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Publisher: Oxford University Press   (Total: 406 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 406 Journals sorted alphabetically
ACS Symposium Series     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.189, CiteScore: 0)
Acta Biochimica et Biophysica Sinica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.79, CiteScore: 2)
Adaptation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.143, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54, SJR: 2.196, CiteScore: 5)
Aesthetic Surgery J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.434, CiteScore: 1)
Aesthetic Surgery J. Open Forum     Open Access  
African Affairs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 66, SJR: 1.869, CiteScore: 2)
Age and Ageing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 90, SJR: 1.989, CiteScore: 4)
Alcohol and Alcoholism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 1.376, CiteScore: 3)
American Entomologist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
American Historical Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 180, SJR: 0.467, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Agricultural Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44, SJR: 2.113, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Clinical Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 184, SJR: 3.438, CiteScore: 6)
American J. of Epidemiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 196, SJR: 2.713, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Health-System Pharmacy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 54, SJR: 0.595, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Hypertension     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 1.322, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Jurisprudence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.281, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Legal History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.116, CiteScore: 0)
American Law and Economics Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 1.053, CiteScore: 1)
American Literary History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.391, CiteScore: 0)
Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 1.038, CiteScore: 1)
Animal Frontiers     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Behavioral Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.423, CiteScore: 3)
Annals of Botany     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38, SJR: 1.721, CiteScore: 4)
Annals of Oncology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 55, SJR: 5.599, CiteScore: 9)
Annals of the Entomological Society of America     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.722, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Work Exposures and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 0.728, CiteScore: 2)
Antibody Therapeutics     Open Access  
AoB Plants     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.28, CiteScore: 3)
Applied Economic Perspectives and Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.858, CiteScore: 2)
Applied Linguistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60, SJR: 2.987, CiteScore: 3)
Applied Mathematics Research eXpress     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.241, CiteScore: 1)
Arbitration Intl.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Arbitration Law Reports and Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 0.731, CiteScore: 2)
Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Arthropod Management Tests     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Astronomy & Geophysics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44, SJR: 0.146, CiteScore: 0)
Behavioral Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53, SJR: 1.871, CiteScore: 3)
Bioinformatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 347, SJR: 6.14, CiteScore: 8)
Biology Methods and Protocols     Hybrid Journal  
Biology of Reproduction     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.446, CiteScore: 3)
Biometrika     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 3.485, CiteScore: 2)
BioScience     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29, SJR: 2.754, CiteScore: 4)
Bioscience Horizons : The National Undergraduate Research J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.146, CiteScore: 0)
Biostatistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 1.553, CiteScore: 2)
BJA : British J. of Anaesthesia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 187, SJR: 2.115, CiteScore: 3)
BJA Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 67)
Brain     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 70, SJR: 5.858, CiteScore: 7)
Briefings in Bioinformatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49, SJR: 2.505, CiteScore: 5)
Briefings in Functional Genomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 2.15, CiteScore: 3)
British J. for the Philosophy of Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38, SJR: 2.161, CiteScore: 2)
British J. of Aesthetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.508, CiteScore: 1)
British J. of Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 604, SJR: 1.828, CiteScore: 3)
British J. of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 87, SJR: 1.019, CiteScore: 2)
British Medical Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.355, CiteScore: 3)
British Yearbook of Intl. Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Bulletin of the London Mathematical Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.376, CiteScore: 1)
Cambridge J. of Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 71, SJR: 0.764, CiteScore: 2)
Cambridge J. of Regions, Economy and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 2.438, CiteScore: 4)
Cambridge Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.104, CiteScore: 0)
Capital Markets Law J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.222, CiteScore: 0)
Carcinogenesis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 2.135, CiteScore: 5)
Cardiovascular Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 3.002, CiteScore: 5)
Cerebral Cortex     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52, SJR: 3.892, CiteScore: 6)
CESifo Economic Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.483, CiteScore: 1)
Chemical Senses     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.42, CiteScore: 3)
Children and Schools     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.246, CiteScore: 0)
Chinese J. of Comparative Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.412, CiteScore: 0)
Chinese J. of Intl. Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.329, CiteScore: 0)
Chinese J. of Intl. Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.392, CiteScore: 2)
Christian Bioethics: Non-Ecumenical Studies in Medical Morality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.183, CiteScore: 0)
Classical Receptions J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
Clean Energy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Infectious Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 69, SJR: 5.051, CiteScore: 5)
Communication Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 2.424, CiteScore: 3)
Communication, Culture & Critique     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.222, CiteScore: 1)
Community Development J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.268, CiteScore: 1)
Computer J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.319, CiteScore: 1)
Conservation Physiology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.818, CiteScore: 3)
Contemporary Women's Writing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.121, CiteScore: 0)
Contributions to Political Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.906, CiteScore: 1)
Critical Values     Full-text available via subscription  
Current Developments in Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Current Legal Problems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Current Zoology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.164, CiteScore: 2)
Database : The J. of Biological Databases and Curation     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.791, CiteScore: 3)
Digital Scholarship in the Humanities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.259, CiteScore: 1)
Diplomatic History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.45, CiteScore: 1)
DNA Research     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 2.866, CiteScore: 6)
Dynamics and Statistics of the Climate System     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Early Music     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.139, CiteScore: 0)
Econometrics J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32, SJR: 2.926, CiteScore: 1)
Economic J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 116, SJR: 5.161, CiteScore: 3)
Economic Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48, SJR: 3.584, CiteScore: 3)
ELT J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.942, CiteScore: 1)
English Historical Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56, SJR: 0.612, CiteScore: 1)
English: J. of the English Association     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Environmental Entomology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.818, CiteScore: 2)
Environmental Epigenetics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Environmental History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.408, CiteScore: 1)
EP-Europace     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 2.748, CiteScore: 4)
Epidemiologic Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 4.505, CiteScore: 8)
ESHRE Monographs     Hybrid Journal  
Essays in Criticism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.113, CiteScore: 0)
European Heart J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 66, SJR: 9.315, CiteScore: 9)
European Heart J. - Cardiovascular Imaging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 3.625, CiteScore: 3)
European Heart J. - Cardiovascular Pharmacotherapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
European Heart J. - Quality of Care and Clinical Outcomes     Hybrid Journal  
European Heart J. : Case Reports     Open Access  
European Heart J. Supplements     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.223, CiteScore: 0)
European J. of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.681, CiteScore: 2)
European J. of Intl. Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 205, SJR: 0.694, CiteScore: 1)
European J. of Orthodontics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.279, CiteScore: 2)
European J. of Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 1.36, CiteScore: 2)
European Review of Agricultural Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.172, CiteScore: 2)
European Review of Economic History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 0.702, CiteScore: 1)
European Sociological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43, SJR: 2.728, CiteScore: 3)
Evolution, Medicine, and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Family Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.018, CiteScore: 2)
Fems Microbiology Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.492, CiteScore: 4)
Fems Microbiology Letters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.79, CiteScore: 2)
Fems Microbiology Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33, SJR: 7.063, CiteScore: 13)
Fems Yeast Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.308, CiteScore: 3)
Food Quality and Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Foreign Policy Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 1.425, CiteScore: 1)
Forest Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.89, CiteScore: 2)
Forestry: An Intl. J. of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.133, CiteScore: 3)
Forum for Modern Language Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.104, CiteScore: 0)
French History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 0.118, CiteScore: 0)
French Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.148, CiteScore: 0)
French Studies Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.152, CiteScore: 0)
Gastroenterology Report     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Genome Biology and Evolution     Open Access   (Followers: 16, SJR: 2.578, CiteScore: 4)
Geophysical J. Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 1.506, CiteScore: 3)
German History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.161, CiteScore: 0)
GigaScience     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 5.022, CiteScore: 7)
Global Summitry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Glycobiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 1.493, CiteScore: 3)
Health and Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57, SJR: 0.388, CiteScore: 1)
Health Education Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.854, CiteScore: 2)
Health Policy and Planning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 1.512, CiteScore: 2)
Health Promotion Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.812, CiteScore: 2)
History Workshop J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33, SJR: 1.278, CiteScore: 1)
Holocaust and Genocide Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.105, CiteScore: 0)
Human Communication Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.146, CiteScore: 3)
Human Molecular Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 3.555, CiteScore: 5)
Human Reproduction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 75, SJR: 2.643, CiteScore: 5)
Human Reproduction Open     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Human Reproduction Update     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 5.317, CiteScore: 10)
Human Rights Law Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 64, SJR: 0.756, CiteScore: 1)
ICES J. of Marine Science: J. du Conseil     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58, SJR: 1.591, CiteScore: 3)
ICSID Review : Foreign Investment Law J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
ILAR J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.732, CiteScore: 4)
IMA J. of Applied Mathematics     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.679, CiteScore: 1)
IMA J. of Management Mathematics     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.538, CiteScore: 1)
IMA J. of Mathematical Control and Information     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.496, CiteScore: 1)
IMA J. of Numerical Analysis - advance access     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 1.987, CiteScore: 2)
Industrial and Corporate Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.792, CiteScore: 2)
Industrial Law J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41, SJR: 0.249, CiteScore: 1)
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47, SJR: 2.511, CiteScore: 4)
Information and Inference     Free  
Innovation in Aging     Open Access  
Integrative and Comparative Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.319, CiteScore: 2)
Integrative Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.36, CiteScore: 3)
Integrative Organismal Biology     Open Access  
Interacting with Computers     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.292, CiteScore: 1)
Interactive CardioVascular and Thoracic Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.762, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. Affairs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 68, SJR: 1.505, CiteScore: 3)
Intl. Data Privacy Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Intl. Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.851, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. Immunology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 2.167, CiteScore: 4)
Intl. J. for Quality in Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36, SJR: 1.348, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Constitutional Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 65, SJR: 0.601, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Epidemiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 259, SJR: 3.969, CiteScore: 5)
Intl. J. of Law and Information Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.202, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Law, Policy and the Family     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.223, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Lexicography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.285, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Low-Carbon Technologies     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.403, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Neuropsychopharmacology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.808, CiteScore: 4)
Intl. J. of Public Opinion Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.545, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Refugee Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 0.389, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Transitional Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.724, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. Mathematics Research Notices     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 2.168, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. Political Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40, SJR: 1.465, CiteScore: 3)
Intl. Relations of the Asia-Pacific     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.401, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. Studies Perspectives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.983, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. Studies Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50, SJR: 2.581, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. Studies Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 1.201, CiteScore: 1)
ISLE: Interdisciplinary Studies in Literature and Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.15, CiteScore: 0)
ITNOW     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.103, CiteScore: 0)
J. of African Economies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.533, CiteScore: 1)
J. of American History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46, SJR: 0.297, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Analytical Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.065, CiteScore: 2)
J. of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.419, CiteScore: 4)
J. of Antitrust Enforcement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
J. of Applied Poultry Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.585, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41, SJR: 1.226, CiteScore: 2)
J. of Breast Imaging     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
J. of Burn Care & Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.768, CiteScore: 2)

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
International Journal of Refugee Law
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.389
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 39  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0953-8186 - ISSN (Online) 1464-3715
Published by Oxford University Press Homepage  [406 journals]
  • The Global Compacts on Refugees and Migration: A New Era for International
           Protection'
    • Authors: McAdam J.
      Pages: 571 - 574
      Abstract: 2018 will go down in history as a significant year for the protection of refugees and migrants – at least on paper. The adoption of two new instruments on people movement – the Global Compact on Refugees (Refugee Compact) and the Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration (Migration Compact)11 – signals new moral and political undertakings by the world’s governments. They promise to respect the human rights of people on the move, to provide the conditions for them to live in safety and with dignity, and to empower them to enrich the societies in which they live. Such undertakings reaffirm the essence of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, adopted 70 years ago.
      PubDate: Tue, 09 Apr 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ijrl/eez004
      Issue No: Vol. 30, No. 4 (2019)
       
  • The Promise and Potential of the Global Compact on Refugees
    • Authors: Türk V.
      Pages: 575 - 583
      Abstract: It is my pleasure to open this special issue with some reflections on the Global Compact on Refugees11 and its potential to shape our collective approaches to refugee situations around the world.
      PubDate: Fri, 08 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ijrl/eey068
      Issue No: Vol. 30, No. 4 (2019)
       
  • The Global Compact for Migration: From the Sustainable Development Goals
           to a Comprehensive Agreement on Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration
    • Authors: Klein Solomon M; Sheldon S.
      Pages: 584 - 590
      Abstract: In 2015, governments adopted the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, with 17 goals and 169 targets, designed to shape action over the next 15 years to realize the human rights of all and to balance economic, social, and environmental development. For the first time, the global development agenda contained explicit commitments on migration.
      PubDate: Thu, 21 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ijrl/eey065
      Issue No: Vol. 30, No. 4 (2019)
       
  • The Global Cop-Out on Refugees
    • Authors: Hathaway J.
      Pages: 591 - 604
      Abstract: During the drafting of the 1951 Refugee Convention, a non-governmental observer – clearly frustrated by the difficulty of securing firm commitments to protect refugees – commented that:
      PubDate: Fri, 08 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ijrl/eey062
      Issue No: Vol. 30, No. 4 (2019)
       
  • The Normative Impact of the Global Compact on Refugees
    • Authors: Gammeltoft-Hansen T.
      Pages: 605 - 610
      PubDate: Sat, 09 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ijrl/eey061
      Issue No: Vol. 30, No. 4 (2019)
       
  • Fairness, Failure, and Future in the Refugee Regime
    • Authors: Cantor D.
      Pages: 627 - 629
      Abstract: In late 2018, the United Nations General Assembly adopted the Global Compact on Refugees (Refugee Compact) and the Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration (Migration Compact). The groundwork for those texts was laid by the 2016 New York Declaration for Refugees and Migrants, which drew on a report by the UN Secretary-General earlier that year.11 After almost three years of negotiations and debate, the two Global Compacts look close to becoming a reality.
      PubDate: Thu, 21 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ijrl/eey069
      Issue No: Vol. 30, No. 4 (2019)
       
  • Global Compact on Refugees: One Step Forward, Two Steps Back
    • Authors: Chimni B.
      Pages: 630 - 634
      Abstract: Any process of global consultations between stakeholders on a most pressing issue of our times, resulting in agreement on a common (if not legally binding) text – the Global Compact on Refugees (Refugee Compact) – is welcome, as it may help to promote international cooperation in dealing with the global refugee crisis. Its proposed new mechanisms of a Global Refugee Forum, Support Platforms, and possible solidarity conferences will surely help in responding to mass outflows of refugees. However, in my view, the Refugee Compact is a flawed text for several reasons: it avoids mention of the principal cause of recent refugee flows; dilutes established principles of international refugee law; may weaken the protection of children and women; is short on real mechanisms for responsibility sharing; is myopic in stressing ‘specific deliverables’ (para 43) in speaking of future academic work; and leaves to the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) the task of supervision which it is not equipped to perform (as the Compact itself, which it helped draft, demonstrates). I will make these points in a schematic manner, concluding with a reflection or two on the way forward.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ijrl/eey067
      Issue No: Vol. 30, No. 4 (2019)
       
  • Refugees and (Other) Migrants: Will the Global Compacts Ensure Safe Flight
           and Onward Mobility for Refugees'
    • Authors: Costello C.
      Pages: 643 - 649
      PubDate: Fri, 11 Jan 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ijrl/eey060
      Issue No: Vol. 30, No. 4 (2019)
       
  • The Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration: An Unlikely
           Achievement
    • Authors: Newland K.
      Pages: 657 - 660
      Abstract: The most remarkable thing about the Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration (Migration Compact) is that it exists at all. Two years ago, when the Compact process began, many observers doubted that negotiations among all 193 members of the United Nations (UN) would produce anything other than a bland, least-common-denominator document. Although the United States dropped out of the negotiation process in December 2017, the other 192 UN Member States agreed on a substantive and fairly comprehensive text. It was adopted in December 2018 (although several other countries announced after negotiations were concluded that they would not endorse the Compact). That the Compact is not legally binding undoubtedly helped to reach this degree of consensus, but it is still a notable achievement. What characteristics of the negotiations and the final text made this outcome possible'
      PubDate: Wed, 09 Jan 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ijrl/eey058
      Issue No: Vol. 30, No. 4 (2019)
       
  • The UN Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration: What Place
           for Human Rights'
    • Authors: Guild E.
      Pages: 661 - 663
      Abstract: The New York Declaration for Refugees and Migrants, adopted by the United Nations (UN) General Assembly on 19 September 2016, called for the adoption of two compacts by the end of 2018, one on refugees and the other on migrants. The Refugee Compact was presented to the UN as an annex to the UN High Commissioner for Refugees’ annual report in September 2018. The Global Compact on Migration (Migration Compact) will be adopted in Marrakesh, Morocco, at a special meeting of the UN General Assembly on 10–11 December 2018. This article examines the human rights of migrants in the context of the Migration Compact.
      PubDate: Wed, 09 Jan 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ijrl/eey049
      Issue No: Vol. 30, No. 4 (2019)
       
  • The Global Compacts and the Dilemma of Children in Immigration Detention
    • Authors: Muntarbhorn V.
      Pages: 668 - 673
      PubDate: Wed, 30 Jan 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ijrl/eey070
      Issue No: Vol. 30, No. 4 (2019)
       
  • The Global Compacts and the Future of Refugee and Migrant Protection in
           the Asia Pacific Region
    • Authors: Goodwin-Gill G.
      Pages: 674 - 683
      Abstract: Whether the 1951 Refugee Convention and its 1967 Protocol are still relevant to today’s displacement challenges is a recurring question, particularly with the passing of time and the fact that neither instrument deals with the causes of refugee movements, or with the scope and extent of State responsibility to determine claims for protection, or with making international cooperation both concrete and equitable. Certainly, the Convention and the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) were framed with key provisions of the UN Charter in mind – sovereign equality and non-intervention – so that the refugee regime has long been essentially reactive, rather than forward-looking. Still, the treaties have continued to attract support among States, so far as they encapsulate a widely understood, if not exhaustive, concept of the refugee and set out certain basic principles of protection. Some 148 States are now party to the Convention and/or the Protocol, but the Asia Pacific region is generally under-represented, even though historically it has played a significant role in receiving refugees and in contributing to solutions.
      PubDate: Fri, 08 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ijrl/eey064
      Issue No: Vol. 30, No. 4 (2019)
       
  • Indonesia and the Global Compacts on Refugees and Migration
    • Authors: Afriansyah A.
      Pages: 684 - 686
      Abstract: The adoption in December 2018 of the Global Compact on Refugees and the Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration signals major commitments by States to address people movement. The Global Compacts are also significant in their emphasis on international cooperation, especially as they relate to other issues requiring multi-dimensional responses, such as the prevention of transnational crime, the handling of international conflicts, the protection of human rights, and development.
      PubDate: Sat, 13 Apr 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ijrl/eey066
      Issue No: Vol. 30, No. 4 (2019)
       
  • Assessing the Impact of the Global Compacts on Refugees and Migration in
           the Middle East
    • Authors: Akram S.
      Pages: 691 - 695
      Abstract: Today, the overwhelming burden of the global refugee and migrant crisis is borne by the Middle East region, driven by protracted armed conflict and exacerbated by a deficit of applicable international legal norms. Most States in the Middle East have not adopted the international treaties that provide protection guarantees for refugees and stateless persons, the 1951 Refugee Convention and its 1967 Protocol, the 1954 Convention on the Status of Stateless Persons, and the 1961 Convention on the Reduction of Statelessness. The lack of legal status for persons displaced by conflict, many of whom are stateless refugees, leaves them in situations of protracted vulnerability in host States with no apparent solutions. These populations have become among the largest and longest-standing intergenerational stateless refugees in the world, remaining in a region that is perceived as endlessly mired in conflict, sectarian strife, terrorism, and a democracy deficit. Huge numbers of refugees, stateless people, and other displaced persons considerably strain already-scarce resources in countries such as Lebanon, where one in four persons today is a refugee, or Jordan, which is the fourth-most water-stressed country in the world. The Global Compact on Refugees (Refugee Compact) and the Global Compact on Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration (Migration Compact) may provide a timely and much-needed impetus to re-energize local strategies aimed at filling these normative legal gaps through regional, rather than international, agreements. Regional (Arab) and Islamic agreements such as the Arab Charter on Human Rights, the Organization of the Islamic Conference’s (OIC) Covenant on the Rights of the Child in Islam, and the Protocol for the Treatment of Palestinians in Arab States (Casablanca Protocol), all of which have relevant provisions on nationality, refugees, and statelessness, are being re-evaluated through the Global Compact processes, while most of the parallel international treaties continue to lack credibility in the region.
      PubDate: Sun, 17 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ijrl/eey071
      Issue No: Vol. 30, No. 4 (2019)
       
  • What Promise Does the Global Compact on Refugees Hold for African
           Refugees'
    • Authors: Khan F; Sackeyfio C.
      Pages: 696 - 698
      Abstract: For too long, most refugees in Africa have been dependent on the care and maintenance programmes of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR). Critics have justifiably described refugees in Africa as ‘languishing in camps’11 for prolonged periods and have accused UNHCR of ‘administering human misery’.22 Regrettably, this has been the case despite efforts by host States and UNHCR to provide protection. Much of the assistance provided to refugees in camps in Africa has been dehumanizing, from group status determinations to mass warehousing. It has been more about crisis management than about addressing – or even recognizing – individual needs.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Mar 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ijrl/eez002
      Issue No: Vol. 30, No. 4 (2019)
       
  • Prospects for the Global Compacts in Africa: Combining International
           Solidarity with Home-Grown Solutions
    • Authors: Ndonga Githinji E; Wood T.
      Pages: 699 - 703
      PubDate: Sun, 17 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ijrl/eey072
      Issue No: Vol. 30, No. 4 (2019)
       
  • Regional Solutions and the Global Compact on Refugees: The Experience from
           Africa
    • Authors: Dare O; Abebe A.
      Pages: 704 - 706
      Abstract: The contributions of regional and sub-regional mechanisms in fulfilling the objectives of the Global Compact on Refugees (Refugee Compact) have rightly been recognized in that instrument (paras 28–30). Recent experiences of the African Union (AU) and the Intergovernmental Authority on Development (IGAD) reinforce the importance of this role. Future implementation of the Refugee Compact needs to fully take account of the potential of these mechanisms to provide opportunities to reinvigorate international support to regional approaches on solutions for large-scale refugee problems. The AU has designated 2019 as the year of ‘Refugees, Returnees and Internally Displaced Persons: Towards Durable Solutions to Forced Displacement in Africa’. The regional and global development visions, particularly the AU’s Agenda 2063 and the Sustainable Development Goals, are anchored in a revised framework for collaboration between the United Nations (UN) and the AU. This framework is already serving as a solid basis for global–regional collaboration on how to manage refugees and migration.
      PubDate: Thu, 21 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ijrl/eey063
      Issue No: Vol. 30, No. 4 (2019)
       
  • Case Law Summaries
    • Pages: 711 - 714
      PubDate: Sat, 18 May 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ijrl/eez006
      Issue No: Vol. 30, No. 4 (2019)
       
  • New York Declaration for Refugees and Migrants
    • Pages: 715 - 743
      Abstract: United Nations General Assembly A/71/L.1 (13 September 2016)Seventy-first sessionItems 13 and 118 of the provisional agenda
      PubDate: Sat, 18 May 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ijrl/eez018
      Issue No: Vol. 30, No. 4 (2019)
       
  • Report of the United Nations High Commissioner for RefugeesPart II Global
           compact on refugees
    • Pages: 744 - 773
      Abstract: General Assembly
      PubDate: Sat, 18 May 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ijrl/eez010
      Issue No: Vol. 30, No. 4 (2019)
       
  • Resolution adopted by the General Assembly on 19 December 2018
    • Pages: 774 - 816
      Abstract: [without reference to a Main Committee (A/73/L.66)]
      PubDate: Sat, 18 May 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ijrl/eez009
      Issue No: Vol. 30, No. 4 (2019)
       
  • At Home in Two Countries, Citizenship and Migration in the Americas series
    • Authors: Fripp E.
      Pages: 817 - 822
      Abstract: SpiroPeter J, At Home in Two Countries, Citizenship and Migration in the Americas Series (New York University Press, New York2016) viii + 191 pp, ISBN 978-0-81478582-9 (hbk)
      PubDate: Sat, 18 May 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ijrl/eez007
      Issue No: Vol. 30, No. 4 (2019)
       
  • The Evolution of Migration Management in the Global North
    • Authors: Zidar R.
      Pages: 822 - 826
      Abstract: OelgemöllerChristina, The Evolution of Migration Management in the Global North, Interventions Series (Routledge, London & New York2017) xviii + 196 pp, ISBN 978-1-138-18534-0 (hbk)
      PubDate: Sat, 18 May 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ijrl/eez003
      Issue No: Vol. 30, No. 4 (2019)
       
  • Exclusion from Protection as a Refugee: An Approach to a Harmonizing
           Interpretation in International Law, International Refugee Law Series
    • Authors: Iannelli O.
      Pages: 826 - 829
      Abstract: LiYao, Exclusion from Protection as a Refugee: An Approach to a Harmonizing Interpretation in International Law, International Refugee Law Series, vol 9 (Brill Nijhoff, Leiden2017) xii + 383 pp, ISBN 978-90-04-34970-4 (hbk)
      PubDate: Sat, 18 May 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ijrl/eez008
      Issue No: Vol. 30, No. 4 (2019)
       
  • The Unfinished Work of the Global Compact on Refugees
    • Authors: Aleinikoff T.
      Pages: 611 - 617
      Abstract: As a result of a mass flow of Syrian refugees and African migrants across the Mediterranean, which peaked in 2015, European States wanted something done at the international level. The United Nations (UN) General Assembly responded by convening a ‘high-level plenary meeting on addressing large movements of refugees and migrants’ the following year.
      PubDate: Sat, 22 Dec 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ijrl/eey057
      Issue No: Vol. 30, No. 4 (2018)
       
  • Responsibility Sharing: From Principle to Policy
    • Authors: Doyle M.
      Pages: 618 - 622
      Abstract: Responsibility sharing was a central commitment in the 2016 New York Declaration for Refugees and Migrants (annex 1, para 1). It was also a key commitment in the preamble to the landmark 1951 Refugee Convention, in which countries of first asylum are promised that their providing refuge will be met by ‘international cooperation’, without specifying its content. Yet, just as the 1951 Refugee Convention failed to define what international cooperation meant, so, too, the New York Declaration was long on principles but short on specific commitments.
      PubDate: Sun, 09 Dec 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ijrl/eey046
      Issue No: Vol. 30, No. 4 (2018)
       
  • The Global Compact on Refugees: Towards a Theory of Change'
    • Authors: Betts A.
      Pages: 623 - 626
      Abstract: The Global Compact on Refugees (Refugee Compact) addresses one of the most significant gaps in the international refugee regime. Since the creation of the modern refugee system, there has been a disjuncture between a strongly institutionalized norm of ‘asylum’ and a weakly institutionalized norm of ‘responsibility sharing’. While States’ obligations towards refugees who are within their territory or jurisdiction are relatively clearly defined, States’ obligations to support refugees who are on the territory of another State are much weaker. Consequently, while law has shaped asylum, politics has defined responsibility sharing. This has long led to a major power asymmetry within the refugee system in which geography and proximity to crisis de facto define State responsibility. Distant donor countries’ commitments to provide money or resettlement have been viewed as largely discretionary. Historically, the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) has therefore needed to rely upon ad hoc conferences or discretionary, often earmarked, and usually annual commitments to elicit responsibility sharing. In displacement crises in which donor and resettlement commitments have been low, protection and access to solutions have inevitably been limited.
      PubDate: Mon, 17 Dec 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ijrl/eey056
      Issue No: Vol. 30, No. 4 (2018)
       
  • Indicators for the Global Compact on Refugees
    • Authors: Gilbert G.
      Pages: 635 - 639
      Abstract: One of the guiding principles of the Global Compact on Refugees (Refugee Compact) is ‘to operationalize the principles of burden- and responsibility-sharing to better protect and assist refugees and support host countries and communities’ (para 5). Success will be measured by indicators to be developed ahead of the first Global Refugee Forum in 2019 (which will take stock of progress to date) (paras 102–03). This short article considers the kinds of indicators that might be appropriate to measure compliance and implementation.
      PubDate: Wed, 12 Dec 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ijrl/eey053
      Issue No: Vol. 30, No. 4 (2018)
       
  • A Global Academic Network on Refugees: Some Unanswered Questions
    • Authors: Crisp J.
      Pages: 640 - 642
      Abstract: The Global Compact on Refugees (Refugee Compact) envisages the establishment of a ‘global academic network on refugee, other forced displacement, and statelessness issues ... involving universities, academic alliances, and research institutions, together with UNHCR and other relevant stakeholders’ (para 43). The purpose of this network, it goes on to say, will be ‘to facilitate research, training and scholarship opportunities which result in specific deliverables in support of the objectives of the global compact’ (para 43).
      PubDate: Mon, 26 Nov 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ijrl/eey050
      Issue No: Vol. 30, No. 4 (2018)
       
  • Towards a Mobile and Diverse World: ‘Facilitating Mobility’ as a
           Central Objective of the Global Compact on Migration
    • Authors: Crépeau F.
      Pages: 650 - 656
      Abstract: At the same time as the means of mobility are more accessible than ever, many parts of the world witness increasing political resistance to migration, based largely on myths, stereotypes, and misconceptions about the ‘danger’ that migrants pose to the well-being, stability, and values of host societies’ populations. Wealthier States are erecting barriers to prevent people from moving, specifically targeting poor, uneducated, and persecuted people. Most Westerners can travel around the world with ease. However, many countries in the global North are preventing humanitarian rescue ships from landing, adding visa obligations for citizens of countries that ‘produce’ refugees, and funding militias and security apparatus in transit countries in the global South. Security measures aim to block undocumented migrants – including refugees, unaccompanied minors, and pregnant women – and to arrest, detain, and deport them (often in terrible conditions) before they can reach any global North border.
      PubDate: Mon, 17 Dec 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ijrl/eey054
      Issue No: Vol. 30, No. 4 (2018)
       
  • The Global Compact on Migration: A Ray of Hope for Disaster-Displaced
           Persons
    • Authors: Kälin W.
      Pages: 664 - 667
      Abstract: One of the most innovative elements of the Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration (Migration Compact) is the explicit recognition of the nexus between disasters triggered by natural hazards (including the adverse effects of climate change) and migration (described here as the ‘disaster–migration nexus’), and the commitment to address the challenges of disaster- and climate change-related human mobility.
      PubDate: Sat, 15 Dec 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ijrl/eey047
      Issue No: Vol. 30, No. 4 (2018)
       
  • Strengthening Responsibility Sharing with South–South Cooperation:
           China’s Role in the Global Compact on Refugees
    • Authors: Song L.
      Pages: 687 - 690
      Abstract: Long perceived as a largely refugee-generating country, China has generally maintained a low profile in the international discourse on refugees. Although it remains a major source of refugees and asylum seekers, in the past 20 years China has also emerged as a destination and transit country. It has also started to demonstrate growing interest in a greater role in refugee affairs,11 in contrast to the United States’ weakening commitment to leading the international community in helping refugees.
      PubDate: Sat, 22 Dec 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ijrl/eey059
      Issue No: Vol. 30, No. 4 (2018)
       
  • The Global Compact on Refugees and Conflict Prevention in Africa: ‘Root
           Causes’ and Yet Another Divide
    • Authors: Sharpe M.
      Pages: 707 - 710
      Abstract: The Global Compact on Refugees (Refugee Compact) may ameliorate refugee protection in Africa because its four overarching objectives squarely address the three principal protection challenges prevailing on the continent. First among such challenges is the scale of the refugee problem, coupled with limited resources. Africa hosts about a third of the world’s refugees but also contains many of its most impoverished countries. The African States among the world’s top 10 refugee hosts in 2017 – Ethiopia, Sudan, and Uganda – are all eligible to receive resources from the World Bank’s International Development Association, meaning they are among the very poorest countries in the world. In this context, the Refugee Compact’s first objective of easing pressures on host countries and its third objective of expanding third-country solutions are critical. Secondly, refugees in Africa frequently find some of their most important rights systemically violated; they are often forced to reside in camps and can neither work nor send their children to school. For example, 57 per cent of refugee children in Uganda do not have access to education.11 The Refugee Compact’s second objective, regarding enhanced refugee self-reliance, speaks to rights including employment and education. Thirdly, refugee situations in Africa are often protracted. The Somali caseload in Kenya, the longstanding (but now largely resolved) situation of Burundians in Tanzania, and the Rwandan refugees (whose status as refugees formally ceased in January 2018) across East Africa are salient examples. The Refugee Compact’s fourth objective of supporting conditions for return in safety and dignity can help address this challenge.
      PubDate: Fri, 07 Dec 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ijrl/eey052
      Issue No: Vol. 30, No. 4 (2018)
       
 
 
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