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Publisher: Oxford University Press   (Total: 397 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 397 Journals sorted alphabetically
ACS Symposium Series     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.189, CiteScore: 0)
Acta Biochimica et Biophysica Sinica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.79, CiteScore: 2)
Adaptation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.143, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53, SJR: 2.196, CiteScore: 5)
Aesthetic Surgery J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.434, CiteScore: 1)
African Affairs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 66, SJR: 1.869, CiteScore: 2)
Age and Ageing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 92, SJR: 1.989, CiteScore: 4)
Alcohol and Alcoholism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 1.376, CiteScore: 3)
American Entomologist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
American Historical Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 162, SJR: 0.467, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Agricultural Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45, SJR: 2.113, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Clinical Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 168, SJR: 3.438, CiteScore: 6)
American J. of Epidemiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 189, SJR: 2.713, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Hypertension     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 1.322, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Jurisprudence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.281, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Legal History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.116, CiteScore: 0)
American Law and Economics Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 1.053, CiteScore: 1)
American Literary History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.391, CiteScore: 0)
Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 1.038, CiteScore: 1)
Animal Frontiers     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Behavioral Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.423, CiteScore: 3)
Annals of Botany     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37, SJR: 1.721, CiteScore: 4)
Annals of Oncology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56, SJR: 5.599, CiteScore: 9)
Annals of the Entomological Society of America     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.722, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Work Exposures and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33, SJR: 0.728, CiteScore: 2)
Antibody Therapeutics     Open Access  
AoB Plants     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.28, CiteScore: 3)
Applied Economic Perspectives and Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.858, CiteScore: 2)
Applied Linguistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58, SJR: 2.987, CiteScore: 3)
Applied Mathematics Research eXpress     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.241, CiteScore: 1)
Arbitration Intl.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Arbitration Law Reports and Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 0.731, CiteScore: 2)
Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Arthropod Management Tests     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Astronomy & Geophysics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44, SJR: 0.146, CiteScore: 0)
Behavioral Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52, SJR: 1.871, CiteScore: 3)
Bioinformatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 325, SJR: 6.14, CiteScore: 8)
Biology Methods and Protocols     Hybrid Journal  
Biology of Reproduction     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.446, CiteScore: 3)
Biometrika     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 3.485, CiteScore: 2)
BioScience     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29, SJR: 2.754, CiteScore: 4)
Bioscience Horizons : The National Undergraduate Research J.     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.146, CiteScore: 0)
Biostatistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 1.553, CiteScore: 2)
BJA : British J. of Anaesthesia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 177, SJR: 2.115, CiteScore: 3)
BJA Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 65)
Brain     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 68, SJR: 5.858, CiteScore: 7)
Briefings in Bioinformatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51, SJR: 2.505, CiteScore: 5)
Briefings in Functional Genomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 2.15, CiteScore: 3)
British J. for the Philosophy of Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36, SJR: 2.161, CiteScore: 2)
British J. of Aesthetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.508, CiteScore: 1)
British J. of Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 600, SJR: 1.828, CiteScore: 3)
British J. of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 85, SJR: 1.019, CiteScore: 2)
British Medical Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.355, CiteScore: 3)
British Yearbook of Intl. Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Bulletin of the London Mathematical Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.376, CiteScore: 1)
Cambridge J. of Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 65, SJR: 0.764, CiteScore: 2)
Cambridge J. of Regions, Economy and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 2.438, CiteScore: 4)
Cambridge Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.104, CiteScore: 0)
Capital Markets Law J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.222, CiteScore: 0)
Carcinogenesis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 2.135, CiteScore: 5)
Cardiovascular Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 3.002, CiteScore: 5)
Cerebral Cortex     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46, SJR: 3.892, CiteScore: 6)
CESifo Economic Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.483, CiteScore: 1)
Chemical Senses     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.42, CiteScore: 3)
Children and Schools     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.246, CiteScore: 0)
Chinese J. of Comparative Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.412, CiteScore: 0)
Chinese J. of Intl. Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.329, CiteScore: 0)
Chinese J. of Intl. Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.392, CiteScore: 2)
Christian Bioethics: Non-Ecumenical Studies in Medical Morality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.183, CiteScore: 0)
Classical Receptions J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
Clean Energy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Infectious Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 70, SJR: 5.051, CiteScore: 5)
Communication Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 2.424, CiteScore: 3)
Communication, Culture & Critique     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.222, CiteScore: 1)
Community Development J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.268, CiteScore: 1)
Computer J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.319, CiteScore: 1)
Conservation Physiology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.818, CiteScore: 3)
Contemporary Women's Writing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.121, CiteScore: 0)
Contributions to Political Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.906, CiteScore: 1)
Critical Values     Full-text available via subscription  
Current Developments in Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Current Legal Problems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Current Zoology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.164, CiteScore: 2)
Database : The J. of Biological Databases and Curation     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.791, CiteScore: 3)
Digital Scholarship in the Humanities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.259, CiteScore: 1)
Diplomatic History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.45, CiteScore: 1)
DNA Research     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 2.866, CiteScore: 6)
Dynamics and Statistics of the Climate System     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Early Music     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.139, CiteScore: 0)
Economic Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42, SJR: 3.584, CiteScore: 3)
ELT J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.942, CiteScore: 1)
English Historical Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54, SJR: 0.612, CiteScore: 1)
English: J. of the English Association     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Environmental Entomology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.818, CiteScore: 2)
Environmental Epigenetics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Environmental History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.408, CiteScore: 1)
EP-Europace     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 2.748, CiteScore: 4)
Epidemiologic Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 4.505, CiteScore: 8)
ESHRE Monographs     Hybrid Journal  
Essays in Criticism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.113, CiteScore: 0)
European Heart J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 63, SJR: 9.315, CiteScore: 9)
European Heart J. - Cardiovascular Imaging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 3.625, CiteScore: 3)
European Heart J. - Cardiovascular Pharmacotherapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
European Heart J. - Quality of Care and Clinical Outcomes     Hybrid Journal  
European Heart J. : Case Reports     Open Access  
European Heart J. Supplements     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.223, CiteScore: 0)
European J. of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.681, CiteScore: 2)
European J. of Intl. Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 195, SJR: 0.694, CiteScore: 1)
European J. of Orthodontics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.279, CiteScore: 2)
European J. of Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 1.36, CiteScore: 2)
European Review of Agricultural Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.172, CiteScore: 2)
European Review of Economic History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 0.702, CiteScore: 1)
European Sociological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42, SJR: 2.728, CiteScore: 3)
Evolution, Medicine, and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Family Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.018, CiteScore: 2)
Fems Microbiology Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.492, CiteScore: 4)
Fems Microbiology Letters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.79, CiteScore: 2)
Fems Microbiology Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32, SJR: 7.063, CiteScore: 13)
Fems Yeast Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 1.308, CiteScore: 3)
Food Quality and Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Foreign Policy Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 1.425, CiteScore: 1)
Forest Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.89, CiteScore: 2)
Forestry: An Intl. J. of Forest Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.133, CiteScore: 3)
Forum for Modern Language Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.104, CiteScore: 0)
French History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33, SJR: 0.118, CiteScore: 0)
French Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.148, CiteScore: 0)
French Studies Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.152, CiteScore: 0)
Gastroenterology Report     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Genome Biology and Evolution     Open Access   (Followers: 14, SJR: 2.578, CiteScore: 4)
Geophysical J. Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36, SJR: 1.506, CiteScore: 3)
German History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.161, CiteScore: 0)
GigaScience     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 5.022, CiteScore: 7)
Global Summitry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Glycobiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 1.493, CiteScore: 3)
Health and Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57, SJR: 0.388, CiteScore: 1)
Health Education Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.854, CiteScore: 2)
Health Policy and Planning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 1.512, CiteScore: 2)
Health Promotion Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.812, CiteScore: 2)
History Workshop J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31, SJR: 1.278, CiteScore: 1)
Holocaust and Genocide Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.105, CiteScore: 0)
Human Communication Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.146, CiteScore: 3)
Human Molecular Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 3.555, CiteScore: 5)
Human Reproduction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 72, SJR: 2.643, CiteScore: 5)
Human Reproduction Open     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Human Reproduction Update     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 5.317, CiteScore: 10)
Human Rights Law Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 62, SJR: 0.756, CiteScore: 1)
ICES J. of Marine Science: J. du Conseil     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56, SJR: 1.591, CiteScore: 3)
ICSID Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
ILAR J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.732, CiteScore: 4)
IMA J. of Applied Mathematics     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.679, CiteScore: 1)
IMA J. of Management Mathematics     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.538, CiteScore: 1)
IMA J. of Mathematical Control and Information     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.496, CiteScore: 1)
IMA J. of Numerical Analysis - advance access     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 1.987, CiteScore: 2)
Industrial and Corporate Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.792, CiteScore: 2)
Industrial Law J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38, SJR: 0.249, CiteScore: 1)
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48, SJR: 2.511, CiteScore: 4)
Information and Inference     Free  
Integrative and Comparative Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.319, CiteScore: 2)
Interacting with Computers     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.292, CiteScore: 1)
Interactive CardioVascular and Thoracic Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.762, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. Affairs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 65, SJR: 1.505, CiteScore: 3)
Intl. Data Privacy Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Intl. Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.851, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. Immunology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 2.167, CiteScore: 4)
Intl. J. for Quality in Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36, SJR: 1.348, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Constitutional Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 64, SJR: 0.601, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Epidemiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 241, SJR: 3.969, CiteScore: 5)
Intl. J. of Law and Information Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.202, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Law, Policy and the Family     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.223, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Lexicography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.285, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Low-Carbon Technologies     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.403, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Neuropsychopharmacology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.808, CiteScore: 4)
Intl. J. of Public Opinion Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.545, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Refugee Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38, SJR: 0.389, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Transitional Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.724, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. Mathematics Research Notices     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 2.168, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. Political Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40, SJR: 1.465, CiteScore: 3)
Intl. Relations of the Asia-Pacific     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.401, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. Studies Perspectives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.983, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. Studies Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48, SJR: 2.581, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. Studies Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 1.201, CiteScore: 1)
ISLE: Interdisciplinary Studies in Literature and Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.15, CiteScore: 0)
ITNOW     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.103, CiteScore: 0)
J. of African Economies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.533, CiteScore: 1)
J. of American History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46, SJR: 0.297, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Analytical Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.065, CiteScore: 2)
J. of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.419, CiteScore: 4)
J. of Antitrust Enforcement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
J. of Applied Poultry Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.585, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40, SJR: 1.226, CiteScore: 2)
J. of Burn Care & Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.768, CiteScore: 2)
J. of Chromatographic Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.36, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Church and State     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.139, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 55, SJR: 4.411, CiteScore: 5)
J. of Competition Law and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37, SJR: 0.33, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Complex Networks     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.05, CiteScore: 4)
J. of Computer-Mediated Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 29, SJR: 2.961, CiteScore: 6)
J. of Conflict and Security Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.402, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Consumer Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 47, SJR: 5.856, CiteScore: 5)

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Journal Cover
Age and Ageing
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.989
Citation Impact (citeScore): 4
Number of Followers: 92  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0002-0729 - ISSN (Online) 1468-2834
Published by Oxford University Press Homepage  [397 journals]
  • 46STAYING ACTIVE ON WARD 9, AN ACUTE MEDICAL ELDERLY WARD
    • Authors: Thomson F; Howley S, Nozedar L, et al.
      Abstract: Topic: Deconditioning during hospital admission is a concern for elderly care clinicians. The ward team noticed patients had little to entertain them, rarely watching TV and variable visits from friends/ family. Some patients spent much of the day asleep due to lack of stimulation.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy211.46
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 60EXAMINING THE UTILITY OF THE CONNECT WITH PHARMACY (CWP) INTERVENTION IN
           REDUCING ELDERLY READMISSION
    • Authors: Sabir F; Tomlinson J, Strickland-Hodge B, et al.
      Abstract: Topic: Substantial evidence demonstrates an increased risk of hospital admission when patients move between care providers. This is particularly pronounced in elderly patients who are more likely to have complex needs. We investigated whether sharing discharge information would impact on hospital readmission rates in this population.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy211.60
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 18A SERVICE EVALUATION OF THE PERFORMANCE OF THE 4-AT AS A COGNITIVE
           SCREENING TOOL IN AN ENGLISH UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL
    • Authors: Torsney K; Romero-Ortuno R.
      Abstract: Introduction: Delirium is a common and serious disorder that is under-recognised in hospitalised patients. The 4-AT is a validated tool for detecting delirium. Since 2017, our hospital has routinely used the 4-AT under the national dementia CQUIN to screen non-elective admissions aged ≥75 without a known history of dementia. Our aim was to evaluate the feasibility of the 4-AT in our setting and study its association with patient characteristics and outcomes.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy211.18
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 32IMPROVING THE CARE OF PATIENTS WHO REQUIRE RAPID TRANQUILISATION: A
           CLINICAL AUDIT
    • Authors: Chowienczyk S; Rose A, Calderwood H, et al.
      Abstract: Evidence-base: Rapid Tranquilisation (RT) refers to the use of an injectable chemical restraint used to manage challenging behaviour safely and effectively. It is a high risk procedure to which older patients may be particularly susceptible. Previous audits have demonstrated poor adherence to RT local guidelines and inadequate documentation of RT incidents.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy211.32
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 59DE-PRESCRIBING THE PROTON PUMP INHIBITORS - STOPPING THE EPIDEMIC
    • Authors: Fawzi N; Varley O, Mulroy M, et al.
      Abstract: Topic: In older patients proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are commonly inappropriately prescribed, causing potential harm (e.g. association with Clostridium Difficile infection). De-prescribing is a planned process of dose reduction or cessation of medication that is inappropriately prescribed. Our aim was to evaluate the prevalence of PPI prescription in patients admitted to our rehabilitation ward, before and after introduction of active PPI de-prescribing.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy211.59
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 4ASSESSMENT AND PRESCRIPTION OF PROPHYLAXIS FOR VENOUS THROMBOEMBOLISM ON
           CARE OF THE ELDERLY WARDS
    • Authors: Oswal A; Bhagat N.
      Abstract: Background: There is a significant preventable morbidity and mortality with Venous Thromboembolism (VTE) associated with hospital admissions. In the U.K, upwards of 32,000 cases of hospital-associated VTE occur every year. In our trust in the last 6 months, 59 patients were admitted with a hospital associated thrombosis, 4 of which were deemed to be avoidable.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy211.04
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 17IMPROVING COLLABORATION IN THE CARE OF THE FRAIL OLDER PERSON ACROSS THE
           PRIMARY-SECONDARY INTERFACE
    • Authors: Ekwegh U.
      Abstract: Background: In East Lancashire NHS Trust, the role of Frailty Specialty Doctor in the Emergency Department (ED) was created in October 2016. This was to enable a comprehensive “front door” multidisciplinary team (MDT) assessment and to facilitate community management of the frail older person who presented in the ED.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy211.17
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 45TALES FROM PRIMARY CARE: DOES A COMMUNITY-BASED, MULTIDISCIPLINARY CARE
           HOME VISITING SERVICE IMPROVE CARE AND REDUCE UNPLANNED HOSPITAL
           ADMISSIONS IN OLDER RESIDENTS WITH DEMENTIA, FRAILTY AND MULTI-MORBIDITY.
           RESULTS OF A THREE MONTH EXPLORATORY PILOT
    • Authors: Attwood D; Chandler A, Avis T, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Mortality in care home patients is significant; 26.2% of patients die within a year, with dementia as a leading cause of death. This exploratory pilot analysed a community-based, multidisciplinary home visiting service (called the Winter Pressures Service- WPS) which provided acute and proactive care to care home residents in the Paignton and Brixham locality, South Devon.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy211.45
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 85A PROSPECTIVE STUDY ON FACTORS PREDICTING EARLY FUNCTIONAL OUTCOMES OF
           HIP FRACTURE REHABILITATION IN A SINGAPORE COMMUNITY HOSPITAL
    • Authors: Goh K.
      Abstract: Introduction: Rehabilitation is an integral component of hip fracture management. The majority of the elderly hip fracture population in Singapore undergo rehabilitation in a community hospital. The aim of this study was to determine the factors predicting early functional outcomes post-hip fracture repair, as measured by the Modified Barthel Index (MBI) and De Morton Mobility Index (DEMMI).
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy200.02
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 31IMPROVING ACCESS TO COMPREHENSIVE GERIATRIC ASSESSMENT AT THE FRONT DOOR
           THROUGH A NEW AMBULATORY FRAILTY PATHWAY - AN INTERDISCIPLINARY QUALITY
           IMPROVEMENT PROJECT
    • Authors: Law R; Murdoch C, Almeida P, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: At Whittington Health we have embarked on an interdisciplinary quality improvement (QI) project to better integrate care of older people moving through the Emergency Department (ED) and increase their access to comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA).
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy211.31
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 99USE OF RECOMMENDED ASSESSMENTS OF PHYSICAL FRAILTY AND SARCOPENIA IN
           HOSPITALISED OLDER PEOPLE: IS IT FEASIBLE'
    • Authors: Ibrahim K; Howson F, Culliford D, et al.
      Abstract: Background: Frailty and sarcopenia are common among hospitalised older people and associated with poor healthcare outcomes. Recommended gold standard tools for their identification are the Fried Frailty Phenotype and the European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People (EWGSOP) criteria. We studied the feasibility of using these tools on acute wards for older people.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy202.07
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 16POP-UP DELIRIUM SIMULATION TRAINING
    • Authors: Vale J; Bird K, Mayl C, et al.
      Abstract: Topic: There was a failure to adequately recognise, record and respond to a diagnosis of delirium within the Emergency Department (ED) and Acute Medical Unit (AMU). Every additional 48 hours of undetected delirium increases mortality by 11%. We sought to improve clinical skills and staff confidence so that delirium could either be avoided or recognised and better managed.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy211.16
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 58HELPING OLDER PEOPLE LIVE WELL: THE IMPLEMENTATION OF A SELF-MANAGEMENT
           SUPPORT INTERVENTION IN PRIMARY CARE
    • Authors: Anathhanam S; De Biase S, Thornton G, et al.
      Abstract: Topic: Self-management support (SMS) interventions aim to increase people’s knowledge about their condition, improve ability to self-care and enhance ability to utilise health services appropriately (Panagioti M, Richardson G, Small N et al. BMC Health Services Research 2014; 356:1−20). They have been shown to be effective for people living with other long-term conditions but not specifically frailty.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy211.58
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 3VALIDATING THE USE OF ELECTRONIC FRAILTY INDEX SCORE IN REFERRAL
           PATHWAYS; A RETROSPECTIVE STUDY OF HEART FAILURE DIAGNOSTIC APPOINTMENTS
           IN SECONDARY CARE FROM APRIL 2016 TO APRIL 2016
    • Authors: Farah N; Carr-White G, McDiarmid A.
      Abstract: Introduction: Heart failure has a prevalence of 1–3% which rises to 10 % amongst elderly patients in the UK1. In addition to clinical diagnosis, BNP and NT-pro BNP are biomarkers that are now recommended in diagnostic algorithms for detection of heart failure, and are independent predictors of mortality and other cardiac outcomes in patients with heart failure2. The electronic frailty index (eFI) score is a parameter used in primary care which helps identify and predict adverse outcomes in elderly patients.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy211.03
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 113SCREENING OF FRAILTY IN THE ELDERLY PATIENTS ADMITTED IN AN EMERGENCY
           UNIT. ABOUT A PROSPECTIVE STUDY
    • Authors: Zulfiqar A.
      Abstract: Introduction: At present, it is recognised that screening for frailty in the elderly is a major public health issue.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy204.06
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 44THE PATIENT EXPERIENCE OF HOME CARE SERVICES
    • Authors: D’Alton M; Malomo K, Beirne A, et al.
      Abstract: Background: Home care services are pivotal for the timely and successful discharge of frail older adults. I n Ireland they are largely provided by private companies. Home Care Services accounted for €376 m of Irish health expenditure in 2017. 19,807 people were in receipt of a home care package (HCP) and 46,243 of home help hours. We conducted a survey to illuminate the patient experience of home care and specific issues arising in practice.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy211.44
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 84TIME TO REDEFINE INITIAL ORTHOSTATIC HYPOTENSION IN OLDER ADULTS'
    • Authors: Finucane C; Kenny R.
      Abstract: Introduction: Recent evidence suggests that while orthostatic hypotension (OH) increases the future risk of all-cause, unexplained (UF) and injurious falls (IF) in older adults initial orthostatic hypotension (IOH) does not. Our goal was to further examine this relationship by comparing the risk of falls associated with new definitions of initial OH based on two approaches: normative data driven and physiological thresholds.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy200.01
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 127EFFICACY AND SAFETY OF OPICAPONE IN PATIENTS OVER 70 YEARS WITH
           PARKINSON’S DISEASE AND MOTOR FLUCTUATIONS
    • Authors: Lees A; Ferreira J, Costa R, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Opicapone (OPC), a novel once-daily peripheral COMT inhibitor, has shown to be safe and effective in reducing OFF-time in Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients with motor fluctuations. PD mainly affects older subjects and the incidence increases with age, being the second most prevalent neurodegenerative disease among the elderly
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy205.04
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 138Dementia and hospital admission post-TIA and stroke: longitudinal
           population-based study
    • Authors: McColl A; Luengo-Fernandez R, Li L, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Dementia after Transient Ischaemic Attack (TIA)/stroke is associated with age, lesion burden and neurodegenerative disease but systemic factors including inflammation/infection may also play a role. We therefore determined associations between TIA/stroke-associated dementia and hospitalisation in a longitudinal study.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afz001.04
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 57IDENTIFYING CARE HOME PATIENTS IN THE LAST TWELVE MONTHS OF LIFE
    • Authors: Woods S; Chu C.
      Abstract: Topic: In the UK 26.2% of care home residents die within 1 year. Patients in their last twelve months of life have more unplanned admissions and persistent symptoms as they become increasingly frail. On the Wirral Emergency Healthcare Plans (EHCPs) are used for anticipatory clinical planning, helping to reduce avoidable Hospital admissions.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy211.57
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 112WHAT KEEPS YOU SHARP' PEOPLE’S VIEWS ABOUT PRESERVING
           THINKING SKILLS IN OLD AGE
    • Authors: Niechcial M; Vaportzis E, Gow A.
      Abstract: Introduction: Changes in thinking skills are commonly experienced by older adults, though large person-to-person variation exists. To develop clear information about the factors that might predict better brain health, it is useful to first understand adults’ views around halting or preventing changes in cognitive abilities. A survey was carried out to explore adults’ ideas about maintaining and improving cognitive skills with age.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy204.05
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 30REDUCING THE INCIDENCE OF URINARY TRACT INFECTIONS IN FRACTURED NECK OF
           FEMUR PATIENTS
    • Authors: Jones S; Heycock R, Lawson O, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction:Our hip fracture patients protocol is for catheterisation in the acute stages both for comfort, hygiene and fluid balanceWe had previously audited post-operative infections in our hip fracture patients which revealed an incidence of treated urinary tract infections of ~28 % with an average time to catheter removal of 6.2 days
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy211.30
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 83SLOWING OF LIFE EXPECTANCY IN THE UK
    • Authors: Parry L; Steel N, Ford J.
      Abstract: Introduction: Life expectancy in the UK stopped increasing in 2009. To identify possible causes for this, we explored changes in life expectancy by age, sex and condition.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy199.01
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 43IMPROVING THE COMMUNICATION OF RESUSCITATION STATUS ON DISCHARGE FROM
           COMMUNITY HOSPITAL
    • Authors: Duncan C; Wass A, Logan J.
      Abstract: Evidence base: Over 50% of patients transferred to nursing home die within one year (1). Where a DNACPR is completed and discussed with the patient and/or family, this decision should be communicated clearly on discharge (2). This aligns with the aims of Realistic Medicine, focusing on individualised, patient centred care, to reduce unnecessary interventions and minimise harm.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy211.43
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 56A QUALITY IMPROVEMENT PROJECT TO IMPLEMENT A FRAILTY TOOL AS AN APP AS
           PART OF A WELLBEING ASSESSMENT FOR OLDER ADULTS AT LARKHILL VILLAGE IN
           NOTTINGHAM
    • Authors: Hall S.
      Abstract: Background: In an ageing population where many older people have two or more long term conditions, frailty has now been identified as a long term condition (BGS 2013). ExtraCare is a charity with 30 retirement locations (villages and schemes) that offer independent living for older people. Each location has a Wellbeing Advisor who offers a wellbeing assessment for all residents. A research study commissioned by ExtraCare produced a validated frailty tool (Holland et al 2015), and recommended that this should be incorporated into the wellbeing assessment, to help identify personal goals with residents and to facilitate residents to become more resilient. The aim of this project was to implement this tool at Larkhill village in Nottingham.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy211.56
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 2HEAD OVER HEELS
    • Authors: Crawford A; Dunlop S, Malone C, et al.
      Abstract: Objective: Reduce the number of in-patient falls by 25% over a 6-month period in ward 6 South BCH (Belfast City Hospital), 28th September 2016 – 28th March 2017.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy211.02
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 137A trial to evaluate an eXTended RehAbilitation service for Stroke
           patients (EXTRAS): main patient results
    • Authors: Rodgers H; Shaw L, Bhattarai N, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Development of longer-term stroke rehabilitation services is limited by lack of evidence of effectiveness for specific interventions and service models.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afz001.03
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 98GER-e-TEC: TELEMONITORING PROJECT FOR ELDERLY RESIDENTS IN NURSING HOMES
    • Authors: Zulfiqar A; Hajjam A, Talha S, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Year on year, the number of patients in the emergency departments from nursing homes continues to grow. It is necessary to provide tools to health care teams for these nursing homes, such as assistance in the prevention of decompensation of some geriatric syndromes.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy202.06
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 15COMBINING FORCES TO IMPROVE THE CARE OF OLDER PEOPLE PRESENTING TO
           HOSPITAL
    • Authors: Chowdhury K; Taylor J, Alleleyn J, et al.
      Abstract: Topic: Providing comprehensive geriatrics assessment (CGA) for older people with frailty presenting to hospital is considered gold standard care. The best way to provide such a service with constrained resources is hotly debated, and varies widely.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy211.15
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 111REVIEW OF ANIMAL ASSISTED THERAPY WITH VISITING DOGS IN DEMENTIA
    • Authors: Farid A.
      Abstract: Introduction: Dementia is complex clinical syndrome, which is progressive and irreversible and is associated with significant effect on mental function. Behavioural and Psychological symptoms of dementia are complex, having impact not only on the patients, but also their carers. (NICE Guidelines,2016). Treatment of Dementia is complex and is associated with side effects.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy204.04
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 29STAYING STEADY: IMPACT OF 3 - MONTH GROUP EXERCISE PROGRAMS - A SURVEY
    • Authors: Karlekar R; Tan W, Li E.
      Abstract: Background: The physical, social and financial burden of falls is widely researched and known to be a growing problem with the ageing population. Croydon Falls Service runs 12-week OTAGO based group exercise programs, aimed at reducing this burden in an aging population.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy211.29
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 126ARE FEAR OF FALLING AND CAREGIVER BURDEN ASSOCIATED WITH COGNITIVE
           IMPAIRMENT AMONG PEOPLE WITH PARKINSON’S DISEASE'
    • Authors: Boswell A; Ibrahim K, Owen C, et al.
      Abstract: Background: Cognitive impairment affects many people with Parkinson’s (PwP) and falling is also common. Falls can lead to a fear of falling (FOF) among PwP and high caregiver burden among their close relatives, both of which can be detrimental to an individual’s quality of life. The aim of this study was to examine whether FOF among PwP and caregiver burden in their relatives are affected by cognitive impairment. A secondary outcome was to determine whether FOF among PwP is associated with caregiver burden among their relatives.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy205.03
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 42HEAD INJURIES IN OLDER PEOPLE: IMPROVING THE PATIENT PATHWAY INTO THE
           FALLS SERVICE AND INCREASING GERIATRICIAN INVOLVEMENT IN CARE
    • Authors: Rogans-Watson R; Graichen Y, Dean J, et al.
      Abstract: Topic: Older patients presenting with head injury to Croydon University Hospital (CUH) are either admitted under non-geriatric teams or discharged with no set pathway into the falls service. We assessed the quality of care against NICE Guideline 161: “Falls in older people” (NICE, 2013) for patients aged 65 and over, making changes to improve the pathway and patient management.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy211.42
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 136Rates, risks and routes to reduce vascular dementia (R4VAD)
    • Authors: Backhouse E; Brown R, Williams S, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Stroke is common in older adults and increases the risk of cognitive impairment and vascular dementia. However, there is a lack of knowledge about risk factors which restricts mechanistic understanding, prevention, treatment and design of patient services. R4VAD is a multi-site longitudinal, inclusive study in patients presenting with stroke to the UK Stroke Centres. The aim of the study is to determine rates of, and risk factors for, cognitive and related impairments after stroke to assess mechanisms and improve prediction models.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afz001.02
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 1SHOP-75: SAFER HANDOVER FOR OLDER PEOPLE 75+
    • Authors: Pedersen A; Howe A, Earnshaw C, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Accurate Discharge Summaries (DS) play a crucial role in the continuing health care of patients discharged from hospital. The Academy of Medical Royal Colleges provides guidance on the structure and content of DS. Content required includes a social and functional assessment, a list of new diagnoses, and details of the patient’s past medical history (PMH).
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy211.01
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 110ONE CHANCE TO GET IT RIGHT: EXPLORING DIFFERENT PERSPECTIVES ON
           DECISION MAKING FOR CARE HOME DISCHARGE
    • Authors: Logan G; Rhynas S, Burton J.
      Abstract: Background: Discharge from acute hospital to care home is a complex and life changing process. Previous work (Harrison et al 2017) found variation in documented discharge practice and identified the complexity of the patients involved. This study aimed to explore the perspectives of the individual and a range of key stakeholders who contribute to decision-making about discharge to care home.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy204.03
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 14THE EXTENSION OF THE EXISTING OLDER PERSONS ASSESSMENT AND LIAISON
           (OPAL) SERVICE IN AN EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT
    • Authors: Allen J; Mayl C, Bird K, et al.
      Abstract: Topic: We had an established older persons assessment and liaison (OPAL) practitioner service based in our Emergency Department (ED) with demonstrable improvements in patient outcomes with weekday, 8 am–6 pm, coverage. There was recognition the service could not see all frail older people within these working hours.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy211.14
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 28IMPLEMENTATION OF ROUTINE GRIP STRENGTH MEASUREMENT AS PART OF
           COMPREHENSIVE GERIATRIC ASSESSMENT IN A DAY HOSPITAL SETTING
    • Authors: Dodds R; Davies K, Boyle K, et al.
      Abstract: Topic: Weak grip strength is a key component of sarcopenia and frailty and has been used widely in ageing research. There is growing interest in the use of grip strength in routine clinical care, for example to identify those who stand to benefit most from diet and exercise interventions. Our aims were to assess the feasibility of implementing grip strength in a day hospital and to assess the prevalence of weak grip strength in this setting.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy211.28
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 55PROJECT FOR VASCULAR GERIATRICIAN INPUT
    • Authors: Gupta S; Shah S, Alimami F.
      Abstract: Objective: We did a pilot project in a DGH to see if a geriatrician input for elderly vascular surgical patients altered the clinical outcome. So far no such service existed for any of the surgical patients in this trust.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy211.55
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 125WHAT ARE THE NEEDS AND PREFERENCES OF PEOPLE WITH PARKINSON’S AND
           THEIR INFORMAL CAREGIVERS FOR THE EFFECTIVE SELF-MANAGEMENT OF FALLING, AS
           PERCEIVED BY HEALTHCARE PROFESSIONALS' A QUALITATIVE STUDY
    • Authors: Owen C; Dennison L, Kirby S, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Falls are common in Parkinson’s disease, and a recognised research priority. This qualitative study aimed to establish healthcare professionals (HCPs) views of the experiences, needs and preferences of people with Parkinson’s (PwP) who fall, and their informal caregivers.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy205.02
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 41CARE HOMES LEARNING TOGETHER INITIATIVE: A COLLABORATIVE APPROACH TO
           CARE HOME MEDICINE
    • Authors: Robinson P; Steel A, Hopwood H, et al.
      Abstract: Aims: Identify residents with challenging Medical and/or Psychological problems in Residential Care and apply Principles of Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment; and compare this structured approach to best practice guidelines (Enhanced Health in Care homes – NHS England) and combine with education sessions to enhance multi-professional learning.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy211.41
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 97DELAYED TRANSFER OF CARE: IMPROVING OUTCOMES BY PROCESS INNOVATION IN A
           DISTRICT GENERAL HOSPITAL
    • Authors: Spake C; Williams A, Matthews D, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Delayed transfers due to social care have risen steeply since 2014. However, the majority of delays (58 per cent in 2016/17) are still attributed to the NHS. Delayed discharges are associated with increased risk of infection, decreased mobility, low mood and reduced motivation, which can increase chances of readmission or institutionalisation. This compounds pressure on hospital bed flow and financial sustainability
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy202.05
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 75NEVER TOO LATE FOR DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS (DKA)
    • Authors: Shekaraiah T; Evans P.
      Abstract: Background: Type 1 diabetes in the elderly is rarely reported. An extensive review of the literature yielded limited reports of new-onset type 1 diabetes in elderly patients. We present one such case in a 77year old female.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy210.02
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 109A GROUNDED THEORY APPROACH TO UNDERSTANDING THE ROLE OF MEDICATION
           SAFETY WITHIN A HOSPITAL EARLY DISCHARGE TEAM
    • Authors: Tomlinson J; Silcock J, Karban K, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: National priorities such as emergency department (ED) targets, increasing workload pressures in acute Trusts and social care and financial penalties for 30 day hospital readmissions have created a drive to facilitate safer early discharge. A Northern hospital’s Early Discharge Team (EDT) of nurses and therapists (n = 8) pro-actively supports the timely discharge of older patients from the ED and acute admissions wards. There is compelling evidence that EDTs are effective (Parsons et al., Age and Ageing 2018; 47: 288–294), however their role within medication safety has not been defined. This project aimed to explore the role of this EDT in supporting older patients with their medication.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy204.02
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 135Dysphagia and pneumonia in older stroke inpatients admitted to a
           geriatric ward in a tertiary Malaysian Teaching Hospital
    • Authors: Karthigayan A; Tan K.
      Abstract: Introduction: Post-stroke dysphagia (PSD), defined as difficulty swallowing after a stroke, is a common complication in the early phase of an acute stroke. It affects 37–78% of stroke survivors, depending on the sensitivity of the technique used. It is an important risk factor for pneumonia within the first days after stroke and previous studies reported increased risk of mortality in the acute phase.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afz001.01
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 27THE WEYMOUTH AND PORTLAND INTEGRATED CARE HUB
    • Authors: Dharamshi R; Persey H, Scourfield K.
      Abstract: Background: The Weymouth and Portland Hub builds on the model of integrated community care developed in Bridport and presented at the BGS Spring Conference 2016(1).
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy211.27
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 54IMPROVE THE DIAGNOSIS AND MANAGEMENT OF DELIRIUM BY USING 4AT IN
           COMPREHENSIVE GERIATRIC ASSESSMENT
    • Authors: Sivagnanam T; Galusko V, Verma A, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Delirium is a major presenting factor in older people requiring hospital admission. NICE guidance recommends early identification and management of delirium can improve patients’ outcome. There was no local delirium assessment tool in the clerking proforma to help in the management plan in this hospital.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy211.54
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 13THE FRAILTY FLYING SQUAD HOTLINE: DIRECT REFERRAL FROM PARAMEDICS TO THE
           ACUTE HOSPITAL FRAILTY SERVICE. REPORT OF AN INITIAL PDSA CYCLE
    • Authors: Robson G; Hammond-Williams J, Richards K, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: We identified a group of frail older adults who required paramedic assistance but might not need to attend the Emergency Department (ED). Although paramedics can access alternative options to keep patients at home, sometimes this is not possible.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy211.13
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 96A PRELIMINARY STUDY OF THE CLINICAL OUTCOMES OF ACUTELY UNWELL PATIENTS
           WITH DEMENTIA: ANEURIN BEVAN UNIVERSITY HEALTH BOARD, WALES (UK)
    • Authors: Duric D; Musa S, Rasuly A, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Patients with dementia often have other associated medical co-morbidities which directly or indirectly could result in poorer outcomes. The National Audit of Dementia (NAD) in the UK showed a wide variation in the quality and approach of care for acutely unwell patients with dementia. The objective of this study is to record the demographics and patient characteristics to understand and benchmark clinical outcomes of acutely unwell dementia patients admitted across three acute sites within Aneurin Bevan University Health Board, Wales (UK).
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy202.04
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 74CLASSIFICATION OF OLDER AGE PATIENTS WITH TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS IN
           TERMS OF SEVERITY AND GLUCOSE LOWERING THERAPY NEEDS USING LATENT CLASS
           ANALYSIS
    • Authors: Christiaens A; Hermans M, Boland B, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Older patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) represent a heterogeneous group regarding their metabolic profile. It complicates glucose-lowering-therapy’s (GLT) choice and management, as it should be adjusted to this severity of T2DM. This study aimed to identify subgroups existing among older patients with T2DM.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy210.01
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 124WHAT ARE THE NEEDS AND PREFERENCES OF PEOPLE WITH PARKINSON’S AND
           THEIR INFORMAL CAREGIVERS FOR THE EFFECTIVE SELF-MANAGEMENT OF
           FALLING' A MIXED METHODS STUDY
    • Authors: Owen C; Dennison L, Gaulton C, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Falls are common in Parkinson’s disease, and a recognised research priority. This mixed methods study aimed to establish the experiences, needs and preferences of people with Parkinson’s (PwP) who fall, and their informal caregivers, for the effective self-management of falls. PwP with cognitive impairment (CI)/ dementia were included.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy205.01
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 108ABNORMAL DIURNAL BLOOD PRESSURE VARIABILITY IN PATIENTS WITH RECENT
           DELIRIUM
    • Authors: Shanahan E; Carew S, Costelloe A, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Delirium is a common condition whose underlying pathophysiology is poorly understood. We hypothesise that autonomic impairment, through altering cerebral perfusion, plays a role in the development of delirium. Under normal circumstances night-time BP is 10–20% lower than daytime BP. This represents a reduction in sympathetic activity. Alterations in dipping status have previously been shown to be associated with cognitive impairment (CI) and cerebral small vessel disease. We aimed to identify if there was an association between delirium and BP dipping status.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy204.01
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 40IDENTIFICATION AND REFERRAL OF FRAIL ELDERLY SURGICAL PATIENTS TO THE
           ELDERLY CARE ASSESSMENT TEAM (ECAT)
    • Authors: Pepper O; Japp D.
      Abstract: Evidence Base: Frail elderly patients have poor outcomes after surgery; surgical procedures are higher risk, there is an increase in medical complications and poorer cognitive outcomes (Wilkinson K, Martin IC, Gough MJ, NCEPOD, 2010). Evidence suggests improved outcomes in these patients when proactively reviewed by specialist geriatric teams, notably reduction in medical complications, length of stay and mortality (Partridge J, Harari D, BJS, 2017). In the Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh, current access to specialist geriatric review is by referral to the Elderly Care Assessment Team (ECAT) using an intranet based referral form.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy211.40
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 53ADVANCED CLINICAL PRACTITIONERS AND THEIR ROLE IN DELIVERING CGA TO
           STREAMLINE THE MANAGEMENT OF PATIENTS LIVING WITH FRAILTY
    • Authors: Everett R; Collins P, Patel H.
      Abstract: Topic: Older people living with frailty are at risk of recurrent hospital admissions. CGA is associated with decreased morbidity and better cognition. As older people are susceptible to repeat assessments, frequent moves and treatment delays consequent to poorly integrated services, mechanisms to ensure personalised care plans remain responsive to patient’s needs after discharge are not always robust due to lack of clarity within the MDT of roles and responsibilities.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy211.53
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 12PYJAMA PARALYSIS
    • Authors: Rogerson F; Kendall C.
      Abstract: Aim: To measure the degree of deconditioning on the geriatric ward at Epsom General Hospital (EGH), in order to review the multi-disciplinary team (MDT) management of elderly patients, with a view to education to improve practice.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy211.12
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 95FRAILTY PREDICTS MEDICATION-RELATED HARM REQUIRING HEALTHCARE: A UK
           MULTICENTRE PROSPECTIVE COHORT STUDY
    • Authors: Parekh N; Ali K, Stevenson J, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Frailty has been under investigated as a risk factor for medication-related harm (MRH) in older adults[1]. We sought to determine whether frailty is independently associated with MRH in a large multicentre prospective cohort, the PRIME study.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy202.03
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 69CAN P1NP LEVELS AID DECISION MAKING IN PATIENTS WHO SUSTAIN A HIP
           FRACTURE WHILST ON BISPHOSPHONATE TREATMENT'
    • Authors: Wilkinson I; Griffiths S, Bandyopadhyay S, et al.
      Abstract: Topic: Procollagen-N-terminal-peptide (P1NP) is a bone formation marker. A level <35 ug/L can be used to demonstrate therapeutic response to bisphosphonate therapy. It is known that bone turnover markers sampled up to 3 days after a new fracture may not be altered from pre-injury levels with a subsequant rise so that levels are significantly elevated at 4 and 12 months.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy214.06
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 63A FRAILTY PROFILE FOR USE IN THE COMMUNITY: INCLUSION OF PSYCHOLOGICAL
           VARIABLES IMPROVES PREDICTION OF CARE NEEDS AND FALLS
    • Authors: Holland C; Garner I, O’Donnell J, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Frailty is defined as a state of high vulnerability for adverse health outcomes when exposed to a stressor. Previous studies have described accumulated deficits profiles of frailty, and their use to predict mortality and institutionalisation is well evidenced. However, community use of frailty assessment in non-medical facilities to inform social care support decisions, lifestyle and prevention strategies has been less explored. This paper describes the validation of a community-based frailty index based on self-declared diagnoses and objective assessments. Importantly, it includes psychological as well as physical variables.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy209.01
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 123PSYCHOMETRIC CHARACTERISTICS OF MULTIDIMENSIONAL ASSESSMENT TOOLS FOR
           THE OLDER ADULTS: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW
    • Authors: Cezar A; Vaz S, Rebustini F, et al.
      Abstract: Topic: Multidimensional instruments to assess health needs of older adults should be comprehensive and systematic, raising biopsychosocial information and identifying needs and resources to care management. To ensure the quality and effectiveness of the instruments, they must be valid and reliable.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy204.16
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 52IMPLEMENTING HOSPITAL ANTICIPATORY CARE PLANNING IN ACUTE ORTHOPAEDIC
           WARDS - A QUALITY IMPROVEMENT PROJECT
    • Authors: Mactier M; Bamford C, Waas A, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Up to 50% patients with neck of femur (NoF) fractures are deceased at one year. Mortality is only partly attributable to fracture, with frailty and co-morbidities conferring significant risk. Hospital Anticipatory Care Planning (HACP) is designed to guide interventions if patients deteriorate. It aligns well with the goals of Realistic Medicine, promoting individualised, patient-centred care to minimise harm and avoid futile treatment.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy211.52
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 11A FULL CYCLE AUDIT: ARE AMT AND ECG PERFORMED FOR THE CONSULTANT REVIEW
           ON A GERIATRIC ADMISSIONS WARD'
    • Authors: Dadey E; Tay H.
      Abstract: Topics: AMT (Abbreviated mental test) is a screening test to assess for acute confusion. Though there are limitations such as language barriers there is a 70–80% sensitivity and 71–90% specificity. There is increased validity in older populations and as delirium is common in unwell older patients, a baseline cognition is important. Delirium carries a high mortality of up to 26% and yet it is still under diagnosed and under recognised.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy211.11
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 26IMPLEMENTING THE COMPREHENSIVE GERIATRIC ASSESSMENT (CGA) AT UNIVERSITY
           HOSPITAL SOUTHAMPTON
    • Authors: Collins P; Everett R, Patel H.
      Abstract: Topic: Recent research indicates that older people admitted to hospital who receive a CGA may be more likely to be alive and in their own homes and are less likely to be in a nursing home in the next 3-12 months.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy211.26
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 39PROACTIVE IDENTIFICATION, ASSESSMENT AND TREATMENT OF MODERATELY FRAIL
           PATIENTS IN NORTH ISLINGTON
    • Authors: McGinley H; Curran P.
      Abstract: Topic: Frailty affects 10% of people over 65 and 25–50% of those over 85 (Clegg et al, Lancet, 2013, 381 868, 752–762). Frailty should be identified with a view to improving outcomes and avoiding unnecessary harm (www.bgs.org.uk, accessed 15/06/18). The proactive identification of patients with moderate frailty will allow earlier intervention and improved access to care in patients that may otherwise be missed.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy211.39
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 107YIELD OF CT BRAIN SCANS IN VERY ELDERLY PATIENTS WITH ACUTE CONFUSION:
           A RETROSPECTIVE STUDY AT A DISTRICT GENERAL HOSPITAL
    • Authors: Lloyd M; Currie H, Paneerselvam H, et al.
      Abstract: Background: Delirium is a common complaint in hospital with inpatient prevalence of delirium of up to 30 percent (Ryan et al, 2013). Many patients with delirium have neuroimaging performed, typically a CT Brain. Limited retrospective studies have shown that the yield of neuroimaging in this population is low (Hufschmidt et al, 2008)
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy203.02
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 94INCREASED PHYSICAL ACTIVITY LEVELS AMONG HOSPITALISED OLDER PEOPLE: THE
           ROLE OF TRAINED VOLUNTEERS
    • Authors: Lim S; Ibrahim K, Dodds R, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Sedentary behaviour among older inpatients is associated with increased risk of functional decline, institutionalisation and death. Studies have shown that exercise and mobility interventions can reduce the risks of some of these adverse effects. However, most studies use paid staff to deliver such interventions. We explored the feasibility and acceptability of training volunteers to promote increased physical activity among older inpatients.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy202.02
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 134HOSPITAL AT HOME REDUCES EARLY READMISSION RATES FOR OLDER PEOPLE WITH
           EXACERBATION OF COPD
    • Authors: Morgan C; Woodfield R, Noble D, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a significant healthcare burden, accounting for 1 in 8 hospital admissions and ~£180,000,000 of annual healthcare costs in Scotland. ‘Hospital at home’ provides an alternative to acute hospital admission by providing treatment treatment and rehabilitation at home, leading to greater patient satisfaction, avoidance of hospital admission-related harm, and has proven to be cost-effective for COPD. We compared 1 year patient outcomes following admission to hospital or ‘hospital at home’ for COPD exacerbation.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy208.01
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 25IMPLEMENTATION OF THE COMPREHENSIVE GERIATRIC ASSESSMENT (CGA) PROCESS
           IN AN ACUTE HOSPITAL IMPROVES THE QUALITY OF DISCHARGE
    • Authors: Collins P; Everett R, Patel H.
      Abstract: Topic: Older people frequently move between services and organisations and are therefore susceptible to the effects of multiple assessments and delays typical of poorly integrated services. CGA has been shown to reduce morbidity. However, mechanisms to ensure personalised care plans remain responsive to the patient’s needs after discharge are not always robust with lack of clarity of MDT roles and responsibilities.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy211.25
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 122CLINICIAN ATTITUDES REGARDING THE UTILITY OF FRAILTY TOOLS IN MANAGING
           OLDER ADULTS WITH END STAGE KIDNEY DISEASE: LITERATURE REVIEW AND SURVEY
           STUDY
    • Authors: Kumarasinghe A; Inderjeeth C, Maher S, et al.
      Abstract: Background: The incidence and prevalence of End Stage Kidney Disease (ESKD) in Australia is rising, with the fastest increase seen amongst older adults, above the age of 65 years. However, the rate of increase of the number of older adults on dialysis has slowed over the last five years. This maybe owing to emerging evidence of the limited benefit and potential deleterious effects of dialysis initiation in frail older adults. Frailty, a clinical syndrome of increased vulnerability to adverse health outcomes, is predictive of survival in the renal population. However, there is not yet a widely accepted frailty tool for routine use in managing older adults with ESKD.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy204.15
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 68COMPARISON OF MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY OUTCOMES OF FRACTURED HUMERUS WITH
           FRACTURED NECK OF FEMUR IN OLDER ADULTS
    • Authors: Bukkapatnam S; Peel N, Ward S, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Osteoporotic fractures are associated with significant morbidity and increased healthcare costs. While the outcomes of fractured neck of femur (NOF) are well documented, there is paucity of evidence regarding the impact of humeral fractures.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy214.05
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 51PROACTIVE FRAILTY MANAGEMENT WITHIN AN INTEGRATED CARE SYSTEM
    • Authors: Abbott L.
      Abstract: Topic: The Surrey Heath older population is projected to grow faster than the national average, meaning an increasing proportion of the population who may have additional care needs as a result of living with frailty. Identifying frailty as a long-term condition and providing anticipatory interventions provides an opportunity to meet the growth and demand for care services sustainably.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy211.51
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 10THE EFFECT OF ORAL ANTICOAGULATION ON MEETING BEST PRACTICE TARIFF
           TIME-TO-SURGERY TARGET FOR FRAGILITY HIP FRACTURES
    • Authors: Rabiu A; Moore A, Minney D, et al.
      Abstract: Background: Hip fractures have a 12-month mortality of 33% and an estimated annual care cost of £1 billion in the UK alone(1). NICE hip fracture guidelines(1) and the Best Practice Tariff (BPT) for fragility hip fractures(2) have been introduced to improve care and cost-effective management of these patients. The BPT encourages prompt surgery of all hip fractures within 36hrs from time of diagnosis(2) and the NICE guidelines state that surgery should not be delayed by correctible co-morbidity such as anticoagulation(1). The use of oral anticoagulants has been shown to delay time-to-surgery for hip fractures patients(3). Is the impact of oral anticoagulants on meeting the BPT large enough to warrant a change in how we manage these patients preoperatively'
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy211.10
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 38“HIP SPRINT” USING THE 2017 NATIONAL AUDIT OF PHYSIOTHERAPY TO
           DEVELOP QUALITY STANDARDS FOR PHYSIOTHERAPY AFTER HIP FRACTURE
    • Authors: Johansen A; Liddicoat M, Boulton C, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Hip fracture anaesthesia and surgery are now so successful that nearly all patients will get out of bed by the day after operation. However, their subsequent recovery of mobility and independence depends on the quality of care provided by the ward’s multidisciplinary team.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy211.38
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 93PRACTICES, ISSUES AND POSSIBILITIES AT THE INTERFACE BETWEEN GERIATRICS
           AND PALLIATIVE CARE: AN EXPLORATORY STUDY (INGAP)
    • Authors: Borgstrom E; Schiff R, Khan S, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: With the expansion of palliative care into non-malignant conditions, there is an increasing emphasis on inter-disciplinary working between geriatric and palliative care teams. This inter-disciplinary working has evolved organically and more needs to be known about current working practices. This is of policy and clinical interest as the elderly patient population continues to grow.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy202.01
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 133DEPRESSIVE SYMPTOMS ARE ASSOCIATED WITH PERCEIVED, NOT OBJECTIVE,
           EXERTION DURING EXERCISE IN EUROPEAN, INDIAN ASIAN AND AFRICAN-CARIBBEAN
           GROUPS
    • Authors: James S; Jones S, Tillin T, et al.
      Abstract: Background: Physical activity interventions are increasingly recognised to help reduce depressive symptoms; however, fatigue and perception of increased energy expenditure, often associated with depression, may be barriers to compliance. Whether this association differs between different ethnicities is unknown. This analysis investigates associations between depressive scores and perception of exertion and physiologically measured exertion during exercise in a tri-ethnic population of older adults.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy207.03
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 106EARLY LIFE RISK FACTORS FOR SYMPTOMS OF DEPRESSION AND ANXIETY IN LATER
           LIFE: ANALYSIS OF 4 COHORT STUDIES
    • Authors: Backhouse E; Shenkin S, McIntosh A, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Depression and anxiety are common at older ages and often appear as comorbid disorders. Common risk factors include disability, cognitive impairment and poor health however factors from early in life including prenatal life may also be important. Few studies have examined early life factors and symptoms of depression and anxiety in later life.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy203.01
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 67THE OLDER EMERGENCY GENERAL SURGERY PATIENT. FACTORS PRESENT AT THE TIME
           OF HOSPITAL ADMISSION THAT ARE PREDICTIVE OF DEATH AT 12-MONTHS: SALFORD
           POPS-GS
    • Authors: Vilches-Moraga A; Springall N, Rowley M, et al.
      Abstract: Objectives: Almost half of the patients admitted non-electively to general surgery are over 70-years of age. This study describes the demographic of older emergency general surgery (EGS) patients and factors that influence 12-month mortality in this population
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy214.04
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 121A RETROSPECTIVE COHORT STUDY: READMISSIONS AND MORTALITY OF PATIENTS
           DISCHARGED FROM IMC OVER A 12 MONTH PERIOD
    • Authors: Rabia M; Egbe M, Patel I, et al.
      Abstract: Objective: To measure the readmission and mortality rate of patients who have been discharged from intermediate care (IMC) and the association between, co-morbidities, poly-pharmacy, re-admission and mortality in intermediate care patients.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy204.14
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 24UTILISING PEER ASSESSMENTS FOR STAFF RECOGNITION AND MULTISOURCE
           FEEDBACK IN A MULTIDISCIPLINARY GERIATRICS TEAM
    • Authors: Obehi A; Omokhoa A.
      Abstract: Introduction and Intervention: We implemented a peer assessment project aimed at identifying outstanding staff in the Geriatrics Unit of University of Benin Teaching Hospital (UBTH), Nigeria. The assessment tool comprised 6 performance indictors drawn from the team’s standard operating procedures (SOPs): passion for holistic, patient-centred care of the elderly, communication skills, adherence to SOPs, organizational skills, flexibility and creativity in service delivery. The project was undertaken as an anonymized survey. Team members who had worked in the Unit for 12 months or more were eligible to be assessed, except for house officers who spent 12 weeks. Twenty one house officers, 17 nurses and 13 support staff were eligible. Data were analysed with Microsoft Excel software.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy211.24
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 9THERE AND BACK AGAIN: THE DEVELOPMENT OF AN AMBULATORY CARE PATHWAY FOR
           OLDER PEOPLE LIVING WITH FRAILTY THAT BEGINS AND ENDS IN THE PATIENT’S
           OWN HOME. PART 2: RESULTS OF A FOUR DAY PILOT
    • Authors: Attwood D; D’Arcy N, Shepherd J, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: HeaIth predictive modelling from part 1 of the study demonstrated that housebound older people accounted for 32% of GP unplanned admissions (238 unplanned bed days/month) in a locality with a population of 52,500. “High risk” clinical presentations resulting in hospitalisation were falls, shortness of breath, abdominal pain, acute confusion, and new/worsening immobility and incontinence. CCG data demonstrated a 20% reduction in length of stay in patients arriving at lunch time compared with late afternoon arrivals.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy211.09
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 37A QUALITY IMPROVEMENT PROJECT TO REDUCE INAPPROPRIATE BLOOD TESTING FOR
           HIP FRACTURE PATIENTS
    • Authors: Jackson E; Stowe S.
      Abstract: Introduction: All patients admitted to Airedale General Hospital (AGH) with a hip fracture are screened with blood tests for haematinic deficiency (ferritin, folate and vitamin B12) and thyroid function (TFTs). There is very little evidence to support this practice although NICE guidelines suggest urgent optimisation of any patients presenting with a hip fracture who are anaemic to avoid delays to surgery. It is known that untreated thyrotoxicosis is a risk factor for fragility fracture.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy211.37
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 92ANOREXIA IN OLDER PEOPLE AND ITS TREATMENT: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW
    • Authors: Cox N; Ibrahim K, Sayer A, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Appetite loss in older people, often termed ‘Anorexia of Ageing’ (AA), is common. Recognised consequences include undernutrition, sarcopenia, frailty, and in-hospital increased length of stay, morbidity and mortality. Identification and management of AA is important to optimise care of older people.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy201.01
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 50DO NOT ATTEMPT RESUSCITATION DECISIONS AND PATIENT CAPACITY
    • Authors: Whyte L; Yates L.
      Abstract: Topic: Do Not Attempt Resuscitation (DNAR) forms are commonly completed for frail elderly patients on admission to hospital. It is standard practice to involve the patient in these discussions, and recent court cases have ruled that failure to notify the patient and allow them opportunity to express their wishes and preferences is a breach of their human rights. However, it is not uncommon for elderly patients to lack capacity on admission due to delirium or underlying dementia. In Scotland, a patient lacking capacity is treated using the Adults With Incapacity Act 2000 (AWI). Where DNAR decisions are made using AWI, the care plan should be completed to state this.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy211.50
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 66INTRODUCING A NATIONAL PROGRAMME OF SCREENING WITH THE 4A TEST TO
           IDENTIFY DELIRIUM - THE COMMONEST COMPLICATION OF HIP FRACTURE SURGERY
    • Authors: Johansen A; Liddicoat M, Hannaford J, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Delirium is often poorly recognised by staff looking after patients with hip fracture. The National Hip Fracture Database (NHFD) have therefore adopted the 4A test (4AT) to encourage routine assessment and help improve staff understanding of a complication that can dominate patients’ hospital stay and recovery (Bellelli et al. Age Ageing 2014).
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy214.03
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 132EFFECTS OF DIURETICS ON COGNITIVE FUNCTIONS IN PATIENTS DIAGNOSED WITH
           DEMENTIA
    • Authors: Zamfirescu A; Aurelian S, Mirsu-Paun A, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: The literature regarding effects of antihypertensive medication on cognition is infused by controversy. Our objective was to examine the effect of antihypertensive medication as associated with specific anti-dementia medication on cognitive functioning: memory (MMSE, Clock Drawing Test), functionality (ADL, IADL), behaviour disorders (NPI-Q: Neuropsychiatric Inventory Questionnaire) and global deterioration (GDS Test -Reisberg) in time.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy207.02
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 120TO WHAT EXTENT ARE OLDER PEOPLE LIVING WITH CANCER INVOLVED IN THE
           DECISION-MAKING PROCESS REGARDING TREATMENT AND SUPPORT'
    • Authors: Lewis L; Farrington N, Patel H, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Improving cancer care for all is a priority. Comprehensive assessment is acknowledged as a useful means to identify comorbidities and functional challenges in older people living with cancer. Current studies mainly ascertain the benefits of risk identification and shared decision making amongst the cancer inter-professional team. Our aims were to examine the range and nature of literature exploring how and to what extent older people are involved in decision making relating to their cancer care.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy204.13
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 119CHARACTERISTICS AND OUTCOMES FOLLOWING EMERGENCY ADMISSION AMONGST
           OLDEST OLD IN A DISTRICT GENERAL HOSPITAL
    • Authors: King P; Brooke C, Tiwari D.
      Abstract: Background: In the last decade emergency admissions of older adults have risen by 50% among those ≥90 years compared to a 10% increase in the 65–69 year age-group. Total number of bed days following emergency admission have decreased for people aged 65–84 but increased for those aged ≥85 years. We aimed to understand characteristics and outcomes following emergency admissions amongst the oldest old.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy204.12
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 36THE APPROPRIATENESS OF LIDOCAINE PATCH CLINICAL USE AT THE ROYAL
           LIVERPOOL AND BROADGREEN UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS NHS TRUST: A QUALITY
           IMPROVEMENT PROJECT
    • Authors: Chen-Turner C; Johnston M.
      Abstract: Aim: This Quality Improvement Project (QIP) aimed to evaluate and improve the clinical appropriateness of lidocaine patch usage in the Clinical Gerontology department at the Royal Liverpool and Broadgreen University Hospitals NHS Trust (RLBUHT). The only approved indication for lidocaine patch prescribing at RLBUHT is post herpetic neuralgia.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy211.36
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 91IS THERE A ROLE FOR AN ORTHOGERIATRIC MODEL OF CARE IN THE MANAGEMENT OF
           VERTEBRAL FRAGILITY FRACTURES IN HOSPITAL
    • Authors: Ong T; Sahota O, Gladman J.
      Abstract: Introduction: Patients admitted to hospital with vertebral fragility fractures (VF) have significant pain, disability and are at risk of poor outcomes. Coordinated multidisciplinary orthogeriatric care (OG) for hip fractures has led to improved outcomes. This study aims to develop the theoretical framework if there is a role for OG for hospitalised VF patients.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy200.08
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 105PHYSICIANS’ ATTITUDES TOWARDS DEPRESCRIBING
    • Authors: Chan H; Chen Y, Cheong S.
      Abstract: Introduction: Deprescribing has been proposed to address the growing problem of polypharmacy. A local study involving patients attending public primary healthcare clinics in Singapore showed that majority of the patients were keen to have medications deprescribed if deemed appropriate by their prescriber. A survey of Vancouver physicians however showed that while most doctors were keen to deprescribe medications, prescription by another healthcare specialist was a barrier towards deprescribing. While this study was conducted overseas, there is paucity of literature available on the attitudes of doctors towards deprescribing in the local context. Hence this study aimed to elucidate physicians’ attitudes towards deprescribing.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy202.13
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 131UTILITY OF THE 4AT RAPID ASSESSMENT INSTRUMENT IN ASSESSMENT OF
           DELIRIUM AND COGNITIVE IMPAIRMENT IN ACUTE CARE
    • Authors: Shenkin S; Fox C, Goodacre S, et al.
      Abstract: Background: Delirium affects 15% of hospitalised patients and is linked with worse outcomes. More than 50% of patients with delirium also have dementia. The 4AT (4“A”s Test: Alertness, Attention (Months of the Year Backwards), Abbreviated Mental Test-4 to test orientation; Acute change) is a short (<2 min) delirium assessment tool incorporating brief cognitive testing designed for routine clinical use which does not require special training: www.the4AT.com. Primary objective: diagnostic accuracy of the 4AT for delirium detection in acute patients aged ≥70. Secondary objectives: comparative performance of Confusion Assessment Method (CAM); assess performance of individual 4AT test items in the 4AT in detecting dementia; to determine if 4AT scores predict outcomes.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy207.01
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 23EVALUATING THE FIRST OLDER PEOPLE’S EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT
    • Authors: Navaneetharaja N; Mitchell A, Honney K, et al.
      Abstract: Background: Older people frequently enter acute hospitals via the emergency department. This patient group are often frail, multi-morbid, and require a multidisciplinary approach to their care. In addition, it is estimated that numbers of people aged 85 and over will more than double in the next 20 years. These factors test the traditional paradigms of acute care services which must adapt to provide the best possible care for our older population.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy211.23
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 65PREVALENCE OF VITAMIN D DEFICIENCY IN ROMANIAN ELDERLY PATIENTS WITH
           OSTEOPOROSIS AND CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES
    • Authors: Zamfirescu A; Tabara C, Aurelian S, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Meta-analysis studies have shown an association between 25-hydroxyvitamin D deficiency and the prognosis of patients with osteoporosis and cardiovascular diseases. We analysed the relationship between cardiovascular diseases and vitamin D levels at a Romanian elderly hospital.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy214.02
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 8THE EFFECTIVENESS OF DELIVERING COMPREHENSIVE GERIATRIC ASSESSMENTS IN
           THE EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT
    • Authors: Nelson C; Abbott L.
      Abstract: Background: Given the significant rise in the number of older adults presenting to the Emergency Department (ED) with frailty and complex needs there is an urgency to explore new ways of working to support the increasing demand. The delivery of comprehensive geriatric assessments (CGAs), in the acute hospital setting has been shown to improve outcomes for older adults living with frailty. Evidence to-date has predominately focused on frailty units or wards led by geriatricians, with a lack of evidence supporting the delivery of CGAs in the ED.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy211.08
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 118URINALYSIS AND UTI IN GERIATRIC PATIENTS - A REVIEW OF PERFORMANCE IN A
           DISTRICT GENERAL HOSPITAL
    • Authors: Everson J; Gupta P, Kaneshamoorthy M, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Dipstick urinalysis is a cheap, quick, and simple bedside investigation. While there are issues with asymptomatic bacteriuria and potential inappropriate antibiotic use in the elderly, urinary tract infection (UTI) remains a common and potentially serious condition in these patients. Urinalysis can effectively exclude UTI (Devillé et al., BMC Urol, 2004, 4:4), and considering geriatric patients frequently present atypically with more non-specific signs and symptoms of infection (Gavazzi & Krause, The Lancet Infectious Diseases, 2002, 11:655), urinalysis remains worthwhile. As such we decided to review the use of urine dipsticks in our Trust.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy204.11
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 104GOAL SETTING FOR PATIENTS WITH MULTIMORBIDITY IN PRIMARY CARE: A
           CLUSTER RANDOMISED FEASIBILITY TRIAL
    • Authors: Steel N; Ford J, Lenaghan L, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Establishing patients’ goals, values and priorities is recommended for patients with multimorbidity by the National Institute of Health and Clinical Excellence amongst others. Goal setting has been used in rehabilitation and geriatric medicine, but there is little evidence of effectiveness or guidance about how to do it for general practitioners (GPs) and their patients. We aimed to assess the feasibility of GPs setting goals with patients with multimorbidity and at high risk of hospital admission, with a view to undertaking a future definitive trial.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy202.12
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 90EFFECTS OF ACTIVE VIDEO GAME TRAINING ON POSTURAL CONTROL OF OLDER
           ADULTS
    • Authors: Sessa M; Silva V, Testa D, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Falls are among the main causes of morbidity and mortality in individuals over 60 years of age. Although their multifactorial origin, reductions in muscle strength and balance are among the main predictors of future events. Evidence from literature suggests that postural instability increases with ageing, mainly during dual-task activities. So, exercise training that challenges both balance and cognitive abilities appears promising in maintaining postural control in older age.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy200.07
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 64LATE-ONSET RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS (OVER 60 YEARS OF AGE): CLINICAL,
           BIOLOGICAL, AND THERAPEUTIC FEATURES. ABOUT A RETROSPECTIVE STUDY
    • Authors: Zulfiqar A.
      Abstract: Introduction: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the most common type of chronic inflammatory rheumatism in adults. The objective of our study was to analyse its clinical, biological and therapeutic characteristics in subjects over 60 years old.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy214.01
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 73ACS IN ELDERLY “LONG TERM FUNCTIONAL OUTCOME AND TREATMENT PATTERN”:
           A PROSPECTIVE STUDY AT A TERTIARY CARE CENTRE
    • Authors: Kore V.
      Abstract: Introduction: Coronary artery disease is a major cause of death in the elderly all over the world and India. Even though evidence based therapies have improved the outcomes as a whole, outcomes in the elderly are equivocal.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy197.04
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 7A NEW VIRTUAL WARD; ASSESSING ITS IMPACT ON ELDERLY PATIENTS IN THE POOLE
           NORTH LOCALITY IN POOLE, UK
    • Authors: Jefferson-Loveday C.
      Abstract: Topic: Dorset has an expanding elderly population above the national average. Poole North locality implemented a new virtual ward in September 2017. Virtual wards provide patient centred multi-disciplinary case management for vulnerable and complex elderly patients. Virtual wards aim to prevent unplanned hospital admissions and long inpatient hospital stays, both of which are associated with high infection rates, falls and mortality.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy211.07
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 117ADVANCED AGE AND THE PRESENTATION OF FRAILTY, RATHER THAT SINGLE SYSTEM
           DIAGNOSES, ARE THE MAIN PREDICTORS OF INPATIENT LENGTH OF STAY: A
           RETROSPECTIVE LINEAR MULTIPLE REGRESSION ANALYSIS OF 23,151 ADMISSION
           EPISODES
    • Authors: Li H; Taylor M.
      Abstract: Introduction: To aid discharge planning we have investigated the accuracy of the predicted length of stay (pLOS) in a district general hospital. To improve the accuracy of the pLOS we have developed a computer algorithm to generate a pLOS from data on an electronic patients tracking application “Tracker”. It recorded data on dates and times of arrival, referral, clerking, “Post-take” review and discharge. Tracker also collected demographic data, predicted length of stay (pLOS) and diagnoses (within free text fields). Frailty was screened for. As part of this process it was decided to see if there were any variables identifiable at the time of admission that would be predictive of a longer hospital stay.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy204.10
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 22A TRIAL OF A FRAILTY IN-REACH TEAM INTO A GENERAL MEDICAL ADMISSIONS
           UNIT AT LINCOLN COUNTY HOSPITAL
    • Authors: Kessler M; Daniels L, Birch D, et al.
      Abstract: Background: The Frailty Assessment Unit (FAU) at Lincoln County Hospital is a 19 bedded ward aimed at providing a ‘front door’ service for frail older patients who have a short length of stay (<72hrs). Previous pilots have demonstrated that only 50% of suitable patients are admitted to FAU.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy211.22
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 49MARKERS OF CLINICAL COMPLEXITY IN HOSPITALISED OLDER PATIENTS WITH
           PARKINSON’S DISEASE AND ASSOCIATIONS WITH OUTCOMES
    • Authors: Torsney K; Romero-Ortuno R.
      Abstract: Background: Older patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) admitted to the acute hospital are often clinically complex, but we do not know whether their clinical characteristics differ to those of non-PD admissions, or if PD is, in the face of routinely measured markers of clinical complexity, an independent predictor of outcomes. Our aim was to address this knowledge gap.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy211.49
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 103PERSPECTIVES ON QUALITY OF TRANSITIONAL CARE FROM HOSPITAL TO HOME FOR
           VULNERABLE OLDER PATIENTS
    • Authors: van Tol L; Kuipers S, Gussekloo J, et al.
      Abstract: Background: Good quality transitional care may partly prevent negative health outcomes and readmissions for vulnerable older patients after hospital discharge. For good quality care, patient satisfaction is important. However, little is known about factors of influence on vulnerable older patients’ satisfaction with transitional care. Therefore, the objective of this study is to explore possible factors of influence on vulnerable older patients’ satisfaction with the transfer of care from hospital to primary care.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy202.11
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 89REVIEW OF NECK OF FEMUR FRACTURE (NOFF) PATHWAY AT PRINCESS ALEXANDRA
           HOSPITAL
    • Authors: Kaneshamoorthy M; Snook J, Seguera P, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: It is well established achieving Best Practice Tariff for patients with NOFF improve patient outcomes. The care standards include, 1) patients with neck of femur fracture should be transferred to an orthogeriatric unit within 4 hours of admission 2) Surgery should be within 36 hours of admission and 3) Assessment by a geriatrician within 72 hours of admission. 4) Fracture prevention assessment (falls and bone health) 5) Multidisciplinary team rehab post-surgery.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy200.06
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 62DELIRIUM 5: AN INTERVENTION TO IMPROVE SAFETY AND RELIABILITY IN
           DELIRIUM CARE
    • Authors: Sommerville P; Rossdale J, Pye C, et al.
      Abstract: Topic: Delirium is extremely common and associated with significant morbidity, including falls. In out trust, cognitive impairment, including delirium, is associated with 40−50% of all inpatient falls. Incident reviews of falls with serious injuries revealed missed opportunities in the recognition and management of delirium.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy211.62
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 72THE EFFICACY, SAFETY AND ACCEPTABILITY OF NON-PHARMACOLOGIC THERAPY FOR
           ORTHOSTATIC HYPOTENSION IN OLDER PEOPLE: A MIXED METHODS STUDY
    • Authors: Robinson L; Gibbon J, Newton J, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Orthostatic hypotension (OH) is a common and debilitating condition. Older people have expressed a preference for non-pharmacologic therapies over drug therapies. The current evidence base for its treatment is poor, particularly in older people. Aim: Determine the safety, efficacy and acceptability of single and combination therapies for OH in older people.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy197.03
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 35DELIRIUM CLINIC: THINKING OF DELIRIUM AS THE TIA OF DEMENTIA
    • Authors: Mitchell S; Saber S, Shafiq S, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Delirium is a neuropsychiatric syndrome of acute onset. Symptoms include fluctuating cognition, memory, and inattention. Delirium is linked to increased morbidity and mortality in the elderly population, and causes include infection, drugs and metabolic abnormalities. Delirium and dementia symptoms overlap, and patients may have both conditions. At Barking Havering and Redbridge Hospital Trust, a unique delirium clinic run by a geriatrician and psychiatric consultant has been developed.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy211.35
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 130PREVALENCE OF ANTICHOLINERGIC DRUG USE IN OLDER ADULTS WITH DEMENTIA IN
           A LARGE TERTIARY HOSPITAL IN SINGAPORE
    • Authors: Mamun K; Chen L, Fong T, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: The use of anticholinergic drugs is controversial in patients diagnosed with dementia due to increased risk of cognitive impairment and psychosis in this population. Anticholinergic drugs are often involved in explicit criteria for inappropriate prescribing in older adults. However, the extent of anticholinergic drug use in Singapore General Hospital’s patient population is unknown.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy206.03
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 116WHAT FACTORS KNOWN AT THE TIME OF ADMISSION ARE PREDICTIVE OF INCREASED
           MORTALITY: A RETROSPECTIVE LINEAR MULTIPLE REGRESSION ANALYSIS OF
           ADMISSION DATA FROM 23,151 NEW PATIENT EPISODES
    • Authors: Li H; Taylor M.
      Abstract: Introduction: An in-house tool, “Tracker”, was developed. It recorded data on dates and times of arrival, referral, clerking, “Post-take” review and discharge. Tracker also collected demographic data, predicted length of stay (pLOS) and diagnoses (within free text fields). Frailty was screened for. It was considered that these data would enable us to explore factors associated with increased mortality.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy204.09
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 102GERIATRIC VULNERABILITY IN OLDER EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT PATIENTS
           ACCORDING TO ELECTRONIC HEALTH RECORDS
    • Authors: Blomaard L; Korpershoek B, Lucke J, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Older emergency department (ED) patients often have complex care needs and are at increased risk of adverse outcomes. Guidelines indicate that evaluation of geriatric vulnerability can lead to improved outcomes for older patients by optimizing care. The aim of this study was to assess the current registration of the risks in social, physical and cognitive domains as a proxy for clinician’s awareness of geriatric vulnerability.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy202.10
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 21DOES A COMPREHENSIVE GERIATRIC ASSESSMENT (CGA) WARD-ROUND PROFORMA WORK
           IN A BUSY DISTRICT GENERAL HOSPITAL (DGH)'
    • Authors: Quyn N; Kaneshamoorthy M, Jegard J, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: It is well established doing a CGA improves care for geriatric patients1. They are less likely to suffer deterioration and are more likely to be alive in their own home1. The aim is to look at CGA implementation on Geriatric wards.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy211.21
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 88SHOULD NECK OF FEMUR FRACTURES (NOFF) BE ADMITTED UNDER JOINT CARE - A
           REVIEW OF A NOVEL HIP FRACTURE PATHWAY AT PRINCESS ALEXANDRA HOSPITAL
    • Authors: Snook J; Kaneshamoorthy M, Seguera P, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: In Princess Alexandra Hospital, a novel approach to manage neck of femur fractures was introduced. Originally, NOFF patients were seen on different wards, and these patients had a high mortality rate. In September 2009 a new hip fracture pathway was introduced where NOFF patients were seen jointly from admission by the medical and orthopaedic teams. NOF patients were streamlined to an orthogeriatric hip fracture unit.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy200.05
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 6THINK GOLD STANDARD FRAMEWORK, IMPROVE END OF LIFE CARE
    • Authors: Ghouri B; Farooq M.
      Abstract: Introduction: The gold standards framework (GSF) is a national protocol which helps clinicians to recognise when a patient is approaching the end of life. The primary aim is to ensure that patients receive the best care at the end of life and also a fast track access to palliative care services.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy211.06
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 34ASSESSMENT OF PHARMACOLOGICAL APPROACHES IN BEHAVIOURAL AND
           PSYCHOLOGICAL SYMPTOMS OF DEMENTIA WITH OR WITHOUT SPECIALIST INPUT
    • Authors: Singh S; Abas T, Quinn P, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Behavioural and psychological symptoms (BPSD) of dementia occur in most patients with dementia and can have debilitating outcomes during acute hospital admissions. These have been associated with a poorer prognosis, with both cognitive and functional decline. Management of BPSD can be challenging for physicians and healthcare teams. Despite evidence of limited efficacy, psychotropic medications such as benzodiazepines and atypical anti-psychotic medications are widely used as a first line treatment for those with BPSD.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy211.34
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 48IS ADVANCED CARE PLANNING HELPING OLDER COMMUNITY DWELLERS ACHIEVE THEIR
           PREFERRED PLACE OF CARE'
    • Authors: Honney K; Mitchell A, Nash H, et al.
      Abstract: Background: Recent advancements in palliative medicine have raised the profile of advance care planning (ACP). This is common practice in patients with a terminal cancer diagnosis but less established in the frail, elderly population (Detering K et al. BMJ 2010;340:c1345).
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy211.48
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 71PRE-CAPILLARY PULMONARY HYPERTENSION OF THE ELDERLY: ABOUT A
           RETROSPECTIVE STUDY
    • Authors: Zulfiqar A.
      Abstract: Introduction: Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a serious disease, complicating many common pathologies. PH seems to be increasing in elderly patients, but it is poorly studied. The aim of this study was to describe the features of precapillary PH in elderly patients and compare them to the features of younger patients.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy197.02
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 129DEPRESCRIBING INTERVENTIONS AND THEIR IMPACT ON MEDICATION ADHERENCE IN
           COMMUNITY-DWELLING OLDER ADULTS WITH POLYPHARMACY: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW
    • Authors: Ulley J; Ali A, Harrop D, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Polypharmacy, and the associated adverse drug events such as non-adherence to prescriptions, is a common problem for elderly people living with multiple comorbidities. Deprescribing, i.e. the gradual withdrawal from medications with supervision by a healthcare professional, is regarded as a means of reducing adverse effects of multiple medications, including non-adherence. This systematic review examined the evidence for deprescribing as an effective strategy for improving medication adherence amongst older, community dwelling adults.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy206.02
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 115TRIAL WITHOUT CATHETER: THE ROLE OF BLADDER FILLING PRIOR TO REMOVAL OF
           URETHRAL CATHETERS. A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW OF RANDOMISED CONTROLLED TRIALS
    • Authors: Thayabaran D; Hindley E, Schiff R.
      Abstract: Scope: Urinary catheters are commonly used with hospital prevalence highest in patients over 70. In acute care, the risk of catheter-associated urinary tract infections significantly rises after two days with associated risks of sepsis, death, and estimated NHS costs of £1700/episode.[1] New initiatives are needed to minimise catheter-related harm including delirium and functional decline in older adults. Bladder filling with fluid prior to catheter removal presents a possible technique to facilitate early removal. However the clinical effectiveness of this procedure remains unclear.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy204.08
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 101OLDER PATIENTS' SATISFACTION WITH EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT CARE
    • Authors: Blomaard L; van Baarle F, Lucke J, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Patient-centred care is especially important for the growing numbers of older emergency department (ED) patients, because their complex health care needs may require other outcomes than usually investigated. We therefore investigated satisfaction of older patients with ED care as a starting point to improve care for this patient group.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy202.09
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 20IS A SCAN PART OF THE PLAN' A STUDY EVALUATING THE USE OF MYOCARDIAL
           PERFUSION SCANS (MPS) AS A PREOPERATIVE ASSESSMENT TOOL TO ASSESS
           CARDIOVASCULAR RISK IN PATIENTS WHO UNDERGO ENDOVASCULAR ANEURYSM REPAIR
           (EVAR)
    • Authors: Redgrave L; Stopher L, Currigan D, et al.
      Abstract: Aims: The vascular geriatric service runs as part of a multi-disciplinary team optimising the care of peri-operative vascular patients. This study aims to ascertain whether the current use of MPS in elective EVAR patients pre-operatively is appropriate.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy211.20
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 87MOVING MEDICINE - A NATIONAL PHYSICAL ACTIVITY RESOURCE FOR FALLS AND
           FRAILTY
    • Authors: Kerss H; Neale J, Clelland P, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Evidence overwhelmingly supports the role of Physical Activity and Exercise in the prevention and treatment of a range of chronic health conditions. Healthcare professionals commonly cite barriers such as knowledge, skills, time and confidence in utilising physical activity promotion with their patients. Educational resources specifically supporting evidence based disease specific physical activity counselling in the UK are lacking.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy200.04
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 61ELECTRONIC DO NOT ATTEMPT CARDIO-PULMONARY RESUSCITATION (DNACPR): TOO
           FAR' AN EVALUATION OF PRACTICE WITHIN GERONTOLOGY AT KING’S COLLEGE
           HOSPITAL (KCH), LONDON, UK
    • Authors: Harrington L; Price K, Rampota C, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: DNACPR decisions are an ethical and legal challenge (Fritz, Slowther & Perkins. BMJ2017;356:813) with great emphasis placed on quality communication, decision-making and documentation for patient safety (BMA Resuscouncil, 2014). Following the introduction of a DNACPR toolbar within electronic records (Johnson, Whyte, Loveridge. BMJ2017;6), and a staff-survey demonstrating uncertainty around resuscitation, our study aimed to evaluate practice.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy211.61
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 5FRAILTY ASSESSMENT IN PATIENTS UNDERGOING CARDIOVASCULAR INTERVENTIONS: A
           QUALITY IMPROVEMENT PROJECT
    • Authors: Fawzy A; Lakhani H, Wyrko Z.
      Abstract: Topic: With an ageing population, more elderly patients are undergoing elective surgery. Frailty is an ageing-associated independent risk factor for post-operative morbidity and mortality. It is important to recognise frailty to identify the vulnerable patients, avoid unnecessary harm and improve outcomes. The British Geriatrics Society recommends that patients should be assessed for frailty prior to surgical interventions. In this quality improvement project (QIP), we looked at whether the Rockwood Frailty Score (RFS) was appropriately used in the pre-operative assessment of cardiac patients.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy211.05
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 33BEST PRACTICE TARIFF FOR FRAGILITY HIP FRACTURES - A COMPLETED AUDIT
           CYCLE IN A DISTRICT GENERAL HOSPITAL
    • Authors: Walters S; Cuthbert R, Karaj J, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Fragility hip fractures are the most common serious injury in older people, costing the NHS and social care around £1 billion per year.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy211.33
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 70DID YOU MEAN TO MAKE ME BLEED' TREATING FRAIL OLDER PEOPLE WITH
           NSTEMI CARRIES A HIGH RISK OF BLEEDING
    • Authors: Wahab A; Michaels J, Ellenger K, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: NICE guidance recommends managing NSTEMI (Non-ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction) with dual antiplatelets and antithrombin therapy but asks clinicians to consider bleeding risk. Frail older people with co-morbidities such as anaemia, heart failure and chronic kidney disease are at higher risk of bleeding, and bleeding is associated with an increased risk of adverse outcomes and death. The risk of bleeding can be estimated using a scoring tool such as “CRUSADE.” We wished to investigate how older people with NSTEMIs treated in the elderly medicine department of a large teaching hospital, i.e. deemed not suitable to be cared for by cardiologists, were treated, and whether they suffered adverse bleeding outcomes.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy197.01
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 47A FULL CYCLE AUDIT: GET UP, GET DRESSED AND GET MOVING
    • Authors: Tay H; Junaid S, Wosu C.
      Abstract: Topics: EndPJParalysis is a campaign to encourage older hospital inpatients to sit out in a chair, get dressed and walk as much as possible to avoid deconditioning whilst in hospital. The aims of this audit were to identify the proportion of patients sitting out, getting dressed in home clothes and walking daily in an acute geriatric medical ward of unselected acute admission.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy211.47
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 114FRAILTY AS A PREDICTOR OF 12-MONTH MORTALITY IN OLDER PATIENTS
           UNDERGOING EMERGENCY LAPAROTOMY: A PROSPECTIVE STUDY
    • Authors: Rowley M; Paracha A, Khan H, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Older patients undergoing emergency laparotomy have high rates of in-hospital mortality but less is known about their long-term survival. Whilst frailty is an established predictor of poor outcomes, evidence supporting the use of frailty scores in predicting mortality is limited. This study describes the influence of dependency, frailty score and ASA score on long-term outcomes including 12-month mortality and readmission rates.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy204.07
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 19AN INNOVATIVE MULTIDISCIPLINARY MEDICINES REVIEW CLINIC FOR FRAIL OLDER
           PATIENTS WITH PROBLEMATIC POLYPHARMACY
    • Authors: Ralston L; Shelton K, Fletcher H.
      Abstract: Background: Comprehensive medication reviews for frail older people can resolve adverse drug reactions, improve quality of life, improve medication adherence and be cost saving (1). It is more effective when delivered as part of a multidisciplinary intervention (2) and although primarily performed in primary care, research suggests an outpatient setting may be appropriate (3).
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy211.19
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 100ADHERENCE TO GERIATRIC EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT GUIDELINES IN ROUTINE CARE
    • Authors: Blomaard L; Booijen A, Lucke J, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: There is growing interest in the complex health care needs of older people presenting to emergency departments (EDs). Geriatric Emergency Department (GED) guidelines provide recommendations on how to improve care for these patients. The aim of this study was to describe adherence to GED guidelines for older ED patients.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy202.08
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 128MEDICATION-RELATED HARM DUE TO NON-ADHERENCE MAY EXPLAIN THE
           RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN POLYPHARMACY AND MORTALITY
    • Authors: Parekh N; Ali K, Stevenson J, et al.
      Abstract: Introduction: Strong evidence exists for a relationship between polypharmacy and mortality1, independent of comorbidity. The mechanisms underlying this relationship are unclear. Medication-related harm (MRH) may occur due to non-adherence or adverse drug reactions. We sought to determine if MRH due to non-adherence or adverse drug reactions may explain the association between polypharmacy and mortality.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy206.01
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 86QUANTIFICATION OF THE IMPACT OF HIP FRACTURE AND THE OPERATIVE PROCEDURE
           ON PATIENTS’ BASIC MOBILITY IN THE EARLY POSTOPERATIVE PERIOD
    • Authors: Michael A; Swingewood N.
      Abstract: Introduction: Cumulated Ambulatory Score (CAS) is a tool to assess three aspects of basic mobility; get in and out of bed, sit to stand from a chair with armrests and indoor walking. Each activity is scored from 0-2 depending on whether the patient can perform it independently (2), a human assistance is needed (1) or the patient is unable to do it (0).
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy200.03
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 82A CONTRIBUTION TO THE AGEING SOCIETY BY INTERDISCIPLINARY EDUCATION: THE
           MASTER’S PROGRAMME ON VITALITY AND AGEING
    • Authors: Drewes Y; Bakker C, Schoenmakers A, et al.
      Pages: 21 - 22
      Abstract: Introduction: The world’s population is ageing. Ageing societies require innovative professionals enabled with knowledge of biological, individual and societal perspectives to enhance and improve the vitality of older people. Traditionally, education on these perspectives is taught in separate studies. To prepare students to contribute interdisciplinary to the healthcare sector in an ageing society, we developed the internationally 1-year Master’s programme on Vitality and Ageing (2016). The interdisciplinary interaction in the programme is fundamentally embedded by recruiting students from diverse health-related science studies and by offering interfaculty education. Two years after the start, we explore the diversity in admittance, student’s progress and the diversity in career prospects.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy198.07
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 81IMPROVING GERIATRIC DISCHARGE COMMUNICATIONS
    • Authors: Sivagnanam T; Galusko V, Verma A.
      Pages: 21 - 22
      Abstract: Background: Comprehensive geriatric assessments (CGA) are becoming an essential part of admission to the geriatric department. We have recently introduced the CGA and multidisciplinary team (MDT) meeting pro forma to collect information surrounding the patient care. Whilst it is important to ascertain these, keeping a permanent record of, and communicating them to the GP is essential for continuity of care.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy198.06
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 80POSTOPERATIVE DELIRIUM FOLLOWING CARDIOTHORACIC SURGERY: A NURSING
           PERSPECTIVE
    • Authors: Nayar S; Xavier K, Braude P.
      Pages: 21 - 22
      Abstract: Introduction: Postoperative delirium following cardiac surgery affects a significant proportion of patients over age 60. This is often under recognised by healthcare professionals and is associated with increased risk of mortality, nosocomial complications, poor functional recovery and long-term cognitive decline. The aim of our study was to determine nursing knowledge and perspective of delirium in cardiothoracic postoperative patients.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy198.05
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 79IS THERE SCOPE FOR SIMULATION TO TEACH COMMUNICATION SKILLS'
    • Authors: Kaneshamoorthy M.
      Pages: 21 - 22
      Abstract: Introduction: Communication skills are a key part of Geriatric Medicine. It is common for a clinician discuss advanced care planning or having to break bad news to patients and/or relatives. Despite a variety of teaching courses, it is done poorly in hospitals. I did a literature review to see if simulation can be used to improve communication skills.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy198.04
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 78POOR ATTITUDES TOWARDS OLDER PATIENTS AMONGST JUNIOR DOCTORS: THE
           CONTRIBUTION OF MEDICAL UNCERTAINTY
    • Authors: Ralston L; O’Rourke R.
      Pages: 21 - 22
      Abstract: Introduction: Work to improve doctors’ attitudes towards older patients (1) rarely explores why such attitudes exist; this is especially relevant for poor attitudes and their potentially deleterious effects on care (2). This qualitative study explored attitudes towards the older patient amongst junior doctors, from a range of specialities, in a single Trust.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy198.03
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 77OLDER PEOPLE SURGICAL OUTCOMES COLLABORATION: ACADEMIC TRAINING AND
           DEVELOPMENT
    • Authors: Tay H; Ablett A, Evans L, et al.
      Pages: 21 - 22
      Abstract: Introduction: OPSOC (www.opsoc.eu) is a collaboration of Surgeons, Geriatricians and Epidemiologists who have an interest in surgery in older people. Since 2013, data have been collected in Cardiff, Bristol, Glasgow, Manchester and Aberdeen. It now includes collaboration with centres at Belgium and US. We aim to improve care and outcomes for older surgical patients by carrying out multi- centre research studies, many of which were led by trainees or students.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy198.02
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
  • 76COMMUNITY GERIATRICS TRAINING IS INVALUABLE: A SURVEY OF GERIATRIC
           SPECIALTY TRAINEES
    • Authors: Rogans-Watson R; May-Miller H, Bell C, et al.
      Pages: 21 - 22
      Abstract: Background: There is an increasing call for community geriatricians to facilitate the care of frail, multi-morbid, older people in their own homes or care homes. Community geriatrics is a core component of the geriatric specialty training curriculum, but relatively few trainees have access to a dedicated community rotation. We conducted this survey of geriatric registrars to determine the need for and benefits of specific community training.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy198.01
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. Supplement_1 (2019)
       
 
 
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