Publisher: African Journals Online   (Total: 263 journals)

 A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

        1 2 | Last   [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

Showing 1 - 200 of 263 Journals sorted alphabetically
Abia State University Medical Students' Association J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Acta Structilia : J. for the Physical and Development Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Acta Theologica     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.282, CiteScore: 0)
Africa Development     Open Access   (Followers: 34, SJR: 0.155, CiteScore: 0)
Africa Sanguine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
African Anthropologist     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
African Crop Science J.     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
African Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.446, CiteScore: 1)
African J. of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
African J. of Biomedical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.145, CiteScore: 0)
African J. of Chemical Education     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
African J. of Clinical and Experimental Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.192, CiteScore: 0)
African J. of Cross-Cultural Psychology and Sport Facilitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
African J. of Drug and Alcohol Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.168, CiteScore: 0)
African J. of Economic Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
African J. of Educational Studies in Mathematics and Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
African J. of Food, Agriculture, Nutrition and Development     Open Access   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.115, CiteScore: 0)
African J. of Governance and Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
African J. of Health Professions Education     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
African J. of Infectious Diseases     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.243, CiteScore: 0)
African J. of Livestock Extension     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
African J. of Neurological Sciences     Open Access  
African J. of Physiotherapy and Rehabilitation Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
African J. of Reproductive Health     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.381, CiteScore: 1)
African J. of Rheumatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
African J. of Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
African J. of Sustainable Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
African J. of Traditional, Complementary and Alternative Medicines     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
African J. on Conflict Resolution     Open Access   (Followers: 27)
African Research Review     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
African Review of Economics and Finance     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
African Sociological Review : Revue Africaine de Sociologie     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Afrika Statistika     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Afrimedic J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Afrique Science : Revue Intl.e des Sciences et Technologie     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
AFRREV IJAH : An Intl. J. of Arts and Humanities     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
AFRREV LALIGENS : An Intl. J. of Language, Literature and Gender Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
AFRREV STECH : An Intl. J. of Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Agro-Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Agronomie Africaine     Full-text available via subscription  
Agrosearch     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Animal Research Intl.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Annales des Sciences Agronomiques     Full-text available via subscription  
Annals of African Surgery     Open Access  
Annals of Biomedical Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Annals of Humanities and Development Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Annals of Ibadan Postgraduate Medicine     Open Access  
Annals of Modern Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Arab J. of Nephrology and Transplantation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Archives of Medical and Biomedical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
ATBU J. of Environmental Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Bayero J. of Pure and Applied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Bio-Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Biokemistri     Open Access  
Botswana J. of Economics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Botswana J. of Technology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Bulletin of Animal Health and Production in Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Bulletin of the Chemical Society of Ethiopia     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.24, CiteScore: 1)
Cameroon J. of Experimental Biology     Open Access  
Central African J. of Medicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Communicate : J. of Library and Information Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 67)
Contemporary J. of African Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Counsellor (The)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Creative Artist : A J. of Theatre and Media Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Critical Studies in Teaching and Learning (CriSTaL)     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Dar Es Salaam Medical Students' J.     Open Access  
East African J. of Public Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
East African Medical J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.122, CiteScore: 0)
East African Orthopaedic J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
East and Central African J. of Pharmaceutical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
East and Central African J. of Surgery     Open Access  
Eastern Africa Social Science Research Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Ebonyi Medical J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Egyptian J. of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology     Full-text available via subscription  
Egyptian J. of Biology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Natural History     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
ESARBICA J. : J. of the Eastern and Southern Africa Regional Branch of the Intl. Council on Archives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Ethiopian J. of Agricultural Sciences     Open Access  
Ethiopian J. of Biological Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Ethiopian J. of Business and Economics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Ethiopian J. of Economics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Ethiopian J. of Education and Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Ethiopian J. of Environmental Studies and Management     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Ethiopian J. of Health Development     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.131, CiteScore: 0)
Ethiopian J. of Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.418, CiteScore: 1)
Ethiopian J. of Science and Technology     Open Access  
Ethiopian J. of the Social Sciences and Humanities     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Ethiopian Pharmaceutical J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Ethiopian Veterinary J.     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Filosofia Theoretica : J. of African Philosophy, Culture and Religions     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
FUTY J. of the Environment     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Ghana J. of Agricultural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Ghana J. of Development Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Ghana J. of Forestry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Ghana J. of Geography     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Ghana J. of Linguistics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ghana Library J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Ghana Medical J.     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.301, CiteScore: 1)
Ghana Mining J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Global Approaches to Extension Practice : A J. of Agricultural Extension     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Global J. of Agricultural Sciences     Full-text available via subscription  
Global J. of Educational Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Global J. of Engineering Research     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.109, CiteScore: 0)
Global J. of Environmental Sciences     Full-text available via subscription  
Global J. of Geological Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Global J. of Mathematical Sciences     Full-text available via subscription  
Global J. of Pure and Applied Sciences     Full-text available via subscription  
Global J. of Social Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Haramaya Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Highland Medical Research J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Huria : J. of the Open University of Tanzania     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Ibadan J. of Humanistic Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
IMTU Medical J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Information Manager (The)     Open Access   (Followers: 30)
Information Technologist (The)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Inkanyiso : J. of Humanities and Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Internet J. of Medical Update     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Applied Agriculture and Apiculture Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Basic, Applied and Innovative Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Community Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Engineering, Science and Technology     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Health Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Herbs and Pharmacological Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Medicine and Biomedical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.104, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Modern Anthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Pedagogy, Policy and ICT in Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Italian Studies in Southern Africa : Studi d’Italianistica nell’Africa Australe     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
J. de la Recherche Scientifique de l'Universite de Lome     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
J. for the Study of Religion     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
J. of Agricultural Extension     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.188, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Agricultural Research and Development     Full-text available via subscription  
J. of Agriculture and Food Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
J. of Agriculture and Social Research (JASR)     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
J. of Agriculture, Forestry and the Social Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
J. of Applied Biosciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Applied Science and Technology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
J. of Applied Sciences and Environmental Management     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Aquatic Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
J. of Community Medicine and Primary Health Care     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
J. of Computer Science and Its Application     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
J. of Development and Communication Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
J. of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Diabetes of South Africa     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.174, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Environmental Extension     Full-text available via subscription  
J. of Family Ecology and Consumer Sciences :Tydskrif vir Gesinsekologie en Verbruikerswetenskappe     Open Access  
J. of Health and Visual Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
J. of History and Diplomatic Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
J. of Language, Technology & Entrepreneurship in Africa     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Medical and Biomedical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.162, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Medicine and Biomedical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Meteorology and Climate Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
J. of Pharmaceutical and Allied Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
J. of Pharmacy & Bioresources     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.405, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Religion and Human Relations     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
J. of Research in Forestry, Wildlife and Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
J. of Research in National Development     Full-text available via subscription  
J. of Science and Sustainable Development     Full-text available via subscription  
J. of Science and Technology (Ghana)     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
J. of Social Development in Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
J. of the Ghana Science Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
J. of the South African Society of Archivists     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
J. of Tropical Microbiology and Biotechnology     Full-text available via subscription  
Jos J. of Medicine     Open Access  
KCA J. of Business Management     Open Access  
Kenya Veterinarian     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Kioo cha Lugha     Full-text available via subscription  
Lagos Historical Review     Full-text available via subscription  
Lagos Notes and Records     Full-text available via subscription  
Law, Democracy & Development     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Legon J. of the Humanities     Full-text available via subscription  
Lwati : A J. of Contemporary Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Madagascar Conservation & Development     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Makerere J. of Higher Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Malawi J. of Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Marang : J. of Language and Literature     Full-text available via subscription  
Medical J. of Zambia     Open Access  
Mizan Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Momona Ethiopian J. of Science     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
New Agenda : South African J. of Social and Economic Policy     Full-text available via subscription  
New Egyptian J. of Microbiology     Full-text available via subscription  
Nigeria Agricultural J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Nigerian Dental J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Nigerian Endocrine Practice     Full-text available via subscription  
Nigerian Food J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Nigerian Health J.     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Nigerian Hospital Practice     Full-text available via subscription  
Nigerian J. of Animal Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Nigerian J. of Biotechnology     Open Access  
Nigerian J. of Chemical Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Nigerian J. of Clinical Medicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Nigerian J. of Family Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Nigerian J. of Gastroenterology and Hepatology     Full-text available via subscription  
Nigerian J. of Guidance and Counselling     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Nigerian J. of Medicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Nigerian J. of Natural Products and Medicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Nigerian J. of Nutritional Sciences     Full-text available via subscription  
Nigerian J. of Paediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Nigerian J. of Parasitology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Nigerian J. of Physiological Sciences     Open Access   (SJR: 0.128, CiteScore: 0)
Nigerian J. of Psychiatry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)

        1 2 | Last   [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Nigerian Journal of Family Practice
Number of Followers: 1  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 2141-9884
Published by African Journals Online Homepage  [263 journals]
  • Editorial
    • Authors: Shabi Olabode
      Abstract: No Abstract
      PubDate: 2018-02-07
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Family physicians and research ethics in clinical practice
    • Authors: I.S. Bello, O.M. Shabi
      Abstract: No Abstract
      PubDate: 2018-02-07
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Prevalence and predictors of depression among women undergoing treatment
           for infertility at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital
    • Authors: A.A. Adelosoye, D.D. Uyagu, E.M. Obazee
      Abstract: Background: Depression is a significant form of psychological distress experienced by women suffering from infertility in our society. Itis worsened by the negative attitudes of family members, who in some cultures attribute the failure of the women to conceive, as women's problems only, while exonerating the male partners. This assumption can discourage efforts by the couple from seeking effective solution, and heighten the tension at home, thereby causing emotional responses which may lead to psychological distress like anxiety or depression among the women. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and predictors of depression among women undergoing treatment for infertility at the fertility clinics of University of Benin Teaching Hospital (UBTH).Methodology: A cross sectional descriptive study was carried out on 341 women attending the UBTH fertility clinics over a 3 months period, using a semi-structured interviewer administered questionnaire. A clinical diagnostic tool for depression (ZUNG's self depression assessment scale) used to diagnose and classify depression was included in the questionnaire in addition to information on demographics. The data collected was analysed using SPSS version 16.Result: The mean age of respondents was 36 (± 5.3) years. The prevalence of depression was found to be 42.5%. Of this, 64.2%, 30.4% and 5.4% had mild, moderate and severe depression respectively. There were statistically significant associations between depression status of the respondents and the following parameters; level of education (p=0.004), duration of infertility (p=0.007), type of family (p=0.017) and parity (p=0.022).Conclusion: The burden of depression in women with infertility is significant. It is therefore advocated that Gynecologists and other attending Physicians should look out for signs and symptoms of depression in women presenting with infertility with a view to offer them timely psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy treatment, promote good relationship in their homes thereby improving their quality of life and the outcome of their fertility treatment.Keywords: Depression, evaluation, fertility clinics and infertility
      PubDate: 2018-02-07
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Spirituality and adherence to antiretroviral drugs among HIV positive
           patients at Federal Medical Center, Keffi, Nigeria
    • Authors: R.A. Barminas, S Yohanna
      Abstract: Background to the study: Adherence to Antiretroviral Treatment (ART) is a major determinant of successful treatment outcomes among People Living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA). Poor drug adherence is a major problem in the care of HIV patients on antiretroviral treatment. Spirituality is one of the several factors that affects drug adherence among HIV positive patients. The link between spirituality and drug adherence has been found to differ among several studies. This study aimed to determine the association between spirituality and adherence to antiretroviral drugs among PLWHA at Federal Medical Centre, Keffi to improve treatment outcomes among them.Method: It was an observational, longitudinal study in which 215 consenting HIV positive patients aged 18 to 65 years who were on antiretroviral drugs were recruited through systematic random sampling technique. Socio-demographic characteristics, clinical history and physical examination findings were documented for each participant. The Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy- Spirituality (FACIT-Sp) tool was used to determine their level of spirituality. Participants were classified as having high or low spirituality. They were all followed up for three months during which they received routine care at the antiretroviral clinic. At the end of the study period, the level of adherence to antiretroviral drugs was assessed using the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS).Results: Most of the study participants were between 36 and 45 years old. Majority were females, married, Christians and unskilled workers with no formal education who earned less than 20,000 naira per month. Majority (69%) of the study participants also had a high level of spirituality. 46.7% of them had a high level of medication adherence while 27.6%and 26.3% had medium and low adherence respectively. There was a statistically significant association between level of spirituality and adherence to ARVs (χ2: 5.928, p: 0.015). A higher level of spirituality was associated with better levels of medication adherence.Conclusion: High level of spirituality is a significant predictor of high level of adherence to antiretroviral medications. It is therefore recommended that spirituality should be routinely assessed as part of the initial evaluation of patients being enrolled for antiretroviral treatment.Keywords: spirituality, adherence, antiretroviral drugs, HIV positive
      PubDate: 2018-02-07
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Hepatitis B and C coinfection with human immunodeficiency virus in a
           tertiary centre in Jos, North Central, Nigeria
    • Authors: Chima A.A. George, O.J. Adetutu, Edwin Oseni-Momodu
      Abstract: Background: Human immunodeficiency virus HIV, hepatitis B and hepatitis C co-infection have become a global health challenge. The situation is made worse by the fact that they share the same route of transmission and co-infection increase's progression, complications and outcome illness. Prompt recognition of the co-infections leads to a well-timed early treatment with better outcome. Lack of funding prevented Hepatitis B and C routine screening among HIV positive clients at the inception of the HIV/AIDS programme in our facility. Our aim was to discover the baseline data in our local populace to enable us understand the magnitude of the problem in our facility and Jos metropolis in particular.Materials and Methods: A 5-year retrospective review (from January 1st, 2009 to December 31st; 2013) was carried out. Subjects who previously tested positive to HIV and were on highly active anti-retroviral therapy in Bingham University Teaching Hospital (BHUTH), Jos were recruited into the study. The subjects' were then tested for Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and the anti – HCV antibody. All data were collated and analysed with SPSS version 22.Results: A total of 2,224 subjects were tested for hepatitis B and C viral presence. Females were 1,527 (68.7%) while 697 (31.7%) were males, giving a male: female ration of 1:2.2. Out of the 2,224 screened, 297 were HBV positive, 95 had HCV infection while 7 of the subjects had both HBV and HCV coexisting with HIV. The prevalence of HbsAg was 13.4% while the prevalence of HCV was 4.3% whereas only 0.31% the three infections coexisting.Conclusion: Co-infection of HIV with Hepatitis B and or C infection in our environment is significant, making it imperative that HBV and HCV screening be carried out among HIV positive clients routinely to enhance early treatment and better quality of care.Keywords: Co-infection, Prevalence, Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) and Hepatitis C Virus (HCV)
      PubDate: 2018-02-07
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Pattern of media literacy skills and internet health information
           utilization among in-school adolescents in Osun State, south-west, Nigeria
           
    • Authors: I.N. Shabi, F.O. Oyewusi, O.M. Shabi
      Abstract: Background: Adolescents due to their impressionability and gullibility are particularly vulnerable to media influence.Objectives: The study set out to determine media literacy skill levels and its relationship with socio-demographic profile and the purpose of Internet health information by in-school adolescents in Osun State, Nigeria.Methodology: A descriptive cross-sectional survey using multi-stage sampling method. A calculated sample size of 1,200 adolescents from 6 public and 6 privately owned high schools were selected for the study.Result: Findings revealed that majority, 798(67.3%), of respondents were in the mid adolescence stage with as much as 792(66.8%) belonging to the lower social class IV. A little over half (51.9%) reported good media literacy skill levels. There were statistically significant relationships (p< 0.50) between age, gender, socio-economic class and media literacy skills. Sexuality issues ( x̄ =3.09), other nutritional issues ( x̄ =3.08) and body size, shape, body image or physique (x̄ =2.91) were affirmed as ranking highest among the purpose for Internet health information use by the respondents.Keywords: media literacy, social class, adolescence, in-school adolescents, gender
      PubDate: 2018-02-07
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Socio-demographic and clinical factors affecting adherence to
           antihypertensive medications and blood pressure control among patients
           attending the family practice clinic in a tertiary hospital in northern
           Nigeria
    • Authors: O.A. Ibrahim, F.A. Olaniyan, A.G. Sule, B.Y. Ibrahim
      Abstract: Background: The prevalence of hypertension is high while the level of blood pressure control is low in developing countries such as Nigeria. Nonadherence to antihypertensive medication is a very important factor affecting effective blood pressure control. Unfortunately, the level of adherence to antihypertensive medication is also generally low. Non- adherence to antihypertensive medication therefore poses a great challenge to the management of hypertension in Nigeria.Methods: The objective of the study was to assess the factors affecting adherence to antihypertensive medication in patients attending the Family Practice Clinic of Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital, Zaria, (ABUTH, Zaria) in order to improve management outcomes.A hospital- based cross- sectional study was carried out on 302 hypertensive patients at the Family Practice Clinic of ABUTH, Zaria who had been on antihypertensive drugs for at least one month. Adherence was measured with the Morisky- Green Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS- 8), with a score of greater than 2 being non-adherent and a score of 0-2 being adherent. A patient was said to have achieved blood pressure control if the blood pressure was < 140/90mmHg. A structured interviewer-administered questionnaire was used to assess the socio-demographic and clinical profile of respondents. The blood pressure, weight and height were measured with standardized instruments and their body mass index was calculated.Results: Adherence to antihypertensive medication and blood pressure control rates were 52.6% and 36.1% respectively. Independent predictors of adherence were religion (OR= 0.547, p= 0.03, CI= 0.317- 0.943), duration of diagnosis of hypertension (OR=0.283, p= 0.043, CI= 0.084-0.059), duration of taking antihypertensive medication between 1-10 years (OR= 7.241, p= 0.033, CI= 0.955-54.896) and taking > 3 types of antihypertensive medication ( OR= 0.242, p= 0.033, CI= 0.066-0.891). Blood pressure control and family functionality were also associated with adherence to antihypertensive medication although the association was not statistically significant.Conclusion: In this study, it was found that the proportion of adherence and blood pressure control was low and the identified factors associated with poor adherence were religion, duration of diagnosis, duration of taking medication, taking greater than three drugs and family dysfunction. Therefore continuous adherence counseling should be done to hypertensive patients with these identified factors in order to improve adherence, blood pressure control and ultimately cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.Keywords: hypertension, medication adherence, blood pressure control, socio demographic factors, clinical factors
      PubDate: 2018-02-07
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • The effect of text messaging on hospital visits and blood pressure control
           among literate adults attending the outpatient department in Bingham
           University Teaching Hospital Jos, Nigeria
    • Authors: O.V. Mamven, S Yohanna
      Abstract: Background: Non-attendance to hospital appointment and non-adherence to blood pressure lowering medication are major factors in sub-optimal control of high blood pressure. The aim of the study was to assess the effect of text messaging on improving hospital visits and blood pressure control in adult hypertensives in Bingham University Teaching Hospital Jos.Methods: Seventy-two consenting adult hypertensives receiving care at the Out Patient Departments of the hospital were recruited and randomly allocated into two groups, with 35 participants in the Intervention and 37 in the Control group. Socio-demographic characteristics and clinical parameters were obtained from participants in both groups using standardized questionnaires. Text messages were sent to the Intervention group weekly and the participants were followed up every four weeks for 12 weeks. The main outcome was to determine if there was an improvement in adherence to hospital visits and blood pressure control. The data was imputed and analyzed using SPSS (Statistical Package for Social Sciences) software version 20. Relationships were determined using chi-square, students t-test and statistical means.Results: Following intervention, there was a significant difference in the level of adherence to hospital visits between the two groups. This difference was statistically significant for the first (p=0.001), second (p=0.008) and third visits (p=0.002). At baseline, the systolic and diastolic blood pressures of the participants in the two groups were similar. At four, eight and 12 weeks post intervention, there was a statistically significance difference in the change in mean systolic (p= <0.000) and mean diastolic blood pressure (p= <0.000) between the two Control groups. There was also a statistically significant difference in the mean diastolic blood pressure (p=<0.000) between the two groups over the follow up period. Adherence to hospital visits led to an improvement in medication adherence and in turn blood pressure control in both groups.Conclusion: Text messaging greatly improved adherence to hospital visits in the Intervention group compared to the Control group. There was also a significant difference in the change in mean blood pressure across the hospital visits in both groups.
      PubDate: 2018-02-07
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • The predictive value of syndromic approach to diagnosis of malaria among
           adults attending the outpatient clinic of a tertiary hospital in Ikeja,
           Lagos
    • Authors: A.O. Orolu, B.C. Chukwukelu, A Adedokun, S.A. Malomo
      Abstract: Background: Malaria is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in Nigeria-a country known for high prevalence of malaria. Available records show that ≥ 50% of the population of the country suffers from at least one episode of malaria each year. In all settings, ideally clinical suspicion of malaria should be confirmed with a parasitological diagnosis. However, in settings where parasitological diagnosis is not possible, the use of detailed weighting and scoring systems for clinical symptoms and signs of malaria may improve the accuracy of clinical diagnosis. This study evaluated the complementary role of a syndromic approach to the diagnosis of malaria with the use of a structured algorithm as a tool to improve upon the presumptive diagnosis of malaria.Methods: A hospital based descriptive cross-sectional study was done. Participants were selected using a systematic sampling method. A total of 386 adult participants with subjective experience of fever who had presumptive diagnosis of malaria were studied. Common presenting symptoms and signs were evaluated for those associated with positive malaria microscopy in order to determine their utility in syndromic diagnosis of malaria. The clinical predictors of malaria were determined by the logistic regression model. The level of statistical significance was set at p ≤ 0.05. Sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values were calculated for the various clinical predictors and the algorithm score.Results: The data of 386 participants who presented with complaint of fever were analysed. There were 49.48% male and 50.52% female respondents. The respondents aged 31-40 years were in the majority (44.82%). The prevalence of malaria as indicated by positive malaria microscopy was 71.76%. The clinical features significantly associated with positive malaria microscopy in the bivariate analysis were joint pains, reduced appetite, and normal chest examination, however, following logistic regression, reduced appetite (OR 1.65; 95% CI: 1.04- 2.64, p value = 0.035) and normal chest examination (OR 3.07; 95% C.I: 1.41-6.70, p value= 0.005) were features found to be significant. Syndromic positivity for malaria assigned to total scores >7, had a sensitivity of 97.5%, specificity of 7.3%, positive predictive value of 72.8%, and negative predictive value of 53.3%.Conclusion: A total score > 7 as syndromic positivity for malaria in this study had a very high sensitivity (97.5%) but low specificity (7.3%) for malaria infection. A respondent with a history of fever who had been presumed to have malaria, and has a total score > 7, is three times more likely to have malaria infection. Such patient should be treated for malaria in settings with no facility for parasitological diagnosis. However, on account of the low specificity of this syndromic approach, it is important for clinicians to examine patients properly to rule out other causes of fever such as urinary tract infection, gastrointestinal infection.Keywords: Syndrome, Malaria, Adult, Outpatient, Hospital
      PubDate: 2018-02-07
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Pains of amputation amongst diabetic foot ulcer patients in north central
           Nigeria: amputation versus no amputation
    • Authors: E Oseni-Momodu, A.A.G. Chima, S Lengman
      Abstract: Background: Diabetic foot ulcers (DFU) arising from diabetic “foot at risk” are frequent clinical complications of long standing Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) of the elderly patients in this environment. The diabetic patient has a foot at risk of developing infections when not properly cared for. Ulcer prevalence of over 40% T2DM accounts for over 50% of major amputations with high morbidities and mortalities.The pathophysiology of DFU is multi factorial consisting of peripheral polyneuropathy, arterial disease, and breaches of skin and consequent infections.Objective: Was to determine patterns, management modalities and treatment outcomes of foot ulcers in chronic diabetics and whether there are no other solutions for the irresistibly damning consequences of Diabetic Foot Ulcers (DFU) namely amputations of extremities with high 5-year mortality index, and to find out what these alternatives are.Methods: A 5-year retrospective study between June 2012 and June 2017 was undertaken of both type's adult diabetic patients, T1DM and T2DM, with foot ulcers, which were managed surgically at Bingham University Teaching Hospital (BHUTH), Jos, North-Central Nigeria.Results: Fifty-three 53 (100%) patients with Diabetes Foot Ulcers (DFU) were studied. Fifty-two 52 (98 %) came with advanced ulcers whose limbs could not be salvaged. They were amputated because they came too late with expansive infections. Forty-seven (47) T2DM patients (88.7 %) were discharged home, after amputation of different sorts. We recorded a post amputation mortality of five (5) patients (9.6%). Only one patient, who also came late, a T1DM male patient, was not operated. He was already on insulin and oral anti-diabetic medication at home. Managed with regular wound dressings, his ulcers healed well.Conclusions: Foot ulcers occur frequently in diabetics who had neglected proper foot care. Chanace of the contralateral limbs becoming also ulcerated and getting amputated with attendant mortality were high.Keywords: Foot at risk, Diabetic Foot Ulcer, contralateral amputations, salami type-amputations
      PubDate: 2018-02-07
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • The effect of structured counselling on lifestyle modification measures
           among adult hypertensive patients in a tertiary hospital in north central
           Nigeria
    • Authors: D.A. Salihu, S Yohanna
      Abstract: Aim: The study was undertaken to determine the effect of structured counseling on lifestyle modification measures among adult hypertensive patients.Methods: The study was a randomized controlled trial involving hypertensive adults aged 20 years and above presenting in GOPC of JUTH. Participants were consecutively selected and randomized to an intervention group that was offered structured counselling on lifestyle modification and a control group that was offered routine advice only. Participants were followed up monthly for twelve weeks and adherence to lifestyle modification measures noted. The proportion of observed changes were analysed using chi square and Fischer's exact tests. Data was analyzed on an intention-to-treat basis. A p-value of <0.05 was considered significant in all analyses.Results: Changes in lifestyle measures was notably more among the intervention group, especially in the dietary intake of fruits and vegetables and aerobic exercise.Conclusion: There is a better adherence to lifestyle measures with a more structured counselling.Keywords: Structured counselling, General advice, Lifestyle modification
      PubDate: 2018-02-07
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Cervical cancer: current knowledge, perception and associated factors
           among female undergraduate student in a Nigerian polytechnic
    • Authors: K.E. Adedokun, A.O. Ayodapo
      Abstract: Background and Objective: Cervical cancer is a major public health problem and one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality amongst the gynaecological cancers worldwide, especially in developing countries. Cervical cancer continues to persist in Nigeria like other developing countries despite the existence of interventions. This study was carried out to assess the knowledge and perception of female students of The Polytechnic, Ibadan about cervical cancer.Methods and Design: This was a cross-sectional descriptive study using a cluster sampling technique to select respondents. Sample of 420 was divided between the four (4) female hostels. Data was collected using self-administered semi-structured questionnaire and was analysed with SPSS® version 16. Bivariate analyses were conducted to identify factors associated with knowledge and perception about cervical cancer.Results: Of all the interviews conducted, 89.1% were aware that cervical cancer is a life threatening situation, and 67.4% of the respondents knew that cervical cancer is linked to the virus, Human Papilloma Virus (HPV). Majority recognized that smoking (90.2%), multiple sexual partners (75.7%), early onset of sexual intercourse (73.2%) are risk factors for cervical cancer. Most (85.7%) agreed it can be treated if detected early, while 78.8% agreed that screening for cancer of the cervix is necessary to detect cancer. Poor perception put women at high risk of cervical cancer (p < 0.05).Conclusion: Cervical cancer is a major health burden for women in sub-Saharan Africa, yet only three-fifth and half of the respondents had good knowledge and good perception of cervical cancer respectively. Understanding factors associated with women's perceived risk of cervical cancer could guide future educational and clinical interventions to increase knowledge, perception and cervical cancer screening.Keywords: Cervical cancer, knowledge, perception, female undergraduate
      PubDate: 2018-02-07
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Pattern of BMI among adolescents in secondary schools in Kaduna,
           north-west Nigeria
    • Authors: P Eseigbe, L.A. Moses, F.M. Onuoha, B.Y. Ibrahim, A.O. Aiyebelehin
      Abstract: Background: Adolescence has been identified as a priority for health monitoring. Adolescents constitute one-fifth of the world's population. According to the 2006 census in Nigeria, adolescents comprised 31.7% of the population. Underweight and obesity coexist in developing countries. Adolescent obesity is a global epidemic with major implications for healthcare now and in the future. Many chronic diseases in adulthood have their roots in adolescence. This study was carried out to determine the prevalence of adolescent underweight, overweight, and obesity thereby improving adolescent health.Objective: The general objective was to determine the pattern of BMI among adolescents with a view of raising awareness and ultimately reducing the morbidities/mortalities associated with an abnormal BMI.Methods: This was a cross-sectional school based study carried out in both public and private secondary schools in Kaduna South. Simple random sampling was used to select the schools and systematic sampling to recruit the participants. An interviewer administered questionnaire was used to collect the data. BMI was classified using the CDC gender- specific growth charts in percentiles.Results: A total of 150 adolescents participated in the study. The mean age was 14.1 ± 2.3 years, and constituted 56.7% (85) girls and 43.3% (65) boys. The prevalence of underweight was 2.7%, overweight was 21.3% and obesity was 14.0%. Being a girl (x2 = 17.97, p=0.01) and increasing age (x2 =13.71, p=0.03) were significantly associated with the development of obesity. Thirty out of the fifty-three overweight/obese adolescents were in senior classes and this was significant x2 =8.75, p=0.03. All except one of the obese adolescents belonged to the upper socioeconomic group, though this was not statistically significant (x2 =10.48, p=0.57).Conclusion: This study has shown that adolescent obesity is on the increase in this part of the world, in line with the global trend. There is the need for preventive measures to be adopted in order to curtail this menace thereby securing the future.Keywords: Adolescents, secondary school, underweight, overweight, obesity, Kaduna
      PubDate: 2018-02-07
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Determinants of patient satisfaction among clients of a national health
           insurance scheme clinic in Uyo, Nigeria
    • Authors: A.E. Akpan, E.A. Etukumana, N.E. Udonwa
      Abstract: Background: Patient satisfaction is an important indicator of quality of care. Satisfied patients have been shown to be more likely to adhere to treatment plans and guidelines. They also exhibit better care seeking behaviour and this leads to a reduction in mortality.Methods: This was a cross sectional study carried out at the NHIS clinic of UUTH between August and October 2014. A total of 418 eligible respondents were recruited using a systematic random sampling technique and a semi-structured self-administered questionnaire was used to collect information from respondents.Results: The mean age of respondents was 41.6 ± 9.1 years. The overall level of satisfaction with services rendered was 80.6%. Statistically significant factors positively affecting patient satisfaction were duration of consultation (χ2 = 26.41, p < 0.001), consultation process (χ2 = 24.03, p < 0.001), attitude of the doctor (χ2 = 44.10, p < 0.001), access to specialists (χ2 = 29.39, p < 0.001), ease of registration (χ2 = 15.46, p < 0.001), quality of service of clerical staff (χ2 = 46.12, p < 0.001), quality of service at the pharmacy (χ2 = 51.00, p < 0.001), quality of service at the NHIS administrative office (χ2 = 166.00, p < 0.001), ease of payment (χ2 = 37.13, p < 0.001), waiting time (χ2 = 41.50, p < 0.001), comfort in the waiting room (χ2 = 31.10, p < 0.001), quality of service of hospital staff (χ2 = 106.60, p < 0.001), and quality of service of nursing staff (χ2 = 63.87, p < 0.001). However, patient-related factors were not statistically significant in influencing overall satisfaction.Conclusion: Overall satisfaction rate was satisfactory. Client satisfaction was positively influenced by physician-related factors and system-related factors but was uninfluenced by patient related factors. Efforts must be made by healthcare providers to improve all aspects of the patient experience so as to improve enrolment and health services utilization.Keywords: Patient satisfaction, health insurance, NHIS, Uyo, Family Medicine
      PubDate: 2018-02-07
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Correlation of antemortem diagnoses and postmortem diagnoses in a
           preliminary survey - any discrepancies'
    • Authors: A.O. Komolafe, A.A. Adefidipe, H.A.M. Akinyemi
      Abstract: Background: The postmortem examination is a veritable means of ascertaining the correct diagnoses. Over the years, there has been a severe drop in the number of requests for postmortem examination despite its numerous advantages and benefits. The study is aimed at showing the pivotal role of the autopsy in medical education and qualitative patients' care.Materials and Methods: A retrospective review of (total number of cases) full post mortem dissections done, some including histological examination were comprehensively reviewed. The clinical diagnoses were evaluated along with postmortem diagnoses. The ages of the patients were reviewed along with organ systems thought to have problems and those missed.Results: Out of 62 complete autopsy dissections, 25 (40.32%) of our cases were discrepant while 37 (59.68%) cases were concordant. Most cases of discrepant diagnoses were in the 4th decade of life accounting for 9 (36%) of discrepant cases. While diagnoses were more usually correct in the 3rd decade of life accounting for 10 (27.05%) of concordant diagnoses. The bulk of incorrect diagnoses was in the 3rd to 7th decade of life. Five commonly missed diagnoses were 4 cases of systemic hypertension, 3 cases of intracranial haemorrhage, 4 cases of lobar pneumonia, 3 cases of hepatocellular carcinoma and 2 cases of renal cell carcinoma accounting for 16 (64%) of all missed cases.Conclusion: The postmortem examination remains the gold standard for the ultimate diagnoses. All health institutions especially secondary and tertiary health institutions should put structures in place for conducting autopsies and auditing patients care.Keywords: Correlation, antemortem, postmortem, diagnoses, discrepancies
      PubDate: 2018-02-07
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 1 (2018)
       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 3.235.75.174
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-