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Publisher: Oxford University Press   (Total: 370 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 370 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Biochimica et Biophysica Sinica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.881, h-index: 38)
Adaptation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.111, h-index: 4)
Aesthetic Surgery J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.538, h-index: 35)
African Affairs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57, SJR: 1.512, h-index: 46)
Age and Ageing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 82, SJR: 1.611, h-index: 107)
Alcohol and Alcoholism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.935, h-index: 80)
American Entomologist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
American Historical Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 129, SJR: 0.652, h-index: 43)
American J. of Agricultural Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41, SJR: 1.441, h-index: 77)
American J. of Epidemiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 157, SJR: 3.047, h-index: 201)
American J. of Hypertension     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 1.397, h-index: 111)
American J. of Jurisprudence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
American J. of Legal History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.151, h-index: 7)
American Law and Economics Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.824, h-index: 23)
American Literary History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.185, h-index: 22)
Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Annals of Botany     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35, SJR: 1.912, h-index: 124)
Annals of Occupational Hygiene     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.837, h-index: 57)
Annals of Oncology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47, SJR: 4.362, h-index: 173)
Annals of the Entomological Society of America     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.642, h-index: 53)
Annals of Work Exposures and Health     Hybrid Journal  
AoB Plants     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.78, h-index: 10)
Applied Economic Perspectives and Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.884, h-index: 31)
Applied Linguistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51, SJR: 1.749, h-index: 63)
Applied Mathematics Research eXpress     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.779, h-index: 11)
Arbitration Intl.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Arbitration Law Reports and Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.96, h-index: 71)
Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.102, h-index: 20)
Arthropod Management Tests     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Astronomy & Geophysics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47, SJR: 0.144, h-index: 15)
Behavioral Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47, SJR: 1.698, h-index: 92)
Bioinformatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 236, SJR: 4.643, h-index: 271)
Biology Methods and Protocols     Hybrid Journal  
Biology of Reproduction     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.646, h-index: 149)
Biometrika     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 2.801, h-index: 90)
BioScience     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 2.374, h-index: 154)
Bioscience Horizons : The National Undergraduate Research J.     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.213, h-index: 9)
Biostatistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.955, h-index: 55)
BJA : British J. of Anaesthesia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 141, SJR: 2.314, h-index: 133)
BJA Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 66, SJR: 0.272, h-index: 20)
Brain     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 61, SJR: 6.097, h-index: 264)
Briefings in Bioinformatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45, SJR: 4.086, h-index: 73)
Briefings in Functional Genomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.771, h-index: 50)
British J. for the Philosophy of Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33, SJR: 1.267, h-index: 38)
British J. of Aesthetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.217, h-index: 18)
British J. of Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 510, SJR: 1.373, h-index: 62)
British J. of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 79, SJR: 0.771, h-index: 53)
British Medical Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 1.391, h-index: 84)
British Yearbook of Intl. Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Bulletin of the London Mathematical Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.474, h-index: 31)
Cambridge J. of Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56, SJR: 0.957, h-index: 59)
Cambridge J. of Regions, Economy and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.067, h-index: 22)
Cambridge Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 7)
Capital Markets Law J.     Hybrid Journal  
Carcinogenesis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 2.439, h-index: 167)
Cardiovascular Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 2.897, h-index: 175)
Cerebral Cortex     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 4.827, h-index: 192)
CESifo Economic Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.501, h-index: 19)
Chemical Senses     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.436, h-index: 76)
Children and Schools     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.211, h-index: 18)
Chinese J. of Comparative Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Chinese J. of Intl. Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.737, h-index: 11)
Chinese J. of Intl. Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.238, h-index: 15)
Christian Bioethics: Non-Ecumenical Studies in Medical Morality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.191, h-index: 8)
Classical Receptions J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 3)
Clinical Infectious Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58, SJR: 4.742, h-index: 261)
Clinical Kidney J.     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.338, h-index: 19)
Community Development J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.47, h-index: 28)
Computer J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.371, h-index: 47)
Conservation Physiology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Contemporary Women's Writing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.111, h-index: 3)
Contributions to Political Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.313, h-index: 10)
Critical Values     Full-text available via subscription  
Current Legal Problems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Current Zoology     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.999, h-index: 20)
Database : The J. of Biological Databases and Curation     Open Access   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.068, h-index: 24)
Digital Scholarship in the Humanities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Diplomatic History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.296, h-index: 22)
DNA Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 2.42, h-index: 77)
Dynamics and Statistics of the Climate System     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Early Music     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.124, h-index: 11)
Economic Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54, SJR: 2.052, h-index: 52)
ELT J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 1.26, h-index: 23)
English Historical Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46, SJR: 0.311, h-index: 10)
English: J. of the English Association     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.144, h-index: 3)
Environmental Entomology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.791, h-index: 66)
Environmental Epigenetics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Environmental History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.197, h-index: 25)
EP-Europace     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 2.201, h-index: 71)
Epidemiologic Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 3.917, h-index: 81)
ESHRE Monographs     Hybrid Journal  
Essays in Criticism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 6)
European Heart J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47, SJR: 6.997, h-index: 227)
European Heart J. - Cardiovascular Imaging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 2.044, h-index: 58)
European Heart J. - Cardiovascular Pharmacotherapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
European Heart J. - Quality of Care and Clinical Outcomes     Hybrid Journal  
European Heart J. Supplements     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.152, h-index: 31)
European J. of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.568, h-index: 104)
European J. of Intl. Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 149, SJR: 0.722, h-index: 38)
European J. of Orthodontics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.09, h-index: 60)
European J. of Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 1.284, h-index: 64)
European Review of Agricultural Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.549, h-index: 42)
European Review of Economic History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.628, h-index: 24)
European Sociological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 2.061, h-index: 53)
Evolution, Medicine, and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Family Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.048, h-index: 77)
Fems Microbiology Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.687, h-index: 115)
Fems Microbiology Letters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 1.126, h-index: 118)
Fems Microbiology Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 7.587, h-index: 150)
Fems Yeast Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 1.213, h-index: 66)
Foreign Policy Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.859, h-index: 10)
Forestry: An Intl. J. of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.903, h-index: 44)
Forum for Modern Language Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.108, h-index: 6)
French History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 0.123, h-index: 10)
French Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.119, h-index: 7)
French Studies Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.102, h-index: 3)
Gastroenterology Report     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Genome Biology and Evolution     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 3.22, h-index: 39)
Geophysical J. Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31, SJR: 1.839, h-index: 119)
German History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.437, h-index: 13)
GigaScience     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Global Summitry     Hybrid Journal  
Glycobiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.692, h-index: 101)
Health and Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46, SJR: 0.505, h-index: 40)
Health Education Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.814, h-index: 80)
Health Policy and Planning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 1.628, h-index: 66)
Health Promotion Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.664, h-index: 60)
History Workshop J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.313, h-index: 20)
Holocaust and Genocide Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.115, h-index: 13)
Human Molecular Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 4.288, h-index: 233)
Human Reproduction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 79, SJR: 2.271, h-index: 179)
Human Reproduction Update     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 4.678, h-index: 128)
Human Rights Law Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58, SJR: 0.7, h-index: 21)
ICES J. of Marine Science: J. du Conseil     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54, SJR: 1.233, h-index: 88)
ICSID Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
ILAR J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.099, h-index: 51)
IMA J. of Applied Mathematics     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.329, h-index: 26)
IMA J. of Management Mathematics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.351, h-index: 20)
IMA J. of Mathematical Control and Information     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.661, h-index: 28)
IMA J. of Numerical Analysis - advance access     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 2.032, h-index: 44)
Industrial and Corporate Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.37, h-index: 81)
Industrial Law J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29, SJR: 0.184, h-index: 15)
Information and Inference     Free  
Integrative and Comparative Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.911, h-index: 90)
Interacting with Computers     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.529, h-index: 59)
Interactive CardioVascular and Thoracic Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.743, h-index: 35)
Intl. Affairs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51, SJR: 1.264, h-index: 53)
Intl. Data Privacy Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Intl. Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.835, h-index: 15)
Intl. Immunology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.613, h-index: 111)
Intl. J. for Quality in Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32, SJR: 1.593, h-index: 69)
Intl. J. of Constitutional Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 59, SJR: 0.613, h-index: 19)
Intl. J. of Epidemiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 126, SJR: 4.381, h-index: 145)
Intl. J. of Law and Information Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.247, h-index: 8)
Intl. J. of Law, Policy and the Family     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.307, h-index: 15)
Intl. J. of Lexicography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.404, h-index: 18)
Intl. J. of Low-Carbon Technologies     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.457, h-index: 12)
Intl. J. of Neuropsychopharmacology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.69, h-index: 79)
Intl. J. of Public Opinion Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.906, h-index: 33)
Intl. J. of Refugee Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32, SJR: 0.231, h-index: 21)
Intl. J. of Transitional Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.833, h-index: 12)
Intl. Mathematics Research Notices     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 2.052, h-index: 42)
Intl. Political Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 1.339, h-index: 19)
Intl. Relations of the Asia-Pacific     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.539, h-index: 17)
Intl. Studies Perspectives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.998, h-index: 28)
Intl. Studies Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36, SJR: 2.184, h-index: 68)
Intl. Studies Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.783, h-index: 38)
ISLE: Interdisciplinary Studies in Literature and Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.155, h-index: 4)
ITNOW     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.102, h-index: 4)
J. of African Economies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.647, h-index: 30)
J. of American History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 0.286, h-index: 34)
J. of Analytical Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 1.038, h-index: 60)
J. of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 2.157, h-index: 149)
J. of Antitrust Enforcement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
J. of Applied Poultry Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.563, h-index: 43)
J. of Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43, SJR: 1.341, h-index: 96)
J. of Chromatographic Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.448, h-index: 42)
J. of Church and State     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.167, h-index: 11)
J. of Competition Law and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 0.442, h-index: 16)
J. of Complex Networks     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.165, h-index: 5)
J. of Conflict and Security Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.196, h-index: 15)
J. of Consumer Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 41, SJR: 4.896, h-index: 121)
J. of Crohn's and Colitis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.543, h-index: 37)
J. of Cybersecurity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
J. of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.69, h-index: 36)
J. of Design History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.166, h-index: 14)
J. of Economic Entomology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.894, h-index: 76)
J. of Economic Geography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 2.909, h-index: 69)
J. of Environmental Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.457, h-index: 20)
J. of European Competition Law & Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
J. of Experimental Botany     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 2.798, h-index: 163)
J. of Financial Econometrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 1.314, h-index: 27)
J. of Global Security Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
J. of Heredity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.024, h-index: 76)
J. of Hindu Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.186, h-index: 3)
J. of Hip Preservation Surgery     Open Access  
J. of Human Rights Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.399, h-index: 10)
J. of Infectious Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40, SJR: 4, h-index: 209)
J. of Insect Science     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.388, h-index: 31)

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Journal Cover Fems Microbiology Ecology
  [SJR: 1.687]   [H-I: 115]   [8 followers]  Follow
    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 0168-6496 - ISSN (Online) 1574-6941
   Published by Oxford University Press Homepage  [370 journals]
  • Potential of semiarid soil from Caatinga biome as a novel source for
           mining lignocellulose-degrading enzymes
    • Authors: Lacerda Júnior GV; Noronha MF, de Sousa SP, et al.
      PubDate: 2017-06-15
      DOI: 10.1093/femsec/fix075
      Issue No: Vol. 93, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Biogeography of cryoconite bacterial communities on glaciers of the
           Tibetan Plateau
    • Authors: Liu Y; Vick-Majors TJ, Priscu JC, et al.
      Abstract: Cryoconite holes, water-filled pockets containing biological and mineralogical deposits that form on glacier surfaces, play important roles in glacier mass balance, glacial geochemistry and carbon cycling. The presence of cryoconite material decreases surface albedo and accelerates glacier mass loss, a problem of particular importance in the rapidly melting Tibetan Plateau. No studies have addressed the microbial community composition of cryoconite holes and their associated ecosystem processes on Tibetan glaciers. To further enhance our understanding of these glacial ecosystems on the Tibetan Plateau and to examine their role in carbon cycling as the glaciers respond to climate change, we explored the bacterial communities within cryoconite holes associated with three climatically distinct Tibetan Plateau glaciers using Illumina sequencing of the V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene. Cryoconite bacterial communities were dominated by Cyanobacteria, Chloroflexi, Betaproteobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria. Cryoconite bacterial community composition varied according to their geographical locations, exhibiting significant differences among glaciers studied. Regional beta diversity was driven by the interaction between geographic distance and environmental variables; the latter contributed more than geographic distance to the variation in cryoconite microbial communities. Our study is the first to describe the regional-scale spatial variability and to identify the factors that drive regional variability of cryoconite bacterial communities on the Tibetan Plateau.
      PubDate: 2017-05-20
      DOI: 10.1093/femsec/fix072
      Issue No: Vol. 93, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Different abundance and correlational patterns exist between total and
           presumed pathogenic Vibrio vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus in shellfish
           and waters along the North Carolina coast
    • Authors: Williams TC; Froelich BA, Phippen B, et al.
      Abstract: Monitoring of Vibrio vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus abundance is pertinent due to the ability of these species to cause disease in humans through aquatic vectors. Previously, we performed a multiyear investigation tracking Vibrio spp. levels in five sites along the southeastern North Carolina coast. From February 2013 to October 2015, total V. vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus abundance was measured in water, oysters and clams. In the current study, pathogenic subpopulations were identified in these isolates using molecular markers, revealing that 5.3% of V. vulnificus isolates possessed the virulence-correlated gene (vcgC), and 1.9% of V. parahaemolyticus isolates harbored one or both of the virulence-associated hemolysin genes (tdh and trh). Total V. parahaemolyticus abundance was not sufficient to predict the abundance of pathogenic subpopulations. Specifically, pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus isolates were more often isolated in cooler waters and were sometimes isolated when no other V. parahaemolyticus strains were detectable. Vibrio vulnificus clinical (C-) genotypes correlated with total V. vulnificus; however, salinity, water depth and total suspended solids influenced C- and E-genotypes differently. Lastly, we documented individual oysters harboring significantly higher V. vulnificus levels for which there was no ecological explanation, a phenomenon that deserves closer attention due to the potentially elevated health hazard associated with these ‘hot’ shellfish.
      PubDate: 2017-05-20
      DOI: 10.1093/femsec/fix071
      Issue No: Vol. 93, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Bacterioplankton assemblages in coastal ponds reflect the influence of
           hydrology and geomorphological setting
    • Authors: Huggett MJ; Kavazos CJ, Bernasconi R, et al.
      Abstract: The factors that shape microbial community assembly in aquatic ecosystems have been widely studied; yet it is still unclear how distinct communities within a connected landscape influence one another. Coastal lakes are recipients of, and thus are connected to, both marine and terrestrial environments. Thus, they may host microbial assemblages that reflect the relative degree of influence by, and connectivity to, either system. In order to address this idea, we interrogated microbial community diversity at 49 sites in seven ponds in two seasons in the Lake MacLeod basin, a system fed by seawater flowing inland through underground karst. Environmental and spatial variation within ponds explain <9% of the community structure, while identity of the pond that samples were taken from explains 50% of community variation. That is, ponds each host distinct assemblages despite similarities in size, environment and position in the landscape, indicating a dominant role for local species sorting. The ponds contain a substantial amount of previously unknown microbial taxa, reflecting the unusual nature of this inland system. Rare marine taxa, possibly dispersed from seawater assemblages via the underground karst connection, are abundant within the inland system, suggesting an important role for regional dispersal within the metacommunities.
      PubDate: 2017-05-15
      DOI: 10.1093/femsec/fix067
      Issue No: Vol. 93, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Members of Microvirga and Bradyrhizobium genera are native endosymbiotic
           bacteria nodulating Lupinus luteus in Northern Tunisian soils
    • Authors: Msaddak A; Rejili M, Durán D, et al.
      Abstract: The genetic diversity of bacterial populations nodulating Lupinus luteus (yellow lupine) in Northern Tunisia was examined. Phylogenetic analyses of 43 isolates based on recA and gyrB partial sequences grouped them in three clusters, two of which belong to genus Bradyrhizobium (41 isolates) and one, remarkably, to Microvirga (2 isolates), a genus never previously described as microsymbiont of this lupine species. Representatives of the three clusters were analysed in-depth by multilocus sequence analysis of five housekeeping genes (rrs, recA, glnII, gyrB and dnaK). Surprisingly, the Bradyrhizobium cluster with the two isolates LluI4 and LluTb2 may constitute a new species defined by a separate position between Bradyrhizobium manausense and B. denitrificans. A nodC-based phylogeny identified only two groups: one formed by Bradyrhizobium strains included in the symbiovar genistearum and the other by the Microvirga strains. Symbiotic behaviour of representative isolates was tested, and among the seven legumes inoculated only a difference was observed i.e. the Bradyrhizobium strains nodulated Ornithopus compressus unlike the two strains of Microvirga. On the basis of these data, we conclude that L. luteus root nodule symbionts in Northern Tunisia are mostly strains within the B. canariense/B. lupini lineages, and the remaining strains belong to two groups not previously identified as L. luteus endosymbionts: one corresponding to a new clade of Bradyrhizobium and the other to the genus Microvirga.
      PubDate: 2017-05-15
      DOI: 10.1093/femsec/fix068
      Issue No: Vol. 93, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Aminobacter sp. MSH1 invades sand filter community biofilms while
           retaining 2,6-dichlorobenzamide degradation functionality under C- and
           N-limiting conditions
    • Authors: Horemans B; Vandermaesen J, Sekhar A, et al.
      Abstract: Aminobacter sp. MSH1 is of interest for bioaugmentation of biofiltration units in drinking water treatment plants (DWTPs) due to its ability to degrade the groundwater micropollutant 2,6-dichlorobenzamide (BAM). Using a continuous flow chamber biofilm model, MSH1 was previously shown to colonize surfaces and degrade BAM at trace concentrations as low as 1 μg/L under the oligotrophic conditions found in DWTPs. In DWTP filtration units, MSH1 has to compete with the resident biofilm microbiota for space and nutrients. Using the same model, we examined how a sand filter community (SFC) affects MSH1's BAM-degrading activity and biofilm formation under C- and N-limiting conditions when fed with trace concentrations of BAM. MSH1 was inoculated simultaneously with the SFC (co-colonization mode) or after the SFC formed a biofilm (invasion mode). MSH1 successfully established in the SFC biofilm showing growth and activity. In co-colonization mode, MSH1 decreased in number in the presence of the SFC and formed isolated colonies, while specific BAM-degradation activity increased. In the invasion mode, MSH1 also decreased in numbers in the presence of the SFC but formed mixed colonies, while specific BAM degradation was unaffected. Our results show that MSH1 invades and performs successfully in an SFC biofilm under the oligotrophic conditions of DWTPs.
      PubDate: 2017-05-11
      DOI: 10.1093/femsec/fix064
      Issue No: Vol. 93, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Community composition and assembly processes of the free-living and
           particle-attached bacteria in Taihu Lake
    • Authors: Zhao D; Xu H, Zeng J, et al.
      Abstract: Although previous studies have compared the diversity and community composition of free-living (FL) and particle-attached (PA) bacterial groups in marine ecosystems, few studies have focused on the FL and PA bacterial communities in large and shallow eutrophic lakes. Furthermore, the assembly processes of the FL and PA bacterial communities have not been investigated. To illustrate the differences between PA (≥5.0 μm) and FL (0.22–5.0 μm) bacterial communities, samples were collected from 13 different sites in Taihu Lake, China. A higher diversity of the PA bacterial group than that of the FL group was observed, and significant differences in bacterial community composition between FL and PA groups were found (analysis of similarity, R = 0.2425, P < 0.001). Moreover, the two groups exhibited different relationships with environmental factors and geographic distance. Environmental factors played more important roles in affecting the FL bacterial community. A deterministic process was found as the primary factor driving the community of FL bacteria in Taihu Lake. However, the PA bacterial group was characterized by insignificant results of partial Mantel tests, which indicated that the community assembly was controlled by unknown processes.
      PubDate: 2017-05-11
      DOI: 10.1093/femsec/fix062
      Issue No: Vol. 93, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Contribution of aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria to total organic
           carbon pool in aquatic system of subtropical karst catchments, Southwest
           China: evidence from hydrochemical and microbiological study
    • Authors: Li Q; Song A, Peng W, et al.
      Abstract: Aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria may play a particular role in carbon cycling of aquatic systems. However, little is known about the interaction between aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria and hydrochemistry in groundwater-surface water exchange systems of subtropical karst catchments. We carried out a detailed study on the abundance of aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria and bacterioplankton, hydrochemistry and taxonomy of bacterioplankton in the Maocun watershed, Southwest China, an area with karst geological background. Our results revealed that bacteria are the important contributors to total organic carbon source/sequestration in the groundwater-surface water of this area. The aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria, including β-Proteobacteria, also appear in the studied water system. In addition to that, the genus Polynucleobacter of the phototropic β-Proteobacteria shows a close link with those sampling sites by presenting bacterial origin organic carbon on CCA biplot and is found to be positively correlated with total nitrogen, dissolved oxygen and pH (r = 0.860, 0.747 and 0.813, respectively) in the Maocun watershed. The results suggest that Polynucleobacter might be involved in the production of organic carbon and might act as the negative feedback on global warming.
      PubDate: 2017-05-11
      DOI: 10.1093/femsec/fix065
      Issue No: Vol. 93, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Comparing the responses of rumen ciliate protozoa and bacteria to excess
           carbohydrate
    • Authors: Teixeira CV; Lana R, Tao J, et al.
      Abstract: When given excess carbohydrate, certain microbial species respond by storing energy (synthesizing reserve carbohydrate), but other species respond by dissipating the energy as heat (spilling energy). To determine the importance of these responses in the rumen microbial community, this study quantified the responses of mixed ciliate protozoa vs bacteria to glucose. We hypothesized that ciliates would direct more glucose to synthesis of reserve carbohydrate (and less to energy spilling) than would bacteria. Ciliates and bacteria were isolated from rumen fluid using filtration and centrifugation, resuspended in nitrogen-free buffer to limit growth, and dosed with 5 mM glucose. Compared with bacteria, ciliates consumed glucose >3-fold faster and synthesized reserve carbohydrate 4-fold faster. They incorporated 53% of glucose carbon into reserve carbohydrate—nearly double the value (27%) for bacteria. Energy spilling was not detected for ciliates, as all heat production (104%) was accounted by synthesis of reserve carbohydrate and endogenous metabolism. For bacteria, reserve carbohydrate and endogenous metabolism accounted for only 68% of heat production, and spilling was detected within 11 min of dosing glucose. These results suggest that ciliates alter the course of ruminal carbohydrate metabolism by outcompeting bacteria for excess carbohydrate, maximizing reserve carbohydrate synthesis, and minimizing energy spilling.
      PubDate: 2017-05-09
      DOI: 10.1093/femsec/fix060
      Issue No: Vol. 93, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • The paleosymbiosis hypothesis: host plants can be colonised by root
           symbionts that have been inactive for centuries to millenia
    • Authors: Pither J; Pickles BJ.
      Abstract: Paleoecologists have speculated that post-glacial migration of tree species could have been facilitated by mycorrhizal symbionts surviving glaciation as resistant propagules belowground. The general premise of this idea, which we call the ‘paleosymbiosis hypothesis’, is that host plants can access and be colonised by fungal root symbionts that have been inactive for millennia. Here, we explore the plausibility of this hypothesis by synthesising relevant findings from a diverse literature. For example, the paleoecology literature provided evidence of modern roots penetrating paleosols containing ancient (>6000 years) fungal propagules, though these were of unknown condition. With respect to propagule longevity, the available evidence is of mixed quality, but includes convincing examples consistent with the paleosymbiosis hypothesis (i.e. >1000 years viable propagules). We describe symbiont traits and environmental conditions that should favour the development and preservation of an ancient propagule bank, and discuss the implications for our understanding of soil symbiont diversity and ecosystem functioning. We conclude that the paleosymbiosis hypothesis is plausible in locations where propagule deposition and preservation conditions are favourable (e.g. permafrost regions). We encourage future belowground research to consider and explore the potential temporal origins of root symbioses.
      PubDate: 2017-05-09
      DOI: 10.1093/femsec/fix061
      Issue No: Vol. 93, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Polyphosphate-accumulating bacterial community colonizing the calcium
           bodies of terrestrial isopod crustaceans Titanethes albus and Hyloniscus
           riparius
    • Authors: Kostanjšek R; Vittori M, Srot V, et al.
      Abstract: Terrestrial isopods from the group Trichoniscidae accumulate calcium in specialized organs, known as the calcium bodies. These consist of two pairs of epithelial sacs located alongside the digestive system. These organs contain various forms of calcium and constantly present bacteria. To elucidate their origin and role, we analyzed the bacteria of the calcium bodies in the cave-dwelling isopod Titanethes albus and the epigean species Hyloniscus riparius, by microscopy, histochemistry, energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry, 16S rRNA analysis and in situ hybridization. The calcium bodies of both species comprise numerous and diverse bacterial communities consisting of known soil bacteria. Despite their diversity, these bacteria share the polyphosphate-accumulation ability. We present the model of phosphorous dynamics in the calcium bodies during the molting cycle and potentially beneficial utilization of the symbiotic phosphate by the host in cyclic regeneration of the cuticle. Although not fully understood, this unique symbiosis represents the first evidence of polyphosphate-accumulating bacterial symbionts in the tissue of a terrestrial animal.
      PubDate: 2017-04-25
      DOI: 10.1093/femsec/fix053
      Issue No: Vol. 93, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Compositional differences among female-associated and embryo-associated
           microbiota of the viviparous Pacific Beetle cockroach, Diploptera punctata
           
    • Authors: Ayayee PA; Keeney G, Sabree ZL, et al.
      Abstract: All cockroach species, except one, harbor the endosymbiont Blattabacterium, transmitted from females to embryos. Adult cockroaches acquire non-Blattabacterium bacteria as part of their gut microbiota over time, but our knowledge of the possible transmission of these non-Blattabacterium bacteria from females to embryos is rudimentary. We characterized the gut microbiota of gravid viviparous Diploptera punctata females and the non-Blattabacterium microbiota of associated developing embryos, as well as the gut microbiota of non-gravid females, and the microbiota of orphan embryos (females not included), following high-throughput sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene to assess bacterial transference. We determined significant differences in community composition between gravid females and associated embryos and overall greater similarity in community composition among embryos than adult females. Results suggest various routes of transference of bacteria from females or the environment to embryos. The bacterial families Halomonadaceae and Shewanellaceae were more abundant in embryos than in gravid females. The functional relevance of these families remains to be elucidated, but provisioning of amino acids deficient in the brood sac secretion is a possibility. Overall, our results highlight the need for further studies investigating the uptake and selective screening of microbes by D. punctata embryos, as well as their functions.
      PubDate: 2017-04-18
      DOI: 10.1093/femsec/fix052
      Issue No: Vol. 93, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Water table drawdown shapes the depth-dependent variations in prokaryotic
           diversity and structure in Zoige peatlands
    • Authors: Zhong Q; Chen H, Liu L, et al.
      Abstract: Microbial communities are important to ecosystem function and sensitive to hydrological dynamics. However, we lack predictable knowledge about how soil microorganisms respond to water table drawdown in different depths. This research used a high-throughput sequencing method to determine the responses of prokaryotic communities to the changes of water table and depth on Zoige peatlands. Our results showed that water table drawdown reduced alpha diversity indices (observed species, Shannon diversity and Chao1 richness) of prokaryotic communities. Intriguingly, the reduction of diversity varied in different depths, and was statistically significant in intermediate layers (20–30 cm and 50–60 cm), but not in the surface (0–10 cm) or deep layer (90–100 cm). In deeper layers there was greater relative abundance of most anaerobic microorganisms (e.g. Chloroflexi, Planctomyctes and NC10), but lesser amounts of most aerobes (e.g. Proteobacteria and Acidobacteria). However, the vertical distribution of prokaryotic microbiota along the depth gradient was altered by water table drawdown, mainly by enriching oligotrophs (e.g. Acidobcteria) over copiotrophs (e.g. Bacteriodetes). In addition, we found that the most important soil parameters influencing community structure were soil pH, total organic carbon and total nitrogen. Our study illuminates that the variations of prokaryotic communities caused by water table drawdown are depth-dependent, and that water table drawdown leads to predictive changes of microbiota in peatlands.
      PubDate: 2017-04-18
      DOI: 10.1093/femsec/fix049
      Issue No: Vol. 93, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Leaf endophytic fungus interacts with precipitation to alter belowground
           microbial communities in primary successional dunes
    • Authors: Bell-Dereske L; Takacs-Vesbach C, Kivlin SN, et al.
      Abstract: Understanding interactions between above- and belowground components of ecosystems is an important next step in community ecology. These interactions may be fundamental to predicting ecological responses to global change because indirect effects occurring through altered species interactions can outweigh or interact with the direct effects of environmental drivers. In a multiyear field experiment (2010–2015), we tested how experimental addition of a mutualistic leaf endophyte (Epichloë amarillans) associated with American beachgrass (Ammophila breviligulata) interacted with an altered precipitation regime (±30%) to affect the belowground microbial community. Epichloë addition increased host root biomass at the plot scale, but reduced the length of extraradical arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungal hyphae in the soil. Under ambient precipitation alone, the addition of Epichloë increased root biomass per aboveground tiller and reduced the diversity of AM fungi in A. breviligulata roots. Furthermore, with Epichloë added, the diversity of root-associated bacteria declined with higher soil moisture, whereas in its absence, bacterial diversity increased with higher soil moisture. Thus, the aboveground fungal mutualist not only altered the abundance and composition of belowground microbial communities but also affected how belowground communities responded to climate, suggesting that aboveground microbes have potential for cascading influences on community dynamics and ecosystem processes that occur belowground.
      PubDate: 2017-03-15
      DOI: 10.1093/femsec/fix036
      Issue No: Vol. 93, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Sediment anoxia limits microbial-driven seagrass carbon remineralization
           under warming conditions
    • Authors: Trevathan-Tackett SM; Seymour JR, Nielsen DA, et al.
      Abstract: Seagrass ecosystems are significant carbon sinks, and their resident microbial communities ultimately determine the quantity and quality of carbon sequestered. However, environmental perturbations have been predicted to affect microbial-driven seagrass decomposition and subsequent carbon sequestration. Utilizing techniques including 16S-rDNA sequencing, solid-state NMR and microsensor profiling, we tested the hypothesis that elevated seawater temperatures and eutrophication enhance the microbial decomposition of seagrass leaf detritus and rhizome/root tissues. Nutrient additions had a negligible effect on seagrass decomposition, indicating an absence of nutrient limitation. Elevated temperatures caused a 19% higher biomass loss for aerobically decaying leaf detritus, coinciding with changes in bacterial community structure and enhanced lignocellulose degradation. Although, community shifts and lignocellulose degradation were also observed for rhizome/root decomposition, anaerobic decay was unaffected by temperature. These observations suggest that oxygen availability constrains the stimulatory effects of temperature increases on bacterial carbon remineralization, possibly through differential temperature effects on bacterial functional groups, including putative aerobic heterotrophs (e.g. Erythrobacteraceae, Hyphomicrobiaceae) and sulfate reducers (e.g. Desulfobacteraceae). Consequently, under elevated seawater temperatures, carbon accumulation rates may diminish due to higher remineralization rates at the sediment surface. Nonetheless, the anoxic conditions ubiquitous to seagrass sediments can provide a degree of carbon protection under warming seawater temperatures.
      PubDate: 2017-03-15
      DOI: 10.1093/femsec/fix033
      Issue No: Vol. 93, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Microbial community structure and biodiversity of size-fractionated
           granules in a partial nitritation–anammox process
    • Authors: Luo J; Chen H, Han X, et al.
      Abstract: The performance of a granule-based partial nitritation–anammox process is expected to be affected by the granule size distribution, but little is known about the impact of granule size on microbial community structure and diversity. To reveal how the microbial composition and diversity vary with granule size, granules from a partial nitritation–anammox reactor were size-fractionated into five classes (<0.2, 0.2–0.5, 0.5–0.8, 0.8–1.0 and >1.0 mm). Microbial communities and diversity in these size-fractionated granules were investigated using 16S rRNA gene high-throughput sequencing. It was found that larger granules harbor more diverse microbial communities than small granules. Both quantitative PCR and 16S rRNA gene sequencing indicated that the abundance of anammox bacteria (dominated by Candidatus Brocadia) exhibited an increasing trend with granule size. In contrast, the abundance of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (Nitrosomonas) decreased with increasing granule size. Moreover, larger granules harbored more diverse anammox bacteria, with four genera found in the largest granules while only two with limited abundance were detected in the smallest granules. The findings highlight an important role for granule size in shaping community structure and biodiversity.
      PubDate: 2017-02-18
      DOI: 10.1093/femsec/fix021
      Issue No: Vol. 93, No. 6 (2017)
       
 
 
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