Publisher: African Journals Online   (Total: 263 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 263 Journals sorted alphabetically
Abia State University Medical Students' Association J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Acta Structilia : J. for the Physical and Development Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Acta Theologica     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.282, CiteScore: 0)
Africa Development     Open Access   (Followers: 34, SJR: 0.155, CiteScore: 0)
Africa Sanguine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
African Anthropologist     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
African Crop Science J.     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
African Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.446, CiteScore: 1)
African J. of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
African J. of Biomedical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.145, CiteScore: 0)
African J. of Chemical Education     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
African J. of Clinical and Experimental Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.192, CiteScore: 0)
African J. of Cross-Cultural Psychology and Sport Facilitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
African J. of Drug and Alcohol Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.168, CiteScore: 0)
African J. of Economic Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
African J. of Educational Studies in Mathematics and Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
African J. of Food, Agriculture, Nutrition and Development     Open Access   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.115, CiteScore: 0)
African J. of Governance and Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
African J. of Health Professions Education     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
African J. of Infectious Diseases     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.243, CiteScore: 0)
African J. of Livestock Extension     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
African J. of Neurological Sciences     Open Access  
African J. of Physiotherapy and Rehabilitation Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
African J. of Reproductive Health     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.381, CiteScore: 1)
African J. of Rheumatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
African J. of Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
African J. of Sustainable Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
African J. of Traditional, Complementary and Alternative Medicines     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
African J. on Conflict Resolution     Open Access   (Followers: 27)
African Research Review     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
African Review of Economics and Finance     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
African Sociological Review : Revue Africaine de Sociologie     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Afrika Statistika     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Afrimedic J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Afrique Science : Revue Intl.e des Sciences et Technologie     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
AFRREV IJAH : An Intl. J. of Arts and Humanities     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
AFRREV LALIGENS : An Intl. J. of Language, Literature and Gender Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
AFRREV STECH : An Intl. J. of Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Agro-Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Agronomie Africaine     Full-text available via subscription  
Agrosearch     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Animal Research Intl.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Annales des Sciences Agronomiques     Full-text available via subscription  
Annals of African Surgery     Open Access  
Annals of Biomedical Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Annals of Humanities and Development Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Annals of Ibadan Postgraduate Medicine     Open Access  
Annals of Modern Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Arab J. of Nephrology and Transplantation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Archives of Medical and Biomedical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
ATBU J. of Environmental Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Bayero J. of Pure and Applied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Bio-Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Biokemistri     Open Access  
Botswana J. of Economics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Botswana J. of Technology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Bulletin of Animal Health and Production in Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Bulletin of the Chemical Society of Ethiopia     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.24, CiteScore: 1)
Cameroon J. of Experimental Biology     Open Access  
Central African J. of Medicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Communicate : J. of Library and Information Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 67)
Contemporary J. of African Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Counsellor (The)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Creative Artist : A J. of Theatre and Media Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Critical Studies in Teaching and Learning (CriSTaL)     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Dar Es Salaam Medical Students' J.     Open Access  
East African J. of Public Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
East African Medical J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.122, CiteScore: 0)
East African Orthopaedic J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
East and Central African J. of Pharmaceutical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
East and Central African J. of Surgery     Open Access  
Eastern Africa Social Science Research Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Ebonyi Medical J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Egyptian J. of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology     Full-text available via subscription  
Egyptian J. of Biology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Natural History     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
ESARBICA J. : J. of the Eastern and Southern Africa Regional Branch of the Intl. Council on Archives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Ethiopian J. of Agricultural Sciences     Open Access  
Ethiopian J. of Biological Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Ethiopian J. of Business and Economics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Ethiopian J. of Economics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Ethiopian J. of Education and Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Ethiopian J. of Environmental Studies and Management     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Ethiopian J. of Health Development     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.131, CiteScore: 0)
Ethiopian J. of Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.418, CiteScore: 1)
Ethiopian J. of Science and Technology     Open Access  
Ethiopian J. of the Social Sciences and Humanities     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Ethiopian Pharmaceutical J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Ethiopian Veterinary J.     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Filosofia Theoretica : J. of African Philosophy, Culture and Religions     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
FUTY J. of the Environment     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Ghana J. of Agricultural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Ghana J. of Development Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Ghana J. of Forestry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Ghana J. of Geography     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Ghana J. of Linguistics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ghana Library J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Ghana Medical J.     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.301, CiteScore: 1)
Ghana Mining J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Global Approaches to Extension Practice : A J. of Agricultural Extension     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Global J. of Agricultural Sciences     Full-text available via subscription  
Global J. of Educational Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Global J. of Engineering Research     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.109, CiteScore: 0)
Global J. of Environmental Sciences     Full-text available via subscription  
Global J. of Geological Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Global J. of Mathematical Sciences     Full-text available via subscription  
Global J. of Pure and Applied Sciences     Full-text available via subscription  
Global J. of Social Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Haramaya Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Highland Medical Research J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Huria : J. of the Open University of Tanzania     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Ibadan J. of Humanistic Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
IMTU Medical J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Information Manager (The)     Open Access   (Followers: 30)
Information Technologist (The)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Inkanyiso : J. of Humanities and Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Internet J. of Medical Update     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Applied Agriculture and Apiculture Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Basic, Applied and Innovative Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Community Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Engineering, Science and Technology     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Health Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Herbs and Pharmacological Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Medicine and Biomedical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.104, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Modern Anthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Pedagogy, Policy and ICT in Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Italian Studies in Southern Africa : Studi d’Italianistica nell’Africa Australe     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
J. de la Recherche Scientifique de l'Universite de Lome     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
J. for the Study of Religion     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
J. of Agricultural Extension     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.188, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Agricultural Research and Development     Full-text available via subscription  
J. of Agriculture and Food Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
J. of Agriculture and Social Research (JASR)     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
J. of Agriculture, Forestry and the Social Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
J. of Applied Biosciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Applied Science and Technology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
J. of Applied Sciences and Environmental Management     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Aquatic Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
J. of Community Medicine and Primary Health Care     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
J. of Computer Science and Its Application     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
J. of Development and Communication Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
J. of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Diabetes of South Africa     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.174, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Environmental Extension     Full-text available via subscription  
J. of Family Ecology and Consumer Sciences :Tydskrif vir Gesinsekologie en Verbruikerswetenskappe     Open Access  
J. of Health and Visual Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
J. of History and Diplomatic Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
J. of Language, Technology & Entrepreneurship in Africa     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Medical and Biomedical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.162, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Medicine and Biomedical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Meteorology and Climate Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
J. of Pharmaceutical and Allied Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
J. of Pharmacy & Bioresources     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.405, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Religion and Human Relations     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
J. of Research in Forestry, Wildlife and Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
J. of Research in National Development     Full-text available via subscription  
J. of Science and Sustainable Development     Full-text available via subscription  
J. of Science and Technology (Ghana)     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
J. of Social Development in Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
J. of the Ghana Science Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
J. of the South African Society of Archivists     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
J. of Tropical Microbiology and Biotechnology     Full-text available via subscription  
Jos J. of Medicine     Open Access  
KCA J. of Business Management     Open Access  
Kenya Veterinarian     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Kioo cha Lugha     Full-text available via subscription  
Lagos Historical Review     Full-text available via subscription  
Lagos Notes and Records     Full-text available via subscription  
Law, Democracy & Development     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Legon J. of the Humanities     Full-text available via subscription  
Lwati : A J. of Contemporary Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Madagascar Conservation & Development     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Makerere J. of Higher Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Malawi J. of Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Marang : J. of Language and Literature     Full-text available via subscription  
Medical J. of Zambia     Open Access  
Mizan Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Momona Ethiopian J. of Science     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
New Agenda : South African J. of Social and Economic Policy     Full-text available via subscription  
New Egyptian J. of Microbiology     Full-text available via subscription  
Nigeria Agricultural J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Nigerian Dental J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Nigerian Endocrine Practice     Full-text available via subscription  
Nigerian Food J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Nigerian Health J.     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Nigerian Hospital Practice     Full-text available via subscription  
Nigerian J. of Animal Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Nigerian J. of Biotechnology     Open Access  
Nigerian J. of Chemical Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Nigerian J. of Clinical Medicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Nigerian J. of Family Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Nigerian J. of Gastroenterology and Hepatology     Full-text available via subscription  
Nigerian J. of Guidance and Counselling     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Nigerian J. of Medicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Nigerian J. of Natural Products and Medicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Nigerian J. of Nutritional Sciences     Full-text available via subscription  
Nigerian J. of Paediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Nigerian J. of Parasitology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Nigerian J. of Physiological Sciences     Open Access   (SJR: 0.128, CiteScore: 0)
Nigerian J. of Psychiatry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)

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Nigeria Agricultural Journal
Number of Followers: 2  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0300-368X
Published by African Journals Online Homepage  [263 journals]
  • Assessment of food security status of farming households in Abia State,
           Nigeria
    • Authors: C.I. Okpokiri, N.M. Agwu, F.O. Onwukwe
      Abstract: The insurgency in northern Nigeria and the Niger-delta unrest has posed a serious threat to food security in the country. The study was conducted to determine the status of food security in the study area, to identify the major determinants of food security among the rural household and challenges faced by households in their bid to stay food secure. 60 farming households were randomly selected in the three agricultural zones of Abia State; food security index and probit analysis model were the major tools used in the study. The survey result shows that about 36.7% of sampled farmers were food secure. Farm Size, marital status, gender, household size, and farm income were significant variables having varying degrees of influence on household food security. The study recommends that government should provide storage facilities which will reduce waste of excess produce as a result of lack of storage facilities.Keywords: Food security, probit and farming households
      PubDate: 2018-05-31
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Women farmers as veritable tools in rural community development: a case
           study of Michael Okpara University of Agriculture Umudike Model
           Communities in Abia State, Nigeria
    • Authors: R.U. Kanu, M Mazza, Q.N. Obioma
      Abstract: Owing to the short fall in agricultural production as result of ineffective labour, women have responded as veritable tools in boosting food production to the nation. The study was carried out in the model communities of Michael Okpara University of Agriculture Umudike (Umudike, Umuariaga and Ndoro) which are in Ikwuano Local Government Area of Abia State. A total of 150 respondents were randomly selected for the study. Data were collected through a well-structured interviewed schedule and oral discussion. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and focus group discussion. Findings showed that majority of the farmers were females. Results revealed that almost all the women were involved in farm activities to enhance the wellbeing of their communities and the entire nation. It further revealed that inadequate farm materials, inadequate capital, inadequate health facilities, inefficient market, bad road, and community conflict were their major problems. Inadequacy of farm materials has been a problem because when they are not sufficient, farmers found it difficult to produce on a larger scale. It was also observed that large percentage of the respondents was married. This means spouses take decision on agriculture and rural development activities in the host communities. Result revealed that, the respondents were predominantly Christians. In conclusion, women farmers in MOUAU selected model communities in Abia State are predominantly Christians.Keywords: Women Farmers, Veritable Tools, Model Community and Development
      PubDate: 2018-05-31
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Effects of intercropped legumes with maize (Zea mays L.) on chemical
           properties of soil and grain yield of maize in Abakaliki, Nigeria
    • Authors: J.N. Nwite, C Njoku, M.O. Alu
      Abstract: An experiment was carried out to study effects of intercropped legumes with maize (Zea mays L.) on chemical properties of soil and grain yield of maize in Abakaliki. The field was laid out in a Randomized Complete Block Design with four treatments of soybean (Glycine max) and maize, groundnut (Arachis hypogea) and maize, bambaranut (Vigna subterranean) and maize and sole maize which is the control and were replicated five times. Data obtained from the study were subjected to Statistical Analysis System for Agricultural Science (SAS). Results showed significantly (P<0.05) higher effect of legumes intercropped with maize on soil pH, total N, organic carbon, calcium, magnesium, cation exchange capacity (CEC) and base saturation when respectively compared to values obtained in sole maize monoculture except in soybean intercropped with maize for organic carbon, CEC and base saturation. Soil pH, total N and organic carbon in plot treated with bambaranut and maize intercrop were higher by 9, 35 and 57% compared to their respective values in plot receiving sole maize. Groundnut and maize intercrop had 39, 34, 29 and 10% higher Ca, k, CEC and base saturation than values obtained in sole maize. Legumes intercropped with maize further showed significantly (P<0.05) higher effect on grain yield of maize than in sole maize. Groundnut and maize intercrop had 33, 4 and 44% higher grain yield of maize compared to values recorded in plots receiving soybean and maize as well as bambaranut and maize intercrop and sole maize. Legumes intercrop with maize is recommended as management technology for higher and sustainable soil productivity in Abakaliki agro ecology, but with more emphasis on groundnut and maize intercrop for its phenomenal superior performance and easy accessibility.Keywords: Chemical properties, fertility, grain yield, Intercropped and legumes
      PubDate: 2018-05-31
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Effects of cocoyam (Colocosia esculentus L. ) planting densities on soil
           loss and yield in Abakaliki, south-eastern Nigeria
    • Authors: J.N. Nwite, C Njoku, E.N. Uchewa
      Abstract: An experiment was carried out on effects of cocoyam planting densities on soil loss and yield in Abakaliki. The field was laid out in Randomized Complete Block Design (RCBD) with four treatments of 44, 100 and 174 planting densities of cocoyam and control (bare plot). Samples were collected at 0-20cm depth for determination of soil properties. Soil lost after each rainfall was collected from each plot. Data were subjected to analysis of variance (ANOVA). Bare plot had significantly (P<0.05) higher soil loss than plots receiving different densities of cocoyam. Significantly (P<0.05) taller cocoyam plants were obtained in plot receiving 44 stands at 3WAP as well as mean yield of cocoyam which also showed significant differences among the planting densities. Whereas, bare plot had 53, 58 and 62% higher soil loss than other plots receiving different densities, cocoyam height at 3WAP was 32 and 37% higher in plot with 44 stands than Plots with 100 and 178 planting densities. Mean yield of cocoyam was 5 and 48% higher in plot having 44 stands when compared to plots with 100 and 178 cocoyam densities. Trend of soil loss, growth and yield of cocoyam according to treatments is in the order of bare soil >44>100>178 for soil loss and 44>100>178 for plant height and yield for the planting densities, respectively. Lower density of cocoyam is recommended for higher yield but for soil conservation against loss, higher density is advocated.Keywords: Cocoyam density, effect, fertility, productivity, soil loss, yield
      PubDate: 2018-05-31
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Studies on the flowering ability and variability in tuber yield
           characteristics of trifoliate yam (Dioscorea dumetorum)
    • Authors: I.I.M. Nwankwo, O.K. Akinbo, O.D. Okeagu
      Abstract: Fifteen accessions of trifoliate yam were collected from farmers in Abia State, Akwa Ibom State and from the Genetic Resources Unit of the National Root Crops Research Institute (NRCRI) Umudike to study the flowering ability and variability in tuber yield characteristics of the trifoliate yam. The trial took place at the Institute's experimental field. The field was demarcated into 15 plots in a randomized complete block design replicated three times. Data collected were on above-ground breeding traits such as vigour, flower sex, time of flower initiation, flowering ability, and belowground traits such as number of large tubers, number of small tubers, percentage of large number of tubers and fresh tuber weight. Data collected were subjected to analyses of variance. Result indicated that accessions that combine both high number of large tubers and fresh tuber yield above their grand means will be adequate as good parents for developing high yielding progenies with large tuber sizes.Keywords: Trifoliate yam, breeding traits, progenies, flowering ability and tuber yield
      PubDate: 2018-05-31
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Influence of differently processed mango seed kernel meal on performance
           response of west African dwarf goats fed spear grass based diet
    • Authors: M.I. Okoruwa, E Omoragbon
      Abstract: Twenty four growing goats balanced for weight 8.00 ± 0.45kg were fed spear grass based diet with differently processed mango seed kernel meal supplement to assess growth, nutrient digestibility and nitrogen utilization. Goats were assigned to four dietary treatments with six goats per treatment in a completely randomised design. The four compared experimental diets were; TA (contained 65% spear grass with 35% concentrate diet that served as the control group) TB (comprised spear grass and raw mango seed kernel meal with concentrate diet in a ratio of 35:30:35), TC (constituted spear grass and soaked mango seed kernel meal with concentrate diet in a ratio of 35:30:35) and TD( consisted spear grass and parboiled mango seed kernel meal with concentrate diet in a ratio of 35:30:35). Results obtained showed that TA was significantly (P < 0.05) best in digestibility of ash (62.01%) compared with other treatment diets. Feed conversion ratio (3.35), digestibility of ether extract (67.03%) and nitrogen in faeces (4.97g/day) were significantly (P < 0.05) higher in TB, while TC was significantly (P<0.05) higher in crude fibre digestibility (71.23kg). Final body weight gain (14.06kg), total weight gain (5.46kg), average weight gain (65.00g), total feed intake (10.97kg), average daily feed intake (130.60g), digestibility in dry matter (70.41%) with crude protein (81.07%), nitrogen intake (14.00g/day), nitrogen absorb (11.35g/day), nitrogen retain (10.36g/day), nitrogen absorb and retain as percentage of nitrogen intake (8.07 and 94.00g/day) were higher in TD and significantly (P<0.05) different from other treatment diets. Significant difference (P > 0.05) did not occur in initial body weight and nitrogen in urine among treatment diets. It was concluded that the combination of spear grass and parboiled mango seed kernel meal with concentrate diet in a ratio of 35:30:35(TD) has the potential to improve growth, nutrient digestibility and nitrogen utilization for goats.Keywords: Mango seed kernel, spear grass, performance and goats
      PubDate: 2018-05-31
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Micronutrient content of maize grown under continuous cropping and long
           term fertilizer use in an ultisol in Nigeria
    • Authors: N.N. Oti, R Agomuo, I.I. Ekpe
      Abstract: The micronutrient content of maize grown under continuous cropping and long term fertilizer use in an Ultisol in Nigeria was studied in 2014 and 2015 cropping seasons. The four sites studied were; 12 years Organic Fertilizer Amendment (OFT) site at 200 Kg.ha-1 yr-1 , 10 years inorganic fertilizer amendment (IFT) site at 200 Kg.ha-1 year-1, 10yrs Organic and Inorganic Fertilizer Amendment (CFT) site at 300 Kg.ha-1 year-1 and a 15years fallow land of Zero fertilizer amendment (CONT) at O Kg.ha-1 year-1. The experiment was laid out in a Completely Randomized Design with three replications. The raw data were subjected to analysis of variance (ANOVA) and mean differences were separated using F-LSD at p=0.05. Plant parts used in the experiment were the roots and above ground portion of the maize plant. Measurements were measured at 4 and 8 Weeks after Planting (WAP). The micronutrient content in the plant portions was compared with standards to establish toxicity levels. The results showed the content of micronutrient in maize was affected by long term fertilizer amendment, above ground portion and growth stages. At both 4 and 8 WAP, the OFT showed significantly higher content of Cu, Zn,and Fe than maize from other treated sites. At 4 WAP Cu, Zn, Fe content in the root and above ground portion of maize were 1.65, 2.30, 0.46 mg.plant-1 and 2.47, 34.17, 34.17 and 4.82 mg.plant -1 respectively. But, manganese was found to be exceptionally higher in maize plants grown at CFT site compared to other site while the maize from the control site recorded the least values in all the plant parts studied. All the micronutrients studied were within the normal limit in the plant parts sampled.Keywords: Micronutrients, Fertilizers, Application, Cropping and Soil
      PubDate: 2018-05-31
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Assessment of depth distribution of micronutrients (Cu, Fe, Mn and Zn) in
           soils under a long term fertilizer use in Imo, southeast Nigeria
    • Authors: N Oti, R Agomuo, I.I. Ekpe
      Abstract: To assess the long term fertilizer application and continuous cropping effects on soil micronutrient, this study examined the depth distribution of iron, manganese , Copper and Zinc at depth of 0-5, 5-10,10-20, 20-30, 30- 50, and 50- 100cm, of ultisols of Imo Southeast, Nigeria. Four treatments comprised of; 15 years land fallow of no fertilizer amended site (CONT) , 12 years organic fertilizer amended site (OFA) of 200 kg ha-1 year-1, 10 years inorganic fertilizer amended (IFA) site of 200 kg ha-1 year-1 and 10 years organic and inorganic fertilizer amended site (CFA) of 300 kg ha-1 year-1. Three profile pits were dug each year in 2013 and 2014, at all the experimental treatments and a total of 108 composite samples were generated over these study period in all the sites and were arranged in Completely Randomized Design (CRD). Sample means were separated with Fischer Least Significant Difference at p = 0.05. Micronutrients were affected by long term fertilizer amendment. Thus, the OFA site in the 0-5cm depth with Fe, Mn, Zn content of 9.40, 9.49, 18.33 mg/kg were significantly higher than the other amended sites while, the CFA sites with Cu content of 1.72mg/kg was higher than other site at the same depth. Micronutrients decreased with depth in all the sites. The last soil depth of CFA site recorded copper, iron, manganese, zinc contents of 0.36, 0.17, 2.24, 1.74 mg/kg, respectively and was significantly higher than other treatment sites at same depth. This result may have occurred mainly do leaching, anthropogenic disturbance, biological cycling and strongly affected by long term fertilizer amendment and continuous cropping.Keywords: Assessment, Concentration, fertilizers, Micronutrient and distribution
      PubDate: 2018-05-31
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Effect of incorporating NPK 15:15:15 fertilizer with cow dung on growth,
           yield and economics of ginger production in rain forest zone of Nigeria
    • Authors: C.N. Ebeniro, C.O. Amadi, D.M. Lenka
      Abstract: This study was conducted at the National Root Crops Research Institute, Umudike experimental field to determine the effects of incorporation of cow dung and NPK 15:15:15 fertilizer on ginger yield and economics of production. The treatment factors comprise of four rates of cow dung, 0 t/ha, 4 t/ha, 8 t/ha and 12 t/ha and four rates of NPK 15:15:15 fertilizer (0 kg/ha, 100kg/ha, 200 kg/ha and 300 kg/ha). Results obtained indicate that incorporation of cow dung and NPK 15:15:15 significantly (P<0.05) enhanced tiller and leaf production. Maximum yield of ginger when cow dung was applied sole was 6.98t/ha at the rate of 12t/ha of cow dung while maximum yield when NPK 15:15:15 was applied soil was 5.64t/ha at the rate of 200kg/ha of NPK 15:15:15. The incorporation of NPK 15:15:15 and cow dung increases yield of ginger significantly. For optimum yield in ginger production the combination of cow dung and NPK 15:15:15 at the rate of 8t/ha and 200kg/ha respectively was recommended. The gross margin analysis showed that applying cow dung alone at 12t/ha gave the maximum return on investment of 58% and NPK 15:15:15 applied as sole had the maximum return on investment of 17% at the rate of 200kg/ha. The optimum gross margin (₦989.53/ha) with return on investment of 62% was obtained from incorporation of 8t/ha of cow dung and NPK 15:15:15 at 200kg/ha. Based on productivity and gross margin analysis, the study recommends the incorporation of cow dung and NPK 15:15:15 at the rates of 8t/ha and 200kg/ha respectively to improve yield and profitability of ginger production.Keywords: Gross margin, Inorganic Leaves, manure, Organic manure, Tillers and Zingiber officinale
      PubDate: 2018-05-31
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Effect of organic and inorganic fertilizers on sweetpotato genotypes for
           yield stability
    • Authors: G.O. Nwaigwe, G.E. Nwofia, I.I.M. Nwankwo, S.O. Afuape
      Abstract: A field experiment was carried out in 2013 and 2014 at the National Root Crops Research Institute, Umudike, in the rainforest zone, to evaluate the effect of organic and inorganic fertilizer on sweetpotato genotypes for yield stability. The experiment was carried out using a split plot in a randomized complete block design replicated three times. The treatments included ten fertilizer levels (NPK 15:15:15 fertilizer (100kg/ha, 200kg/ha, 300kg/ha); poultry manure (10t/ha, 20t/ha, 30t/ha and combination of NPK 15:15:15 and poultry manure: 5t/ha+50kg/ha NPK, 10t/ha+100kg/ha NPK, 15t/ha+150kg/ha NPK and 0t/ha PM/NPK as control); and eight sweetpotato genotypes: Centennial, Ex-Oyunga ,UMUSPO/3 UMUSPO/1, NRPS/05/3D, Ex-Igbariam, TIS/8164, and TIS/87/0087 were involved in the trial. Data on some growth and yield parameters were measured and subjected to Genotypes and Genotype -by- Environment interaction (GGE) biplot and Additive Main effects and Multiplicative interaction (AMMI).The results revealed that UMUSPO/1 (G8), TIS/87/0087 (G6) and TIS 8164 (G5) had significant mean saleable root yield (t/ha) above the grand mean and largest IPCA1 scores respectively, while Centennial (G2) Ex-oyunga (G4) and NRSP/05/3D (G1) had low saleable root mean yield and lowest IPCA1 score. Results also showed that yield increase are not totally due to genetic potential of the cultivars but also due to improved agronomic practices with observed good yields supported by environments such as 10t/ha poultry manure in 2014 (E12), 10t/ha poultry manure + 100kg/ha NPK in 2013 (E9), 5t/ha poultry manure + 50kg/ha NPK in 2013 (E8) and 30t/ha poultry manure (E4) in 2013. From the results, sweetpotato farmers can cultivate any of the genotypes in any of the E4, E8, E9 and E12 environments for high saleable root yield of sweetpotato.Keywords: Organic, inorganic, AMMI, genotype x environment interaction and saleable root yield
      PubDate: 2018-05-31
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Auxins and cytokinin as a biostimulant for cassava root initiation and
           tuberization
    • Authors: S.P. Abah, U.E. Okoroafor, G.C. Nsofor, E Uba, J.O. Mbe, S.C. Njoku, C.N. Egesi
      Abstract: Plant biostimulant is any substance applied to plants with the aim to enhance nutrition efficiency, abiotic stress tolerance and/or crop quality traits, regardless of its nutrients content. In view of this, a field experiment was conducted to investigate auxins and cytokinins as a biostimulant for cassava root initiation and tuberization at different concentration rates grown under rainfed conditions. The experiment was arranged in a randomized complete block design with three replications. A 3x3x2 factorial arrangement was used, corresponding to three varieties (TME419, Umucass 37 and CR41-10) and three concentrations of two PGRs which were α- naphthalene acetic (NAA) acid as auxins (0, 0.1 and 0.2mM) and 6-benzyladenine (BA) as cytokinins (0, 0.2, and 0.5mM). The Result showed that application of auxins and cytokinins promotes slightly early growth of cassava. The response to the biostimulant depends on the cassava varieties. The biostimulant application caused the greatest growth increase in CR 41-10 than in Umucass 36 and TME419 varieties. Application of auxins enhances growth and root development while cytokinins had no significant effect on root initiation and tuberization.Keywords: Auxins, cytokinins, biostimulant, root initiation and tuberization
      PubDate: 2018-05-31
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Marketing and market integration of rice in Abia State, Nigeria
    • Authors: O.R. Iheke, A.C. Obasi
      Abstract: This study analyzed the marketing and market integration of rice in Abia State. Specifically, the study examined the co-movement of prices and the transmission of price signals and information across spatially separated markets, determine the magnitude of rice integration and its profitability in the market, examine the factors influencing profit of rice marketers and identify the constraints faced by the rice marketers. Multi-stage sampling technique was used in selecting the respondents. Primary data was obtained using a well-structured questionnaire administered to sixty (60) respondents (rice marketers) were analyzed using descriptive statistics and multiple regression analysis and Bivariate correlation. The result shows that rice marketing was profitable by returning a profit of ₦43292.99k per month. Marketing experience, age, level of educational attainment, quantity of rice purchased, purchased price, selling price, storage cost and other charges like the toll fees, phone calls are the significant variables influencing profit. From the result gotten also, it shows that there is high price integration between the urban and rural markets. Also, from the result, it shows that there was a constant rise in the price of rice due to the government policy on the ban of the importation of rice. The greatest problems encountered by the rice marketers were government policy on the ban of importation of rice in the country, inadequate finance, high transportation costs/bad roads, high cost of rice per bag, high rate of taxation. Consequently, to improve the level of market integration of rice in Abia State, transportation, processing, storage, communication and credit facilities should be provided.Keywords: Marketing, Market, Integration and Rice
      PubDate: 2018-05-31
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Efficiency of bitter kola marketing in Abia State, Nigeria
    • Authors: O.R. Iheke, J.B. Simonyan, E.U. Egwuatu
      Abstract: The goal of marketing of agricultural products is to ensure that consumers get satisfaction from the entire process of production, as well as create benefit to the various participants in the marketing channel. This study analyzed the efficiency of bitter kola marketing in Abia State, Nigeria. The specific objectives of the study were to identify the main marketing channels of bitter kola marketing in Abia State, determine the marketing efficiency and the factors influencing the marketing efficiency of bitter kola, and ascertain the problem encountered by the marketers of bitter kola in the study area. A multistage sample technique was used in selecting 40 bitter kola marketers. Data were collected through the use of structured questionnaire and interview schedules which were administered to the respondents. Descriptive statistical tools like frequency tables, means and percentages and ordinary least squares (OLS) regression were used to analyze the data. The marketing chain of bitter kola showed that the key actors involved in the marketing of bitter kola were farmers/producers, assemblers, wholesalers, retailers and consumers. The average marketing efficiency of the bitter kola marketers was 1.19%, which showed that bitter kola marketing was relatively efficient as a return of 19kobo was made for every ₦1 spent. This implies the value added by marketing was less than the total marketing cost. The significant variables influencing marketing efficiency were age of the marketer (P= 0.01), years of education (P = 0.01), marketing experience (P = 0.05), selling price (P = 0.01), purchase cost (P = 0.01), marketing costs (P = 0.01), and access to credit (P = 0.01). The major problems faced by the bitter kola marketers were seasonality of the commodity which makes the commodity scarce during the off season, high cost of transport incurred in sourcing the commodity from producers and local markets, lack of storage facilities especially during the harmattan periods causing the nuts cover to peel off. Other problems identified by the markers include weather condition, insufficient capital and daily charges by government at the markets. The study there recommended that policies aimed at reducing cost incurred in the marketing process should be put in place for improved efficiency. Such policies will include among others reduction of transportation cost by constructing rural roads, and provision of credit facilities to alleviate capital constraints.Keywords: Efficiency, Bitter Kola and Marketing
      PubDate: 2018-05-31
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Analysis of accessibility of finance by women entrepreneurs in Abia State,
           Nigeria: a case study of small and medium scale enterprises
    • Authors: C.R. Okezie, A.C. Igwebuike
      Abstract: This study analyzed the effect of accessibility of finance on the growth of women entrepreneurs in Abia State, Nigeria. The specific objectives of the study were to determine the factors affecting accessibility of finance among women entrepreneurs and to determine the effect of accessibility of finance on the growth of women entrepreneurs in Abia state. A structured questionnaire was administered to 60 respondents using simple random sampling technique. Descriptive statistics and multiple regression analysis were used in analyzing data. The study showed that majority of the respondents were less than 40years old, had tertiary education, and are married with small household sizes. The regression result showed that business experience, membership of cooperative society, source of credit and educational qualification were positive and significantly related to the accessibility of finance while type of business ownership and interest rates were negatively and significantly affected women‘s access to finance at different levels. However, the type of business they engage in did not significantly affect their ability to access financial aid. The result of the simple regression showed that amount of credit had a significant effect on the growth of the businesses while negative intercept of -147333.33 indicates that finances are not sufficient for the businesses, implying that there is still room for growth. The study thus recommended, based on the findings, that women entrepreneurs should be trained by relevant government and non-government agencies which will encourage them to register their business and also join existing self-help groups or form new ones in order to present a recognizable front for accessing funds from creditors.Keywords: Accessibility, Financial aids and Women Entrepreneurs
      PubDate: 2018-05-31
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Borrowing behaviour among oil palm processors in Idemili North Local
           Government Area in Anambra State, Nigeria
    • Authors: D.C. Anoliefo, N.M. Agwu, C.E. Okoye
      Abstract: The study analysed borrowing behavior among oil palm processors in Idemili North Local Government Area of Anambra State, Nigeria. A multi-stage sampling technique was employed in the selection of the 100 respondents. Primary data was collected with the use of structured questionnaire and personal interview with the respondents. Data were analyzed with the aid of descriptive statistics and multiple regression models. Results showed that 93% of the respondents demanded for and obtained between ₦100,000.00 – ₦250,000.00. Results of multiple regression analysis showed that processors age, output and farm size had significant positive influence on processors borrowing behavior with the exception of household size, income and marital status which had a significant negative influence on the behavior of the processors towards borrowing at various levels of probability. Based on the finding, the study recommended that young processors should be motivated with needed credit since they are innovative; males should also be encouraged to go into oil palm processing business, amongst other things.Keywords: Borrowing, Behaviour, Oil palm and Processors
      PubDate: 2018-05-31
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Climate change awareness and its effects on the performance of
           agribusiness households in Abia State, Nigeria
    • Authors: C.I. Okpokiri, N.M. Agwu, D.C. Anoliefo
      Abstract: The greatest challenge that confronts man and societies today and the generations to come is that issue of climate change. Nigeria is no stranger to the menace of climate change and as such, efforts should be geared towards creating awareness to mitigate its quandary. The study examined the sources of climate change awareness in the study area; perceived evidence of climate change by farmers in the area and the effect of climate change on the performance of farmers in the study area. Two hundred and forty (240) agribusiness households were purposively selected for the study and data obtained through primary sources. Multiple regression, descriptive statistics and likert scale were used to analyze data for the study. The results showed that major source of information about climate change was through the print media while extension services were relatively poor in the area. Changed timing of rainfall, reduced yield was among the changes noticed by farmers as a result of climate change. The regression analysis showed that gender, household size, years of education, change timing of rainfall, experience and number of extension visits were statistical significant variables affecting farmers‘ performance and the study recommended that more extension agents should be trained to help increase the extension network in the study area.Keywords: Climate, Climate change, Awareness and Agribusiness
      PubDate: 2018-05-31
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Effects of socio-economic empowerment on entrepreneurial capacity: a case
           study of agro-firms in Aba Metropolis, Abia State, Nigeria
    • Authors: J Onwumere, F.N. Agu-Aguiyi
      Abstract: This study aimed at ascertaining the effect of socio-economic empowerment on entrepreneurial capacity: a study of agro-firms in Aba metropolis, Abia state, Nigeria. The specific objectives includes: to determine the socio-economic characteristics of agro-based entrepreneurs; analyse the factors affecting the entrepreneurial capacity of agro-based entrepreneurs; analyse the factors affecting the socio-economic empowerment of agro-based entrepreneurs; analyse the relationship between socio-economic empowerment and entrepreneurial capacity of agro-based entrepreneurs; analyse the relationship between the entrepreneurial capacity, financial equity and debt of agrobased entrepreneurs. To achieve this, a sample size of 140 (one hundred and forty) agro-based entrepreneurs in Aba metropolis was chosen. Data presentation and analyses were done using simple descriptive statistics, probit regression and correlation analysis. Findings from the analysis showed that educational level, years of experience, income, labour force, raw materials, access to loan and customer base, initial capital, age and financial equity are all significant factors affecting the entrepreneurial capacity of agro-firms. There was also a strong positive relationship between socio-economic empowerment and entrepreneurial capacity. The study recommends that government empowerment programmes should be restructured, re-designed, and should centre on ― participatory approach‖. This approach emphasizes the importance of involving the beneficiaries in all stages of the programme. This approach emphasizes the importance of involving the beneficiaries in all stages of the programme. There should be greater investment in human capital investment of youths. This implies that improvement in education, health and nutrition, employment opportunities, and social services, directly address the most important problem of poverty and reduces crime among youths. Government should also organize empowerment programmes so as to train and fund aspiring agro-based entrepreneurs. This would lead to self-sufficiency which is the object of today‘s government.Keywords: Socio-Economic Empowerment, Entrepreneurial Capacity and Agro-Firms
      PubDate: 2018-05-31
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Determinants of return on investment and entrepreneurship development
           among food-based entrepreneurs in Aba Metropolis of Abia State, Nigeria
    • Authors: J Onwumere, C.O. Eluwah, C.H. Ene
      Abstract: The study analysed the determinants of return on investment and entrepreneurship development of 110 food-based entrepreneurs in Aba metropolis of Abia state, Nigeria. The specific objectives included: to analyse the features of the food-based firms and the socio-economic characteristics of the agro-based entrepreneurs; ascertain the relationship between return on investment, asset size and entrepreneurship development; determine the factors that affect return on investment, asset size and entrepreneurship development. Simple descriptive statistics, Pearson correlation and multiple and probit regression analytical tools were employed to analyse the data obtained. Findings showed that many of the food-based firms in Aba metropolis were small and medium enterprises following the assertion of the National Policy on Micro, Small, and Medium Scale Enterprises (MSMEs) by Central Bank of Nigeria. The results also revealed that there is a significant and positive relationship between return on investment, asset size and entrepreneurship development. The study further revealed that sex, experience, educational attainment, finance, technology, taxation, infrastructure, location, return on investment and asset size are significant factors that affect entrepreneurship development. The study therefore recommends that a strategic action plan be adopted to address these key constraints confronting agro-based entrepreneurs and also to enhance returns on investment and efficient entrepreneurship development.Keywords: Return on Investment, Asset Size and Entrepreneurship development
      PubDate: 2018-05-31
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Factors affecting women entrepreneurs’ financial performance in Umuahia
           Ubani Market, Abia State, Nigeria
    • Authors: C.R. Okezie, C.A. Okezie, C.C. Sylvester
      Abstract: This study examined the factors affecting women entrepreneurs‘ financial performance in Umuahia Ubani market, Abia State Nigeria by investigating their socio-economic characteristics, the financial factors affecting their performance and the financial accessibility challenges facing women entrepreneurs. A simple random technique was used to collect data from 100 women entrepreneurs in the study area, using a well-structured questionnaire. Data were analyzed using ordinary least square regression model and descriptive statistics like frequency table. The regression result showed that co-efficient of business experiences, record keeping and working capital were directly related to performance at 10% level each while age and financial accessibility had indirect relationship with performance at 5% level each. With R2 level of 0.4472 which indicated 44.72% variability in performance was explained by the independent factors. The F value of 2.82 was significant at 5% indicating goodness of fit of the regression line. The study recommends that financial institutions should map out simple ways of accessing financial facilities for women entrepreneurs and also policies aimed at educating women on financial information and accounting techniques to enhance
      record keeping should be encouraged by government through seminars, workshops and trainings.Keywords: Women, Entrepreneur, Financial performance and Nigeria
      PubDate: 2018-05-31
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Factors influencing processors’ willingness to engage in mechanized palm
           fruits processing in Abia State, Nigeria
    • Authors: T.A. Amusa, S.C. Anugwo, S.E. Esheya
      Abstract: The study investigated factors influencing processors‘ willingness to engage in mechanized palm fruits processing in Abia State, Nigeria. Purposive, multi stage and random sampling technique was used for selecting 90 palm fruits processors across the three agricultural zones in the state. Primary data were collected for the study using a close-ended structured questionnaire. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, gross margin and binary probit model. The study found that traditional technologies are widely practiced among palm fruits processors in Abia state than mechanized processing. The gross margin of the palm fruits processors was ₦74,960.00 with net return of ₦72,230.00 and profitable index (PI) of 0.38. The result of the binary probit model showed that the explanatory power of the specified variables as indicated by the pseudo R2 value of (0.772) was relatively high and good while the overall goodness of fit as reflected by Prob>Chi2 (0.000) was also good. Out of the nine explanatory variables specified in the model, six (education, household size, experience, income, extension visits and membership of cooperative) were statistically significant at 1 and 5%. Some of the notable challenges facing the processors include high cost of processing input, high cost of transportation, fluctuation of prices of products, poor road network, labour intensive nature of palm fruit processing and inadequacy of labour supplies for palm fruit processing among others. Based on these findings, the study recommended provision of soft loans to processors for acquisition of modern processing machines, creation of awareness and capacity building training for palm fruits processors in the use of modern processing machines.Keywords: Palm fruits, palm oil, traditional, mechanized processing, willingness to engage
      PubDate: 2018-05-31
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Short-term effect of tillage, bradyrhizobium inoculation and nitrogen
           fertilizer application on carbon stock and soil nitrogen in maize-soybean
           cropping systems in Nigeria Alfisol
    • Authors: J.O. Omeke
      Abstract: The role of soil carbon and nutrients conservation and management is gaining more attention in mitigating climate change, while enhancing sustainable food production. To such, short-term experiments (2011 and 2012) were conducted at the Institute for Agricultural Research, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria to assess the role of some integrated soil management on soil health under maize-soybean cropping systems. Split-split plot design was used for establishment of the research with three replications using TGX-1448-2E and SAMMAZ 14 as test crops. The treatments were reduced and conventional tillage as main plot, rhizobium inoculated soybean-maize intercrop, rhizobium uninoculated soybean-maize intercrop, rhizobium inoculated soybean-maize rotation and rhizobium uninoculated soybean-maize rotation as sub plot and 0, 40, 80 and 120 kg N ha-1 application rates as sub-sub plot. The soil samples taken from each experimental plot were analysed. The results showed that organic carbon (OC) and nitrogen (TN) were consistently higher in reduced tillage (RT) (6.59 and 1.11 g/kg) than under conventional tillage (CT) (6.32 and 1.06 g/kg) respectively. Carbon stock obtained was 11.42 % higher in RT treatment. The values of OC, TN and carbon stock obtained under rhizobium inoculated soybean-maize rotation was significantly higher, followed by rhizobium inoculated soybean-maize intercrop and rhizobium uninoculated soybeanmaize intercrop. Significant difference was found among effects of N rates on carbon stock and total nitrogen, which were consistently lower in control plots. The study demonstrated that integration of rhizobium inoculation in maize-soybean cropping systems under tillage practices; especially reduced tillage in combination with 80 kg N ha-1 improved soil productivity for mitigating climate change and global warming.Keywords: Tillage, Rhizobium inoculation, Nitrogen fertilizer, carbon stock and nitrogen status
      PubDate: 2018-05-31
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Determinants of adoption/utilization level among beneficiaries of cocoyam
           value addition training in Ohafia Agricultural Zone by National Root Crop
           Research Institute, Umudike in Abia State, Nigeria
    • Authors: R.I. Kanu, M Oti, U.J. Ukpabi, B.C. Okoye, G.N. Asumugha, C.O. Mbanaso, J.E. Ewuziem, E.C. Kanu
      Abstract: The study examined the Factors Enhancing Adoption/Utilization Level of Beneficiaries of Cocoyam Value Addition Training in Ohafia Agricultural Zone, by National Root Crop Research Institute, Umudike in Abia State, Primary data were collected with the use of a well structured questionnaire which was administered on 120 respondents that were purposively selected from the list of cocoyam value addition trainees collected from Agricultural Development Programme (ADP). The result showed that 35% of the respondents were within the age bracket of 46-55 years, 35% of them attended secondary education, 57% of them were full time farmers, 43% of them had income ranging from N50,000-69,999, 59% of them had farming experience ranging from 21-30 years and 87% of them were married. The result of the regression result showed that double-log function was chosen as the lead equation having satisfied most of the apriori expectations. Educational level, household size, age, income, frequency of visit and cooperative membership were the factors enhancing the level of adoption/utilization of the cocoyam new processing technologies by the beneficiaries in the study area. Based on the findings, it was concluded that the training was effective/positive. Therefore the research recommended that farmers should be encouraged to get basic education as this will enhance the productivity of the farmers, thereby increasing their income level.
      PubDate: 2018-05-31
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Farmers’ perception on improved cassava varieties cultivated in Abia
           State, Nigeria
    • Authors: C.U. Nwaobiala, C.A. Isaac
      Abstract: This study analyzed farmers‘ perception of improved varieties of cassava cultivated in Abia state, Nigeria. Multistage random sampling procedure was used to select 120 cassava farmers. Data were analyzed with descriptive and inferential statistics (Probit regression model). The result shows that majority (70.8%) of the farmers were females and practised mixed cropping (76.7%).The result also revealed that farmers had favourable perception of cassava attributes (x̄= 3.8) and mostly cultivated TME - 419 (x̄ =2.9), NR-8082 (x̄ =2.8) and TMS – 98/0505 (x̄ =2.8) cassava varieties. The Probit regression result showed that coefficients for high yielding, dry matter content, disease resistance, high stem ratio tolerant to moisture stress and intercropping with component crops resistance influenced farmers use of these improved varieties at different levels of probability. The result of Paired "t" test showed that there is no significant difference between perception and use of the cassava varieties by farmers in the study area. Poor extension contacts, literacy levels of farmers and type of farming system practiced were constraints to use of these varieties. The study therefore recommend development of high yielding, disease resistance and moisture tolerant varieties by breeders for increased cassava cultivation and value addition in the study area.Keywords: Perception, Cassava, Varieties, Farmers and Attributes
      PubDate: 2018-05-31
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Measurement of scale efficiency in ginger farms in Kachia Local Government
           Area of Kaduna State, Nigeria: non-parametric model approach
    • Authors: H.S. Umar, K Yahaya, S.L. Kachiro
      Abstract: The study was carried out to measure scale efficiency among ginger farmers in Kachia Local Government Area of Kaduna State. A two stage sampling techniques was used to select 99 ginger farmers from whom the data for the study were collected. Data were analyzed using Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) and descriptive statistics. Results show that the mean values of overall TE, Pure TE and scale efficiency were 0.718, 0.804 and 0.898 respectively. Only 14 % the farms were operating on the optimal scale. While about 86% of the farms were experiencing scale inefficiency (sub-optimal scale), consisting of 47% of the farms revealing increasing return to scale and 38% exhibiting decreasing returns to scale. Therefore, it is recommended that for realization of optimal production scale in the study area, farmers operating at inefficient production scale should be encouraged to either increase farm size to address scale inefficiency from IRS, or decrease farm size to remedy scale inefficiency due to DRS.Keywords: Ginger farms, scale efficiency and DEA
      PubDate: 2018-05-31
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Spatial and depth variation of soil physico-chemical properties of two
           land use systems in Umudike, Abia State, Nigeria
    • Authors: R.C. Eneje, Udochi Zik, S.E. Adesemuyi
      Abstract: The effects of two land use systems, oil palm plantation and arable cropping (maize, melon and cassava mixtures) on soil physicochemical properties were evaluated along the axis of horizontal spacing and depth variability in Umudike, Abia State. Soil samples were collected at three depths; 0-20, 20-40 and 40-60cm respectively using soil auger, from five locations 10m apart within a hectare area. The samples were collected in three replicate each from the two different land uses and an adjacent area of land was sampled and used as control. The samples were analyzed in the laboratory using standard procedures. The data obtained were subjected to analysis of variance (ANOVA) and means were separated using fisher‘s least significant difference at five percent probability level. The study showed that the different land uses produced differences in soil physical and chemical properties across the fields and the values for these properties decreased with depth of the soil. However, the texture of the soil (sandy loam) was the same in both land use studied. Soil properties investigated such as organic carbon content of the arable cropped land varied, with OC value for the arable land classed as medium (1.54-1.70) compared to that of oil palm plantation which was high (2.01-2.06). The soil pH of arable cropped farmland varied from strongly acidic to moderately acidic (4.70-5.21) while oil palm farm was moderately acidic (5.13-5.33). The effect of depth of sampling indicated that soil chemical properties varied with depth indicating that beyond 40cm depth nutrient elements decreased as you move down the profile limiting plant nutrient absorption and proper crop growth and yield. Therefor spatial and depth variability in soils should be taken into consideration during soil testing to enable efficient prediction of the quantity of input (fertilizer or organic manure) required for uniform and maximum plant growth and yield.Keywords: Land use, spatial variability, arable land, organic carbon and depth variability
      PubDate: 2018-05-31
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Breeding cassava genotypes for early maturity, high starch content, dry
           matter content and resistance to biotic and abiotic stress
    • Authors: S Njoku, S.P. Abah, C Opara, E Ukenyi
      Abstract: A two year field trial was conducted to evaluate the performance of some cassava genotypes under the uniform yield trial for early maturity, high starch and dry matter content and resistance to biotic and abiotic stress at National Root Crops Research Institute, Umudike. The trial is a randomized complete block design experiment replicated three times. Ten cassava genotypes and two standard checks were used. Disease, yield and yield component data were collected and statistical analysis performed. The result of the analysis showed that varieties has significant (p<0.05) diversities for biotic stress, yield, dry matter and starch content with most of the varieties showing disease free or tolerance to biotic stress. Variety NR04/0071 showed the highest value for yield and dry matter but variety NR04/0351 showed the highest starch content while variety NR04/0081 showed the least starch content for the two years.Keywords: Cassava breeding, dry matter content, biotic and abiotic stress
      PubDate: 2018-05-31
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Effect of artisanal mineral mining on heavy metals content and chemical
           properties of soils of Ameka Mining Area in Abakaliki, Ebonyi State
    • Authors: J.S. Nwogha, I.A. Mmeremikwu, E.O. Anedo, V.E. Osodoke, A.O. Ano
      Abstract: The study was conducted at Ameka mining area in Abakaliki, Southeastern Nigeria, to evaluate the effect of artisanal mineral mining activities on heavy metals (lead, Zinc and cadmium) concentrations and Chemical Properties of soils of Ameka mining area. Auger Soil Samples (0.20cm) were collected at the four compass directions from 0m to 100m and 2500m away from the mines sites at 10m intervals. At each sampling interval three samples were collected randomly, to make three replications three composites were obtained at each interval of the four compass directions. Unmined soil ofAgbaja Unuhu community was used as control. The effect of artisanal mineral mining on lead, zinc and Cadmium concentrations in soils of the mineral mining area and soil chemical properties were assessed using randomized complete block design. The result showed that Lead, Zinc and Cadmium concentrations in soils of the mineral mining site were significantly (p<0.05) higher than that of the unmined soil of Agbaja Unuhu. On average Lead concentration was 860.4% higher in soils of mining area than the unmined soil of Agbaja Unuhu and 215.1% higher than the maximum tolerable limit 100mg/kg of soil. Zinc concentration in soils of Ameka mining area was 290.3% higher than the unmined soil of Agbaja Unuhu, however it was still below the maximum tolerable limit of 300mg/kg of soil. Cd concentration in soils of mining area was 53100% higher in soils of the mining area than the unmined soil of Agbaja Unuhu and 177% higher than the maximum tolerable limit in the soil. The result equally revealed negative and significant correlations between concentrations of lead, zinc and cadmium and critical soil chemical properties such as; pH, Available phosphorous, total Nitrogen, Organic Matter content, and Cation Exchange Capacity, which is an indication that the concentrations of lead, zinc and cadmium have negatively impacted on the fertility of the soils of Ameka mineral mining area.Keywords: Mining, Lead, Zinc, Cadmium and Soil Chemical properties
      PubDate: 2018-05-30
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Effect of Aspilia Africana (Bush Marrigold) leaf extract on haematological
           parameters of broiler birds
    • Authors: E.N. Uchewa, B.N. Mbam, F.N. Nweke
      Abstract: A 56 days feeding trial was conducted at the Poultry Unit of the Teaching and Research Farm in the Department of Animal Science, Ebonyi State University, Abakaliki. The study was conducted to evaluate the effect of Aspillia Africana leaf extract on the haematological parameters of broiler birds. A total of eighty four (84) day old Agrited broiler chicks used in this study were randomly grouped into four (4) treatments with three (3) replications of seven (7) birds each. The leaves were sun dried for seven days and grounded, 10g of the dried grounded leaves were dissolved in warm water and used for the research. T1 (control) received 2liters of water with no extract, T2 received 150ml/2liters of the extract, T3 received 200ml/2liters of the extract, T4 received 250ml/2liters of the extract on daily basis for 8 weeks. Blood samples were collected at the 8th week from one bird per replicate through the wing vein using a 2ml syringe and sterilized needle and placed into an EDTA container for haematological studies. Data collected from the haematological indices of the birds were subjected to statistical analysis, using Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) in Completely Randomized Design (CRD). Treatment means were separated using Least Significant difference (LSD). The effect of Aspillia Africana was significant (p>0.05) on the parameters such as packed cell volume (PCV), Haemoglobin Count (Hb), White blood cell (WBC),Red blood cell (RBC) and Neutroglobin concentration (MCHC), Lymphocytes, Monocytes, eosinophils and Basophils were significantly (p>0.05) not influenced by Aspillia Africana. The result obtained from this study indicated that T2 (150ml/2liters of the extract) gave better result compared to other levels of inclusion. It is therefore recommended that 150ml/2liters of the extract be included in the drinking water of birds because this level of inclusion possesses antibacterial property.Keywords: Aspillia Africana, Haematology and Broilers
      PubDate: 2018-05-30
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Microbiology of the gastrointestinal tract of turkey fed fermented and non
           fermented liquid feed
    • Authors: E.N. Uchewa, S.U. Nwibo, B.N. Mbam
      Abstract: The microbiology of the gastrointestinal tract of turkey fed fermented and non- fermented liquid feed was investigated in an experiment that lasted for 12 weeks. Sixty five day old poults were used for the experiment. In a Completely Randomized Design each treatment was replicated 3 times with 7 birds per replicate. Commercial poultry starter and growers diets were used such that T1 is dry feed, T2 diet was non fermented liquid diet while T3 diet was fermented with lactobaccilus acidilactici. Non fermented feed (T2) was prepared daily by mixing the dry feed with water in a feed to water ratio of 1:2 while the fermented liquid feed (T3) was prepared by the addition of lactobacillu acidlactici, a strain of lactic acid bacteria for a period of 24hrs at temperature of 3oC . The birds were given ad liitum access to experimental diets and water. Data was collected on the pH value of feed, Lactic Acid Bacteria: coliform ratio, coefficient of correlation. indicates; significant (p < 0.05) higher concentration of lactobacillus spp in T3 (0.00021 CFU), significant (p<0.05) higher lactobacillus- coliform ratio in T3 (7.04 CFU), higher concentration of salmonella spp in T1 (0.000042) and higher concentration of sacharomyces spp in T2 (0.00060 cells/ml). Cost benefit analysis indicated higher cost of production in T2 and T3 with mean values of ₦1743.42 and ₦1770.26 respectively. Similarly, higher revenue was generated in T2 and T3 turkeys with mean values of ₦696.58 and ₦1014.74 respectively. Results for coefficient of correlation of GIT bacteria to body weight of turkey shows that lactobacillus and lactobascillus- coliform ratio were positively correlated while coliform, salmonella and saccharomyces spp were negatively correlated to body weight of turkey. This study therefore concluded that turkeys fed T3 diets fermented with lactic acid bacteria culture had a better microbial profile, highest Body weight, better cost benefit ratio and better result for correlation.
      PubDate: 2018-05-30
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Response of growth and yield characters of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum
           L.) varieties to nitrogen rates during the rainy season
    • Authors: S.A. Zakari, S.A. Tadda, N.I. Galadanci, K.T. Aliyu
      Abstract: Field experiments were conducted at Bayero University, Kano (BUK) and the National Institute for Horticultural Research (NIHORT) sub-station, Bagauda, Kano, during 2014 rainy season to investigate the performance of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) varieties during rainy season under different Nitrogen regimes. The treatment consisted of three varieties (Icrixina, RomaVF and UC82B) and four Nitrogen rates (0, 50, 100 and 150 kg ha-1) factorially combinedand they were arranged in a randomized complete block design (RCBD), replicated three times. Application of nitrogen fertilizer significantly (P≤ 0.05) affected number of fruits plant-1, average fruit weight, marketable fruit yield and fruit yield hectare-1 at both locations but did not significantly affect chlorophyll content (μg), leaf area, number of cracked fruits, blossom end rot and non-marketable fruit yield. Varietal differences were significant on leaf area and chlorophyll content at Bagauda. Number of fruit plant-1, average fruit weight, number of cracked fruits, marketable fruit yield and yield hectare-1 were significant (P≤ 0.05) at BUK. No significant differences (P≤ 0.05) were observed among the varieties for leaf area, blossom end rot and non-marketable fruit yield at Bagauda. Application of 150 kg N ha-1 resulted in significantly (P≤ 0.05) higher fruit yield. The varieties Icrixina and RomaVF had more fruit yield compared to UC82B. Therefore, 150 kg N ha-1 is suggested for Icrixina and RomaVF varieties, respectively.Keywords: Heat tolerant, Susceptible, Solanum lycopersicum, Nitrogen and Rainy Season
      PubDate: 2018-05-30
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Biological weed control efficiency and productivity of cassava-cucumber
           intercropping system in Umudike, southeastern Nigeria
    • Authors: C.C. Nwokoro, M.N. Mbadiwe, I.N. Onyekwere, T.U. Madu, U Udealor, O.N. Eke-Okoro
      Abstract: The concern about the control of increasing weed populations without the use of herbicides has limited farmer‘s ability to reduce cost of production and protect the ecosystem while in the business of farming. We investigated the biological weed control efficiency of cassava-cucumber intercropping system by and the productivity of the system using varied cucumber population densities (20,000; 30,000 and 40,000 plants/ha) and two cassava genotypes (NR 8082 and TME 419) in the southeastern part of Nigeria over two consecutive growing seasons (2012 and 2013). Result of the two experimental seasons revealed that at all record dates in both seasons cucumber plant regardless of population density, under monocultures and intercrops, significantly reduced weed population density and dry weight (g m-2) relative to monocultures of each of the cassava genotypes used. The highest cucumber population density (40,000 plants ha-1) under monoculture and intercrop gave the largest leaf area index and fruit yield (t ha-1). No significant treatment effect was observed on cassava fresh root yield (t ha-1). Assessments of system productivity by means of Land equivalent ratio (LER) and Area harvest equivalent ratio (AHER) indicated yield advantages in the 2012 and 2013 trials.Keywords: Biological weed control, Cucumber, Cassava, Intercropping and productivity
      PubDate: 2018-05-30
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Comparative analysis of the effect of cadmium bioaccumulation on the age
           and body weight of fishes in different water bodies in Ebonyi State
    • Authors: M.O. Nwabunike
      Abstract: The study comparatively underscored the effects of Cadmium bioaccumulation on the age and body weight of fishes in three (3) water bodies of Ebonyi State. After taking fork length measurements and weights of all the fishes caught from each water body, 5 fishes were selected based on age. Inferential statistics in the form of ordinary least square simple regression analysis was used to identify the similarities or differences on the impact of Cadmium on the fish age and body weight of the different Ebonyi river systems; vis a vis; Ameka dam, Enyigba river and Ebonyi river. The results obtained showed that in Ameka dam, Cadmium exerted negative influence on body weight and age of fishes but had higher influence on the body weight of fishes than on the age of fishes with R2 values of 46.00% and 3.90% respectively. In Enyigba river, it was observed that Cadmium exerted higher influence on body weight than age of fishes with R2 values of 3.0% and 0.1% respectively, though while the influence on age was positive, the influence on body weight was negative. In Ebonyi river, Cadmium exerted higher effect on the body weight of fishes than on the age of fishes with R2 values of 57.60% and 0.60% respectively, though while the influence on age was positive, the influence on body weight was negative. Among the recommendations was that fishes caught in slow flowing dams should be monitored of cadmium bioaccumulation to forestall it constituting a hazard to human health.Keywords: Comparative, Influence, Cadmium, Fish and Ebonyi River
      PubDate: 2018-05-30
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Effect of mulching materials and pruning on growth and yield of cucumber
           (Cucumis sativus L.)
    • Authors: L.G. Ekwu, G.N. Nwokwu, E.B. Utobo
      Abstract: The effects of two pruning treatments (main stem pruning and non-pruning) and four mulching materials (non – mulching, black plastic, white plastic and rice hull mulch) on the growth and yield of cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) was studied. The experiment was a 2 x 4 factorial laid out in Randomized Complete Block Design (RCBD). There were a total of 8 treatments with four replications. Data collected was statistically analyzed for differences between mulching materials and pruning using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and separation of means for significant effect was by the use of Least Significant Difference (LSD) at 5% of probability. Vine length, number of leaves, number of flowers, total number of fruits, length, diameter and weight of fruits, number of marketable and non – marketable fruits were highest in rice hull mulched plots. Non – pruning treatment produced a higher total number of fruits, length, diameter and weight of fruits, number of marketable and non- marketable fruits. Black plastic mulch which took the longest time to bud break also produced the least value in all the yield parameters assessed except in the length of fruits. In Abakaliki, rice hull mulch and non-pruning produced an optimum marketable yield of cucumber.Keywords: Cucumber, mulching materials, pruning and performance
      PubDate: 2018-05-30
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Evaluating eco-friendly potting media on growth and yield of carrot
           varieties in Abakaliki, south eastern Nigeria
    • Authors: E.B. Utobo, L.G. Ekwu, G.N. Nwokwu, A.C. Nwogbaga, K Nwanchor
      Abstract: Screen house and field experiments were conducted in 2012 to evaluate the influence of different potting media on the growth and yield of carrot varieties, using 3 x 7 factorial laid out in a Completely Randomized Design (CRD). Factor A was three (3) different carrot varieties, whereas factor B was seven (7) different potting media. The result revealed that the carrot varieties were significantly different in vegetative and yield parameters measured under both conditions regardless of potting media. Lunga rossa ottusa 2 (V2) performed best, followed by Technisem (V1) and the least was that of Royal Sluis (V3). In terms of potting media, significant effects were also observed in growth and yield of the three carrot varieties evaluated under both screen house and field conditions respectively. Medium 6 (composted rice hull + composted sawdust + cured pig dung + top soil) performed best under both conditions, followed by media 5 (composted rice hull + cured pig dung + top soil), compared to the rest of the media.Keywords: Potting media, carrot, growth, yield and eco-friendly
      PubDate: 2018-05-30
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Phenotypic correlations between biologic markers and quantitative traits
           in F1 Nigeria local turkey
    • Authors: R.J. Nosike, R.A. Amaefule, H.O. Ukwu, J.C. Ezike, O.F. Nwakpu, O.C. Obi, O.M. Obike, D.N. Onunkwo, S.N. Ibe, U.K. Oke
      Abstract: The study was conducted using data on 210 F1 progeny consisting of 70 Poults each of three phenotypic classes (Black, White and Spotted) of the Nigerian local turkey to determine phenotypic associations between body weight (BWT), linear body measurements (quantitative traits) and biologic markers. Linear body measurements studied were body length (BDL), shank length (SHL), keel length (KLL), breast width (BW), wing length (WGL) and drumstick length (DSL). Biologic markers measured include packed cell volume (PCV), haemoglobin (Hb), white blood cell (WBC), red blood cell (RBC), total blood protein (TBP), blood glucose (BGC) and rectal temperature (RT). The result showed significant (p<0.05, p<0.01), positive and moderate correlations between the biologic markers (PCV, WBC, RBC, Hb, BPT and BGC) and all the quantitative traits in the Black variety. The White phenotype had moderately positive and significant (p<0.05, p<0.01) correlations between the quantitative traits and PCV, WBC, Hb and BGC only. In the Spotted variety, WBC had significantly (p<0.01) positive and high associations with all the quantitative traits. The other markers (RT, PCV, RBC and Hb) however showed positively significant but moderate correlations with the quantitative traits. Generally, the positive and significant correlations indicate that increase in the biologic markers will lead to a concomitant increase in the quantitative traits and vice versa. It then implies that the quantitative traits can be genetically improved by selecting for the biologic markers studied if the latter is more difficult to measure and if environmental influence is negligible.Keywords: Local turkey, markers, quantitative traits and phenotypic correlations
      PubDate: 2018-05-30
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Price responsiveness and class substitution of white and yellow garri in
           Abakaliki Metropolis of Ebonyi State
    • Authors: S.U. Nwibo, G.N. Umeh, C.C. Nwakpu, N.E. Odoh
      Abstract: The increasing price volatility and variations of food commodities is now a common phenomenon. However, the responsiveness of consumers to price and class substitution of the commodity seems not to have received scholarly attention. A combination of purposive sampling technique involving systematic approach was used to select 90 respondents for the study. Primary data were collected with the aid of structured questionnaire. Both descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyse the data generated. The results showed that price exerted significant effect on the consumption of white and yellow garri in Abakaliki metropolis as the coefficient of price of both yellow and white garri were positively signed and significant at 1% (P = 0.01) level; and the Fratios were 286.891 & 392.869 for yellow and white garri respectively. The result further indicated that 58.9% of the respondents patronized white garri while 41.1% of them patronized yellow garri. The class analysis revealed that there exist four classes of garri consumers in the area which individual analysis showed that white garri was mainly consumed by students (41.5%) and farmers (30.2%) while, civil/public servants (48.7%) were the major consumers of yellow garri. The result showed that the consumption of white garri was influenced by organoleptic, health and economic factors while organoleptic, health and social factors influenced yellow garri consumption. The coefficient of price elasticity of demand for white garri was 0.7, implying that it is inelastic while that of yellow garri was 1.3, signifying elastic. The study recommended improving the organoleptic quality of white garri so as to make it compete favourably with yellow garri.Keywords: Garri, class, organoleptic, demand, elasticity and substitution
      PubDate: 2018-05-30
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Critical limits and zinc requirement for maize (Zea mays L.) production in
           acid soils of south-eastern Nigeria
    • Authors: E.U. Eteng, D.O. Asawalam
      Abstract: The study was conducted to determine available Zn in the soils, evaluate the critical limits of Zn for maize and then establish optimum rate of Zn fertilizer required to achieve maximum Zn uptake and grain yield in maize producing area of southeastern Nigeria. Results of the 20 surface (0-20 cm) soil samples analyzed were sandy loam (SL), very strongly acidic (4.62) in reaction, low in organic carbon (0.98 gkg-1) and in ECEC (8.15 cmol kg-1). The status of available Zn in the soils by different extractants were found to be very low and ranged from 0.38 mgkg-1 to 2.24 mgkg-1 extracted by NH4OAc, and Coca-Cola methods, respectively. The critical limits of Zn in the soils and maize plant, below which high response of applied ZnSO4 to maize could be expected were determined by Cate-Nelson according to the extraction methods as: 0.90-1.52, 1.10-1.65, and 0.70- 1.13, 2.40-3.92 and 2.50-4.24 mgkg-1 for Coca-Cola, EDTA, HCl, NH4OAc + EDTA and NH4OAc, respectively. The results of the pot and field experiments shows that levels of Zn significantly (P<0.05) increased both DMY and grain yields. Approximately 11 kg Zn ha-1 was estimated to be the optimum level of ZnSO4 required for Zn uptake in maize producing for soils of southeastern Nigeria. Similarly, in the field experiment, Zn fertilizers significantly improved grain yields. The application of ZnSO4 fertilizer yielded maximum grain yield of 7.9 and 5.1 tha-1 at the optimum rates of 9.0 and 9.6 kg ha-1 in the 2009 and 2010 plantings.Keywords: Acid sand, critical limit, extractable Zn, maize grain, optimum yield and ZnSO4 fertilizer
      PubDate: 2018-05-30
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 2 (2018)
       
 
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