolonged overall survival of metastatic gastric cancer patients with
           BRCA germline mutations
    • Authors: Halpern N; Grinshpun A, Boursi B, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Gastric cancer is the fifth most frequently diagnosed malignancy worldwide and the third leading cause of cancer related death. The prognosis of gastric cancer remains poor with median overall survival rates of less than 12 months in the advanced setting. Significant efforts are made to identify prognostic and predictive markers to tailor treatment decisions. BRCA1 and BRCA 2 germline mutations are an established predictive marker to a favorable response to DNA-damaging agents (platinum agents and Poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase inhibitors) in ovarian, breast prostate and pancreatic cancers. There is limited clinical data in regard to the efficacy of DNA-damaging agents on BRCA germline mutation carriers with gastric cancer.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.054
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-056Neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio and platelet to lymphocyte ratio are
           independent prognostic factors for overall survival in Hispanic patients
           with gastric adenocarcinoma
    • Authors: Ramos-Esquivel A; Brenes D, Cordero E, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: High values of neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and platelet-lymphocyte ratio (PLR) are associated with poor prognosis in patients with gastric adenocarcinoma. However, the majority of these findings have been carried out in Asian countries. It is well known that outcomes of gastric cancer are different among regions, with better outcomes in patients from Asia in comparison to Western populations. Besides, recent trials have acknowledged that values of white cells can vary according to ethnicity. Therefore, in this retrospective study we aim to determine the prognostic value of NLR and PLR in Hispanic patients from Costa Rica where gastric cancer occupies the third cause of cancer-related death in both sexes.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.055
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-057Predicting survival benefit of capecitabine plus cisplatin in
           patients with metastatic gastric cancer patients using quantitative
           proteomics
    • Authors: An E; Ryu M, Yan D, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Capecitabine plus cisplatin (XP) is a standard treatment for metastatic gastric cancer (mGC). Capecitabine activation requires the enzymes uridine-cytidine kinase 2 (UCK2) and orotate phosphoribosyl transferase (OPRT). We previously used mass spectrometry to quantitate UCK2 in tumor samples from 5-FUtreated patients with stage II/III colorectal cancer; UCK2 protein expression > 319 amol/ug of tumor protein was associated with improved survival. Here, we assessed whether these biomarkers would predict survival among mGC patients treated with XP.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.056
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-058The prognostic value of systemic inflammatory factors in patients
           with HER2-positive metastatic gastric cancer
    • Authors: Martínez-Lago N; Lesta-Mellid R, Rendo C, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Multiple studies have reported prognostic association of neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and platelet to lymphocyte ratio (PLT) including patients with early and advanced gastric cancer. However, it is unknown the prognostic impact in patients with HER2-positive metastatic gastric cancer.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.057
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-059The overview of H. pylori prevalence in patients with dyspepsia and
           its association with gastric adenocarcinoma at different locations.
    • Authors: Aghayeva S.
      Abstract: Introduction: H. pylori is proved to be strongly associated with development of gastric cancer. The aim of our study is to check H. pylori in newly diagnosed patients with gastric malignancy at different parts of the stomach and to define a correlation of it with H. pylori infection.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.058
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-060Comparison of efficacy and safety between redo-endoscopic treatment
           and surgery for recurrent gastric neoplasms at the scar of prior
           endoscopic submucosal dissection
    • Authors: Kim D; Na H, Ahn J, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: The clinical outcomes of treatment options for recurrent gastric neoplasms at the scar of prior endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) are not well known. Hence, clinicians decide treatment options case-by-case without much evidence. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy and safety of treatments options for recurred gastric neoplasms at prior ESD scar.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.059
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-061Immunocytochemical method for diagnosis of metastases of signet ring
           cell carcinoma of the stomach
    • Authors: Lukmonov S; Usmanov O, Ismailov M, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Evaluation of the informative value of the cytological method in the diagnosis of metastasis of cricoid-cell carcinoma of the stomach in ascites and pleural fluid.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.060
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-062Radiation therapy in locally distributed inoperable cancer of the
           stomach without the symptoms of obstruction
    • Authors: Lukmonov S; Usmanov O, Madatov K, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: To assess the overall survival (OS) of patients with "asymptomatic" LAIGC in the groups of CRT and CT according to a randomized study.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.061
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-063The clinical outcomes and the pathogenetic background of gastric MALT
           lymphoma in Korea
    • Authors: Lee S; Cheung D.
      Abstract: Introduction: Gastric MALT lymphoma is well known slowly progressing malignancy and has a pathogenic trigger, Helicobacter pylori infection, commonly with gastric adenocarcinoma. Literatures report about 6 times higher incidence of adenocarcinoma in gastric MALT lymphoma patients compared to that of general population. However, the development of gastric MALT lymphoma and adenocarcinoma seems to have different pathways. In this study, authors investigated the clinical course of gastric MALT lymphoma and the pathogenic background in the view point of Correa’s hypothesis.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.062
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-064Early outcomes of a pilot study of neoadjuvant chemotherapy with S-1
           plus oxaliplatin at dose of 130mg/m2 (nacG-SOX130) in stage III gastric
           cancer
    • Authors: Konishi S; Manaka D, An H, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Post-operative adjuvant chemotherapy with S-1 is a widely used standard-of-care in pStage II/III gastric cancer in Japan. However, S-1 monotherapy for 1 year is demonstrated to be not sufficient for the high risk group of recurrence, i.e. stage III. In addition, patients(pts) may not pursuit adjuvant doublet chemotherapy because of the poor postoperative compliance induced by surgical stress. In this pilot trial, we evaluated the safety and efficacy of nacG-SOX130 in Stage III gastric cancer.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.063
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-065Patterns of care and clinical outcomes for gastric and
           gastro-oesophageal cancers in South Australian population: Initial results
           of a state-wide audit
    • Authors: Abbas N; Barnes M, Price T, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: The South Australian state-wide Upper gastrointestinal (GI) cancer video linked multidisciplinary team (MDT) meeting encompassing four tertiary hospitals was established in 2009. The primary aim of the MDT is to discuss overall management and provide evidence based care to all newly diagnosed oesophageal, gastro-oesophageal junction (GOJ) and gastric cancer patients. We conducted a retrospective audit to review the patterns of care and patient outcomes for gastro-oesophageal junction (GOJ) and gastric cancers on the state-wide database.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.064
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-066Feasibility study of intraperitoneal docetaxel combined with
           intravenous cisplatin and oral S-1 for gastric cancer patients with
           peritoneal carcinomatosis
    • Authors: Lam K; Law B, Chan W, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Peritoneal carcinomatosis (PC) is common in advanced gastric cancer. Systemic therapy has been the mainstay of treatment but the outcomes remain poor. The V325 study demonstrated superior efficacy for the triplet regimen of IV docetaxel, cisplatin and 5FU at the cost of increased toxicity. Emerging evidence supports the role of intraperitoneal chemotherapy with potentially less systemic toxicity. The current phase I study evaluated the feasibility of a triplet regimen of intraperitoneal docetaxel, IV cisplatin and oral S-1 in gastric cancer patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis. (NCT02024841).
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.065
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-067Neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio as a predictive or prognostic factor
           for gastric cancer treated with nivolumab: A retrospective study
    • Authors: Ogata T; Satake H, Ogata M, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: The ATTRACTION-2 study showed that nivolumab is an effective treatment for advanced gastric cancer (AGC). Many studies have examined the effectiveness of predictive factors, such as programmed death ligand-1, mismatch repaired deficiency, and mutation burden. Several studies have demonstrated that the neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) is effective as a predictive or prognostic factor for lung cancer treated with nivolumab. The objective of this study was to determine the effectiveness of NLR for AGC treated with nivolumab monotherapy.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.066
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-068Clinical outcomes of endoscopic submucosal dissection for lesions on
           the proximal location of the stomach
    • Authors: Kim S; Choi C, Kang D, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Tumors located on the proximal stomach are associated with the longer procedure time and lower en bloc resection of endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD). Especially, ESD for lesions after distal gastrectomy is more difficult because of the narrow inner space. We aimed to evaluate the therapeutic outcomes of ESD for lesion on the remnant stomach compared with that on the upper third of whole stomach.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.067
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-069Associated factors with overlooked multiple synchronous gastric
           epithelial neoplasia
    • Authors: Kang D; Choi C, Kim H, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Since endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) has been accepted as the treatment of choice for early gastric cancer (EGC) without risk of lymph node metastasis, synchronous gastric epithelial neoplasia is no longer rare in the clinical practice. Knowledge about the characteristics associated with synchronous gastric epithelial neoplasia is of great importance to prevent delayed diagnosis.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.068
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-070A multicenter phase II study of TAS-114 in combination with S-1 in
           patients with pre-treated advanced gastric cancer (EPOC1604): Interim
           analysis in the first stage
    • Authors: Kawazoe A; Takahari D, Nakamura Y, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: High deoxyuridine triphosphatase (dUTPase) in tumor tissue, as a gatekeeper enzyme for 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), is associated with its resistance. TAS-114 is an oral dUTPase inhibitor which enhances antitumor activity with 5-FU or fluoropyrimidines. Phase I study of TAS-114 in combination with S-1 showed its tolerability and preliminary antitumor signals for patients (pts) with non-small cell lung cancer and advanced gastric cancer (AGC). This phase II study has been conducted to evaluate efficacy and safety of TAS-114 and S-1 combination in pts with AGC. Here, we present the results of the first stage in the study.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.069
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-071Comparative effectiveness of preoperative, postoperative and
           perioperative treatments for resectable gastric cancer: A network
           meta-analysis for the literature of past 20 years
    • Authors: Cai Z; Yin Y, Shen C, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Different preoperative, postoperative or perioperative treatment strategies including chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy are available for patients with gastric cancer, but conventional meta-analyses assessing two alternative treatments were not powered to compare differences in overall survival. Thus, we did a network meta-analysis to identify the best treatment strategy.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.070
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-072Is there a prognostic effect of etiologies in patients with gastric
           cardia cancer during a recent decade of Korea'
    • Authors: Chung W; Kim Y, Oh S.
      Abstract: Introduction: There are two different etiologies of gastric cardia cancer - Barrett's esophagus and Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) associated atrophy/intestinal metaplasia. We aimed to evaluate the clinical characteristics and outcome between gastric cardia and non-cardia cancer. Also, we evaluated the clinical outcome according to obesity, H. pylori infection, and gastric atrophy.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.071
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-073Prognostic factors for gastric cancer after curative gastrectomy
    • Authors: Karrit S; Belaid I, Ezzairi F, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Lymph node metastasis is the most important prognostic factor for patients with resected gastric cancer. The aim of this study was to determine other prognostic factors for gastric cancer after curative gastrectomy.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.072
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-074Outcome and prognostic factors of gastric cancer in Tunisia
    • Authors: Karrit S; Belaid I, Ezzairi F, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the influence of clinicopathological factors and treatment modalities on overall survival (OS) and progression free survival (PFS) of patients treated for gastric cancer.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.073
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-075Dendritic cell vaccine-based immunotherapy in combination with
           salvage chemotherapy for patients with advanced or relapsed gastric cancer
           
    • Authors: Ogasawara M.
      Abstract: Introduction: Gastric cancer is one of the most lethal cancers despite many advances in therapy. Recently, immune checkpoint blockade agents have been demonstrated to be effective for patients with gastric cancer in advanced stage. However, the efficacy is in the range of 10-30%. New therapeutic modalities are needed for patients with refractory disease. We conducted a phase I/II clinical trial of dendritic cell (DC) vaccination for patients with advanced or relapsed gastric cancer in combination with salvage chemotherapies.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.074
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-076The correlation between RhoA, CDH1 expression and clinicopathological
           characteristics in Chinese gastric cancer patients
    • Authors: Wei Q; He Q, Xu Q, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: The expression of RhoA and CDH1, are reported to be involved in cell adhesiveness. However, their clinicopathological characteristics in Chinese gastric cancer patients are controversial.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.075
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-077Benefit of neoadjuvant chemotherapy for resectable gastric cancer
    • Authors: Chorna N; Lukashenko A, Ostapenko Y, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: The gastric cancer (GC) is remains as one of the most common malignancies in Ukraine and other countries around the world, despite of a steady decline in the incidence. Over the last decades the major treatment strategy has been postoperative systemic therapy. The results of published trials were reviewed. In addition, neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) was evaluated. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with resectable gastric cancer.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.076
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-078Management, outcome and prognostic factors of metastatic gastric
           cancer
    • Authors: Karrit S; Belaid I, Ezzairi F, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Patients with gastric cancer are usually diagnosed at an advanced stage. Metachronous metastases are also frequent. Survival rates of metastatic gastric cancer remain poor. Identifying prognostic factors is necessary to improve current treatment approaches.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.077
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-079Efficacy and safety of nivolumab monotherapy for metastatic gastric
           cancer
    • Authors: Akiyoshi K; Tsuboguchi Y, Ueda S, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: In Japan, nivolumab was approved in September 2017 ahead of the rest of world, so that patients with metastatic gastric cancer were able to receive nivolumab monotherapy refractory to, or intolerant of, at least two previous chemotherapy.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.078
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-080Gastric cancer in young patients under the age of 45 years old: A
           comparative study with older patients
    • Authors: Karrit S; Belaid I, Ezzairi F, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Over the last decade the incidence rate of gastric cancer in young patients has a trend towards a gradual increase. This retrospective comparative study aims to identify clinico-pathological characteristics of young patients with gastric cancer and to analyse prognostic factors influencing their survival.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.079
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-081Early experience on the histopathological response to perioperative
           docetaxel, oxaliplatin and 5-FU/Sodium levofolinate (FLOT) for patients
           with resectable gastric adenocarcinoma when compared to
           cisplatin/5-fluorouracil (CF)
    • Authors: Rolo A; Campelos S, Carvalho P, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Gastric cancer is the fifth most common cancer in the Portuguese population, with 3018 new cases/year and an incidence of 13.1 cases/100000. Portugal has one of the highest gastric cancer incidence rate in Europe, particularly Northern Portugal. Perioperative chemotherapy with epirubicin, cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil (ECF) is currently the standard treatment, but CF is an effective alternative with a more favorable toxicity profile. Recently presented at ASCO and ESMO in 2017, perioperative chemotherapy with FLOT significantly improved rates of curative resection, progression-free-survival and overall survival in patients with resectable gastroesophageal adenocarcinoma compared to ECF/X (capecitabine). We aimed to assess whether FLOT would also result in improved outcomes in gastric cancer, when compared to CF.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.080
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-082Neoadjuvant chemotherapy in gastric cancer
    • Authors: Bounedjar A; Yaici R, Melzi M, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Gastric cancer currently ranks second in global cancer mortality. Most patients are diagnosed at an advanced stage when systemic chemotherapy is the only available treatment option, which may improve its prognosis. This study was conducted to evaluate the response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with advanced gastric cancer, based on the surgical resectability rate.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.081
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-083Impact of the length of the resection margin on local recurrence
           after curative endoscopic submucosal dissection for early gastric cancer
    • Authors: Chung H; Park J, Shin S, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Little is known about safe resection margin in endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) for early gastric cancer (EGC). The aim of this study was to assess the clinical significance of the resection margin.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.082
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-084First‐line mFOLFOX6 for peritoneally disseminated gastric cancer
           with massive ascites or inadequate oral intake
    • Authors: Osumi H; Takahari D, Chin K, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Oral fluoropyrimidine plus platinum is a standard 1st line treatment of the advanced gastric cancer (AGC). However, it is difficult to use it for AGC patients with massive ascites or inadequate oral intake. There were a few evidences about the efficacy and safety of FOLFOX for them. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of modified FOLFOX-6 (mFOLFOX6) regimen for patients with massive ascites or inadequate oral intake.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.083
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-085The impact of the difference in total diameter of metastatic tumor as
           a prognostic factor for advanced gastric cancer treated with systemic
           chemotherapy
    • Authors: Sasaki Y; Hirota J, Konno J.
      Abstract: Introduction: In a previous study, patients with resectable gastric cancer and enlarged lymph nodes that had a diameter ≥ 15 mm preoperatively were found to have worse outcomes. However, data on the significance of metastatic tumor diameter for stage IV gastric cancer treated with systemic chemotherapy are not available.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.084
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-086Treatment and testing patterns among patients with HER2+
           advanced/metastatic gastric, esophageal or gastroesophageal junction (GEJ)
           adenocarcinoma in the United States
    • Authors: Janjigian Y; Hess L, Zhu Y, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: It is estimated that 9-23% of patients diagnosed with advanced or metastatic gastric, esophageal or GEJ adenocarcinoma have tumors that overexpress HER2 in the United States. Current treatment guidelines recommend HER2 testing as part of the initial workup of patients diagnosed with unresectable disease. For patients with tumors that overexpress HER2, trastuzumab-based therapy is recommended in the first-line (1L) setting. Despite evidence for HER2 testing and 1L treatment guidelines for patients whose tumors overexpress HER2, data are lacking with regard to the implementation of testing practices and recommended treatment patterns in real-world practice settings. The aim of this study was to fill this gap in knowledge.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.085
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-087Hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) in combined
           treatment of locally advanced and disseminated gastric cancer: Results of
           a single-centre study
    • Authors: Yarema R; Ohorchak M, Oliynyk Y, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Patients with locally advanced gastric cancer (GC) and/or peritoneal metastases have a poor prognosis despite systemic chemotherapy or palliative surgery. The aim of this retrospective comparative non-randomized study was to evaluate aggressive cytoreduction in combination with hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemoperfusion (HIPEC) as a novel treatment strategy for patients with intraperitoneal disseminated and locally advanced GC.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.086
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-088Genetic polymorphisms and PG1/PG2 and G17 levels can predict gastric
           carcinoids in autoimmune atrophic chronic gastritis patients
    • Authors: Cannizzaro R; Magris R, Maiero S, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Autoimmune Chronic Atrophic Gastritis (ACAG) is epidemiologically and biologically linked to the development of gastric carcinoids type I (GCs) and gastric adenocarcinoma. ACAG is often associated to multiple autoimmune disorders. The aim of the study was to evaluate the incidence of GCs development and to discover potential diagnostic markers related to GCs in patients (pts) with ACAG.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.087
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-089Gastric cancer in Lynch Syndrome: Are precancerous conditions co-
           risk factors'
    • Authors: Fornasarig M; Magris R, Maiero S, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Gastric cancer (GC) risk in Lynch Syndrome (LS) is up to 13% instead of less than 1% in general population. LS is an autosomal dominant disorder caused by germ-line mutations in one of the mismatch repair (MMR) genes (MSH2, MLH1, MSH6, PMS2) or EpCAM gene determining mainly risk of colorectal and endometrial cancer and a lower risk of small bowel, urothelial and gastric cancer. GCs in this setting are usually intestinal type and show microsatellite instability (MSI-H) and loss of MMR protein expression. There are not clear guidelines for surveillance because the histopathologic transformation pathway is unknown. Since Helicobacter Pylori (HP) infection represents a clinical condition predisposing to gastric cancer its eradication is suggested. In our study we investigate clinical features of GC that develop in patients with this syndrome.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.088
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-090Ethnic and racial disparities among young patients with noncardia
           gastric cancer
    • Authors: Hester C; Yopp A, Polanco P, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Although up to 15% of patients with gastric cancer present at young age, the characteristics of these patients are not well described. We sought to determine the clinical and pathologic characteristics of young noncardia gastric cancer patients in the United States to identify differences between ethnicities.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.089
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-091Influence of the visceral vessels structure variations on peculiarity
           of radical surgical treatment of stomach cancer
    • Authors: Khoshimov S; Lukmonov S.
      Abstract: Introduction: Optimization of the choice of diagnostic volume, adequate lymphodissection in patients with stomach cancer.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.090
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-092Multivisceral resections for locally advanced gastric cancer
    • Authors: Ostapenko Y; Lukashenko A, Kolesnik O, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Multiple organ resection for locally advanced (T4) gastric cancer (AGC) is associated with high morbidity and mortality and poor outcomes. Our aim was to evaluate the efficacy of these surgeries in relation to surgical morbidity, mortality and survival.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.091
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-094A phase 3, double-blind, randomized study of pamiparib versus placebo
           as maintenance therapy in patients with inoperable, locally advanced, or
           metastatic gastric cancer that responded to platinum-based first-line
           chemotherapy - Trial in progress
    • Authors: Ciardiello F; Bang Y, Bendell J, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Gastric cancer is the fifth most common cancer and is the third leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. A subset of gastric cancers exhibit platinum sensitivity and genomic instability that is characteristic of homologous recombination deficiency (HRD). Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase proteins 1 and 2 (PARP1/2) are involved in DNA damage repair, and their inhibition is cytotoxic for cells with HRD. Pamiparib (previously known as BGB-290) is a selective PARP1/2 inhibitor that crosses the blood-brain barrier, has shown potent DNA–PARP trapping, and has demonstrated robust antitumor activity in preclinical models. In early phase clinical studies (NCT02361723; NCT03333915), pamiparib was generally well tolerated and showed promising antitumor activity. These studies also established 60 mg orally twice daily as the recommended pivotal dose.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.093
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-095A randomized clinical trial of apatinib on an intermittent versus
           continuous dosing schedule in combination with docetaxel for advanced
           gastric cancer in second-line setting - Trial in progress
    • Authors: He Y; Yan Y, Ke L, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Apatinib, a small molecule oral tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) that mainly targets vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2, has been approved in the treatment of advanced gastric cancer in China. Whereas, many patients treated with apatinib experienced toxicity necessitating dose reduction. Maintaining adequate dosing and drug levels are essential for optimizing clinical efficacy. Thus, it is urgently needed to explore optimal dosing strategy of apatinib treatment in advanced gastric cancer. Other small molecule TKIs such as sunitinib [J Clin Oncol, 27 (22): 3584-3590], sorafenib [Future Oncol, 13(8): 679-693] and anlotinib [J Hematol Oncol, 9(1): 105] have demonstrated efficacy and acceptable tolerability in advanced cancers via an intermittent dosing schedule. The current study was conducted to compare the efficacy and safety of intermittent (5days on/2 days off schedule) vs continuous apatinib therapy in combination with docetaxel as second-line treatment for advanced gastric cancer.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.094
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-096A phase 3 study of chemotherapy + pembrolizumab vs chemotherapy +
           placebo as neoadjuvant/adjuvant treatment for patients with gastric or
           
    • Authors: Bang Y; Van Cutsem E, Fuchs C, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Pembrolizumab monotherapy demonstrated promising efficacy and manageable safety patients with advanced metastatic G/GEJ adenocarcinoma who have received ≥2 prior lines of therapy, resulting in FDA approval for patients with PD-L1–positive tumors (combined positive score [CPS] ≥1) whose disease progressed on or after ≥2 prior lines of therapy. When combined with cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), pembrolizumab demonstrated promising efficacy and manageable safety in patients with previously untreated metastatic G/GEJ cancer in the phase 2 KEYNOTE-059 study. Combining chemotherapy with pembrolizumab in the neoadjuvant/adjuvant setting may be beneficial for patients with locally advanced, resectable G/GEJ cancer. KEYNOTE-585 (ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT03221426) is a phase 3, randomized, double-blind study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of chemotherapy + pembrolizumab versus chemotherapy + placebo as neoadjuvant/adjuvant treatment for locally advanced resectable G/GEJ cancer.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.095
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-097SIRT therapy with Yttrium-90 resin microspheres in patients with
           liver cirrhosis Child Pugh B7-9 and unresectable nonmetastatic
           hepatocellular cancer
    • Authors: Eick J; Burbelko M, Plotkin M, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Treatment options of unresectable hepatocellular cancer (HCC) are limited. Drug therapy with sorafenib, regorafenib or lenvatinib was approved only for HCC-patients with good liver function, i.e. liver cirrhosis Child Pugh A. Sorafenib therapy in HCC-patients with Child Pugh B-cirrhosis results in a median overall survival of 5.2 months (GIDEON trial: Marrero J et al., J Hepatology 2016, 65: 1140–47). Yttrium-90 (Y-90) resin microspheres are effective in nonmetastatic HCC but have not been studied in advanced cirrhosis. We evaluated the safety and efficacy of Y-90 microspheres in HCC-patients with liver cirrhosis B7-9.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.096
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-098Treatment patterns and costs of care for patients diagnosed with
           hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in the United States (U.S.)
    • Authors: Hess L; Cui Z, Li X, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Cost considerations are increasingly becoming important in the care of patients with HCC, and may influence treatment decision making. The objective of this study was to describe treatment patterns and evaluate the direct medical costs of HCC to patients and third-party payers.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.097
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-099Predictive factor for early recurrence of resected hepatocellular
           carcinoma
    • Authors: Kato T; Noda H, Yoshizawa A, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Recurrence rate of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) after surgical resection is over 10% per year, and it reaches 70-80% after 5 years. Early recurrence after hepatectomy occurs in some patients, but its risk factors have not been clarified yet. We carried out to clarify the risk factors of early recurrence after hepatectomy for HCC.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.098
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-100Efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics of the anti-programmed cell
           death receptor-1 (PD-1) monoclonal antibody, tislelizumab (BGB-A317) in a
           phase 2, open-label, multicenter study to investigate in patients with
           unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma - Trial in progress
    • Authors: Cheng A; Abou-Alfa G, Ren Z, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Tislelizumab (BGB-A317) is a humanized IgG4 monoclonal antibody with high affinity and specificity for PD-1 that was specifically engineered to minimize FcgR binding on macrophages, thereby abrogating antibody-dependent phagocytosis, a potential mechanism of T-cell clearance. A first-in-human, phase 1A/1B study (NCT02407990) demonstrated that single-agent tislelizumab was generally well tolerated and had preliminary antitumor effects in patients with solid tumors, including HCC. A recommended dose of tislelizumab administered at 200 mg intravenously (IV) every 3 weeks (Q3W) has been established.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.099
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-101HEPANOVA: A phase 2 trial of tumor treating fields concomitant with
           sorafenib for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma - Trial in progress
    • Authors: Grosu A; Strouthos J, Brunner T, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Tumor Treating Fields (TTFields) are a non-invasive, regional antimitotic treatment modality, which has been approved for the treatment of glioblastoma by the FDA. TTFields predominantly act by disrupting the formation of the mitotic spindle during metaphase. TTFields are delivered at specific frequencies (150 to 200 KHz) to the tumor region through transducer arrays placed on the skin surface. TTFields (200 KHz) are approved for the treatment of patients with recurrent and newly diagnosed glioblastoma. TTFields were effective in multiple preclinical models of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), leading to a significant increase in cell death. The optimal TTFields frequency leading to the highest reduction in cell counts was 150 kHz for both HepG2 and Huh-7D12 cells. TTFields at 150 kHz led to 53-64% reduction in cell counts and over 70% reduction in the clonogenic potential. The combined treatment of TTFields and Sorafenib led to a significant reduction in the number of HepG2 and Huh-7D12 cells as compared to each treatment alone. The Phase 2 HEPANOVA study is the first trial of TTFields in HCC patients, and is designed to test the safety and efficacy of adding TTFields to sorafenib in advanced HCC.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.100
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-102A retrospective review of neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio as a predictive
           prognostic marker in upper gastrointestinal cancers in three UK hospitals
           over a nine year period
    • Authors: Wreglesworth N; Roberts C, Innominato P.
      Abstract: Introduction: Several studies suggest the predictive role of a high neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) leading to poor pan-cancer prognosis. We explored the predictive value of NLR in a cohort of upper GI cancer patients but also the potential additive predictive effects to NLR of platelet-lymphocyte ratio (PLR), monocyte-lymphocyte ratio (MLR) and total protein (TPROT). We retrospectively reviewed data from a cohort of consecutive upper GI cancer patients collected over a 9 year period (2007 to 2016).
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.101
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-103The prospective multicenter study of relation between
           5-HIAA/substance P plasma concentration transition and nausea/vomiting in
           patients with gastrointestinal cancer receiving moderately emetogenic
           chemotherapy
    • Authors: Muranaka T; Komatsu Y, Ohnishi S, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) is one of the serious adverse events after anti-cancer chemotherapy. We usually administrate 5-HT3 receptor antagonist to prevent from acute CINV, and an aprepitant, which is a NK1 receptor antagonist to block substance P, to prevent from delayed CINV. There are some reports that plasma substance P concentration raised up after administration of high dose cisplatin which is categorized as high emetogenic chemotherapy (HEC), but there are few reports to check their transition in patients after receiving oxaliplatin or irinotecan which is categorized as moderately emetogenic chemotherapy (MEC).
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.102
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-104Amrubicin in patients with platinum-refractory metastatic
           neuroendocrine carcinoma of the gastrointestinal tract
    • Authors: Osumi H; Shinozaki E, Chin K, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Patients with gastrointestinal neuroendocrine carcinoma (GI-NEC) have a poor prognosis. Platinum-based combination chemotherapy is commonly used as first-line treatment; however, there are a few reports about the role of amrubicin (AMR) and salvage chemotherapy for GI-NEC. This study aimed to analyze the efficacy and safety of AMR monotherapy in patients with platinum-refractory GI-NEC.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.103
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-105Clinical outcomes and toxicity of chemoradiation with IMRT for anal
           cancer
    • Authors: Fonseca J; Ferreira N, Viveiros C, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Anal carcinoma is an uncommon diagnosis whose treatment carries risks of significant morbidity due to the complex target volume and multiple adjacent organs at risk. Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) offers the potential to reduce toxicity while maintaining or improving the dose distribution to the target volume. Our purpose was to evaluate the outcomes of our center since the implementation of IMRT in the treatment of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the anal canal.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.104
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-106Prognostic factors in patients with advanced biliary tract cancer
           treated with first-line gemcitabine plus cisplatin chemotherapy:
           retrospective analysis of 142 patients
    • Authors: Engin H.
      Abstract: Introduction: Biliary tract cancer (BTC) is a heterogeneous group comprising intrahepatic and extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and gallbladder cancer. Although gemcitabine plus cisplatin (GEMCIS) has been established as the standard first-line chemotherapy for advanced biliary tract cancer based on the ABC-02 trial, more data are needed to define the clinical course of BTC and its prognostic factors with the standard GEMCIS treatment.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.105
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-107Second-line chemotherapy for advanced biliary tract cancer after
           failure of the gemcitabine-platinum combination: A single center
           experience
    • Authors: Engin H.
      Abstract: Introduction: Few data are available on second-line chemotherapy (CT2) for advanced biliary tract cancer (ABTC). The aim of this retrospective study was to describe the CT2 regimens used, the response rates, and the outcomes of patients treated with various CT2 regimens.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.106
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-108Effectiveness of radical radiochemotherapy (RCT) in patients with
           anal cancer managed at the Bank of Cyprus Oncology Centre: 15 years’
           experience
    • Authors: Vassiliou V; Pittaka M, Gudenian A, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Anal cancers are rare, accounting for 2% of gastrointestinal malignancies. Their incidence is increasing, particularly in women. The current standard of care is concurrent RCT. Overall 5-year survival rates reach 75%, colostomy free survival rate is 65-70% and complete pathological response rates reach 90%. While treatment outcomes are excellent, associated toxicities are high. Clinician-reported acute grade 3/4 toxicities can be as high as 80% (1).
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.107
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-109Detection and management of hyperglycaemia in oncology patients
           receiving systemic anti-cancer therapy
    • Authors: Morrison L; Gillmore R, Pierce R.
      Abstract: Introduction: Hyperglycaemia is a significant cause of morbidity in cancer patients accounting for up to 5% of emergency oncology admissions (1). The incidence of hyperglycaemia in non-diabetic patients receiving anti-cancer therapy has been shown to be as high as 11.6% (2). One significant factor is the high doses of steroids administered either as part of the systemic anti-cancer treatment to control nausea and vomiting, or to palliate other cancer-related symptoms such as pain or anorexia. Patients with gastro-intestinal (GI) malignancies, in particular, often receive high doses of steroids as part of their chemotherapy regimens eg for bowel cancer FOLFOX, FOLFIRI and FOLFOXIRI treatments, platinum-containing regimes for patients with upper GI cancers and for the pancreas population FOLFIRINOX treatment. There is currently no consensus regarding blood glucose level (BGL) monitoring in patients receiving anti-cancer treatments. We therefore carried out a prospective audit aiming to identify the prevalence of abnormal blood sugars using random capillary blood glucose measurements.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.108
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-110Squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal and the results of radical
           treatment with intensity-modulated radiotherapy
    • Authors: Oblak I; Velenik V, Anderluh F, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Anal canal cancer is predominantly a locoregional disease and distant metastases are found in only 5–10% of the patients. The treatment of choice is radical radiochemotherapy with the sphincter preservation rates of around 80%, even in cases with locally advanced disease. Surgery is a salvage treatment used only in cases of residual or recurrent disease after radiochemotherapy and for complications of radiotherapy. Before 2013, in our institution 3D conformal radiotherapy using a four-field box technique on a 15 MV linear accelerator, was used. Several authors have reported that intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for anal cancer can dramatically reduce rates of acute and late adverse effects, while maintaining excellent rates of cure and sphincter preservation. The aim of the study was to retrospectively asses the results of treatment with IMRT and concomitant chemotherapy with fluoropyrimidine derivatives and mitomycin C in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal, who were treated at our institution.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.109
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-112Prevalence and genotyping of HPV in anal squamous cell carcinoma
    • Authors: Iseas S; Coraglio M, Gonzalez J, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Anal squamous cell carcinomas (ASCC) account for approximately 2% of all gastrointestinal malignancies. The annual incidence of ASCC has increased by 2.9% per year in recent decades. In 2012, according to GLOBOCAN, 40,000 cases of anal cancer were reported worldwide, 35,000 (87%) attributable to HPV, being HPV-16 the most frequent serotype. A highly active HPV infection is associated with a more immunogenic tumor microenvironment with strong expression of immune markers, such as CD8+ and PD- 1+ tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs), PD-L1+, FOXP3+ Tregs, caspase 8.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.111
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-114The prognostic values of tumor characteristics and clinical factors
           of neuroendocrine tumors: Two centers experience
    • Authors: Sezer E; Eser K, Ercolak V, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Neuroendocrine tumors are large, heterogeneous tumors. Prognostic factors were not clearly established yet. We aimed to investigate clinical and pathological findings of our pts with NETs and detect most reliable factor on prognosis of NETs.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.113
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-115Starting a tumor board meeting at a public sector hospital –
           problems faced and its impact on patient care: A lower middle income
           country experience
    • Authors: Malik A; Afzal M.
      Abstract: Introduction: The importance of tumor board meeting in care or cancer patients cannot be ignored. No dedicated tumor boards are held in any public sector hospital in Lahore. We decided to start a regular tumor board in a public sector hospital in Pakistan. We will discuss the problems faced in conducting these meetings and how they affected patient management.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.114
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-116A long-term analysis of imatinib palliative treatment in
           gastrointestinal stromal tumors
    • Authors: Domingues I; Carvalho J, Pratas E, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is the most common sarcoma accounting for 18% of all sarcomas. It can occur anywhere along the gastrointestinal tract, but mostly in the stomach and small bowel. Historically, GISTs are aggressive tumors with poor prognosis. Imatinib is the first line therapy for GIST patients with unresectable, recurrent, or metastatic disease.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.115
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-11730-day mortality associated with systemic anti-cancer therapy (SACT)
           in gastrointestinal malignancies: The Christie experience
    • Authors: Marti F; McGurk A, Alam N, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Although SACT has very well-known associated toxicities, the safe delivery of it is of paramount importance in current oncology practice. The systematic and prospective analysis of deaths occurring within 30 days of SACT administration provides an optimal opportunity to identify trends, appraise current practice and improve patient care. Here, we present the data from our cancer centre.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.116
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-118Chemoradiation for anal canal carcinoma in a comprehensive cancer
           center: Retrospective cohort study
    • Authors: Dias J; Pereira F, Sousa N, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Squamous cell carcinoma of the anal region is a rare tumor largely caused by HPV. Radiotherapy concurrent with chemotherapy is the standard of care for localized disease, aiming to avoid abdominopelvic amputation and preserve quality of life.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.117
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-119The feasibility study of short hydration with oral rehydration
           therapy in chemotherapy with cisplatin plus gemcitabine for biliary tract
           cancer (KHBO-1302)
    • Authors: Ioka T; Sakai D, Wada H, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Gemcitabine plus cisplatin (GemCis) is a standard chemotherapy for advanced biliary tract cancer. It needs to take long time for hydration to prevent renal toxicity due to cisplatin. This prospective study evaluated the feasibility of short hydration regimen of GemCis with oral rehydration solution in patients with advanced biliary tract cancer.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.118
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-120Comparison of different risk classification systems in patients with
           high risk gastrointestinal stromal tumors
    • Authors: Yin Y; Cai Z, Zhang B, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: To assess and compare the accuracy of different risk classification systems for predicting recurrence risk in patients with high risk GIST (Modified NIH classification) after R0 resection.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.119
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-121Impaired quality of life of caregivers of patients with
           gastrointestinal cancer undergoing palliative chemotherapy
    • Authors: Takeuchi N; Koike K, Yoshida S, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Support of caregivers to patients with gastrointestinal (GI) cancer undergoing palliative chemotherapy is an essential factor in maintaining the safety and continuity of the treatment. Given the insufficient knowledge regarding the quality of life (QOL) of caregivers, no durable strategy exists for their support through the treatment. We aimed to assess the QOL of caregivers of patients with GI cancer undergoing palliative chemotherapy.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.120
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-122Primary gastric diffuse large B cell lymphoma: A single center
           experience from developing country
    • Authors: Gogia A; Raina V, Sharma M.
      Abstract: Introduction: Primary gastric diffuse large B cell lymphoma (PGDLBCL) accounts for 1% of gastric malignancies and 20% of all gastrointestinal lymphoma. There is paucity of data regarding PGDLBCL from developing countries.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.121
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-123Quality of life by Karnofsky index in patients with gastrointestinal
           cancer subject to parenteral nutritional therapy
    • Authors: Pessoa T; Pessoa A, Aguiar P, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: The inaccessibility to early parenteral nutrition therapy (NPT) or delayed administration, by a large part of the Brazilian population with gastrointestinal cancer, has a disastrous consequence for the tertiary level of health and fundamentally for the patient due to worsening of its clinical state and tolerance to oncological treatment generating a functional and emotional dependence, reflected in a decrease in their Quality of Life. Currently, 20% of the deaths of cancer patients are secondary to malnutrition, since it influences energy expenditure in a heterogeneous manner. This study aimed to recognize the nutritional repercussions of NPT in patients with gastrointestinal cancer.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.122
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-124De novo malignancies in patients after liver transplantation: A
           single centre experience
    • Authors: Chmelova K; Spicak J.
      Abstract: Introduction: De novo malignancy is a major cause of long term morbidity and mortality in patients after liver transplantation (LTx). The overall risk is estimated to be 2-4 times higher as compared to general population. Neither cancer screening protocols, nor universal recommendations have yet been established. The aim of this study was to evaluate incidence of de novo malignancies, identify potential risk factors and characterise the overall outcome of patients after LTx.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.123
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-125Laparoscopic liver resection for tumors in proximity to major
           vasculature and the impact of neo-adjuvant systemic therapy
    • Authors: D'Hondt M; Willems E, Parmentier I, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Only small case series have been published regarding laparoscopic liver resection (LLR) for tumors in proximity to major vessels (MVs). The aim of this study is to compare peri-operative outcomes of LLR for tumors < 20 and ≥ 20mm from MVs.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.124
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-126Impact of revision surgery timing on overall survival in incidentally
           detected gall bladder cancer: An experience from tertiary care centre of
           Northern India
    • Authors: Mishra A; Gowda M, Bhoriwal S, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Gall bladder cancer is very common in South East Asia. It is an aggressive malignancy. Currently half of the patients of GBC are being detected as incidental. Most of these incidentally detected gall bladder cancer found to be early staged. As per current literature, there is no consensus on ideal time of revision or completion surgery if required. The timing of surgery may play crucial role in outcome of these early staged gall bladder cancer.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.125
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-128Surgical resection of primary tumor site is associated with prolonged
           survival in metastatic pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma
    • Authors: Feng T; Ling S.
      Abstract: Introduction: Most of pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma (PanNEC) present with distant metastases. According to more aggressive biological behaviors, surgery is not recommended for metastatic PanNEC patients considering the limited survival benefits compared to well differentiated grade patients. However, limited evidences could support these recommendations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of surgical resection of the primary tumor in the patients with PanNEC and distant metastases, as well as identify variables associated with prolonged survival in this patient population.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.127
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-129Comparing efficacy of 1-L Peg-Asc with prucalopride versus 2-L
           Peg-Asc for bowel preparation
    • Authors: Jang S; Jeen Y, Choi S, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Though numerous researches enabled decrease of the bowel preparation solution volume, it is still a major complaint of patients preparing colonoscopy. There have been studied that additional administration of laxatives could lessen the amount of aqueous formula with prokinetic effect. Prucalopride is a serotonin (5-HT4) receptor agonist which stimulate colonic mass movements and provide main propulsive force for defecation. The aim of this study is to compare 2-L PEG-Asc and 1-L PEG-Asc plus prucalopride for quality of bowel cleansing while preparing for colonoscopy and patient compliance.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.128
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-130A phase I/II Trial of CRISPR-Cas9-mediated PD-1 knockout Epstein-Barr
           virus cytotoxic lymphocytes (EBV-CTLs) for advanced stage EBV associated
           malignancies - Trial in progress
    • Authors: Wei J; Yan J, Su S, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: EBV associated malignancies exhibits high amplification of PD-L1 as distinguished from EBV non-associated malignancies (Kim et al. Gastroenterology 2015; Chen et al. Clinical Cancer Research 2013). The up-regulation of PD-L1 restricts antitumor effect of EBV-CTLs by immune tolerance and results in poor prognosis of patients. Our previous work has generated PD-1-disrupted CTLs by CRISPR-Cas9 system which could up-regulate IFN-γ production and enhance cytotoxicity in tumor cell lines and mouse model (Su et al. Oncoimmunology 2016).
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.129
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-131Endoscopic detachable auxiliary manipulator in endoscopic submucosal
           dissection: Animal model studY
    • Authors: Jeon H; Chun H, Keum B, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is a difficult procedure due to lack of counter traction for unskilled endoscopists. Recently, auxiliary devices have been developed to alleviate the difficulties of ESD. We also developed new endoscopic technique using robotic manipulator. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of endoscopic detachable auxiliary manipulator (EDAM) in vitro animal study.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.130
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-132Poly-Ligand Profiling differentiates pancreatic cancer patients
           according to treatment benefit from gemcitabine+placebo versus
           gemcitabine+evofosfamide and identifies candidate targets
    • Authors: Domenyuk V; Liu X, Magee D, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: The accumulation of a multitude of subtle molecular aberrations during tumor progression limit the efficacy of anti-cancer drugs. A vast array of these variations can be assessed with Poly-Ligand Profiling (PLP), which is utilizing libraries of trillion unique ssDNA with aptamer binding properties. The aims of this study were to develop a PLP library that differentiate pancreatic cancer patients who can benefit from gemcitabine+evofosfamide (GE) or gemcitabine+placebo (G) and identify its molecular targets.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.131
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-133The use of NLR, PLR and CA19.9 as prognostic markers for locally
           advanced pancreatic cancer
    • Authors: Dean A; Higgs D, Das A, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: The routine use of gemcitabine with nab-paclitaxel and FOLFIRINOX is changing the approach to locally advanced pancreatic cancer. This study aims to assess the accuracy of pre-treatment CA19.9, neutrophil lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and platelet lymphocyte ratio (PLR) as markers of prognosis patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.132
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-134Antibodies matter: A meta-analysis of the prognostic value of human
           equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (hENT1) antibodies in
           pancreatobiliary cancer
    • Authors: Yusuf D; Vos L, Lui A, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Gemcitabine, the primary drug for the treatment of pancreatobiliary cancer (PC), requires human equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (hENT1) to enter cells. High tumoral hENT1 expression has been linked to improved survival among PC patients treated with gemcitabine, however this finding has been inconsistent and studies used different anti-hENT1 immunohistochemistry (IHC) antibody assays.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.133
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-135The impact of inflammatory biomarkers on overall survival of patients
           with pancreatic cancer treated with chemoradiation
    • Authors: Holub K; Conill C.
      Abstract: Introduction: Systemic inflammation is a recognised feature of cancer progression and some inflammatory biomarkers such as Neutrophil-to-Lymphocytes Ratio (NLR) emerge as important prognostic factors of survival outcomes and several studies were carried out to explore NLR in pancreatic cancer. Despite the great interest in the role played by neutrophils in antitumour immunity, other subpopulations of leukocytes, such as eosinophils, seem to be overlooked in cancer setting. We evaluated the prognostic value of NLR in patients diagnosed with pancreatic carcinoma and treated with chemoradiation in our institution, and subsequently we proposed new eosinophil-based ratio expressed as Eosinophil-to-Lymphocyte Ratio (ELR), and we analysed its impact on overall survival of the same cohort of patients.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.134
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-136Timed-flat infusion (TFI) 5-fluorouracil with irinotecan and
           oxaliplatin in pancreatic adenocarcinomas: A single institution experience
           with FIr/FOx regimen
    • Authors: Cortellini A; Parisi A, Cannita K, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Triplet chemotherapies, with fluoropyrimidines, platin derivatives and irinotecan, represent an option for first line treatment of metastatic/advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). FOLFIRINOX was often considered difficult to handle in common clinical practice, due to toxicity profile and features of PDAC patients, often frail with symptomatic disease. To increase tolerability and dose intensity (DI), we previously developed an alternative way of administration of 5Fluorouracil (5FU), with nocturnal “timed-flat infusion” (TFI) (from 10:00 PM to 10:00 AM), in several combination-schedules (breast, colorectal and gastric cancers). TFI mimics the chronomodulation of 5FU, without the dose-spike at 04.00 AM, 5FU bolus and folinic acid.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.135
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-137Intraperitoneal chemotherapy for pancreatic cancer with peritoneal
           metastases: A single center retrospective analysis of 25 patients
    • Authors: Tsuji Y; Takayama T, Okamura N, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Unresectable pancreatic cancer is one of the unfavorable prognosis cancers with merely one year of median overall survival (OS). Furthermore, the prognosis becomes even worse with peritoneal metastases due to reduced delivery capacity of anti-cancer drugs and lots of associated complications. Recently, the efficacy and safety data of intraperitoneal paclitaxel (ip PTX) in combination with systemic chemotherapy for gastric cancer with peritoneal metastases has been published by Ishigami at the ASCO 2016. We have participated in this intraperitoneal chemotherapy study projects and here we applied this strategy to pancreatic cancer with peritoneal metastases.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.136
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-138Predictive factors for early relapse and survival in resected
           pancreatic cancer: A single institution experience
    • Authors: Serrano C; Puertas P, Saez O, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive tumor with a high mortality rate. Upon diagnosis only 15-20% of cases are amenable to surgery. Despite achieving a complete resection, relapse free survival (RFS) and prognosis remain poor (RFS 60% at 12 months and 20% 5-year overall survival (OS)). Several studies suggest that early recurrence predicts poor prognosis. However, cut-offs to define early relapse (ER) are variable between reports. The aim of our study is to propose an optimal cut-off for ER and finding clinicopathological factors that predict ER in resected pancreatic cancer.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.137
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-139HGCSG 1403: Phase I trial of oxaliplatin/irinotecan/S-1 (OX-IRIS) as
           first line chemotherapy for unresectable pancreatic cancer
    • Authors: Ishiguro A; Kawamoto Y, Yuki S, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: In recent years, FOLFIRINOX has become one of the primary standard treatment for unresectable pancreatic cancer (PC) with distant metastasis. OX-IRIS is the combination therapy of oxaliplatin (L-OHP), irinotecan (IRI) and S-1. It is the useful treatment to dispense with a continuous infusion of 5FU by administering S-1 orally. For establishing OX-IRIS therapy as a new standard treatment, we planned this study for evaluating dose limiting toxicity (DLT) and maximum tolerated dose (MTD). Furthermore, we exploratorily considered the efficacy (UMIN ID: 000017002).
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.138
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-141PanCO: An open-label, single-arm pilot study of Oncosil™ in
           patients with unresectable locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma in
           combination with FOLFIRINOX or gemcitabine+nab-paclitaxel chemotherapies
    • Authors: Harris M; Croagh D, Aghmesheh M, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) is associated with a poor prognosis. Current standard treatment is limited to chemotherapy or chemo-radiotherapy. Novel treatment approaches are crucial in attempting to combat this unmet medical need. Phosphorus-32 (P-32) Microparticles is a brachytherapy device that implants a predetermined dose of the beta radiation emitting isotope (P-32) directly into pancreatic tumours via endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) guidance. The presented data are early results from an ongoing international, multi-institutional, single-arm pilot study. The study objective is to determine the safety and efficacy of P-32 Microparticles in a patient population undergoing standard chemotherapy for unresectable LAPC.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.140
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-142Updated results of biweekly gemcitabine/nab-paclitaxel as first-line
           treatment for advanced pancreatic cancer
    • Authors: Kokkali S; Drizou M, Tripodaki E, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: The combination of gemcitabine and nab-paclitaxel for first-line treatment for advanced pancreatic cancer has shown better results in response and survival over gemcitabine monotherapy. The standard administration on days 1, 8 and 15 of a 4-week cycle has some practical disadvantages. We present the updated results of an observational study for which we adopted a biweekly regimen with the same dose density.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.141
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-143Safety of gemcitabine plus nab-paclitaxel in advanced pancreatic
           cancer patients presenting with hyperbilirubinemia secondary to bile duct
           obstruction
    • Authors: Sasaki M; Imaoka H, Kan M, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: The MPACT study demonstrated a significant survival benefit of gemcitabine plus nab-paclitaxel (GN) as compared to gemcitabine alone, however, patients with abnormal elevation of the serum total bilirubin (Tbil) levels were excluded from the study. Patients with advanced pancreatic cancer (APC) often present with extrahepatic bile duct obstruction, which can result in elevated Tbil levels. Normalization of Tbil by biliary drainage can take weeks, so safety data to support treatment initiation in patients with elevated Tbil levels are desirable. Therefore, we attempted to evaluate the safety of GN, in terms of the risk of hematological toxicity in APC patients presenting with hyperbilirubinemia secondary to bile duct obstruction.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.142
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-144Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and type 2 diabetes mellitus:
           Cause or consequence' Analysis of the prevalence of alterations in
           glucose metabolism (AGM) in a patients’ cohort with PDAC
    • Authors: Rodriguez L; Cendra C, Gonzalez M, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Type 2 diabetes mellitus is likely the third modifiable risk factor for pancreatic cancer (PDAC) after cigarette smoking and obesity. Epidemiological investigations have found that long-term type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with a 1.5- to 2.0-fold increase in the risk of PDAC. On the other hand, new-onset diabetes may indicate subclinical PDAC, and patients with new-onset diabetes may constitute a population in whom PDAC can be detected early. Use of the antidiabetic drugs, such as metformin, has been associated with reduced risk of PDAC in diabetics and recognized as an antitumor agent with the potential to prevent and treat this cancer. Several ongoing clinical trials are exploring this potential benefit in different settings of PDAC.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.143
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-145FOLFIRINOX in pancreatic cancer: A careful review
    • Authors: Cidon E; Alonso P.
      Abstract: Introduction: Pancreatic cancer approach should be multimodal. FOLFIRINOX (5-fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, irinotecan, and leucovorin) has shown effectiveness in the treatment of this disease by increasing response rate with an impact on median survival. Toxicity could be concerning but supportive measures can help significantly. We carried out a retrospective review of pancreatic cancer patients receiving this treatment. We assessed them for response after 3 months of treatment.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.144
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-146Circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) as a predictor of treatment for locally
           advanced pancreatic cancer
    • Authors: Botiralieva G.
      Abstract: Introduction: By today R0 – curative resection is possible following neoadjuvant treatment for LAPC, however still there is no method to determine patients beforehand who will have a favorable surgical outcome. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prediction possibilities of ctDNA during chemo-radiotherapy after surgical treatment of locally advanced pancreatic cancer.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.145
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-147Use of gemcitabine and nab-paclitaxel as a third-line treatment
           following failure of first line gemcitabine for advanced pancreatic
           adenocarcinoma
    • Authors: McNulty M; Dean A, Das A, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: First line treatment for advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma is well documented and typically involves therapy with FOLFIRINOX or gemcitabine plus nab-paclitaxel. The CONKO-003 trial demonstrated efficacy of 2nd line treatment with the OFF regimen (oxaliplatin, 5-fluorouracil and folinic acid) and more recently the phase III trial, NAPOLI-1, established a tolerable and effective 2nd line treatment option, combining nal-irinotecan with 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin. Despite these advances, there remains minimal amount of data regarding the options for or the efficacy of 3rd line treatment in these patients. This retrospective analysis assessed the use of gemcitabine plus nab-paclitaxel as a 3rd line treatment option in a single hospital settling.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.146
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-148Nimotuzumab bi-weekly/low dose combined to chemotherapy in advanced
           pancreatic cancer: A clinical study
    • Authors: Lima M; Jennifer V, Dominguez C, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Pancreatic cancer is the fourth most common cause of death by an oncological disease worldwide and treatment for advanced stages has not shown satisfactory results in terms of survival. The primary end points were overall survival and the frequency and severity of adverse events.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.147
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-149Risk factors and epidemiological features of pancreatic cancer in
           Iran
    • Authors: Pourshams A.
      Abstract: Introduction: Pancreatic cancer (PC) has the lowest survival rate of all cancers worldwide. PC is more common in affluent nations, but it is on the rise in developing countries. Although increasing in PC incidence is largely because aging, it is necessary to know its risks, to be able to control PC in developing countries.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.148
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-150Prognostic effect of primary tumor location in the NAPOLI-1 phase 3
           study in metastatic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (mPDAC)
    • Authors: Mercadé T; Wang-Gillam A, Chen L, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: In NAPOLI-1 (NCT01494506), treatment with liposomal irinotecan + 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin (nal-IRI+5-FU/LV) significantly increased median overall survival (mOS) vs. 5-FU/LV (6.1 vs. 4.2 months; unstratified hazard ratio [HR]=0.67, 95% confidence interval [CI]:0.49–0.92; P = 0.012) in patients with metastatic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (mPDAC) who had progressed following gemcitabine-based therapy. A potential prognostic impact of primary tumor location on metastatic pancreatic cancer outcomes has been reported. We investigated the effect of primary tumor location on survival following inclusion in the NAPOLI-1 study.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.149
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-151Prognostic value of baseline biliary stents on outcomes in patients
           with metastatic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (mPDAC) in the NAPOLI-1
           trial
    • Authors: Lakatos G; Lee K, Siveke J, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: In the NAPOLI-1 phase 3 study of patients with mPDAC who progressed following gemcitabine-based therapy (NCT01494506), nal-IRI+5-FU/LV significantly increased median overall survival (mOS) vs 5-FU/LV control (6.1 vs 4.2 months; unstratified hazard ratio [HR]=0.67 [0.49–0.92]; P = 0.012). Biliary stenting is used to treat malignant obstructive jaundice and associated complications, allowing bile efflux resulting in normalised bilirubin levels. Patients with a biliary stent were allowed to enter the NAPOLI-1 study if plasma bilirubin was normal.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.150
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-152The effect of best response to prior anticancer therapy on efficacy
           outcomes in the NAPOLI-1 trial of patients with metastatic pancreatic
           ductal adenocarcinoma (mPDAC) previously treated with gemcitabine-based
           therapy
    • Authors: Mercadé T; Wang-Gillam A, Chen L, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: In the NAPOLI-1 phase 3 study of patients with mPDAC who progressed following gemcitabine-based therapy (NCT01494506), nal-IRI+5-FU/LV significantly increased median overall survival (mOS) vs 5-FU/LV control (6.1 vs 4.2 months; unstratified hazard ratio [HR] 0.67 [0.49–0.92]; P = 0.012). Best response to prior therapy may influence treatment outcomes, prognosis and subsequent therapy choices.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.151
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-153Decreased appetite (DA) at baseline impacts prognosis in the NAPOLI-1
           phase 3 study in metastatic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (mPDAC)
    • Authors: Lee K; Bodoky G, Blanc J, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: In NAPOLI-1 (NCT01494506), treatment with liposomal irinotecan + 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin (nal-IRI+5-FU/LV) significantly increased median overall survival (mOS) vs. 5-FU/LV (6.1 vs. 4.2 months; unstratified hazard ratio [HR]=0.67, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.49–0.92; P = 0.012) in patients with metastatic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (mPDAC) who had progressed following gemcitabine-based therapy. We investigated the effect of metabolism and nutrition disorders (MNDs) on survival in NAPOLI-1 patients.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.152
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-154Real life triplet FIr/FOx chemotherapy in first line metastatic
           pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma: Recommended schedule for expected
           activity and safety and phase II study
    • Authors: Bruera G; Massacese S, Manetta R, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Gemcitabine/nab-paclitaxel and FOLFIRINOX demonstrated significantly increased survival vs gemcitabine in metastatic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC): objective response rate (ORR) 23 and 31.6%, progression-free survival (PFS) 5.5 and 6.4 months, overall survival (OS) 8.7 and 11.1 months. Phase II study investigated first line triplet FIr/FOx.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.153
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-155Open-label, multicenter, single-arm study of FABLOx (metronomic
           5-fluorouracil plus nab-paclitaxel, bevacizumab, leucovorin, and
           oxaliplatin) in patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer: Phase I
           results
    • Authors: Sahai V; Saif W, Kalyan A, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Pancreatic cancer (PC) is a leading cause of cancer-related deaths globally, with a dismal all-stage 5-year survival rate of 8%. Systemic chemotherapy can prolong survival and palliate symptoms in patients with metastatic PC (MPC). The phase III MPACT trial demonstrated superiority of first-line nab -paclitaxel plus gemcitabine vs gemcitabine monotherapy across all endpoints, including the primary endpoint of overall survival (OS) in patients with MPC. Promising results have been observed with regimens containing nab -paclitaxel and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU); however, toxicity is a major concern with high-dose intermittent therapy. The goal of this study is to determine whether metronomic therapy (continuous, low-dose treatment) with FABLOx can reduce the associated toxicities without affecting efficacy.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.154
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-156Effectiveness and costs of FOLFIRINOX in the treatment of advanced
           pancreatic cancer in a Portuguese oncology center
    • Authors: Magalhães H; Lima J, Neves M, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Approximately 80% of patients with pancreatic cancer have advanced disease at the time of diagnosis. Despite its poor prognosis, systemic treatment with FOLFIRINOX (combination of oxaliplatin, irinotecan, fluorouracil and leucovorin) when compared to gemcitabine favored a selected population in terms of survival.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.155
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-157Gemcitabine/nabpaclitaxel efficacy in elderly patients with
           metastatic or locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma
    • Authors: Michalaki V; Poydorou A, Frangulidis G, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Pancreatic cancer is a major health concern worldwide and, despite the attempts at management, the prognosis of patients remains poor, with a median survival of a few months. Gemcitabine/nabpaclitaxel is an active regimen currently used as first-line treatment of patients with metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma and a good performance status (PS). but few data are available in elderly patients. Aim of this analysis is to evaluate outcomes and toxicities of gemcitabine/nabpaclitaxel in a cohort of elderly patients.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.156
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-158Correlation of neutrophil lymphocyte ratio, platelet lymphocyte ratio
           and rate of change of CA 19.9 in predicting outcome for metastatic
           pancreatic cancer
    • Authors: Dean A; Higgs D, Das A, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: CA19.9, NLR and PLR have all been proposed as prognostic in pancreatic cancer. We analysed correlation between NLR, PLR and rate of change of CA19.9.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.157
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-159Analysis of early tumor shrinkage and depth of response in metastatic
           pancreatic cancer patients treated with first-line modified FOLFIRINOX or
           gemcitabine + nab-paclitaxel
    • Authors: Vivaldi C; Cappelli C, Donati F, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Early Tumor Shrinkage (ETS) and Depth of Response (DoR) can help in predicting favourable outcome in metastatic colorectal cancer. Combination chemotherapy such as FOLFIRINOX or gemcitabine+nab-paclitaxel (GemNab) represents the main options for fit metastatic pancreatic cancer (PC) patients (pts). Data about the role of ETS and DoR in PC are lacking. The aim of the present analysis is to investigate the putative prognostic role of these parameters in PC.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.158
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-160Quality of life of patients with metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma
           initiating first‐line chemotherapy in routine practice
    • Authors: Velasco A; Macarulla T, Sánchez C, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Considering the physical decline of patients with metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma (mPAC), the assessment of quality of life (QoL) becomes a matter of major concern. We aimed to assess the QoL of mPAC patients treated with first‐line chemotherapy in routine practice.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.159
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-161FOLFIRINOX versus gemcitabine plus nab-paclitaxel for treatment of
           metastatic pancreatic cancer: a single-center cohort study
    • Authors: Cho I; Kang H, Jo J, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Pancreatic cancer demonstrates a dismal prognosis and is one of the main causes of cancer-related death worldwide and Korea. Unlike other cancers, progress in the treatment outcomes of metastatic pancreatic cancer has remained stagnant. Recently, two effective regimens were introduced through large-scale clinical trials. FOLFIRINOX and gemcitabine plus nab-paclitaxel (Gem+nabPTX) improved the prognosis of metastatic pancreatic cancer patients. However, treatment efficacy and safety were not validated in the Asian population and there was also lack of data that compared the efficacy and safety of the two regimens. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy, safety, and economic aspects of FOLFIRINOX and Gem+nabPTX in the treatment of metastatic pancreatic cancer in Korean population.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.160
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-162Second line in pancreatic cancer: Resuming our experience and looking
           for prognostic factors
    • Authors: Anton B; Muñoz F, Abad D, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Pancreatic tumours are a systemic disease with early metastatic spread and poor survival rates. In the past years we have experienced a transition where FOLFIRINOX and Gemcitabine plus NAB-paclitaxel have settled as first line therapy. There is some controversy about second line, with no standard regimen. The challenge of using more than one systemic treatment is based on patients’ clinical conditions since they are not always fit to withstand a systemic treatment. Most of studies described and stratify patients according to the presence of metastases, performance status or progression free survival to first-line. Clearly those patients with better nutritional status, lower burden of disease or less comorbidity hope to present better response to chemotherapy in terms of lower toxicity, although this does not always translate into tumour response. We review the patients with pancreatic cancer in our working area last 10 years that have received second-line systemic chemotherapy (including locally advanced or metastatic), describe survival according to different therapies and assess clinical markers that can be related to best tolerance and prognosis.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.161
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-163Observational study of comparative effectiveness of nab-paclitaxel
           plus gemcitabine vs gemcitabine plus cisplatin or gemcitabine alone for
           the first-line treatment of metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma in the
           University Hospital Centre Zagreb
    • Authors: Prejac J; Goršić I, Vidović M, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: The goal of this non-randomized, retrospective, and observational study was to assess the efficacy of three different first-line chemotherapy regimens in the treatment of metastatic pancreatic cancer.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.162
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-164Gemcitabine plus nab-paclitaxel versus modified FOLFIRINOX as first
           line chemotherapy in metastatic pancreatic cancer: A comparison of
           toxicity and survival
    • Authors: Pacheco-Barcia V; France T, Zogopoulos G, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Gemcitabine plus nab-paclitaxel and modified FOLFIRINOX have been established as first line chemotherapy in metastatic pancreatic cancer, but there is no conclusive data on their comparison. The aim of our study is to evaluate survival and toxicity profile of metastatic pancreatic cancer patients treated with these therapies.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.163
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-165Clinical outcomes for modified FOLFIRINOX chemotherapy for pancreatic
           cancer
    • Authors: Holyoake D; Lo C, Stubbings H, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: FOLFIRINOX chemotherapy improves overall survival in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) when compared to gemcitabine in clinical trials (Conroy et al., 2011). We aimed to examine the delivery and outcomes for this treatment in routine clinical practice.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.164
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-166Questions of resolving cholestasis in metastatic cancer of the
           hepatobiliary system
    • Authors: Khoshimov S.
      Abstract: Introduction: To clarify the indications for decompression of the biliary tract (BT) by proximal access and to determine the possibilities of its long-term drainage in patients with mechanical jaundice (MJ) caused by metastatic cancer of the hepatobiliary system.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.165
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-167Symptoms reported at initial diagnosis of (metastatic) pancreatic
           adenocarcinoma ([m]PAC) in routine clinical practice and variation in
           frequencies across Europe
    • Authors: Melisi D; Westphalen B, àMellbring , et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: PAC is projected to become the second leading cause of cancer death by 2030. It is typically diagnosed late in the course of the disease, amongst other reasons due to lack of screening tests, limited understanding of risk factors, and any clear symptoms typically only appearing late. Systemic treatment options applied in advanced disease vary and recent data on choices and outcomes outside clinical trials are scarce. The goal of this pan-European project was to generate data on diagnosis, treatment patterns and outcomes from the records of patients who completed first-line metastatic PAC treatment across Europe.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.166
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-168Multiple dose pharmacokinetics of erlotinib when combined with
           gastric acid reducing agents: A comparison with a physiologically based
           pharmacokinetic model
    • Authors: Hrgovcic A; Gruber A, Dittrich C, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Erlotinib selectively inhibits the EGFR tyrosine kinase activity and consequently the tumour cell growth in patients. The drug is administered orally and being a weak base, its solubility is strongly dependent upon the acidic pH in the gastric fluid. Gastric acid reducing agents (ARAs), such as proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) and H2-receptor antagonists (H2RAs), increase the pH of the stomach (pH > 4) and cause a physicochemical drug-drug interaction. The secretion of H+ is drastically reduced by PPIs due to an irreversible binding to the H/K-ATPase pump. H2RAs have a shorter elimination half-life and competitively inhibit histamine action of H2 receptors, on gastric parietal cells. Our objective was to evaluate the plasma concentrations of erlotinib when given alone or in combination with different groups of ARAs (PPIs and H2RAs) and to simulate the erlotinib plasma concentration using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model to evaluate possible physicochemical interactions from ARA co-medication.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.167
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-169Gemcitabine induced hemolytic uremic syndrome: Underestimated'
    • Authors: Cidon E; Alonso P.
      Abstract: Introduction: Thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) is characterized by inflammation of the arterioles and capillaries wall, detachment of endothelial cells, accumulation of proteins, cellular debris and platelet thrombi that occlude the vessels. It mainly affects the kidney. The clinical signs are called hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS). This includes non-immune hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and acute kidney injury. Gemcitabine is an antineoplastic agent with many uses in oncology. HUS is an infrequent toxicity although it could be easily underdiagnosed as many cases may go unrecognized due to difficulties in diagnosis. The true incidence is difficult to estimate. It varies from 0.078% in clinical trials to 0.008% in standard practice. However, some authors have documented 2.2%. We carried out a retrospective review to know the incidence of gemcitabine induced HUS in our population of pancreatic cancer patients receiving adjuvant treatment and to ascertain potential risk factors.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.168
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-170Management of patients with unresectable HCC: A simulation-based
           assessment of medical oncologists’ practice choices
    • Authors: Herrmann T; Carothers A, Littman G, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: For the first time in a decade the hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treatment algorithm is undergoing significant change, challenging oncologists to assimilate evidence into practice.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.169
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-171Analysis of echoendoscopic punctures of a solid pancreatic lesions in
           a private institution in Brazil
    • Authors: Pessoa T; Pessoa A, Aguiar P, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: In the last 10 years echoendoscopy has been consolidated as a major weapon for the diagnosis of pancreatic diseases. The improvement in radiological exams (tomography and MRI) increases the number of nodules detected in asymptomatic patients. And it is important to establish diagnoses by cytology or histology. Echoendoscopy is better than conventional ultrasound to guide puncture because of the retroperitoneal localization. This study aimed to analyze the result of punctures performed in solid lesions in pancreas.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.170
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-172Epidemiology, treatment modalities and prognostic factors of
           pancreatic cancer: A retrospective study
    • Authors: Khechine W; Belaid I, Ezzairi F, et al.
      Abstract: Background: Pancreatic cancer is considered a challenge in digestive cancers. Even with early diagnosis, mortality rates are high explaining why, despite the low incidence, it ranks eighth in the world listing of cancer mortality. The aim of this study was to report the epidemiologic profile of patients with pancreatic cancer, to see the different modalities of treatment of this pathology and to identify prognostic factors.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.171
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-175Clinical implication of inflammation markers for identifying
           radiotherapy candidates in inoperable locally advanced pancreas cancer
    • Authors: Cho W; Yu J, Park H, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Several nutrition and inflammation markers are identified to have association with survival in pancreas cancer. This study intended to figure out promising candidates for local radiotherapy among the patients with inoperable locally advanced pancreas cancer (LAPC) using the various inflammation markers.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.174
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-176Analysis of various clinical and pathological factors affecting
           survival in patients diagnosed with pancreatic adenocarcinoma: Single
           institute study
    • Authors: Nagy A.
      Abstract: Introduction: Worldwide, pancreatic cancer ranks 13th in incidence but is the 8th cause of cancer related death. Unfortunately even with early diagnosis, mortality rates are high. The collective median overall survival for all patients ranges from 4-6 months. The initial symptoms of the disease are often vague and nonspecific abdominal pain and weight loss which are subtle in onset and most patients present in an advanced stage.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.175
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-178Clinical characteristic of pancreatic cancer
    • Authors: El Hakim B; Caid N, Saoudi L, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Unfortunately, the majority of cases are diagnosed at an advanced stage, where palliative chemotherapy can be administered to alleviate the symptoms and prolong life. Although pancreatic carcinogenesis has not yet been explained, familial aggregation, tobacco smoking, and hypercaloric intake are associated with pancreatic carcinogenesis. Till date, either prevention or screening programs could yet be proposed.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.177
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-179Surgical management of pancreatic tumors in children
    • Authors: Lukashenko A; Ostapenko Y, Kolesnik O, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Pancreatic tumors in children are relatively uncommon. The data of their presentation accrues mostly through institutional case series. The very limited experience along with the broad histological heterogeneity have made it difficult to identify possible prognostic factors and develop treatment protocols. The aim of the presented research was to improve surgical treatment of pancreatic tumors in children.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.178
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-180Neo-adjuvant FOLFIRINOX in borderline-resectable/locally advanced
           pancreatic adenocarcinoma: An updated analysis
    • Authors: Temraz S; Hammoud M, Zorkot M, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Trials examining FOLFIRINOX (5-fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, irinotecan, and leucovorin) significantly improved the response rate and median survival in patients with locally advanced/borderline resectable pancreatic cancer and showed promising results for neoadjuvant use. There is currently limited experience with neoadjuvant FOLFIRINOX (nFOLFIRINOX) in borderline resectable and locally advanced pancreatic cancer.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.179
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-181Pancreatic head resections: Impact factors, perioperative morbidity,
           mortality and long-term survival
    • Authors: Ilijevec B; Potrc S.
      Abstract: Introduction: One of the toughest procedures for pancreatic surgeon is the resection of the head of the pancreas. The procedure is accompanied by high morbidity and complications. Better patient selection, advancements in perioperative care and in surgical technique have improved perioperative mortality. The main goal of this study was to identify potential impact factors for perioperative morbidity and mortality as well as consequences of perioperative morbidity on long-term survival in pancreatic head resections.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.180
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-182Efficacy and safety of tislelizumab, an anti-PD-1 antibody, versus
           sorafenib as first-line treatment in patients with advanced hepatocellular
           carcinoma in a phase 3, randomized, open-label, multicenter study - Trial
           in progress
    • Authors: Qin S; Finn R, Kudo M, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) accounts for 70% of diagnosed HCC. Tislelizumab (previously known as BGB-A317) is a humanized, IgG4 monoclonal antibody with high affinity and binding specificity for programmed cell death receptor-1 (PD-1). Furthermore, tislelizumab was specifically engineered to minimize FcgR binding on macrophages, thereby abrogating antibody-dependent phagocytosis, a potential mechanism of T-cell clearance. A first-in-human, phase 1A/1B study (NCT02407990) demonstrated that single-agent tislelizumab was generally well tolerated and showed evidence of antitumor activity in patients with advanced solid tumors, including HCC. A recommended phase 3 dose of 200 mg administered intravenously (IV) every 3 weeks (Q3W) has been established for tislelizumab.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.181
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-183A pilot trial of PEGPH20 (Pegvorhyaluronidase alfa) in combination
           with avelumab (anti-PD-L1 MSB0010718C) in chemotherapy resistant
           pancreatic cancer (PDAC) - Trial in progress
    • Authors: Rodriguez L; Guillén-Ponce C, Feliu J, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: PDAC is characterized by excessive hyaluronan (HA) accumulation in the tumor microenvironment, elevating interstitial pressure, resulting in tumor vascular collapse, hypoxia, blocking chemotherapeutic agent perfusion and immune cells. Consequently, checkpoint inhibitors and immunotherapy strategies have failed in PDAC. PEGPH20 targets tumors that accumulate HA. Enzymatically depleting HA from the extracellular matrix (ECM), resulting in decompression of intratumoral blood vessels and increased penetration of antitumor agents. In preclinical models, depletion of HA in the tumor microenvironment has been shown to inhibit the growth of tumors characterized by accumulation of HA. PEGPH20 has been evaluated in a phase II trial in combination with gemcitabine and nab–paclitaxel (PAG) versus gemcitabine plus nab–paclitaxel (AG). For patients with high HA expression on baseline biopsies, the combination arm with PEGPH20 increased progression-free survival (PFS) by 4 months (9.2 vs. 5.2 months; HR 0.51; p = 0.048). Our study tests the hypothesis that elimination of HA in tumor microenvironment by PEGPH20 will result in stromal remodeling and may facilitate the activity of checkpoint inhibitors like avelumab, by at least two mechanisms including increase in drug delivery and increasing immune infiltrate.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.182
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-184CanStem111P trial: A Phase 3 Study of napabucasin (NAPA) plus
           nab-paclitaxel (nPTX) with gemcitabine (Gem) in adult patients with
           metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma (mPDAC) - Trial in progress
    • Authors: Bekaii-Saab T; Okusaka T, Goldstein D, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: NAPA is an oral investigational agent, which has been hypothesized to inhibit cancer stemness pathways, including STAT3 pathway implicated in cancer stem-cell viability. Preclinical studies suggest that NAPA may sensitize heterogeneous cancer cells to chemotherapeutic agents, including nPTX and Gem. Encouraging anticancer activity in mPDAC was observed in a phase 1b study (NCT02231723) of 59 patients (pts), reporting 92% (46/50) disease control rate (DCR) and 56% (28/50) overall response rate (ORR), with 2 complete and 26 partial responses in pts who had a RECIST evaluation. Maturing median progression-free survival (mPFS) and median overall survival (mOS) were 7.06 and 9.59 mo, respectively. On the basis of these data, a phase 3 trial is being conducted in North America, Europe, Australia and Asia.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.183
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-185PANOVA-3: A phase 3 study of Tumor Treating Fields combined with
           nab-paclitaxel and gemcitabine for front-line treatment of
           locally-advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma - Trial in progress
    • Authors: Weinberg U; Faber O, Giladi M, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Tumor Treating Fields (TTFields) are a non-invasive, regional antimitotic treatment modality that predominantly acts by disrupting the formation of the mitotic spindle during metaphase. TTFields are delivered at specific frequencies (150 to 200 KHz) to the tumor region through transducer arrays placed on the skin surface. TTFields (200 KHz) are approved for the treatment of patients with recurrent and newly diagnosed glioblastoma. The effectiveness of TTFields has been demonstrated in multiple preclinical models of pancreatic cancer. TTFields in vitro showed a significant decrease in pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell count, an increase in cell volume and reduced clonogenicity. TTFields in vivo studied either alone or in combination with gemcitabine and paclitaxel in hamsters bearing syngeneic, orthotopic pancreatic tumors significantly reduced tumor volume. The Phase 2 PANOVA study [NCT01971281], the first trial of TTFields (150 KHz) in pancreatic cancer patients, demonstrated the safety of TTFields when combined with nab-paclitaxel and gemcitabine in both metastatic and locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC). Dermatitis was seen below the arrays: Grades 1-2 and 3-4 in 15% and 10% of patients respectively. The median progression-free survival (PFS) with TTFields + gemcitabine + nab-paclitaxel was 12.7 months (95% CI 5.4, NA). The Phase 3 PANOVA-3 trial (NCT03377491) is designed to test the efficacy and safety of adding TTFields to nab-paclitaxel and gemcitabine combination in LAPC.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.184
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-186Chemotherapy for patients with advanced or metastatic pancreatic
           cancer (AMPC)
    • Authors: El Hakim B; Braneci F, Caid N, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Pancreatic cancer is a common, highly lethal disease that is rising in incidence. Chemotherapy based on 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) has been shown to prolong survival in advanced pancreatic cancer. Gemcitabine improves major symptoms and survival outcomes compared with bolus 5-FU. Many novel small molecules are being widely and actively researched. These compounds are based on classical mechanisms of action as well as biological therapies targeting novel cellular survival pathways.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.185
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-187Erythrocyte membrane fatty acids as the potential biomarkers for
           detection of early-stage and progression of colorectal cancer
    • Authors: Kruchinina M; Gromov A, Prudnikova Y, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer in the world. Clinical data show that 5-year survival rate of early-stage CRC postoperative patients is around 90%. However, most of CRC patients were diagnosed at advanced stage due to its asymptomatic and poor diagnostic techniques. Early screening is an effective way to reduce the morbidity and mortality. So, it is necessary to develop low-cost, less invasive, high-sensitivity, and high-specificity screening methods for early diagnosis of CRC and its progression. The study aims to assess erythrocyte membrane fatty acids (FA) as the potential biomarkers for detection of early-stage from healthy controls and progression of colorectal cancer (CRC).
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.186
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-188LncRNA-ZFAS1 contributes to colon cancer progression through the
           miR-150-5p/VEGFA axis
    • Authors: Chen X; Wang S.
      Abstract: Introduction: Increasing long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been reported to play key role in the development and progression in many types of malignancies. ZNFX1 antisense RNA1(ZFAS1) has been reported to be aberrant expression and suggested as a tumor suppressor or oncogene in many cancers. However, the biological role and underlying molecular mechanism of ZFAS1, especially the miRNA sponge role of which in colon cancer remain largely unknown.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.187
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-189Retinoic acid-induced 2 (RAI2) is a potential tumor suppressor and
           RAI2 promoter methylation is a poor prognostic marker in colorectal cancer
           
    • Authors: Yan W; Wu K, Yang Y, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Retinoic acid (RA) plays an important role in development, adult hematopoiesis and cell differentiation. Retinoic acid induced 2 (RAI2) was originally discovered to be induced by retinoic acid in embryonal carcinoma cells. Low retinoic acid induced 2 (RAI2) expression was found in breast cancer as an independent poor prognostic factor, promoting early hematogenous dissemination of human breast cancer cells to bone marrow. The expression of Retinoic acid induced 2 (RAI2) was found reduced in colorectal cancer (CRC) by searching The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) database. The regulation and function of RAI2 in human cancer remain unclear. In this study, we focused on the epigenetic regulation and function of RAI2 in colorectal cancer (CRC).
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.188
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-190The influence of GSTM1-null, TS-del6bp, XRCC1-A751C gene
           polymorphisms on overall survival in colorectal cancer patients related to
           the TNM parameters: A Romanian single-center study
    • Authors: Procopciuc L; Osian G, Iancu M.
      Abstract: Introduction: Sporadic colorectal cancer (CRC) can be caused by different polymorphisms located in genes associated with methylation defects (thymidylate synthase-TS), genes implicated in carcinogen metabolism (glutathione S-transferase Mu 1-GSTM1), and genes involved in the DNA repair process (XRCC1). The objective of this study was to investigate: i) the associations between clinical factors: Duke’s stages and certain parameters of TNM classification such as tumor extension (pT), distant metastases (M), lymph nodes (N), grade of cancer cells (G) and survival in colorectal cancer patients; ii) the influence of the studied gene polymorphisms stratified by TNM parameters.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.189
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-191Combined analysis of KRAS, NRAS, BRAF mutations and mismatch repair
           deficiency testing in Indian patients with metastatic colorectal
           carcinoma: A single centre experience
    • Authors: Sood T; Rauthan A, Patil P, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Molecular evaluation of KRAS, NRAS and BRAF mutation has become an important part in colorectal carcinoma evaluation as their alterations determine the therapeutic response to anti-EGFR therapy and prognosis. MMR deficiency is important for identification of Lynch syndrome families and it has now become an important biomarker of response to immunotherapy in metastatic CRC. The aim of this study is to investigate the distribution of these mutations by tumor localization and to determine the prevalence of MMR deficiency in metastatic colorectal cancer.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.190
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-193RAS status in Algerian metastatic colorectal cancer
    • Authors: Bensalem A.
      Abstract: Introduction: The identification of genetic anomalies within the cancerous cells today constitutes very valuable information to guide the diagnosis, the classification, the choice and the monitoring of the treatment for a growing number of cancers. Mutations in the gene RAS are found in meadows of half of the colorectal cancers and their research is therefore of paramount importance for the therapeutic care and the choice of a targeted therapy appropriate.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.192
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-194Transcribed ultraconserved regions Uc160 and Uc346 in colon cancer
           progression
    • Authors: Kottorou A; Sirinian C, Dimitrakopoulos F, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Expression of Transcribed Ultra Conserved Regions (Transcribed Ultra Conserved Regions, T-UCRs) is often deregulated in many types of cancer, including colorectal cancer (CRC). Our previous results showed that T-UCRs Uc160 and Uc346 are methylated in CRC. Additionally, their tumor methylation is associated with time to disease progression (TTP) and appears to be a promising biomarker for CRC. However, their role in CRC progression has not been elucidated to date.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.193
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-195Cost of illness for colorectal cancer at low middle income countries
           Egypt case
    • Authors: Abotaleb A.
      Abstract: Introduction: According to international statistics colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer. Two-thirds of all colorectal cancers occur in the more developed regions of the world. Egypt with the population with 100 million people (CRC) may represent a pressure on health care system and developing some questions need answers like: Are the polices for CRC treatment efficient for the health care system' Does health care system need new treatments' What is the outcome for present treatment polices' The objective of this study is to estimate the total medical cost of illness (CRC) to improve understanding of the economic consequences of different health-care policies from the payer prospective for the last 3 years with analysis of treatments used.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.194
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-196Anti-angiogenic action of leukotriene-C4 induced
           15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase in colon cancer cells is a TNF-α
           dependent phenomenon
    • Authors: Satapathy S; Sjolander A.
      Abstract: Introduction: Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), which plays a key role in the biosynthesis of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), is often up-regulated in CRC and in other types of cancer. PGE2 induces angiogenesis and tumor cell survival, proliferation and migration. The tumor suppressor 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH) is a key enzyme in PGE2 catabolism, converting it into its inactive metabolite 15-keto-PGE2 and is often down-regulated in cancer. Interesting enough, CRC patients expressing high levels of Cysteinyl leukotriene receptor 2 (CysLTR2) have a good prognosis and therefore, we investigated a potential link between CysLTR2-signaling and the tumor suppressor 15-PGDH in colon cancer cells. In the other hand, TNF-α is considered as the main regulator of COX-2 and mPGES-1 that contribute to the increased synthesis of PGE2, which is inhibited by overexpressed 15-PGDH. Level of the pro-tumorigenic PGE2 is increased in CRC, previously attributed to increased production via TNF-α mediated COX-2 up-regulation but more recently attributed to decreased catabolism due to down-regulation of 15-PGDH.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.195
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-197Repurposing ponatinib for the treatment of colorectal cancer
    • Authors: Tan F; Putoczki T, Hollande F, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the 4th most common cancer globally. Despite, targeted agents producing advances in some CRC patients, tumour progression is still frequently observed. Further research is urgently needed to realise the potential of targeted therapies for CRC. A key transcription factor to potentially target is Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (STAT3). In over 50% of human CRC tissue, STAT3 is hyper-activated, and considerable evidence demonstrates that STAT3 is critical for CRC progression. Inhibiting STAT3 is therefore a crucial step in advancing CRC treatment. But the matter is complicated by the fact that key receptors such as the Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), Interleukin-6 receptor (IL-6R), and Interleukin-11 receptor (IL-11R) all activate STAT3. We and others have shown that blocking one receptor is not sufficient in inhibiting STAT3 activity, as other uninhibited pathways can reactivate STAT3, leading to continued tumour growth and refractory outcomes clinically. Therefore, identifying a therapeutic agent that can inhibit STAT3 activity driven by several upstream mediators, including EGFR, IL-6R and IL-11R, is required to reduce compensatory signalling and STAT3 reactivation. As it stands, the discovery of such a therapeutic agent has not been achieved.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.196
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-198The management of locally advanced and metastatic colorectal cancer:
           A retrospective study of 77 cases
    • Authors: Boudinar F; Bettache G, Wahiba K, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Colorectal cancer is the third most common cause of cancer after lung and breast cancer, with an estimated 1,2 million new cases diagnosed world wide per year and it is the third most common death – related cancer. Liver and lung are the most frequent locations of metastasis.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.197
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-199Colorectal cancer screening in Flanders: Advances in personalised
           screening
    • Authors: van de Veerdonk W; Van Hal G, Peeters M, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: The quantitative faecal immunochemical test (FIT) is used in the Flemish colorectal cancer screening programme to detect precancerous lesions and colorectal cancer (CRC). Current CRC screening programmes are based upon a binary FIT result. However, a substantial part of the positive FITs followed up by colonoscopy are found negative (normal). And several participants are not followed up by colonoscopy within 6 months after a positive FIT. Therefore, this study evaluates the possibility of establishing a risk profile based upon a combination of the quantitative FIT, age and gender to gain more insight into tailored risk prediction and communication of risk to general practitioners (GPs) and/or participants.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.198
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-200Risk factors of colorectal cancer in Linxian, China: A nutrition
           intervention trial with 30 years follow-up
    • Authors: Keskin H; Etemadi A, Taylor P.
      Abstract: Introduction: Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancers in the world. Epidemiological and experimental studies have shown that some dietary factors and vitamins/minerals are associated with the risk of CRC. The Nutrition Intervention Trial (NIT) tested whether daily multivitamin/mineral supplements could reduce the incidence and mortality rate of esophageal/gastric cardia cancer. The current study evaluated the CRC risk factors at the NIT population.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.199
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-201Evaluation of the prognostic value of lymph-node ratio in patients
           with colon cancer in the oxaliplatin era
    • Authors: Bird B; Connell D, O’Connor D.
      Abstract: Introduction: N stage for colon cancer is based on the absolute number of cancer-positive lymph nodes removed at surgery. Lymph node ratio (LNR) is the ratio of the number of cancer-positive nodes to the total number of lymph nodes removed. In patients receiving adjuvant 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), LNR has been shown to be a more accurate prognostic indicator than N stage. However, a combination of adjuvant oxaliplatin and 5-FU has now become the new standard of care. There is limited evidence to show LNR retains its prognostic significance in this setting. The aim of this project is to determine if LNR retains its prognostic significance for colon cancer when patients are treated with oxaliplatin.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.200
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-202Competing risks analysis of microsatellite instability as a
           prognostic factor in colorectal cancer
    • Authors: Spring K; Toh J, Chapuis P, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Despite an extensive literature suggesting that high microsatellite instability (MSI-H) enhances survival and protects against recurrence after colorectal cancer (CRC) resection such effects remain controversial as many studies show no or only a weak bivariate association or no multivariable association. This study examined the association between MSI-H and recurrence and death due to CRC adjusting for death due to other cause as a competing risk.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.201
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-203Survival and prognostic factors of non metastatic rectal
           adenocarcinoma: Analytic multifactor review of 91 cases
    • Authors: Darif K; Benbrahim Z, Benhami M, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Rectal cancers are the second most common cancers in human and major public health problems worldwide. Prognostic factors have a pivotal role in clinical oncology. They are helpful in the selection of treatment; provide insights into the disease process and the therapeutic response. This study attempts to observe the survival of rectal adenocarcinoma and to find prognostic factors and other variables potentially associated with outcome of operated rectal adenocarcinoma.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.202
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-204Prognostic value of neo-adjuvant treatment in localized rectal cancer
           about 78 cases
    • Authors: Darif K; Benbrahim Z, Benhami M, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: The frequency of colorectal adenocarcinoma continues to increase, which is the leading cause of cancer deaths in developed countries. Unlike colon cancer, there is currently no compelling evidence for the value of adjuvant chemotherapy in rectal cancer. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy has become the standard for middle and low rectum tumors, improving local control without improving survival without metastatic relapse and overall survival.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.203
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-205Preoperative short course of radiotherapy in selected high risk
           patients
    • Authors: Gallarín M; González H, Teixidó J, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Preoperative short course radiotherapy (SCRT) is considered a standard treatment in the management of locally advanced rectal cancer. However, in southern European countries, preoperative chemoradiotherapy is the preferred option, leaving SCRT only for those patients not suitable for combined treatment. Our aim was to retrospectively analyze the outcome of patients who have been treated with SCRT in our Institution.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.204
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-206Intensive first line FIr-C/FOx-C association of triplet chemotherapy
           plus cetuximab in RAS wild-type metastatic colorectal cancer patients:
           Preliminary phase II data and individual limiting toxicity syndromes
           prediction by pharmacogenomic biomarkers
    • Authors: Bruera G; Massacese S, Pepe F, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Intensive triplet chemotherapy/bevacizumab significantly increased MCRC outcome. Phase II study investigated safety/activity of FIr-C/FOx-C triplet/cetuximab (CET) in first line RAS wild-type and prediction of individual limiting toxicity syndromes by pharmacogenomic biomarkers.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.205
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-207Clinico-pathological and molecular characterization of BRAF mutant
           
    • Authors: Schirripa M; Biason P, Cortiula F, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Functional studies on preclinical models (Yao et al. Nature 2017) identified 3 classes of BRAF mutations: activating RAS -independent BRAF mutations signaling as monomers (class 1- BRAF V600E) or as dimers (class 2-codons 601/597) and RAS -dependent BRAF mutations with impaired kinase activity (class 3-codons 594/596). While clinico-pathological and molecular features of class 1 mutation are well known, limited data are available with regard to class 2 and 3 mutations, due to their rarity in CRC.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.206
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-208Autophagy (A) related proteins evaluation represents an independent
           survival factor of colorectal cancer (CRC) patients (pts)
    • Authors: Karamouzis M; Saetta A, Koustas E, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: A holds a bimodal role during carcinogenesis. Before tumorigenesis, A promotes normal cells survival and suppress carcinogenesis, while after cancer development A induces cancer cells survival. The aim of this study is to assess the impact of A related proteins in the survival of CRC pts.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.207
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-209P 53 abnormal expression might influence global outcome through EGFR
           modulation in RAS/BRAF wild type metastatic colorectal cancer patients
           receiving later-line irinotecan cetuximab
    • Authors: Puzzoni M; Demurtas L, Ziranu P, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Preclinical data suggest that loss of p53 might influence epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) promoter activity in different tumour types. The clinical role of p53 status in colorectal tumours, however, is still controversial. In the present study we assessed the role of p53 abnormal expression in patients with colorectal tumours treated with anti-EGFR therapy.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.208
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-210Unexpected discordance in 5-year OS rates between Nx colon cancer
           patients and those in stages II plus III
    • Authors: Tonev I; Conev N, Petrov A, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: One of the most commonly diagnosed types of cancer among men and women is colon cancer. Pathological stage at surgery is one of the most important prognostic features in that type of cancer. The number of lymph nodes found during surgery and the presence of nodal metastases is determining for prognosis and further adjuvant treatment decisions. Unknown nodal status is defined as Nx and the results from an analysis performed by Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program show that 14% of colon cancer patients are defined as Nx. The prognosis in the Nx group of patients is not known. Theoretically, the overall survival (OS) in Nx subgroup should be equal to OS in N0+N1+N2 patients. The potential benefit of chemotherapy in Nx patients is not known.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.209
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-211Serum angiogenesis associated proteins and clinical outcome in
           metastatic colorectal cancer patients receiving bevacizumab
    • Authors: Marisi G; Scarpi E, Passardi A, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Bevacizumab (B) plus chemotherapy (CT) is a common choice for first-line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Molecular predictors of B efficacy have not been identified yet. Previous studies have assessed circulating levels of pro- and anti-angiogenic factors at baseline and during therapy in relation to B response with conflicting results. We analyzed the potential role of 22 angiogenesis associated proteins (FGF-basic, HGF, sTIE-2, sVEGFR-1, sVEGFR-2, Ang-2, EGF, IL-6, IL-8, PLGF, VEGF-A, VEGF-C, VEGF-D, PDGF-bb, Ang-1, SDF-1alpha, MDC, Galectin, TSP-1, Endocan, eNOS, HIF-1alpha) in relation to patient outcomes.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.210
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-212CDX2 immunohistochemistry as a prognostic biomarker for colorectal
           cancer
    • Authors: Fatimilehin A; Mikropoulos C, Summers J, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: The caudal-type homeobox transcription factor 2 (CDX2) gene is expressed in intestinal epithelial cells. The encoded protein regulates genes involved in cell growth and differentiation. We performed a retrospective study to assess the impact of loss of expression of CDX2 in our cohort of patients at Kent Oncology Centre diagnosed with colorectal cancer on outcomes.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.211
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-213An evaluation of the clinical utility of a panel of variants in DPYD
           and ENOSF1 for predicting common capecitabine related toxicities
    • Authors: Palles C; Fotheringham S, Chegwidden L, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: 5-Flurouracil (5-FU) based adjuvant chemotherapy, including the 5-FU oral prodrug capecitabine, is commonly used as it is extremely effective in increasing survival of stage III colorectal cancer patients and patients with resectable gastric or breast cancer. Its use is however limited by the concomitant toxicities that arise in some patients. ∼ 50% of patients experience dose limiting toxicity when treated with capecitabine as a single agent and this percentage increases when given in combination e.g. with oxaliplatin. We have tested the diagnostic accuracy of a panel of toxicity associated/DPYD deficiency alleles at predicting patients risk of Capecitabine-related toxicity.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.212
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-214Bevacizumab combined with 1st line chemotherapy in elderly patients
           with metastatic colorectal cancer: Are there good prognostic
           indicators'
    • Authors: Borges C; Simões J, Lemos C, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: As population ages, the incidence of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) amongst elderly patients (>65 years old) rises. However, the geriatric population is a heterogeneous subset of patients, ranging from very fit to very frail, and often underrepresented in clinical trials. Studies suggest that elderly patients may benefit from target therapies as their younger counterparts, but careful clinical and analytical geriatric assessment is necessary in order to individualize treatment approach. The aim of our study is to evaluate the prognostic value of tumor markers and markers of systemic inflammation, in senior patients with mCRC, treated with anti-VEGF in 1st line palliative systemic treatment.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.213
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-216Primum non nocere: Screening patients for fluoropyrimidine-related
           toxicity risk: The most effective method
    • Authors: Boisdron-Celle M; Metges J, Capitain O, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Fluoropyrimidines carry a 3% to 5% risk of grade 3 or higher early toxicities and a 0.2% risk of death linked to dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) deficiency, related to genetic and epigenetic factors.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.215
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-217ABCG2 and TOP-1 as predictive biomarkers and targets for therapy in
           colon cancer
    • Authors: Brünner N; Stenvang J, Popovici V, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: There is a need for new and innovative solutions in the medical treatment of colon cancer since many of these patients eventually develop resistance to currently used drugs leading to untreatable cancer disease and death of the patients. We have by using our DEN50-R cell line based screening platform (isogenic pairs of drug sensitive and drug resistant human cancer cell lines), followed by testing in the PETACC-3 prospective randomized clinical study, identified ABCG2 and TOP1 mRNA expression as significant predictive biomarkers for irinotecan (a topoisomerase 1 inhibitor) resistance in the adjuvant treatment of colon cancer. Moreover, we have identified a new drug (SCO-101) that reverses irinotecan resistance in preclinical experiments (the DEN50-R platform). Here we present the clinical data with the biomarkers and data on SCO-101 including the clinical development plans for the drug.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.216
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-218Biomarkers of oxidative stress in patient with colorectal cancer
    • Authors: Haddouche H.
      Abstract: Introduction: The number of colorectal cancer increases regularly every year in Algeria and precisely in Tlemcen. It is a disease involving several genetic, hormonal, professional, environmental, but also behavioral factors, namely nutrition, the objective is to evaluate the nutritional and lipid profile on the one hand and some oxidative parameters of and to determine the relationship that may exist between nutritional factors and oxidative stress in patients with this type of cancer.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.217
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-219Colorectal neuroendocrine carcinoma and colorectal mixed
           adeno-neuroendocrine carcinoma: A population-based study of the
           surveillance, epidemiology, and end results registry
    • Authors: Liu M; Zhang H, Yang Y, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Neuroendocrine carcinoma (NEC) is defined as poorly differentiated neuroendocrine neoplasms. Mixed adeno-neuroendocrine carcinoma (MANEC) is a really new pathological diagnosis. It was defined as tumors with both neuroendocrine and epithelial components. Both NEC and MANEC belong to NEN. Up to now, the most published literatures about MANEC are case reports and small case studies. Research about the differences between colorectal NEC and colorectal MANEC is missing.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.218
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-220MTHFR, TSER and DPYD gene mutation is associated with toxicity and
           response in pre-operative chemo-radiotherapy for local advanced rectal
           cancer
    • Authors: Mancarella S; Potì O, De Giorgi D, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Radiotherapy and 5 FU based chemotherapy is the most common pre-operative regimen used for cT3-T4, N1 rectal cancer (RC). Evaluation of predictive markers of response and toxicity to radio-chemotherapy is a challenging approach for patients (pts) and drug selection. In the present experience we have analyzed the predictive role of the genetic polymorphisms (MTHFR, TSER and DPYD) on toxicity and response to pre-operative radio-chemotherapy.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.219
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-221Regorafenib or trifluridine/tipiracil in refractory metastatic
           colorectal cancer: The optimization of pharmacological costs
    • Authors: Giuliani J; Bonetti A.
      Abstract: Introduction: The introduction of active new agents for refractory metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC), such as regorafenib and trifluridine/tipiracil, is associated with a relevant increase of costs and it might be interesting to make a balance between the costs of treatment and the added value represented by the improvement of the clinical parameters of interest such as OS (overall survival).
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.220
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-222Is the PEG-G-CSF useful as the prevention for the severe neutropenia
           in metastatic colorectal cancer patients treated with FOLFOXIRI plus
           bevacizumab'
    • Authors: Osumi H; Shinozaki E, Wakatsuki T, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: FOLFOXIRI plus bevacizumab (Bev) significantly improved both the progression free survival (PFS) and the overall survival (OS) of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). However, as the frequency of grade 3/4 neutropenia is very high, we often require the dose adjustment in the clinical practice. The Polyethylene glycol conjugated granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (PEG- G-CSF), which is characterized by an increased circulating half-life, has the potential to shorten the duration and severity of neutropenia. However, there is a few evidences to evaluate the efficacy of the PEG-G-CSF for the neutropenia in mCRC. This study aimed to evaluate treatment outcomes, safety and the efficacy of the PEG-G-CSF for neutropenia in mCRC patients treated with FOLFOXIRI plus Bev.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.221
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-223NORTH/HGCSG1003: A phase II study evaluating the safety and efficacy
           of FOLFOX as adjuvant chemotherapy for patients with stage III colon
           cancer: Comparison with medical oncologists and surgeons
    • Authors: Yuki S; Komatsu Y, Kawamoto Y, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: The efficacy of oxaliplatin containing regimens were confirmed in large randomized phase III trials in which they were superior to fluorouracil and leucovorin as adjuvant setting for patients with stage III colon cancer. In Japan, not only medical oncologists but also surgeons practice chemotherapy. In this analysis, we investigated differences in safety and efficacy between surgeons and medical oncologists from NORTH/HGCSG1003 study.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.222
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-224Analysis of clinical outcomes of two antiEGFR antibodies, cetuximab
           and panitumumab, in the 1st line chemotherapy of RAS wild metastatic
           colorectal cancer, by neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) kinetics
    • Authors: Manaka D; Nishitai R, Konishi S, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: mFOLFOX6+antiEGFR antibody is a standard-of-care in the 1st line chemotherapy of metastatic colorectal cancer. Two molecular targeted drugs, i.e. cetuximab (Cet) and panitumumab (Pani), are the choices of antiEGFR antibody, but the proper use of these drugs are not clarified yet. Cet, IgG subclass1 antibody, is demonstrated to have ADCC activity and other immune, inflammatory functions. Differences of the activities of these two antibodies could be analyzed from this standpoint using the kinetic evaluations of neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR), which is the indicator of cancer-related immune and inflammatory activities.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.223
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-225The role of maintenance therapy in the first line treatment of
           metastatic colorectal cancer
    • Authors: Gridnev D; Popov A, Vozny E, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: The first line of chemotherapy is decisive in the treatment of colorectal cancer. Choosing the right one allows you to increase PFS and improve long-term results. Surgical treatment and maintenance therapy (MT) increase PFS and OS, as they can be prescribed at any stage of treatment.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.224
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-226HGCSG 1301: A Multicenter, Double-Blind, Randomized control phase II
           trial comparing Hange-shashin-to versus placebo to prevent diarrhea in
           patients with metastatic colorectal cancer under IRIS/Bev second-line
           treatment
    • Authors: Nakamura M; Komatsu Y, Muranaka T, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: S-1 plus irinotecan (IRIS) showed non-inferiority to fluorouracil and folinic acid plus irinotecan (FOLFIRI) by FIRIS study. Therefore, IRIS is widely used with bevacizumab (IRIS/Bev) as the second-line chemotherapy in patients with colorectal cancer. The most frequent non-hematological adverse event shown at the study was diarrhea. Baicalin contained within Hange-shashin-to is a potent competitive inhibitor of beta-glucuronidase which cleaves conjugated SN-38-glucuronide to SN-38 which causes cytotoxic diarrhea as an active metabolite from irinotecan. We conducted to evaluate the usefulness of prophylactic administration of Hange-shashin-to to prevent diarrhea in patients receiving IRIS/Bev.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.225
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-227Analysis of the benefit of the adjuvant chemotherapy in stage II
           colon cancer according to the presence of classic poor risk factors: Our
           experience in Ramon y Cajal Hospital
    • Authors: Serrano C; Delgado M, de la Fuente E, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Despite surgery is a curative treatment for colon cancer (CC), recurrence is common. The role of adjuvant chemotherapy (AC) in stage II CC is controversial. Classically, certain factors have been associated with poor prognostic outcomes and they are widely considered in the decision making algorithm for stage II CC.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.226
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-228VOLTAGE: Multicenter phase Ib/II study of nivolumab monotherapy and
           subsequent radical surgery following preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT)
           with capecitabine in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC)
    • Authors: Bando H; Tsukada Y, Inamori K, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Fluoropyrimidine-based Chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and subsequent radical surgery is widely accepted as the standard treatment for patients with Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer (LARC). Higher pathological complete response (pCR) rates are associated with good clinical outcomes. Recently, improved therapeutic effects have been reported in patients with various types of cancer by combining an immune checkpoint inhibitor with radiotherapy (RT). The purpose of this study is to investigate safety, efficacy and proof-of-concept (POC) of nivolumab monotherapy plus subsequent radical surgery following preoperative CRT with capecitabine, in patients with LARC. Here, we present the results of the phase Ib and the preliminary results of phase II part.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.227
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-229Long-term clinical outcomes in large colorectal polyps with
           indefinite or positive resection margin after endoscopic resection
    • Authors: Kang D; Kim H, Choi C, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Large colorectal polyps are often incompletely resected during colonoscopy, and incomplete resection might contribute to the recurrence after endoscopic resection. In indefinite or positive resection margin in pathology after complete endoscopic resection, local recurrence was not well known. We evaluated the long-term clinical outcomes in large, sessile or flat colorectal polyps with indefinite or positive resection margin after complete endoscopic resection.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.228
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-230Second line FOLFOX4 and bevacizumab for metastatic colorectal cancer:
           Real life efficacy and predictive factors
    • Authors: Lewandowski T; Biernacka R, Chmielowiec M, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Bevacizumab with chemotherapy is one of valid options in second line treatment for patients with mCRC. According to clinical trials it improves overall survival (OS) and time to progression (TTP) for approximately 2 and 2.5 months compared to chemotherapy alone. However, it is still uncertain what predictive and prognostic factors are useful to select patient who may benefit from that therapy.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.229
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-231Clinical significance of microsatellite instability in
           gender-dependent patients with right-sided colorectal cancer
    • Authors: Choi J; Kim J, Han S, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Colorectal cancer (CRC) with microsatellite instability (MSI) are known to have better prognosis compared to those with microsatellite stable (MSS). Recent studies reported that there are biological differences according to tumor location in CRC. In this study, we aimed to identify the clinical significance of MSI in patients with right-sided CRC.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.230
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-232Efficacy of adjuvant chemotherapy for elderly patients with colon
           cancer
    • Authors: Delgado M; Serrano C, de la Fuente E, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: The benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy (fluoracil or capecitabine with or without oxaliplatin) has been well established in the adjuvant setting for node-positive colon cancer (stage III). The extent to which older adults benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy was not well established in the different trials (MOSAIC, NSABP C-07, N016968) given that there was no participation of patients older than 75 years old. However, in the latest published systematic reviews there are contradictory results on the efficacy of adjuvant chemotherapy in this population.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.231
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-233Trifluridine/tipiracil vs regorafenib as salvage-line treatment in
           patients with metastatic colorectal cancer: A multicenter retrospective
           study
    • Authors: Kotaka M; Ogata M, Ogata T, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Trifluridine/tipiracil (TAS-102) and Regorafenib (REG) have shown promising activity in patients with heavily pretreated metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy and safety of TAS-102 and REG alone in patients with mCRC refractory to standard chemotherapies.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.232
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-234Phase 1b open-label study evaluating the safety, pharmacokinetics,
           and preliminary efficacy of ABT-165 plus FOLFIRI in patients with
           second-line (2L) colorectal cancer (CRC)
    • Authors: Wainberg Z; Strickler J, Gordon M, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: ABT-165 is a first-in-class dual-variable domain immunoglobulin with specificity for both vascular endothelial growth factor and delta-like ligand 4 (DLL4) that has demonstrated encouraging preliminary clinical antitumor activity as monotherapy. As part of a phase 1 trial, we evaluated an expansion cohort of ABT-165 plus FOLFIRI in patients with 2L CRC previously treated with a fluoropyrimidine/oxaliplatin regimen with or without bevacizumab.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.233
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-235Adjuvant chemotherapy for colorectal cancer using oxaliplatin induced
           irreversible sinusoidal obstruction syndrome
    • Authors: Hara K; Yamada T, Koizumi M, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Oxaliplatin reduces the recurrence rate after curative surgery in high risk stage II and stage III colorectal cancer. However, it can cause hepatic sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (SOS). SOS can cause an adverse effect associated with chemotherapy or morbidity after liver resection at the time of recurrence. Conventionally, SOS is diagnosed using liver biopsy which is invasive. We have reported that the 10% increase in splenic volume (SV) indicate SOS (Journal of Surgical Oncology 2017). In this retrospective study, we evaluated SOS caused by adjuvant chemotherapy by measuring SV.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.234
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-236Clinical and pathological features in colorectal cancer associated to
           Lynch syndrome
    • Authors: Higuera O; Rodriguez A, Rodriguez-Salas N, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Lynch syndrome (LS) is the most common cause of inherited colorectal cancer (CRC) and accounts for approximately 3 percent of newly diagnosed cases of CRC. Lynch syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder that is caused by a germline mutation in one of several DNA mismatch repair genes (MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2) or loss of expression of MSH2 due to deletion in the EPCAM gene (previously called TACSTD1). It is characterized by an increased risk for colorectal cancer (CRC) and cancers of the endometrium, stomach, ovary, small bowel, hepatobiliary tract, urinary tract, brain, and skin. CRCs in Lynch syndrome differ from sporadic CRCs.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.235
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-237Development of a new clinical nomogram including velocity rate of
           disease progression to predict outcome in metastatic colorectal cancer
           patients treated with bevacizumab beyond progression: A subanalysis from
           tribe trial
    • Authors: Dell'Aquila E; Pantano F, Rossini D, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: In metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) there is the unmeet clinical need to predict outcome to second line therapy. Our aim was to test if a new nomogram including the velocity rate of disease progression (VRPD), a new dynamic marker, can predict outcome in terms of second line progression free survival (PFS) in mCRC patients (pts) enrolled in TRIBE trial.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.236
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-238Analysis of classical high risk factors in stage III colon cancer:
           Experience at University Hospital Ramon y Cajal (UHRyC)
    • Authors: Domingo J; Huertas R, García A, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: In colon cancer (CC), surgery is a curative treatment but, because of recurrence risk factors, postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy (AC) is widely accepted, at least for stage III. However, the benefit in stage II remains uncertain and indication of AC is based on risk factors. Nevertheless, the role of these high-risk factors (HRF) in stage III it is not clear.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.237
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-239Impact of adding oxaliplatin to fluoropyrimidines in the adjuvant
           therapy in stage II in colon cancer: Experience in Ramon y Cajal
           Universitary Hospital
    • Authors: Huertas R; Domingo J, de la Fuente E, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: The addition of oxaliplatin to fluorouracil and leucovorin as adjuvant chemotherapy (AC) for patients with stage II and III colon cancer (CC) has been analyzed in two large, randomized trials, MOSAIC and C-07 trials. The updated results of these studies showed that the addition of oxaliplatin enhances overall survival by approximately 5% in patients with stage III disease but has no effect in patients with stage II disease.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.238
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-240Benefit of the addition of oxaliplatin to 5-FU/leucovorin or
           capecitabine in adjuvant therapy for stage II/III colorectal cancer in
           elderly patients: Experience in Ramon y Cajal University Hospital.
    • Authors: de la Fuente E; Serrano C, Delgado M, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Oxaliplatin-based combination chemotherapy is considered standard of care for patients with stage III colorectal cancer disease. However, the benefit of the addition of oxaliplatin to adjuvant chemotherapy in elderly patients (aged 70 years or older) is not well established, because elderly patients are underrepresented in clinical trials. A post hoc analysis of outcomes in the MOSAIC trial, reported in Journal of Clinical Oncology by Tournigand et al. as well as, a recent report from the ACCENT database, suggested that there was no benefit in overall or disease-free survival with the addition of oxaliplatin to 5-FU/leucovorin in patients aged 70 years or older, compared to the use of single agent fluoropyrimidines.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.239
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-242International prospective multi-center clinical trial with adherence
           to surgical and pathological quality measures: Influence of body mass
           index (BMI) on outcome in colon cancer
    • Authors: Protic M; Bilchik A, Nissan A, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Various prognostic factors significantly influence oncological outcomes across various stages of colon cancer (CC). The prognostic influence of BMI for CC remains incompletely defined. We hypothesized that BMI significantly influences outcomes in node-negative (NN) CC.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.241
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. suppl_5 (2018)
       
  • P-243Phase II study of third-line panitumumab rechallenge in patients with
           metastatic wild-type KRAS colorectal cancer who achieved a clinical
           benefit in response to first-line panitumumab plus chemotherapy
    • Authors: Tsuji A; Nakamura M, Watanabe T, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Cetuximab rechallenge has been reported to be promising (Santini D et al. Ann Oncol 2012 and Tsuji A et al. Annals of Oncology, Volume 27, Issue suppl_6, 2016, 510P,).On the other hand, usefulness of panitumumab for cetuximab is expected (WJOG6510G, ASCO-GI 2017). We performed a multicenter phase II prospective study panitumumab rechallenge in Japan.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.242
       
  • P-244Dose finding phase Ib study of triplet plus cetuximab for patients
           with wild-type RAS gene metastatic colorectal cancer (TRICETSU study)
    • Authors: Satake H; Kotake T, Okita Y, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: The aim of this study was to determine the recommended dose of FOLFOXIRI plus cetuximab (Cmab) as first-line treatment for patients (pts) with RAS wild-type metastatic colorectal cancer.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.243
       
  • P-246Rechallenge with oxaliplatin and peripheral neuropathy in colorectal
           cancer patients
    • Authors: Martínez-Villacampa M; Tavera S, Vivas C, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Oxaliplatin (OXA) is a cornerstone in the treatment of colorectal cancer (CRC). Retreatment with OXA is frequently considered as salvage treatment. OXA-induced neuropathy (OIN) is the most frequent and feared long-term side-effect.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.245
       
  • P-247Adding oxaliplatin (OX) do neoadjuvant therapy of locally advanced
           rectal cancer (LARC): Still promising option'
    • Authors: Rogowski W; Wyrwicz L, Sulzyc-Bielicka V.
      Abstract: Introduction: Fluoropyrimidine (5-fluorouracil or capecitabine, FU)-based regimens and radiation are standard-of-care in neoadjuvant treatment of patients with LARC. Meta-analysis (2012) showed, that adding OX to FU significantly improved pathologic complete response (pCR), and reduced peri-operative metastases with significantly higher toxicity rate. The aim of study was to review a literature published after 2012, assessing the role of OX in neoadjuvant treatment of LARC and to consider meta-analysis feasibility.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.246
       
  • P-248G8 screening tool for treatment decision-making in elderly colorectal
           cancer patients
    • Authors: Marín J; Soler G, Martínez-Villacampa M, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer worldwide. It is mostly diagnosed in elderly people, with a median age at diagnosis of 70 years. The aim of our study is to explore whether G8 questionnaire may be helpful to decide the best treatment for older colorectal cancer patients.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.247
       
  • P-249A SEER analysis of increasing disparities in age-related cause
           specific survival (CSS) among patients with colorectal cancer
    • Authors: Mehmood T.
      Abstract: Introduction: Survival for patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) has improved over the past decades. However, it is unclear whether older patients have benefited to the same extent as younger patients.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.248
       
  • P-250Capecitabine, irinotecan, and bevacizumab in patients with previously
           untreated metastatic colorectal cancer: Experience of the oncology
           department of the university hospital of Oran, Algeria
    • Authors: Behourah Z; Bousahba A, Djellali L.
      Abstract: Introduction: This study aims to investigate the effectiveness of the associated chemotherapy based on capecitabine and irinotecan (CARIPI) with anti-VEGF, the bevacizumab, in terms of progression free survival (PFS), objective response rate (ORR) and overall survival (OS), in a way to evaluate the clinical benefit and tolerance to patients with mCRC in first line.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.249
       
  • P-251The prognostic ad predictive value of primary tumor sidedness in the
           mCRC pts
    • Authors: Sezer E; Eser K, Onder A, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: The prognostic and predictive value of primary tumor sidedness in the pts with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) is well known today. Right-sided primary was associated with high mutational burden, microsatellite instability, worse prognosis, more BRAF mutation rates and poor anti-EGFR response. We aimed to investigate the effects of tumor sidedness on survival, RAS-RAF mutation rates and responses to biologic agents in the pts with mCRC.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.250
       
  • P-252The evaluation of liver resection for colorectal cancer liver
           metastases
    • Authors: Ogawa M; Haruki K, Horiuchi A, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: In colorectal cancer chemotherapy, FOLFOX from 2004.4.1, molecular targeted agents from 2009.9.1, has been covered by insurance reimbursement in Japan. In addition, our department expanded the surgical indications from 2004, and actively enforced liver resection. We retrospectively examined the treatment outcome of liver resection for colorectal cancer liver metastases (CRLM) to verify the efficacy of the method and strategy of the new treatment.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.251
       
  • P-253A phase I/II study of panitumumab combined with TAS-102 in patients
           (pts) with RAS wild-type (wt) metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC)
           refractory to standard chemotherapy: APOLLON study
    • Authors: Yamazaki K; Yasui H, Yamaguchi K, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: APOLLON is an open-label, single-arm phase I/II study investigating the efficacy and safety of Pmab in combination with TAS-102 (trifluridine/tipiracil) in pts with RAS (KRAS/NRAS) wt mCRC refractory to standard chemotherapy. The recommended phase II dose (RP2D) of this combination was reported in ASCO-GI 2017 as Pmab at 6 mg/kg on Days 1 and 15, every 4 weeks (Q4W) and TAS-102 at 35 mg/m2 twice daily on Days 1–5 and 8–12, Q4W, and was well tolerated without dose-limiting toxicities. Here, we present the efficacy and safety data for pts treated with Pmab with TAS-102 at the RP2D.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.252
       
  • P-254Ultrasonic monitoring of liver metastasis after radiofrequency
           thermoablation
    • Authors: Khoshimov S.
      Abstract: Introduction: To determine the possibility of ultrasound scanning for the choice of treatment methods and postoperative dynamic observation of patients with colorectal liver metastases.to determine the possibility of ultrasound scanning for the choice of treatment methods and postoperative dynamic observation of patients with colorectal liver metastases.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.253
       
  • P-255Immediate and long-term results of liver resections with metastatic
           lesion
    • Authors: Lukmonov S; Usmanov O, Ismailov M, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: To evaluate the effectiveness of surgical treatment of metastatic liver damage.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.254
       
  • P-256Treatment efficacy and survival analysis of extremely elderly (80
           years of age or older) patients with metastatic colorectal cancer: Single
           institute retrospective study
    • Authors: Liang Y; Wei C, Tsai J, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: With improvement of public health and general medicine, the proportion of elderly cancer patients in daily practice keeps growing. Indeed, the evidence of systemic targeted therapy and chemotherapy to extremely elderly (80 years of age or older) patients remain limited.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.255
       
  • P-257Improvement of metastatic colorectal cancer patient survival: Single
           institution experience
    • Authors: Fenocchio E; Colombi F, Calella M, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: The outcome of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) has significantly improved over the last two decades, reaching a median overall survival (mOS) of around 30 months, more than double that 20 years ago. Both surgery and a more aggressive systemic approach may have contributed to this result. The aim of this study is to describe the evolution of survival of mCRC patients followed at a single institution over the past 17 years, investigating the possible influence of tumour characteristics, as well as the changes in treatment practice through the years.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.256
       
  • P-258HGCSG1503: A retrospective cohort study evaluating the safety and
           efficacy of TAS-102 in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer:
           Analysis of cases of prior regorafenib
    • Authors: Shindo Y; Yuki S, Yagisawa M, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: The J003 trial and RECOURSE trial revealed the safety and efficacy of TAS-102 for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). In March 2014, TAS-102 was approved in Japan. However, in these pivotal trials, there were few cases in which regorafenib was administered as prior treatments, and also there were few reports on the effectiveness and safety of TAS-102 after administration of regorafenib.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.257
       
  • P-259Variability of current global practice patterns in the management of
           metastatic colorectal cancer
    • Authors: Bekaii-Saab T; Marcello K, Fisher G, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Therapeutic options for mCRC have changed dramatically in recent years, greatly increasing the complexity of therapeutic decision-making. Treatment guidelines may limit flexibility to individualize patient care. The aim of this analysis was to assess “real world” global practice patterns for metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) compared with recommendations from US experts based on patient cases entered by clinicians into an online decision support tool designed to provide specific, patient-individualized expert recommendations.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.258
       
  • P-260Quality-of-life in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC)
           treated with aflibercept and FOLFIRI: Interim results of the
           non-interventional AIO study QoLiTrap
    • Authors: Zahn M; Scholten F, von Moos R, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: The anti-angiogenic fusion protein aflibercept targets VEGF-A, VEGF-B and PlGF. Aflibercept is approved in combination with FOLFIRI for treatment of mCRC that is resistant or has progressed after oxaliplatin-containing therapy.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.259
       
  • P-261HGCSG1503: A retrospective cohort study evaluating the safety and
           efficacy of TAS-102 in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer:
           Analysis of GERCOR index
    • Authors: Hatanaka K; Yuki S, Nakano S, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: In the treatment for metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC), it is essential for understanding the prognosis of each individual patient. GERCOR index (GI) based on performance status and serum LDH has been previously proposed. However, in the later line setting, the validity of GI has not been reported in patients treated by TAS-102.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.260
       
  • P-262Trial-level analysis of early tumor shrinkage and disease control
           rate as intermediate end points of first-line medical treatment in
           randomized studies of metastatic colorectal cancer
    • Authors: Colloca G; Venturino A, Guarneri D.
      Abstract: Introduction: Early tumor shrinkage (ETS) is a response-related end point (EP), defined as a radiologic dimensional reduction of at least 20% after 8 weeks of chemotherapy, and it has been shown to be predictive of overall survival (OS) in studies of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). From the available studies and a patient-level meta-analysis it appears that ETS correlates better than overall response rate (ORR) with OS [Sommereir 2014, J Clin Oncol 32:3538]. However, a trial-level pooled analysis concluded that ETS predicted progression-free survival (PFS) but not OS. Disease control rate (DCR) by RECIST appeared as a good intermediate end point of OS from a previous analysis of 11 randomized trials of patients with mCRC who underwent first-line treatment with chemotherapy plus bevacizumab vs. chemotherapy alone, reporting a better performance than PFS [Colloca 2016, Clin Oncol 28:e155-64]. The aim of the present study is to perform a trial level analysis to verify if DCR and ETS after a first-line chemotherapy are related to OS in patients with mCRC receiving various regimens.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.261
       
  • P-263Survival analysis of a multicentre, randomized phase 3 study on the
           optimization of the combination of bevacizumab with FOLFOX/OXXEL in
           patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC)
    • Authors: Avallone A; Nasti G, Rosati G, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Bevacizumab is a humanized anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) monoclonal antibody, approved in combination with chemotherapy in the treatment of mCRC. It is proposed that its schedule of administration might be critical and that anticipating bevacizumab to chemotherapy might improve treatment efficacy.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.262
       
  • P-264HGCSG1401: A retrospective cohort study evaluating the safety and
           efficacy of regorafenib in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer:
           Analysis of risk factors for liver dysfunction
    • Authors: Honda T; Yuki S, Muranaka T, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Regorafenib (REG) prolongs overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) for patients (pts) with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) in RCTs. However, there is a problem with REG-induced severe liver dysfunction (≥Grade 3) which occurs in 5-11% of treated Japanese pts. Therefore, we analyzed the incidence, therapeutic efficacy, and potential risk factors for REG-induced severe liver dysfunction in a community-based retrospective study (HGCSG1401) of pts treated with REG.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.263
       
  • P-265Treatment choices in metastatic colorectal cancer according to
           sidedness and RAS/BRAF status: A national survey by the Brazilian Group of
           Gastrointestinal Tumors (GTG)
    • Authors: Peixoto R; Riechelmann R, Prolla G, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Tumor sidedness and RAS/BRAF status have changed the treatment landscape of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). This study was performed to understand the first line choices of Brazilian oncologists for patients with advanced/unresectable metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC), especially in the emergent context of tumor sidedness and RAS/BRAF V600E status.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.264
       
  • P-266Retrospective analysis of clinical factors associated with a greater
           benefit with Trifluridine and Tipiracil in metastasic colorectal cancer
    • Authors: Rodriguez-Salas N; Segura M, Jimenez-Gordo A, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the most incident in Spain, according to Spanish Network of Cancer Registries (REDECAN) and is the second cause of death by cancer in Spain. Although the OS in metastatic setting has increased to 24-30 months, the 5-year OS continues to be less than 12%. The first and second line of treatment are well defined; however, there are few therapeutic options for those patients who have progressed to these standard therapies. After progression to the second line of treatment, the only therapeutic options with approved specific indication are Regorafenib and Trifluridine and Tipiracil. Trifluridine and Tipiracil has shown its efficacy in two randomized clinical trials comparing Trifluridine and Tipiracil versus placebo: a Phase II and a Phase III study (RECOURSE). In the previous Phase II study, the mOS was 9.0 months in the group treated with Trifluridine and Tipiracil, compared to 6.6 months in the placebo group. In the RECOURSE study, among patients treated with Trifluridine and Tipiracil mPFS was 2 months versus 1.7 months among those treated with placebo, and mOS was 10,5 with Trifluridine and Tipiracil vs 7,6 with placebo. We described the clinical characteristic of patients treated with Trifluridine and Tipiracil in seven hospitals from Madrid; identifying and analyzing clinical factors associated with long-term response.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.265
       
  • P-267The prognostic impact of sidedness in RAS wild-type colorectal cancer
    • Authors: Tavares N; Costa A, Almeida D, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a heterogeneous disease and sidedness [right colon (RC) vs. left colon (LC)] reflects different clinical, biological and molecular behaviors, which could have a significant prognostic impact. This study tried to evaluate the impact of sidedness on overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) in RAS wild-type (RAS-WT) CRC patients treated with anti-EGFR antibodies in first line palliative chemotherapy.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.266
       
  • P-268Advanced colorectal cancer and risk factors for survival
    • Authors: Kaidarova D; Smagulova K, Yesentaeva S, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common localizations of malignant tumors. Given the characteristics of the course of this disease and its diagnosis lead to a large prevalence of advanced form. In the Republic of Kazakhstan CRC takes a leading position in the structure of cancer incidence. In 2015 in Kazakhstan registered 3686 CRC patients and 1840 CRC patients died. Despite the fact that significant progress has been made in the treatment of CRC in recent years, this disease is still one of the leading causes of mortality from cancer pathology.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.267
       
  • P-269Dynamics of the monoclonal antibodies (MABs) treatment rate and
           mortality rate in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) in
           Russia from 2013 to 2016
    • Authors: Fedyanin M; Elsnukaeva H, Polyanskaya E, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Previously, we revealed inverse significant association between mortality rate from mCRC in 2014 and the irinotecan treatment rate in 2013 in Russian regions (Ann Oncol (2016) 27 (suppl 2): ii15). The aim of this study was to evaluate dynamics of penetration of different chemotherapy drugs and Mabs and mortality rate in a population of patients with mCRC across 82 regions of Russia from 2013 to 2016.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.268
       
  • P-270Association between duration of oxaliplatin-free interval and effect
           of reintroduction of oxaliplatin-containing chemotherapy in patients with
           metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC)
    • Authors: Fedyanin M; Tryakin A, Bulanov A, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Reintroduction of chemotherapy and targeted agents is one of the suitable treatment options in patients with mCRC after 3rd line of therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate association between duration of oxaliplatin-free interval and effect of reintroduction of oxaliplatin-containing chemotherapy.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.269
       
  • P-271Prognostic impact of K-RAS mutational status and primary tumour
           location in patients undergoing resection for colorectal cancer liver
           metastases: A METHEPAR analysis (multicentre study in Argentina)
    • Authors: O’Connor J; Huertas E, Loria F, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Even though RAS mutations are known to imply aggressive tumour biology, their objective impact on survival is still controversial. The purpose of this study is to determine the impact of KRAS mutational status in the overall survival (OS) and recurrence free survival (RFS) of patients undergoing surgery for colorectal liver metastases (CLM).
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.270
       
  • P-272Understanding of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) in the real
           world: Initial results from a European survey on the unmet needs of
           patients living with metastatic colorectal cancer
    • Authors: Maravic Z; Wyrwicz L, Karczmarek-Borowska B, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: EuropaColon, a European CRC patient organisation, planned and executed a survey in 12 European countries on the Unmet Needs of Patients Living with mCRC. The aim of this patient survey was to understand the challenges and needs of those living with mCRC and their health-related quality-of-life challenges. Recruitment in Hungary, Serbia and Spain was completed. The objective of this paper is to describe basic demographics and patient responses about discovery of the disease in these four countries.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.271
       
  • P-273Recruitment for a survey on the unmet needs of patients living with
           metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC): Lessons from a European study
    • Authors: Maravic Z; Trenevski J, Bokros J, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Colorectal cancer is still a taboo for many patients and there is little information about the patient’s experience in general practice. Much of what is known about their quality-of-life comes from clinical trials – that are not representative of everyday patient experience. To fill this gap, EuropaColon, a European CRC patient organisation, planned and carried out a survey on the Unmet Needs of Patients Living with Metastatic Colorectal Cancer (mCRC). The aim of the survey was to better understand the challenges and needs of those living with mCRC as well as to understand their quality-of-life.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.272
       
  • P-274The clinical effectiveness and safety of re-induction oxaliplatin,
           irinotecan and fluorouracil (FOLFOXIRI regimen) for the treatment of
           metastatic colorectal cancer after two lines of chemotherapy (oxaliplatin-
           and irinotecan-based regimens)
    • Authors: Ledin E; Mochalova A, Zaitseva Y.
      Abstract: Introduction: The choice of antitumor agents used in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) is limited, which reduces the therapeutic possibilities. The improvement in survival for mCRC patient led to there is a significant number of patients progressing beyond the second or third line of treatment still suitable for further therapy when enrollment into clinical trial is not possible. In this situation, any rechallenge therapy plays an important role. We evaluated the efficacy and safety of the re-induction of oxaliplatin, irinotecan and fluorouracil (FOLFOXIRI regimen) in the third line of chemotherapy mCRC.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.273
       
  • P-275Selective internal radiation therapy (SIRT) with yttrium-90
           microspheres and peri-procedural FOLFIRI/irinotecan in pre-treated
           colorectal liver metastases patients: An analysis of outcomes from a UK
           Cancer Centre between 2009 and 2017
    • Authors: Wilson G; Bentley D, Mullamitha S, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Selective Internal Radiation Therapy (SIRT) involves hepatic intra-arterial infusion of β-particle emitting Yttrium-90 labelled microspheres. SIRT increases first line response rates (RR) and hepatic progression free survival (hPFS) in liver predominant metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients treated with oxaliplatin/5FU/folinic acid (FOLFOX). SIRT is often used in pre-treated mCRC patients with peri-procedural FOLFOX to achieve radio-sensitization and control extra-hepatic disease. Since 2009 we have used FOLFIRI as an alternative peri-procedural regimen with SIRT.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.274
       
  • P-276Raltitrexed as salvage therapy for metastatic colorectal cancer: A
           multicenter retrospective study
    • Authors: Ghanem I; Viudez A, García-Torralba E, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Raltitrexed is used as an alternative to fluoropyrimidines (FP) for the treatment of colorectal cancer patients. We previously reported a retrospectively unicentric study analyzing the activity and tolerance of raltitrexed as salvage therapy for advanced colorectal cancer. Here, we report an update and an enlargement of the sample size as a multicenter study.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.275
       
  • P-277Real world data in colorectal cancer: A retrospective analysis of
           overall survival in metastatic colorectal cancer patients between
           2011-2015 treated in Spain, preliminary results (RWD-ACROSS study)
    • Authors: Pericay C; Gallego J, Montes A, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Colorectal cancer is a global problem due the incidence and prevalence. Clinical trials do not represent treatment of real life population effectiveness, so real world data trials are needed. Aim: We present preliminary results based on a registry for Spanish metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.276
       
  • P-278Prognostic factors in metastatic colorectal cancer
    • Authors: Silva M; Guerreiro I, Abreu S, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: In addition to the predictive value of RAS complex status in metastatic colorectal cancer (MCRC), the impact of several clinicopathological characteristics in the outcome has been described, although the practice recommendations have not yet clearly separate algorithms. The purpose of this study is to identify features that affect natural history of disease in our population. Furthermore, we aim to analyze the difference between prognosis of mCRC according with the choice of initial biologic agent.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.277
       
  • P-279Effectiveness of TAS-102 in patients with metastatic colorectal
           cancer in a single comprehensive cancer center
    • Authors: Sales C; Julião I, Rosinha A, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Trifluridine/tipiracil (TAS-102) prolongs progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) whose disease progressed after at least two standard therapies. TAS-102 is available in Portugal since 2016. The authors evaluate the effectiveness of TAS-102 in patients with mCRC in routine clinical practice.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.278
       
  • P-281The impact of primary tumor location in patients with resected
           colorectal liver metastasis
    • Authors: Pacheco-Barcia V; Donnay O, Solís R, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Recent prospective studies suggest that the primary tumor site in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer correlates with evolution. However, it is unclear whether there is an association between the side of the primary tumor and survival in patients with resected colorectal liver metastasis. The aim of our study is to evaluate the clinical outcome of patients with resected colorectal liver metastasis according to the side of the primary tumor.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.280
       
  • P-282RAS status in metastatic colorectal cancer: What is the relationship
           to epidemiological and anatomo-clinical factors'
    • Authors: Haffadi M; Tawfiq N, Karkouri M, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: In Morocco, colorectal cancer (CRC) is the first digestive cancer. The identification of RAS status has modified the management of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Very few RAS status studies in the mCRC have been conducted in developing countries, such as Morocco, to identify the profile of its patients. The aim of this study is to evaluate the epidemiological and anatomo-clinical profile of mCRC patients based on the RAS status.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.281
       
  • P-283Skin disorders and primary tumor location as a prognostic factor of
           cetuximab plus chemotherapy in the treatment of advanced colorectal cancer
           
    • Authors: Shinya T; Tamotsu S, Fujikawa K, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Treatment with cetuximab is known to significantly increase overall and progression-free survival in patients with left-sided colorectal cancer, but not in patients with right-sided colorectal cancer. Skin rash is a major side effect of cetuximab treatment, and the presence of skin disorder caused by cetuximab is associated with prolonged survival. To date, however, no report has compared the incidence of skin disorder according to tumor location. Furthermore, no report has evaluated overall survival according to both tumor location and skin disorder presence. Therefore, we investigated the frequency of rash according to primary tumor location (left vs. right) in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC), and additionally evaluated overall survival.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.282
       
  • P-284Characteristics of colorectal cancer in the elderly patients about 60
           cases
    • Authors: Aliane H; Ghomari-Bezzar S, Belhadj A, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Older people constitute a heterogeneous population, according to World Health Organization, the elderly person is defined as any individual with a chronological age equal to or higher than 60 years. In most cases, colorectal carcinoma is a disease of the elderly. Occurs mostly in the elderly people of more than 65 years and it poses public health problem. For several years geriatric evaluation has shown multiple benefits and we are witnessing a significant improvement in the oncological management of these patients.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.283
       
  • P-285Optimizing the use of EGFR antibodies across the continuum of care in
           mCRC: Effect of online education on clinician knowledge, competence and
           confidence
    • Authors: Fisher G; Guerra W, Day C, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Optimal application of EGFR antibodies across the continuum of care in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) is critical to achieve the best patient outcomes. A good understanding of the implications of current evidence on treatment beyond progression and re-challenge is important in informing clinical decision making. This study determined whether online continuing medical education (CME) could increase- knowledge and competence related to applying best practices for RAS screening and monitoring, and selecting the right treatment approach for the individual patient across the continuum of care.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.284
       
  • P-286Integrating a paradigm shift in the treatment of metastatic
           colorectal cancer: Effect of online CME on oncologists' knowledge and
           competence
    • Authors: Herrmann T; Cameron D, Carothers A, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: The objective of this study was to determine the effect of online continuing medical education on the knowledge and competence of oncologists regarding the management of metastatic renal cell cancer (mCRC) among community oncologists.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.285
       
  • P-287Treatment based on tumor sidedness in mCRC: Effect of online
           education on clinician knowledge, competence and confidence
    • Authors: Fisher G; Guerra W, Day C, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Emergent data on the impact of tumour sidedness on the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) has important implications to clinical practice. This study determined whether online continuing medical education (CME) could improve oncologists’ knowledge of the most current data supporting the use of available therapeutic options in left- vs right-sided tumors, and improve clinician competence in evidence-based selection and optimal use of EGFR antibodies in clinical practice.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.286
       
  • P-288Causes of death in a cohort of early stage colorectal cancer patients
           at a regional centre in Australia
    • Authors: Lim L; Faisal W, Wuttke M, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Australia has amongst the highest incidence of colorectal cancer in the world. The Australian state of Victoria has amongst the best survival rates nationally and internationally. However, inequalities in CRC survival for cancer patients living in rural and regional areas persist. In particular, there is an absolute difference of 10% in 5-year survival rates of patients diagnosed between 2005 – 2009 in Metropolitan Melbourne compared to the Grampians region in regional Victoria. These differences are also apparent in those with early stage colorectal cancer. We conducted an analysis in a regional cohort of early stage patients to explore potential contributing factors for increased mortality.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.287
       
  • P-289Prognostic factors for early recurrences following cytoreductive
           surgery (CRS) and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) for
           colorectal and appendiceal peritoneal metastases
    • Authors: Chandran N; Tan G, Chia C, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: The introduction of cytoreductive surgery (CRS) and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) has improved the prognosis of selected patients with peritoneal metastases (PM) of colorectal and appendiceal primaries. However, despite careful patient selection and complete macroscopic resection, early recurrences (ER) still occur. This study aims to identify risk factors for ER.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.288
       
  • P-290Simultaneous versus staged resections of liver metastases in patients
           with advanced colorectal cancer
    • Authors: Kolesnik O; Lukashenko A, Ostapenko Y, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Surgical management of metastatic colorectal cancer remains the best method to use which significantly improves overall 5-year survival. There are two well-known possible approaches of surgical treatment of patients with synchronous colorectal liver metastasis. The former includes synchronous resection of the colorectal primary with the following resection of the liver metastases and the latter is a staged resection approach. However, at present the issue of feasibility and effectiveness of simultaneous operations for metastatic liver lesions in patients with synchronous metastatic colorectal cancer (SMCLC) is negotiated and remains uncertain. This study aimed to compare the surgical outcomes and survival benefit between synchronous and staged resections of the colorectal liver metastases.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.289
       
  • P-291The DISTINCTIVE study: A biologically enriched phase II study of
           seconD-line folfiri/aflIbercept in proSpecTIvely stratified, anti-EGFR
           resistaNt, metastatic coloreCTal cancer patIents with RAS Validated wild
           typE status - Trial in progress
    • Authors: Ziranu P; Demurtas L, Puzzoni M, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: The use of chemotherapy in combination with anti-angiogenic treatment represents a standard of care in the second-line setting of metastatic colorectal cancer. In patients pretreated with an oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy either aflibercept or bevacizumab in combination with FOLFIRI are considered equivalent options. However, data regarding second-line anti-angiogenic therapy in RAS wild type patients receiving first-line anti-EGFR treatment are lacking and clinical practice is essentially based on speculations deriving from first-line studies. Moreover, biological data seem to indicate a different clinical outcome according to serum concentrations of angiogenesis-related factors, but prospective validation was not performed. VEGFR2 may play a role as predictive marker of response to antiangiogenic drugs and it should be considered a prognostic marker in patients treated with anti-VEGF therapies, as shown in both preclinical studies and exploratory analysis over randomized trials.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.290
       
  • P-292A phase II study of dose-escalation of regorafenib for patients with
           previously treated metastatic colorectal cancer – DEREGULATE study -
           Trial in progress
    • Authors: Kawaguchi K; Nishitai R, Manaka D, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Regorafenib (REG) is a standard salvage line therapy for metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) after a pivotal phase III study (CORRECT). However, administration of full dose of REG often leads to severe adverse effects, which makes the clinical use of this drug restricted to the patients(pts) relatively in good conditions. In a phase II ReDOS study (regorafenib dose optimization study NCT02368886), the median overall survival (OS) was improved more favorably in dose escalating regimen, which began at 80mg per day and increased weekly up to 160mg per day, than in standard regimen of 160mg per day. The Japanese subpopulation of CORRECT is reported to have received only 69.3% (110.9 mg/day) of the planned dose of REG, although non-Japanese subpopulation has received 80.4%, which suggests that dose escalating regimen may be more suitable for Japanese pts. The aim of this DEREGULATE study is to test the hypothesis that this dose-escalation regimen might have better sustainability and comparative disease-control compared with the standard dose regimen in Japanese pts.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.291
       
  • P-293Comorbidities (CM) and potential impact in outcomes of advanced
           colorectal cancer patients (ACC) in Argentina: EVIREPRO real life program
           - Trial in progress
    • Authors: Schmilovich A; Ramello F, Malicki M, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: CM may influence systemic treatment decisions in cancer care and it could potentially impact outcomes of patients (pts) who receive it. We sought to determine whether CM impacts systemic treatment and survival in pts with ACC.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.292
       
  • P-294Multicenter phase Ib/II study of biweekly TAS-102 with bevacizumab
           combination for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer refractory to
           standard therapies (BiTS study) - Trial in progress
    • Authors: Kato T; Satake H, Oba K, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: TAS-102 (trifluridine/tipiracil) plus bevacizumab combination therapy has shown a promising activity with manageable safety profile in patients with heavily pretreated metastatic colorectal cancer. In a previously reported study assessed this combination therapy, TAS-102 has been given orally every 4 weeks (35mg/m2 given orally twice daily on day 1-5 and 8-12 in a 28-day cycle) and bevacizumab has been administered every 2 weeks (5mg/kg, administered by intravenous infusion for 30 min every 2 weeks) (C-TASK FORCE, Kuboki et al., Lancet Oncol 2017). The aim of this phase Ib/II study was to assess the activity and safety of biweekly TAS-102 with bevacizumab combination for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer who were refractory or intolerant to standard therapies.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.293
       
  • P-295A multicenter, multicohort, phase 2 study of trastuzumab deruxtecan
           (DS-8201a) in subjects with HER2-expressing metastatic colorectal cancer -
           Trial in progress
    • Authors: Yoshino T; Siena S, Dalal R, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Approximately 1% to 5% of metastatic colorectal cancers (mCRC) are HER2-overexpressing. HER2 is considered to be an important target for mCRC, however no HER2-targeted therapies are approved for mCRC. Trastuzumab deruxtecan (DS-8201a) is a novel HER2-targeted antibody-drug conjugate with a humanized HER2 antibody attached to a topoisomerase I inhibitor payload by a cleavable peptide-based linker (deruxtecan), and with a high drug-to-antibody ratio of 7 to 8. In the ongoing phase 1 DS8201-A-J101 trial, DS-8201a provided durable antitumor activity with a manageable safety profile in subjects with HER2-expressing solid tumors, including subjects with mCRC (preliminary objective response rate [ORR] of 20.0% in mCRC) (Tsurutani et al, ESMO 2017).
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.294
       
  • P-296ABT-165 plus FOLFIRI vs bevacizumab plus FOLFIRI in patients with
           metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) previously treated with
           fluoropyrimidine/oxaliplatin and bevacizumab - Trial in progress
    • Authors: Wainberg Z; Wang L, Yue H, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: The dual variable domain immunoglobulin ABT-165 targets human vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and delta-like ligand 4 (DLL4). Combined VEGF and DLL4 blockade increased inhibition of subcutaneous xenograft growth of human colon cancer-derived cell lines vs blockade of either axis alone. In vivo, ABT-165 plus chemotherapy (CT) induced tumor regression with improved efficacy, vs anti-VEGF monoclonal antibody plus CT. In a phase 1 study, a tolerable recommended phase 2 dose was identified for ABT-165 plus FOLFIRI and showed promising efficacy. This phase 2 trial in progress assesses the efficacy/safety of ABT-165 plus FOLFIRI vs bevacizumab (bev) plus FOLFIRI in patients with second-line mCRC.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.295
       
  • P-297CanStem303C trial: A Phase 3 Study of napabucasin (NAPA) in
           combination with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), leucovorin, and irinotecan
           (FOLFIRI) in adult patients (pts) with previously treated metastatic
           colorectal cancer (mCRC) - Trial in progress
    • Authors: Shah M; Grothey A, Tebbutt N, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: NAPA is an oral investigational agent, which has been hypothesized to inhibit cancer stemness pathways, including STAT3 pathway implicated in cancer stem-cell viability. Preclinical studies suggest that NAPA may sensitize cancer cells to chemotherapeutics, including 5-FU and irinotecan. Encouraging anticancer activity in advanced CRC was observed in a phase 1b/2 study (NCT02024607). In the subset of FOLFIRI-naive patients with an on-study RECIST evaluation, disease control rate (DCR) was 85% (33/39) and objective response rate (ORR) was 21% (8/39).1 On the basis of these data, a phase 3 trial is being conducted in North America, Europe, Australia, and Asia.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.296
       
  • P-298A phase II study of avelumab in MSI-H metastatic colorectal cancer
           patients - Trial in progress
    • Authors: Proszynski D; Winiarek M, Marcisz-Grzanka K, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Colorectal cancer is one of the most common malignancies in the Western world. The treatment strategy of metastatic disease (mCRC) includes cytotoxic agents (oxaliplatin, irinotecan and fluoropyrimidines) and targeted agents (anti-VEGF and anti-EGFR). Le et al in their fundamental report presented in 2015, has shown that immunomodulating agents can control the progression and potentially affect overall survival in colorectal cancer patients as well as other gastrointestinal malignancies that harbor mismatch-repair deficiency. This molecular phenomenon is leading to the hypermutated phenotype called microsatellite instability (MSI-H). On the phenotypic level, such tumors harbor hundreds-to-thousands mutations, which can make the tumor immunogenic if immune-reaction is not blocked by PD1-PDL1 axis. Avelumab is anti-PD-L1 antibody which can exhibit the similar efficacy in this rare subtype of mCRC.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.297
       
  • P-299Predictive factors of complete pathological response in operated
           patients with locally advanced rectal cancer after chemoradiotherapy
           neoadjuvant treatment in Peru
    • Authors: Motta R; Ybazeta P, Cordova O, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Surgery after neoadjuvant treatment with chemoradiotherapy is the standard treatment in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). One of the objectives of neoadjuvant treatment is to increase the rate of R0 surgeries after tumor downstaging. The 10-30% of patients achieve complete pathological response (CPR) after chemoradiotherapy treatment, which has shown reduced local recurrence and better overall survival in several studies. However, surgery has several genitourinary, sexual and gastrointestinal postoperative complications. Because of this, the recognition of patients who would achieve CPR could allow us to consider a “watch and wait” therapeutic option instead of surgery in selected patients. The objective of this study is to determine predictive factors of CPR in order to try to identify patients in whom surgical treatment may be avoided and preserve organ function.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.298
       
  • P-300Predictive value of circulating tumor-derived DNA (ctDNA) in patients
           with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) treated with neoadjuvant
           chemoradiotherapy (CT-RT): Preliminary results
    • Authors: Ravenda P; Gregato G, Rotundo M, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: In patients with LARC, neoadjuvant CT-RT followed by curative surgery is the standard of care. Risk-adopted treatment is based on MRI-predicting local T and N stage, radial margins and vascular involvement while no molecular predictive markers are available. In the present prospective study, we investigated the predictive role of serum ctDNA in patients with LARC.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.299
       
  • P-301CRP/albumin ratio can be a predictor of response to neoadjuvant
           chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in rectal cancer
    • Authors: Yetisyigit T; Seber S, Yolcu A.
      Abstract: Introduction: C-reactive protein to albumin (CRP/Alb) ratio is a surrogate marker of hosts reaction to systemic inflammation generated by tumor microenvironment. Recent studies have reported its efficacy as a prognostic marker in various cancers. However, its association with tumor response to treatment has not been fully elucidated. We aimed to investigate the effect of pretreatment CRP/Albumin ratio on treatment response in rectum cancer patients receiving CRT.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.300
       
  • P-302Pathological complete response after chemoradiotherapy in locally
           advanced rectal cancer: Capecitabine or 5-fluorouracil' Which is
           better'
    • Authors: Hernández-Yagüe X; Canals-Subirats E, Esquerda G, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Infusional 5-fluorouracil (5FU) has been the standard radiation sensitizer in patients undergoing preoperative long-course chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for locally advanced rectal cancer. It has been stablished non-inferior results, in terms of pathological complete response (pCR), of capecitabine compared with 5FU administered in bolus or continuous infusion schedule in two phase III studies1,2. Recently it has been reported a reduced rate of pathological complete response related to capecitabine compared to 5FU in a large retrospective Australian cohort3. It seems the ypT0ypN0 and ypT1ypN0 pathological stage after CRT have a similar good survival.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.301
       
  • P-303Food intake and nutritional status of colorectal cancer patients
           undergoing radio-chemotherapy in Sardjito hospital
    • Authors: Purba M; Winarti H, Pangastuti R.
      Abstract: Introduction: Diet has long been thought to have a role in the etiology of colorectal cancer (CRC), particularly when a poor diet is combined with excess calorie intake and weight gain, physical inactivity, and unhealthy practices, such as smoking and consuming a great deal of alcohol. Current knowledge about food consumption patterns indicates that a diet high in vegetables, fruit, and fibre is protective against certain types of cancer, but the evidence that fruit and vegetable consumption is specifically related to a reduced risk of CRC was recently challenged. In an attempt to clarify the relationship between diet and CRC, researchers are examining individual food intake and nutritional status of patients undergoing radio-chemotherapy in Dr Sardjito Hospital.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.302
       
  • P-304Preoperative chemoradiation in locally advanced rectal cancer: A
           single center experience
    • Authors: Oliveira L; Rolo A, Carvalho C, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Preoperative chemoradiation (CRT) is the standard treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of neoadjuvant CRT in the treatment of LARC in Hospital de Guimarães.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.303
       
  • P-305The role of adjuvant chemotherapy according to the status of surgical
           margin in rectal cancer patients who received preoperative chemoradiation
           and total mesorectal excision
    • Authors: Sung S; Lee J, Kim S, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Adjuvant chemotherapy has been recommended for patients who have locally advanced rectal cancer. However, the role of adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with positive surgical margin has not been clarified. We investigated the benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy according to the surgical margin in locally advanced rectal cancer patients who received preoperative chemoradiation (CRT) and total mesorectal excision (TME).
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.304
       
  • P-306The relationship between primary tumor regression grade and lymph
           nodes status in local advanced rectal cancer after neoadjuvant
           chemoradiation therapy
    • Authors: Ju H; Liu L, Wu W, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy may affect the lymph node status in local advanced rectal cancer. In this study, we evaluate the relationship between tumor regression grade and lymph nodes status and prognosis value in local advanced rectal cancer after neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.305
       
  • P-307Preoperative predictors for pathologic response and prognosis of
           rectal cancer after neoadjuvant chemoradiation
    • Authors: Yoo G; Yu J, Park H, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: A watch-and-wait approach following neoadjuvant chemoradiation (NCRT) could avoid the morbidity of surgery for rectal cancer. To determine which patients would be candidates of watch-and-wait approach, it is important to identify reliable factors predictive for the poor responses after the chemoradiation. In this study, we aimed to identify factors associated with pathologic response and long-term disease control.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.306
       
  • P-308Comparison of incidence and survival outcomes in mucinous and
           signet-ring cell colorectal cancers with classical adenocarcinoma: A SEER
           analysis
    • Authors: Mehmood T.
      Abstract: Introduction: Besides classical adenocarcinoma (AC), mucinous adenocarcinoma (MAC) and signet-ring cell carcinoma (SRCC) are less frequent subtypes of colorectal cancer, and their recent epidemiologic data are lacking. The current study was designed to explore the evolving epidemiology and prognosis of patients with colorectal MAC and SRCC, compared with AC.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.307
       
  • P-309Quality improvement in the management of rectal cancer in a large
           healthcare system in the United States
    • Authors: Sause W.
      Abstract: Introduction: Intermountain Healthcare is a twenty-three hospital care delivery system located in the State of Utah. The system represents large referral hospitals and smaller community facilities. Approximately sixty percent of patients who reside in the State of Utah receive their care at an Intermountain facility. Intermountain Healthcare has a long history of quality improvement. In order to facilitate quality improvement Intermountain has developed clinical programs for a variety of disciplines. Oncology represents a focused area of interest. These clinical programs have dedicated infrastructure and leadership in place to evaluate care and initiate improvement in a variety of disease sites.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.308
       
  • P-310Diagnosis and selection of method of combined treatment of
           local-distributed cancer of the rectum with invasion into organs of the
           genitals
    • Authors: Lukmonov S; Usmanov O, Madatov K, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Diagnosis optimization and treatment choice of the locally advanced rectal cancer with invasion in the organs of the genitals.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.309
       
  • P-311Comparison between the toxicity profile of fluorouracil versus
           capecitabine concomitant with radiotherapy in patients with non-metastatic
           rectal cancer
    • Authors: Lotfy A; Yassin M, Rashwan G, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: The incidence of colorectal cancer varies considerably around the world. About 944,717 cases were identified worldwide in the year 2000. High incidences of colon and rectal cancer cases are identified in the developed countries. Concurrent preoperative radiotherapy with chemotherapy (5-Flurouracil based) followed by total mesorectal excision (TME) surgery and further systemic therapy is the recommended standard first-line treatment. Fluorouracil (5-FU) remains the most widely used agent for colorectal cancer. Capecitabine is a rationally designed 5-FU pro-drug developed to mimic the continuous infusion of 5-FU while avoiding complications and inconvenience of intravenous administration.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.310
       
  • P-312Role of consolidative radiation therapy after surgery in patients
           with stage IV rectal cancer
    • Authors: Mehmood T.
      Abstract: Introduction: Radiotherapy (RT) and surgery are known to effectively palliate many symptoms of patients with metastatic rectal cancer (mRC). However, whether RT would provide survival benefit to mRC after surgery remains unclear.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.311
       
  • P-313Nonstandard hypofraction radiotherapy in neoadjuvant chemo-radiation
           therapy of locally advanced rectal cancer
    • Authors: Abdujapparov A; Tkachev S, Djuraev F, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy has become the standard treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer. Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy not only can reduce tumor size and recurrence, but also increase the tumor resection rate and anus retention rate with very slight side effect. Comparing with preoperative chemotherapy, preoperative chemoradiotherapy can further reduce the local recurrence rate and downstage.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.312
       
  • P-314Prone vs supine position in patients with rectal cancer treated with
           volumetric arc therapy and concurrent chemotherapy
    • Authors: Gomez L; Fernandez A, Daffos P, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Patients undergoing radiotherapy often are treated in prone position using a belly board as immobilization system with a full bladder protocol. Doing this, we reduce doses to organ at risk, but the position is difficult to maintain and hardly reproducible. This fact served for previous techniques of radiotherapy, but with the current ones we must suspect that the protection of normal tissues is assured regardless of the position. The objective of our study is to compare both positions and verify the protection of organ at risk, without loss of coverage of the treatment volume, using volumetric arc radiotherapy (VMAT) and concomitant chemotherapy.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.313
       
  • P-315The role of palliative re-irradiation in management of rectal cancer
    • Authors: Janjua T; Hingorani M, Cooper R, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: The role of re-irradiation for management of loco-regional pelvic recurrence in rectal cancer remains poorly defined. Previous studies have employed range of dose-schedules with variable outcomes and the use of higher biological effective dose (BED) regimes has been associated with increased rates of Grade 3-4 toxicity ranging from 20-30 percent. We report on retrospective evaluation of outcomes in rectal cancer following re-irradiation with a palliative fractionated regime of 15 Gy in 5 fractions.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.314
       
  • P-316Is there any association of dose received by pelvic bone marrow in
           preoperative radiotherapy in rectal cancer with hematological toxicity of
           subsequent oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy'
    • Authors: Spalek M; Michalski W, Bujko K, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Preoperative radio(chemo)therapy in rectal cancer may irreversibly damage pelvic bone marrow (PBM) and impair the tolerance of subsequent chemotherapy. The aim of the study was to assess the association between irradiated volume of PBM and the tolerance of subsequent FOLFOX-4 chemotherapy in rectal cancer.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.315
       
  • P-317A single centre experience of in-field recurrence following
           pre-operative radio(chemo)therapy in patients with rectal cancer
    • Authors: Coen O; Karsera L, Tambe N, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Preoperative radio(chemo)therapy is commonly used in the management of rectal cancer. It has consistently shown to improve local recurrence rates over surgery alone and improve progression free survival1,2. There is however limited data as to what proportion of patients develop recurrence within the radiotherapy field. This retrospective review reports outcomes for patients treated with pre-operative radio(chemo) therapy followed by surgery depending on response.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.316
       
  • P-318Laparoscopic technologies in the treatment of patients with locally
           advanced rectal cancer: The possibilities and prospects
    • Authors: Khoshimov S.
      Abstract: Introduction: To improve the results of treatment of patients with locally advanced rectal cancer by using a combined approach in the treatment with the use of minimally invasive technologies.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.317
       
  • P-319Long term efficacy results from the phase II CRAB trial: Neoadjuvant
           bevacizumab, capecitabine and radiotherapy in locally advanced rectal
           cancer
    • Authors: Velenik V; Omejc M, Ocvirk J, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Neoadjuvant capecitabine based chemoradiotherapy and radical surgery are considered to be optimal treatment approach to locally-advanced rectal cancer This prospective, nonrandomised, open -label phase II study investigated the efficacy and safety of bevacizumab (Bev) in combination with capecitabine and concurrent radiotherapy (CRT) for the treatment of locally advanced resectable rectal cancer (LARC). The pathological complete response (pCR) was assessed as primary endpoint and local control and survival parameters as secondary endpoints.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.318
       
  • P-320Pilot trial of YIV-906 with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in
           patients with locally advanced rectal cancer
    • Authors: Johung K; Kann B, Lacy J, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Neoadjuvant CRT is the standard of care for clinical stage T3-4 or node positive rectal adenocarcinoma, but it is associated with a 12% rate of acute grade 3-4 diarrhea and 9% rate of longterm gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities1. Furthermore, the rate of complete pathologic responses to neoadjuvant therapy is low in historic studies (8%)1. Reducing GI toxicity is important because these side effects can lead to delayed or incomplete treatment, which may compromise patient outcomes. Novel agents which may improve pathologic response are of interest, as pCR is associated with improved local control and survival. YIV-906 is derived from Huang-Qin-Tang, a traditional Chinese medicine used to treat GI ailments. YIV-906 is a standardized pharmaceutical subjected to quality-control measures including chemical fingerprinting, individual target bioassays, and genomic bioresponse profiling. Phase I/II clinical trials demonstrated the safety of YIV-906 in combination with irinotecan- and capecitabine-based chemotherapy and a reduction in GI side effects. In addition, these studies suggest that YIV-906 may enhance the tumor response to chemotherapy by altering the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. In a preclinical study, YIV-906 selectively decreased intestinal injury from abdominal radiation (RT) without compromising tumor control. Therefore, a pilot phase I trial was launched to evaluate the novel combination of YIV-906 with neoadjuvant CRT for rectal cancer.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.319
       
  • P-321Profile of neurotoxicity of oxaliplatin in young versus elderly
           patients treated for colorectal carcinoma
    • Authors: Aliane H; Ghomari-Bezzar S.
      Abstract: Introduction: Peripheral neuropathy secondary to oxaliplatin is very frequent, these neuropathies are characterized by the symmetry of the neurological disorders and their distal predominance. In most patients, this neuropathy is only partially reversible and can persist long after the stop of chemotherapy. This is one of the major dose-limiting side effects of chemotherapy that may lead not only to the loss of function physical activity associated with a decrease in the quality of life and difficulties in daily activities, especially if it is an elderly person but which can also result in the reduction and or delay of the administration dose or even in the worst Of the cases the stop of the treatment.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.320
       
  • P-322First study in North Africa: Screening colorectal cancer
    • Authors: Mazouzi C; Bouzid K.
      Abstract: Introduction: In Algeria in 2015 colorectal cancer represents the 2nd cause of cancer mortality after lung cancer in men and after breast cancer in women. The increasing CRC incidence and mortality can be reduced by screening and treating adenomas and early cancers. A pilot CRC screening programme using immunochemical faecal occult blood testing (iFOBT) and colonoscopy for test-positives were implemented in Béjaia a northeast district of Algeria. This study aims to evaluate the acceptability, feasibility, validity of screening tests, and scaling-up of screening in Algeria. This report describes the implementation, coverage and performance indicators of this pilot project.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.321
       
  • P-323Perioperative treatment of gastric cancer: FLOT or not
    • Authors: Djuraev F; Abdujapparov A, Atakhanova N.
      Abstract: Introduction: Gastric cancer is one of the most common cases among oncological diseases especially in developing countries of Asia. The same picture nowadays can be observed in Uzbekistan. Despite of breakthrough developments in chemotherapy, gastric cancer is still one of the most leading causes of cancer deaths. Up to day accepted standard of perioperative treatment of patients with operable gastric cancer includes ECF, however survival is still very poor. The aim of this study was to compare docetaxel based triplet FLOT with anthracycline based triplet ECF.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.322
       
  • P-324Phenformin-induced mitochondrial dysfunction sensitizes
           hepatocellular carcinoma for dual inhibition of mTOR
    • Authors: Veiga S; Ge X, Mercer C, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) ranks second in cancer mortality and has limited therapeutic options. We recently described the synergistic effect of allosteric and ATP-site competitive inhibitors against the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) for the treatment of HCC. However, such inhibitors induce glycemia and increase mitochondrial efficiency. Here we determined whether the mitochondrial complex I inhibitor Phenformin could reverse both side effects, impose an energetic-stress on cancer cells and suppress HCC growth.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.323
       
  • P-325Gut microbial community diversity is associated with systemic
           vascular endothelial growth factor A levels among colorectal cancer
           patients
    • Authors: Holowatyj A; Stephens W, Warby C, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Dysbiosis in the gut microbiota and activation of the angiogenic switch in the tumor microenvironment contribute to colorectal carcinogenesis.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.324
       
  • PD-001Endoscopic prediction of tumor invasion depth in early gastric
           signet ring cell carcinoma
    • Authors: Moon H; Kang S, Sung J, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Endoscopic resection of early gastric cancer (EGC) is now widely accepted in many countries, especially in Korea and Japan. Endoscopic resection is often preferred over surgical resection due to better quality of life. signet ring cell carcinoma (SRC) is categorized as undifferentiated or a diffuse type, endoscopic treatment was originally not considered in early gastric SRC. However, recent studies have proven excellent prognosis of early gastric signet ring cell carcinoma with fewer lymph node (LN) metastasis. Thus, some now regard early gastric SRC as a condition for endoscopic treatment. However, many of them still do not accept endoscopic treatment of SRC due to several reasons. Depth prediction scoring systems have been developed based on the endoscopic features of all histologic types including differentiated and undifferentiated cancer. However, the same endoscopic criteria may not be applied to SRC due to different biological characteristics. We, therefore, evaluated the endoscopic features of M and SM cancers in early gastric SRCs.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy150
       
  • PD-002A phase I/II trial of hafnium oxide nanoparticles activated by
           radiotherapy in hepatocellular carcinoma and liver metastasis
    • Authors: Chajon E; Pracht M, De Baere T, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Management of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and liver metastasis (mets) requires complementary expertise of multiple specialties. Treatment decisions are increasingly complex and physicians must face a wide range of underlying liver dysfunctions and concomitant malignancies. Among available treatments, stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is well-tolerated. Yet, like with all radiation therapy (RT) techniques, the energy dose deposit needs to be maximized in tumor cells without affecting the surrounding healthy tissues. For such purpose, nanoparticles of hafnium oxide, NBTXR3, were designed to effectively absorb ionizing radiation and augment the dose deposited within the tumor cells only when activated by RT. NBTXR3 is characterized by one single administration before the first RT session and it fits into existing standard of care with no change in patient treatment schedule protocol or equipment occupancy. It is currently evaluated in a phase I/II clinical trial bringing together multiple medical fields to introduce the use of NBTXR3 with SBRT in patients with HCC or liver mets [NCT02721056].
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy150.001
       
  • PD-003Comparison of prognosis after hepatic resection of hepatocellular
           carcinoma between intermediate stage tumor and early stage tumor
    • Authors: Arita J; Kokudo T, Akamatsu N, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Despite that patients with intermediate stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), i.e., “4 or more tumors” or “2-3 tumors more than 3 cm in size” without vascular tumor thrombus or extrahepatic metastasis, are candidate for sorafenib according to the BCLC staging system, most of such patients undergo hepatic resection, transcatheter chemoembolization, or radiofrequency ablation. This mono-centric retrospective study assesses the long-term results after hepatic resection for the intermediate stage HCC comparing with that for patients with early or very early stage HCC.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy150.002
       
  • PD-004Baseline characteristics and second-line treatment for metastatic
           pancreatic adenocarcinoma (mPAC) patients receiving first-line FOLFIRINOX,
           gemcitabine+nab-paclitaxel or gemcitabine-monotherapy in routine clinical
           practice across Europe
    • Authors: Prager G; Mercadé T, àMellbring , et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Both FOLFIRINOX and gemcitabine+nab-paclitaxel have shown superior overall survival over gemcitabine-monotherapy in fitter and younger first-line mPAC patients, but with increased toxicity. No randomized phase III data comparing FOLFIRINOX and gemcitabine+nab-paclitaxel are available to help clinical decision making. Furthermore, data on systemic treatment choices in first-line mPAC and outcomes outside clinical trials are scarce. The goal of this large pan-European project was to generate data on diagnosis, treatment patterns and outcomes from the records of patients who completed first-line mPAC treatment across Europe.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy150.003
       
  • PD-005Post-operative venous thromboembolism increased mortality in
           patients with either adenocarcinoma or non-adenocarcinoma pancreatic
           cancer
    • Authors: Majmudar K; Quintero L, Fuentes H, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Pancreatic Cancer is strongly associated with thrombosis and early thrombosis in adenocarcinoma patients has an independent impact on mortality. It is not known whether timing of post-operative thrombosis in pancreatic cancer surgery is an independent predictor of mortality in adenocarcinoma (ACPC) or non-adenocarcinoma pancreatic cancer (NACPC) patients. We investigated post-operative VTE mortality among patients with ACPC compared to NACPC.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy150.004
       
  • PD-006Characterizations of DNA copy number variations and spatio-temporal
           intra tumor heterogeneity in liver metastasis from colorectal cancer
           patients
    • Authors: Marques M; Gambaro K, du Tertre M, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Metastatic colorectal cancers (mCRC) are highly heterogeneous, representing a challenge in treatment management. Studies have largely investigated the genomic landscape of primary tumors at diagnosis. As metastasis is responsible for 90% of cancer patient deaths, this highlights the need to characterize the genomic landscape of metastasis over time of treatment to decipher their evolution and role in therapeutic resistance.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy150.005
       
  • PD-008Molecular characterization of immune microenvironment in colorectal
           cancers with microsatellite instability by digital RNA counting
    • Authors: Giordano M; Moretto R, Giannini R, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Alterations in the mismatch repair (MMR) mechanism in colorectal cancers (CRCs) lead to high levels of microsatellite instability (MSI-h) causing considerable endogenous immune anti-tumor response, counterbalanced by immune inhibitory signals. We evaluated the mRNA immune-profile of a series of MSI-h CRCs to identify new potential targets for future CRC immunotherapy trials by combining an extensive gene expression analysis and the clinicopathological characteristics such as presence of metastases, staging, genotype and primary tumor sidedness.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy150.007
       
  • PD-009Emergence of KRAS mutation may play a major role in the secondary
           resistance to EGFR blockade
    • Authors: Yamada T; Takahashi G, Iwai T, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Oncogenic KRAS mutations are negative biomarkers of response to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) blockade. KRAS mutation is usually detected in biopsies of primary colorectal tumors. However, the genomic profiles of primary tumors and metastases are not always concordant, and chemotherapeutic agents and targeted drugs can alter the tumor molecular landscape. Circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) is a novel tool to detect molecular heterogeneity. In this study, we tried to clarify the mechanism of primary or secondary resistance to EGFR blockade as first-line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy150.008
       
  • PD-010REVERCE: Randomized phase II study of regorafenib followed by
           cetuximab versus the reverse sequence for metastatic colorectal cancer
           patients previously treated with fluoropyrimidine, oxaliplatin, and
           irinotecan: Quality of life analysis
    • Authors: Yoshino T; Yamanaka T, Denda T, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: REVERCE demonstrated longer overall survival (OS) with the therapeutic sequence of regorafenib (R) followed by cetuximab (C) ± irinotecan (R-C arm) compared with that of C ± irinotecan followed by R (C-R arm) for patients (pts) with pretreated metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC; median OS 17.4 vs. 11.6 months, HR 0.61; Shitara K, et al. GI Symposium 2018). Here we report quality of life (QOL) analysis.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy150.009
       
  • PD-011SAPPHIRE: A randomized phase II study of oxaliplatin discontinuation
           after 6 cycles of mFOLFOX6 + panitumumab therapy in patients with
           colorectal cancer: Final analysis of efficacy and safety results
    • Authors: Takahashi M; Munemoto Y, Nakamura M, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: mFOLFOX6 is a common first-line chemotherapy regimen for patients with unresectable, advanced or recurrent colorectal cancer (CRC). However, the long-term administration of oxaliplatin is associated with peripheral neuropathy (PN). Recently, we reported that 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)/leucovorin (LV) + panitumumab therapy after 6 fixed cycles of mFOLFOX6 + panitumumab therapy maintained efficacy with reduced incidence of PN, compared with continued treatment with mFOLFOX6 + panitumumab. Here, we report results from the final analysis of efficacy and safety endpoints (data cut-off: 31 Aug 2017), and from subgroup analyses according to tumor location and early tumor shrinkage (ETS).
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy150.010
       
  • PD-012Early tumour shrinkage (ETS) and its impact on tumour-related
           symptoms in patients with previously untreated RAS wild-type metastatic
           colorectal cancer (mCRC): A retrospective analysis of three panitumumab
           studies
    • Authors: Taieb J; Geissler M, Rivera F, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Systemic therapy with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors ± chemotherapy can result in tumour shrinkage in patients with wild-type (WT) RAS mCRC, potentially facilitating curative surgery. Treatment decisions should be guided in part by patients’ disease symptoms, yet there is no standardised assessment of symptomatic events. This retrospective analysis aimed to investigate whether ETS is related to the time to occurrence of new tumour-related symptoms during first-line treatment of mCRC.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy150.011
       
  • PD-013Usefulness of colonic tattooing using ICG in patients with
           colorectal tumors
    • Authors: Park J; Moon H, Kwon I, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Preoperative endoscopic tattooing assists in finding small-sized lesions on the movable part of the colon, especially in limited operative fields of vision. The aim of this study is to prove that tattooing using indocyanine green (ICG) dye is beneficial in the reduction of operation time, postoperative management, and to prove its usefulness according to stage and type of laparoscopic surgery.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy150.012
       
  • PD-014Survival following curative indented treatment of brain metastases
           from colorectal cancer: A Danish population-based cohort study
    • Authors: Boysen A; Ording A, Astradsson A, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Brain metastases (BM) are an uncommon presentation of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) with reported incidence of about 2-4%. Previously, the focus has been on a palliative treatment course with whole brain radiation, corticosteroids and supportive care, resulting in an expected survival of a few months. Today, there is an increased awareness towards a localized curative intended treatment approach with either surgical resection, stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) or both. We examined the survival for patients treated with a localized modality for BM from CRC in a nationwide population-based study.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy150.013
       
  • PD-015Optimizing the use of first-line chemotherapy in metastatic
           colorectal cancer patients with mucinous histology. A multicenter,
           retrospective, combined analysis on 897 patients
    • Authors: Catalano V; Bergamo F, Cremolini C, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: In metastatic colorectal cancer (MCRC), mucinous histology has been associated with poor response rate and prognosis. We have confirmed that mucinous colorectal cancer (MC) have an unfavourable prognosis to oxaliplatin/irinotecan-based first-line combination chemotherapy compared with nonmucinous (NMC) colorectal cancer patients (pts) (Catalano et al, BJC 2009, 100:881-887). Subgroup analysis showed a possible poor outcome of MCRC pts with mucinous histology treated with oxaliplatin-based regimens (Catalano et al, Ann Oncol 2017, 28 Supplement 6:A1). Therefore, we addressed this study to evaluate whether oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy regimens may affect survival of MCRC pts with mucinous histology.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy150.014
       
  • PD-016Safety of self-expandable metal stents (SEMS) or emergency surgery
           for acute colonic obstruction in metastatic colon cancer patients treated
           with bevacizumab
    • Authors: Pacheco-Barcia V; Solís R, Saez O, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Colorectal cancer presents with malignant bowel obstruction in about 10% of cases. SEMS can be an alternative for immediate surgery although long-term data is limited regarding clinical outcomes and safety of Bevacizumab (BV) in this subset of patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate procedure-related morbidity in relation to the type of previous or subsequent medical treatment used, including BV. 
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy150.015
       
  • PD-017Clinical and molecular determinants of extrahepatic disease
           progression (ePD) in initially unresectable, liver-limited metastatic
           colorectal cancer (mCRC)
    • Authors: Ongaro E; Rossini D, Pietrantonio F, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: In the last years, the availability of active upfront systemic regimens, the development of surgical techniques and the diffusion of other locoregional treatments increased the therapeutic options for mCRC patients with liver-limited disease. Estimating the likelihood to develop extra-hepatic metastases may affect clinicians’ attitudes towards locoregional procedures. No tools to predict the probability of ePD of initially liver limited mCRC are currently available.  
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy150.016
       
  • PD-018Comparing survival in left-sided and right-sided colorectal
           carcinoma: A Belgian population-based study
    • Authors: Janssens K; Boeckx N, Van Camp G, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: In recent years, the difference in survival between right-sided and left-sided colorectal cancer (CRC) has been extensively studied. Various studies have convincingly shown that patients with tumors originating on the left side of the colon have a significantly better prognosis than those with tumors originating on the right side of the colon. However, these conclusions are mostly based on data of clinical trials and therefore selected patients. These findings need to be confirmed in population-based studies. Therefore, the aim of this study is to compare survival rates in left-sided and right-sided CRC in the (non-selected) Belgian population.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy150.017
       
  • PD-019RMB (RENCA Macrobead) therapy in advanced mCRC: Phase IIb
           preliminary multi-site survival findings; correlation & combination
           with Phase I and IIa data including imaging and lab profiles [U.S.FDA
           BB-IND 10091]
    • Authors: Nazarian A; Andrada Z, Thomas J, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Because cancer can be considered as a complex, biological-systems disease, we have explored a cell-based systems therapeutic approach based on this concept. We report ongoing human experience using mouse renal adenocarcinoma cells (RENCA) entrapped in agarose macrobeads (RMB) for late-stage mCRC therapy (Chin J Cancer Res 2018;30(1):72-83). Such cells undergo genomic changes that release multiple anti-neoplastic factors (> ten). One or more achieve 40% of their tumor-cell inhibitory effect via MEF-2 regulation. (Cancer Res. 2011;71(3): 716–724;725–735). Other pathways are currently under study with Lund University. Phase I and IIa RMB trials provided evidence of survival and quality of life benefit in treatment-resistant, late-stage mCRC patients (Cancer Growth Metastasis.2016;9:9–20). Here, we report the combined findings of the P I/IIa, along with new preliminary survival and other-benefit findings from a PIIb multi-site trial.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy150.018
       
  • PD-020Age and RAS status to select patients with metastatic colorectal
           cancer (mCRC) for initial sequential versus combination therapy including
           fluoropyrimidines (FP), irinotecan (Iri) and bevacizumab (Bev): XELAVIRI-
           study
    • Authors: Modest D; von Weikersthal L, Decker T, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: The XELAVIRI (AIO KRK0110) study compared upfront application of FP+BEV plus sequential escalation to IRI+ FP+ BEV (arm A) vs. initial combination therapy with FP+ IRI+ BEV (arm B) in patients (pts) with mCRC, trial identification: NCT01249638. In the full analysis set of the study, non-inferiority of time to failure of strategy (TFS, primary endpoint) was not shown;
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy150.019
       
  • WITHDRAWN
    • PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.279
       
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      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.244
       
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      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy150.006
       
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      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.240
       
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      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.126
       
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      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.092
       
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      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.050
       
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      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.011
       
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      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.045
       
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      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.191
       
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      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.112
       
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      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.110
       
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      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.214
       
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    • PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.139
       
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    • PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.176
       
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    • PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.173
       
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    • PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.024
       
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    • PubDate: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mdy151.172
       
 
 
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