Publisher: African Journals Online   (Total: 263 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 263 Journals sorted alphabetically
Abia State University Medical Students' Association J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Acta Structilia : J. for the Physical and Development Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Acta Theologica     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.282, CiteScore: 0)
Africa Development     Open Access   (Followers: 34, SJR: 0.155, CiteScore: 0)
Africa Sanguine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
African Anthropologist     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
African Crop Science J.     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
African Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.446, CiteScore: 1)
African J. of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
African J. of Biomedical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.145, CiteScore: 0)
African J. of Chemical Education     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
African J. of Clinical and Experimental Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.192, CiteScore: 0)
African J. of Cross-Cultural Psychology and Sport Facilitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
African J. of Drug and Alcohol Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.168, CiteScore: 0)
African J. of Economic Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
African J. of Educational Studies in Mathematics and Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
African J. of Food, Agriculture, Nutrition and Development     Open Access   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.115, CiteScore: 0)
African J. of Governance and Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
African J. of Health Professions Education     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
African J. of Infectious Diseases     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.243, CiteScore: 0)
African J. of Livestock Extension     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
African J. of Neurological Sciences     Open Access  
African J. of Physiotherapy and Rehabilitation Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
African J. of Reproductive Health     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.381, CiteScore: 1)
African J. of Rheumatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
African J. of Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
African J. of Sustainable Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
African J. of Traditional, Complementary and Alternative Medicines     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
African J. on Conflict Resolution     Open Access   (Followers: 27)
African Research Review     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
African Review of Economics and Finance     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
African Sociological Review : Revue Africaine de Sociologie     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Afrika Statistika     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Afrimedic J.     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Afrique Science : Revue Intl.e des Sciences et Technologie     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
AFRREV IJAH : An Intl. J. of Arts and Humanities     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
AFRREV LALIGENS : An Intl. J. of Language, Literature and Gender Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
AFRREV STECH : An Intl. J. of Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Agro-Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Agronomie Africaine     Full-text available via subscription  
Agrosearch     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Animal Research Intl.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Annales des Sciences Agronomiques     Full-text available via subscription  
Annals of African Surgery     Open Access  
Annals of Biomedical Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Annals of Humanities and Development Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Annals of Ibadan Postgraduate Medicine     Open Access  
Annals of Modern Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Arab J. of Nephrology and Transplantation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Archives of Medical and Biomedical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
ATBU J. of Environmental Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Bayero J. of Pure and Applied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Bio-Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Biokemistri     Open Access  
Botswana J. of Economics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Botswana J. of Technology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Bulletin of Animal Health and Production in Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Bulletin of the Chemical Society of Ethiopia     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.24, CiteScore: 1)
Cameroon J. of Experimental Biology     Open Access  
Central African J. of Medicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Communicate : J. of Library and Information Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 68)
Contemporary J. of African Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Counsellor (The)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Creative Artist : A J. of Theatre and Media Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Critical Studies in Teaching and Learning (CriSTaL)     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Dar Es Salaam Medical Students' J.     Open Access  
East African J. of Public Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
East African Medical J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.122, CiteScore: 0)
East African Orthopaedic J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
East and Central African J. of Pharmaceutical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
East and Central African J. of Surgery     Open Access  
Eastern Africa Social Science Research Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Ebonyi Medical J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Egyptian J. of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology     Full-text available via subscription  
Egyptian J. of Biology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Natural History     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
ESARBICA J. : J. of the Eastern and Southern Africa Regional Branch of the Intl. Council on Archives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Ethiopian J. of Agricultural Sciences     Open Access  
Ethiopian J. of Biological Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Ethiopian J. of Business and Economics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Ethiopian J. of Economics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Ethiopian J. of Education and Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Ethiopian J. of Environmental Studies and Management     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Ethiopian J. of Health Development     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.131, CiteScore: 0)
Ethiopian J. of Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.418, CiteScore: 1)
Ethiopian J. of Science and Technology     Open Access  
Ethiopian J. of the Social Sciences and Humanities     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Ethiopian Pharmaceutical J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Ethiopian Veterinary J.     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Filosofia Theoretica : J. of African Philosophy, Culture and Religions     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
FUTY J. of the Environment     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Ghana J. of Agricultural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Ghana J. of Development Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Ghana J. of Forestry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Ghana J. of Geography     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Ghana J. of Linguistics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ghana Library J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Ghana Medical J.     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.301, CiteScore: 1)
Ghana Mining J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Global Approaches to Extension Practice : A J. of Agricultural Extension     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Global J. of Agricultural Sciences     Full-text available via subscription  
Global J. of Educational Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Global J. of Engineering Research     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.109, CiteScore: 0)
Global J. of Environmental Sciences     Full-text available via subscription  
Global J. of Geological Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Global J. of Mathematical Sciences     Full-text available via subscription  
Global J. of Pure and Applied Sciences     Full-text available via subscription  
Global J. of Social Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Haramaya Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Highland Medical Research J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Huria : J. of the Open University of Tanzania     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Ibadan J. of Humanistic Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
IMTU Medical J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Information Manager (The)     Open Access   (Followers: 30)
Information Technologist (The)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Inkanyiso : J. of Humanities and Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Internet J. of Medical Update     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Applied Agriculture and Apiculture Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Basic, Applied and Innovative Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Community Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Engineering, Science and Technology     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Health Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Herbs and Pharmacological Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Medicine and Biomedical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.104, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Modern Anthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Pedagogy, Policy and ICT in Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Italian Studies in Southern Africa : Studi d’Italianistica nell’Africa Australe     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
J. de la Recherche Scientifique de l'Universite de Lome     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
J. for the Study of Religion     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
J. of Agricultural Extension     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.188, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Agricultural Research and Development     Full-text available via subscription  
J. of Agriculture and Food Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
J. of Agriculture and Social Research (JASR)     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
J. of Agriculture, Forestry and the Social Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
J. of Applied Biosciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Applied Science and Technology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
J. of Applied Sciences and Environmental Management     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
J. of Aquatic Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
J. of Community Medicine and Primary Health Care     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
J. of Computer Science and Its Application     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
J. of Development and Communication Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
J. of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Diabetes of South Africa     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.174, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Environmental Extension     Full-text available via subscription  
J. of Family Ecology and Consumer Sciences :Tydskrif vir Gesinsekologie en Verbruikerswetenskappe     Open Access  
J. of Health and Visual Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
J. of History and Diplomatic Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
J. of Language, Technology & Entrepreneurship in Africa     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Medical and Biomedical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.162, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Medicine and Biomedical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Meteorology and Climate Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
J. of Pharmaceutical and Allied Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
J. of Pharmacy & Bioresources     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.405, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Religion and Human Relations     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
J. of Research in Forestry, Wildlife and Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
J. of Research in National Development     Full-text available via subscription  
J. of Science and Sustainable Development     Full-text available via subscription  
J. of Science and Technology (Ghana)     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
J. of Social Development in Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
J. of the Ghana Science Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
J. of the South African Society of Archivists     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
J. of Tropical Microbiology and Biotechnology     Full-text available via subscription  
Jos J. of Medicine     Open Access  
KCA J. of Business Management     Open Access  
Kenya Veterinarian     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Kioo cha Lugha     Full-text available via subscription  
Lagos Historical Review     Full-text available via subscription  
Lagos Notes and Records     Full-text available via subscription  
Law, Democracy & Development     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Legon J. of the Humanities     Full-text available via subscription  
Lwati : A J. of Contemporary Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Madagascar Conservation & Development     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Makerere J. of Higher Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Malawi J. of Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Marang : J. of Language and Literature     Full-text available via subscription  
Medical J. of Zambia     Open Access  
Mizan Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Momona Ethiopian J. of Science     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
New Agenda : South African J. of Social and Economic Policy     Full-text available via subscription  
New Egyptian J. of Microbiology     Full-text available via subscription  
Nigeria Agricultural J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Nigerian Dental J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Nigerian Endocrine Practice     Full-text available via subscription  
Nigerian Food J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Nigerian Health J.     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Nigerian Hospital Practice     Full-text available via subscription  
Nigerian J. of Animal Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Nigerian J. of Biotechnology     Open Access  
Nigerian J. of Chemical Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Nigerian J. of Clinical Medicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Nigerian J. of Family Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Nigerian J. of Gastroenterology and Hepatology     Full-text available via subscription  
Nigerian J. of Guidance and Counselling     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Nigerian J. of Medicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Nigerian J. of Natural Products and Medicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Nigerian J. of Nutritional Sciences     Full-text available via subscription  
Nigerian J. of Paediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Nigerian J. of Parasitology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Nigerian J. of Physiological Sciences     Open Access   (SJR: 0.128, CiteScore: 0)
Nigerian J. of Psychiatry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)

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Journal of Agricultural Extension
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.188
Number of Followers: 2  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Print) 1119-944X
Published by African Journals Online Homepage  [263 journals]
  • Factors affecting sustainable animal trypanosomosis control in parts of
           Kaduna State, Nigeria

    • Authors: Hudu Okankhamame Osue, Felix Apeh. Godwin Lawani, Chukwuemeka Ikechukwu Njoku
      Abstract: This study examined the factors affecting sustainable trypanosomiasis control in parts of Kaduna State within the sub-humid savannah ecological zone of Nigeria. Focus group discussions were held with herdsmen and livestock owners (n=85). Questionnaire was administered to participants (n=25) and key-informants (n=5) were interviewed. Most respondents (80%) were Fulani by tribe who could read and write Hausa in Arabic text (ajami). Over 70% were permanent residents practicing transhumant animal husbandry. Animal trypanosomiasis (sammoré), liverfluke (chiwon hanta), worm infestations (helminthosis), and foot and mouth disease (chiwon kafa baki) in Hausa and “boru” in Fulfulde were ranked in decreasing order of important livestock diseases mentioned. A trypanocide (in sachet) identified to be Berenil® was administered by livestock farmers themselves. Many livestock owners and some households had lost various numbers of cattle and herds because of animal trypanosomosis. Tsetse flies (kudan tsando) were said to be very common, yet many could not differentiate it from other haematophagous biting flies. During dry season, when forage and water shortage is imminent, there is migration to southern parts of  Nigeria. Annual herd movement to rangelands in nearby Bauchi State was due to perceived increased tsetse fly population in wet season. In addition, about 80% of arable land was used for crop cultivation. More awareness and preference for pour-on and aerial spraying were higher than the use of traps, target or screens. Rearing of trypanotolerant breeds and zero grazing was never practiced. A private-public partnership in tsetse and animal trypanosomosis control using commercially available trypanocides and insecticide is feasible and should be effectively explored. Any sustainable control strategy envisaged should recognize the level of awareness of the disease and vectors and willingness of grassroots stakeholders to participate and adapt the control methods.Keywords: Awareness, livestock, indigenous knowledge, socio-economics, trypanosomosis control, tsetse fly
      PubDate: 2018-02-05
      Issue No: Vol. 22, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Role of men and women in agro-input business in north west, Nigeria

    • Authors: Ali Goni Adam
      Abstract: This study examined the role of male and female in agro-inputs entrepreneurship in North West, Nigeria. The specific objectives were to: describe the socio-economic characteristics of the agro-inputs dealers, assess the role of women in agro-inputs business; and identify the constraints of agro-inputs entrepreneurs. Data was obtained from forty eight (48) agro-inputs owners (24 wholesalers and retailers each) were purposively selected. The result revealed that the majority (62.5%) of the agro-inputs entrepreneurs had Senior Secondary School Education. Also, majority (81.3%) of agro-inputs business owners were men. Personal savings was indicated by majority (52%) as the source of fund for starting the business. On staff employed, majority (65%) men as against 35% women employees. The type of operations carried out by the male employees indicates loading/off-loading, driving, trainings of field workers and security guards while sales and records keeping are mostly done by women (53%). Major constraints to agro-inputs business were high taxation (45.1%) and difficulties in sourcing foreign exchange (21.9%). Agricultural policies aimed at encouraging more women participation in agro-inputs business and low taxation were recommended.Keywords: Agro-Inputs business, agro-inputs in north east
      PubDate: 2018-02-05
      Issue No: Vol. 22, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Characteristics of small-scale palm oil production enterprise in Anambra
           State

    • Authors: H.U. Nwalieji, H.U. Ojike
      Abstract: The study examined characteristics of small-scale palm oil production enterprise in Anambra State, Nigeria. All the palm oil producers in Anambra State formed the population of the study. Multi-stage sampling technique was used to select 120 respondents for the study. Data were collected from primary source through validated interview schedule. Data were presented and analyzed using percentage, mean score and factor analysis. Findings show that: mean age was 48.67 years, household size, 7.00 persons and palm oil processing experience, 18.3 years. The majority (93.3%) processed palm fruits as individual or family enterprise, 51.7% pounded cooked palm fruits in large wooden or concrete mortars, 55.8% used hand pressing and 85.0% used NIFOR /Stork hydraulic hand press. The findings further showed the mean annual quantity (174.67 litres), revenue (₦163,417), cost (₦68,000) and profit (₦88,417) of palm oil production, implied that palm oil production in the area was profitable. The major constraints to palm oil production were related to incentive/infrastructure, productivity and socio-economic. The need to improve productivity by encouraging increased use of modern technologies and ensuring good markets for palm oil to encourage more farmers to take up the enterprise was recommended.Keywords: Palm oil production enterprise; Small-scale processors
      PubDate: 2018-02-05
      Issue No: Vol. 22, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Impact of agricultural services and training centre project on tomato
           farmers’ livelihood in Plateau State, Nigeria

    • Authors: Onaivi Yakubu Momoh, Joseph Gambo Akpoko, Mathew Olu Akinola
      Abstract: This study assessed the impact of Agricultural Services and Training Centre (ASTC) on tomato farmers’ livelihood in Plateau State, Nigeria. A multi-stage sampling procedure was used for this study. Firstly, a purposive sampling was used to select three Local Government Areas (LGA) out of each three senatorial zones and three villages from each LGAs while random and purposive sampling were used to select 206 participants in ASTC project and 206 non- participants, making a total sample size of 412 farmers in Plateau State. Questionnaire and interview schedule were used for data collection and analyzed with descriptive statistics and inferential statistics such as chow test model. The result revealed 90% and 77% males of the participants and the non-participants respectively while the females were 10% and 23% participants and the non- participants respectively. Chow test model analysis indicated a positive mean on output F= 149.87), income, (F= 3.95) and level of living (F= 24.24) of the participants’ farmers in ASTC project than the non-participant farmers in the project. The output, income and level of living difference were significant at 5% level of probability which means a significant difference in output, income and level of living of farmers participating in ASTC tomato production. It was concluded that ASTC project intervention had positive impact on tomato production and livelihood of participant farmers in the study area. The study therefore recommends that the existing cooperative society included in the ASTC project be sustained in order to consolidate the achievement of the participating farmers in the scheme.Keywords: Participation, Intervention, Livelihoods
      PubDate: 2018-02-05
      Issue No: Vol. 22, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Constraints to women farmers’ entrepreneurial development in
           Nasarawa State, Nigeria

    • Authors: Joyce Hauwa Kagbu
      Abstract: This study examined the entrepreneurial competencies among women farmers in Nasarawa State, Nigeria. Specifically, this paper described the characteristics of the respondents, identified the characteristics (type, form and duration) of enterprises the respondents engaged in, and examined their constraints to entrepreneurial development. Structured interview schedule was used to collect relevant information from 165 women farmers selected through multi-stage sampling procedure across 6 local government areas of Nasarawa State. Descriptive statistics (percentages and mean) were used to analyze the data. Most (82.8%) of the women entrepreneur were married, and had less than secondary education (82.3%). Also the mean age, household size and annual income was 39, 8 and ₦208,759.38 respectively. Furthermore, the majority (81%) did not belong to their respective business associations. Processing was the major type of business engaged in by many (58.8%) as sole proprietor (87.9%). Persistence, commitment to work contract, and risk-taking ranked highest with a mean score of 2.55, 2.47 and 2.40, respectively among the women entrepreneurial characteristics. Lack of start-up capital (95%), poor infrastructural facilities (93%), and inadequate access to relevant information (89%) were the major constraints to women farmers’ entrepreneurial development. Various tiers of government should create the enabling social and physical infrastructure environments to catalyze entrepreneurial development (with special focus for women) in the rural areas.Keywords: Entrepreneurial development, women entrepreneurial challenges
      PubDate: 2018-02-05
      Issue No: Vol. 22, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Environmental factors influencing artisanal fishing in eastern Obolo Local
           Government Area of Akwa Ibom State

    • Authors: C.C. Ifeanyi-Obi, P Iremesuk
      Abstract: The study identified the environmental factors affecting artisanal fishing in Eastern Obolo local government area of Akwa Ibom state, Nigeria. Ninety artisanal fishermen were selected using two-stage sampling techniques. Questionnaire and interview schedule was used to get information. The research objectives were analyzed using frequency, percentages and mean. On the socio-economics characteristics of the artisanal fishermen, it was found that the majority (58%) of the respondents were male with 36% of the respondents having secondary school as their highest level of education. Also 31% have fishing experience of below10 years with yearly fish output of above 1000kg by 31% of the respondents and yearly income of greater than N200,000 by 53% of the respondents while 81% belong to co-operative society. Extension agents have visited none of the respondents. The major environmental factors affecting artisanal fishing in the area were oil spillage (100%), waste disposal (100%) and climatic factors (100%). On the constraints faced, the study found out that militant activities, inadequate finance, oil spillage around depots, and poor sales were found to be serious. Based on the findings of the study, it was recommended that, the Government and other appropriate authorities should enforce the fishing laws and regulations to avoid illegal exploitation of fishing grounds by trawlers and the destruction of artisanal fishing gears. Also, better access to relevant information should be enhanced by making extension services available to fish farmers in the various depotsKeywords: Artisanal, environmental, fishing
      PubDate: 2018-02-05
      Issue No: Vol. 22, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Symbol recognition and interpretation of HIV/AIDS pictorial messages among
           rural women in Abia State Nigeria

    • Authors: L.E. Odoemelam, S.E. Onu, F.C. Nzeakor
      Abstract: The study investigated the effect of use of symbols and pictorials in designing HIV/AIDS educational preventive interventions in selected rural communities in Abia State, Nigeria. One hundred and eighty respondents composed of female between the ages of (25-55) years were chosen for the study. Data were collected using structured questionnaire and focus group discussion and analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Results show that about 89% of the respondents recognized pictures 1, while 56% of the respondents interpreted correctly, for picture 2, 62.2% recognized the picture while 76.7% interpreted correctly. For picture 3, 57% of the respondents were able to recognize the picture while 88% interpreted the pictures correctly. Also 66% of the respondents recognized the pictures while 69% of the respondents interpreted the pictures correctly. The result shows a significant difference between the conventional media (x̄ = 1.655) and pictoral message (x̄ = 3.8764). The study concludes that the respondents were able to recognise and interprete symbol, using conventional media but were more comfortable using pictorial’s. The study recommends that use of pictorial message for HIV/AIDS campaigns should be encouraged to benefit the women with low literacy skills.Keywords: Visual literacy, women entrepreneurs and HIV/AIDS
      PubDate: 2018-02-05
      Issue No: Vol. 22, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Characteristics of free-range chicken production in Ogun State, Nigeria

    • Authors: S.A. Abanigbe, A Adesina, A Jibodu, M.F.O. Jaji
      Abstract: The study investigated personal characteristics of respondents, habits and practices, numbers of chickens and other animals cared for, causes of chicken loss, chickens’ diseases and health care awareness by respondents, and preferred extension capability to provide linkage services. Fifty farmers were selected using multi-stage sampling procedure. Data were collected with the administration of structured questionnaire and analyzed with frequency counts and percentages. Results showed that 70% of respondents were female and 42% were within 18 to 45 age bracket. Adult female (48%) spend the most time caring for the chickens while, 30% and 24% keep chickens for sales and consumption respectively. 76% provide housing, 74% provided feed-supplement and 80% give medication to support their flocks like intensive system. Predators (40%) and diseases (36%) were the main causes of poultry loss. Continuous sensitization on basic information about chicken care (100%) and market accessibility (76.51%) were some of the preferred extension capability by farmers. Continuous training and provision of linkage services in terms of simple housing, feed-supplement, vaccination against Newcastle-Disease and deworming of birds) are recommended extension capability to develop FPP business.Keywords: Free-Range Chickens
      PubDate: 2018-02-05
      Issue No: Vol. 22, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Price variation of tomatoes and ginger in Giwa Market, Kaduna State,
           Nigeria

    • Authors: Jamila Rabe Mani, Muhammad I. Hudu, Abdurrahman Ali
      Abstract: This study analysed price of tomatoes and ginger in Giwa market, Kaduna State to identify seasonal price patterns and their expected changes over time. The analytical approach in this study was based on the price multiplicative model. The study based preliminary on secondary data collected from NAERLS weekly commodity prices during period 2011-2015. The study found that the Grand Seasonal Index (GSI) showed a deviation from hundred, suggesting seasonality exists in the market for both commodities. The trend and variability of the seasonal index were also calculated and it revealed that the grand seasonal indexes of the commodities in the market were highly variable and this indicates minimal incentives for the rural farmers and marketers of ginger and tomato. Further the result indicated that tomato has the highest volatility than ginger in the market. Declining trends were obtained for majority of the months in both tomato and ginger marketing an indication of principle of supply and demand. The feasibility for storage were 20.71% and 21.44% for tomato and ginger respectively, implying that the producers/marketers of both tomato and ginger will make highest returns if they stored and sold to other (urban/international) markets during periods of high prices rather than selling at the rural market during harvests. Consequently, marketing of ginger and tomato in terms of better prices in these markets is less favorable. Hence recommendation of the implementation of seasonable price stability by the government. In addition, there is need to boost production, activate value chain, collecting and disseminating market information.Keywords: Price variations, grand seasonal index, tomato, ginger
      PubDate: 2018-02-05
      Issue No: Vol. 22, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Differences in climate change effects and adaptation strategies between
           male and female livestock entrepreneurs in Nsukka Agricultural Zone of
           Enugu State, Nigeria

    • Authors: Jane M. Chah, Clement O. Attamah, Ejike M. Odoh
      Abstract: The study examined differences in climate change effects and adaptation strategies between male and female livestock entrepreneurs in Nsukka Agricultural Zone of Enugu State, Nigeria. It was conducted using 80 randomly selected livestock entrepreneurs. Data were collected using interview schedule. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze data. Fifty percent of the respondents were female. Males sourced more climate-related livestock information than females; recording 29.6% difference in feed formulation information; which is the most differed. Females were more affected by climate change than males, with the difference more on disruption of animal heat period due to high temperature (male í?¯?¯?̅= 2.80; female í?¯?¯?̅=3.50; difference in mean{dm} = -0.70). Male entrepreneurs differed from females in the adaptation strategies used in combating climate change and also on their view on effectiveness of adaptation strategies. Females were more constrained than male in adapting to climate change; with the variance more on lack of information facilities (male í?¯?¯?̅= 2.28; female í?¯?¯?̅= 2.60; dm = - 0.32). Males and females differed in their effects and adaptation strategies to climate change. Hence, government and extension should step in to booster productivity by addressing climate-related bottle  neck faced by entrepreneurs in livestock production, especially those faced by female.Keywords: Gender, livestock, climate change, livestock entrepreneurs
      PubDate: 2018-02-05
      Issue No: Vol. 22, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Agricultural extension needs of spinach (Basella spp.) farmers in
           Rivers State, Nigeria

    • Authors: A.I. Emodi, A.E. Agwu, I.I. Momodu
      Abstract: This study examined the agricultural extension needs for spinach (Basella spp.) production by farmers’ in Rivers state, Nigeria. Multi-stage sampling procedure involving purposive technique was used to select 110 respondents from 10 communities in the selected rural households. Data were collected through questionnaire and analyzed with descriptive statistics. About 47.0% of the respondents’ were between the ages of 36-40 years, 73.0% were females, 78.0% married and 67.0% were part-time farmers with 5 years mean of farming experience. The majority (77%) of the respondents’ had 1ha of land, 58.0% inherited lands. The mean household size was 7 persons with monthly expenditure of ₦33,350.00, 61.0% were aware that spinach enhance digestion and emptying of bowel, while 52.0% agreed that spinach reduces symptoms of menopause in women. Their major extension needs in spinach production among others were: source of farm inputs in spinach production (x̄ =3.63); credit facilities in spinach production (x̄ = 3.62). The level of effectiveness of extension services provided for farmers were very low. They include: proper management of pests/diseases; health benefits and use of spinach (x̄ = 0.41) each. The perceived  sufficiency of extension services provided was inadequate with supply of farm inputs being the highest (x̄ =1.21). The major constraints were shortage in supply of spinach to match demand, increasing price of spinach, and low consumer acceptability of spinach products. The study recommended increase in the level of extension services provided by extension agents to meet the farmers’ extension needs in spinach production.Keywords: Households, agricultural extension, spinach production
      PubDate: 2018-02-05
      Issue No: Vol. 22, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Field practical training programme of faculties of agriculture in Edo and
           Delta States, Nigeria

    • Authors: M.J. Koyenikan, O Anozie
      Abstract: The study assessed the Field Practical Training (FPT) programme of Agriculture Faculties in Edo and Delta States, Nigeria. Simple random sampling technique was used to select 150 final year students from three public universities. Data were collected with questionnaire and analyzed. Findings show that more of the respondents were males (56.7%), the majority (68.0%) were 20-24 years while 93.3% were single. Highest proportion (27.3%) of respondents were from the department of Agricultural Economics and Extension Services. The respondents had higher positive attitudes towards a career in agriculture after the practical training (x̄ =3.03) than before FPT (x̄ =2.64). They perceived that they were competence in many tasks carried out especially those related to Crop and Animal Science (x̄ ≥2.5). There was significant difference in respondents’ perceived level of competence before and after FPT at 5% level of significance in all the eight (8) thematic areas, the highest was Animal science (t=7.66). Constraints perceived to militate against achieving entrepreneurial development of youth through FPT included the use of crude farm implements (x̄ =3.19), dearth of improved technologies and inputs (x̄ =3.14), poor exposure to farmers’ condition (x̄ =3.13), and inadequate funding of the programme (x̄ =3.12). FPT enhanced competence and positive attitude towards career in agriculture. Addressing the constraints would better prepare youth for agri-preneurship.Keywords: Practical training, students of agriculture faculty
      PubDate: 2018-02-05
      Issue No: Vol. 22, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Utilization of agricultural information sources and adoption of animal and
           crop technologies among farming households in Imo State, Nigeria

    • Authors: Chisom Norberth Uwandu, Kehinde Adesina Thomas, Chinwe Mercy Okoro
      Abstract: The study ascertained effect of utilization of agricultural information sources on adoption of animal and crop technologies among farming households in Imo State, Nigeria. Structured interview schedule was used to collect data from one hundred and fifty respondents using a multi-stage sampling technique. Data were analyzed using both descriptive and inferential statistics: PPMC and t test. Respondent’s mean age was 48 years; 99.1% had contact with extension agents; 88.4% had access to between 1 and 5 hectares of land; 33.6% practiced crop science; 29.9% practiced animal science. Recommended crop spacing was adopted by 36.6% of the respondents; while 29.9% adopted improved breeds of livestock. Agricultural Development Project (ADP) was the most accessed (x̅ = 2.97) information source. There was a significant relationship between use of agricultural information sources and adoption of crop technologies (r=0.262; p < 0.000), while significant difference (t=3.068; p < 0.05) existed in the adoption of crop technologies between respondents with low and high access to agricultural information. Efforts by relevant agencies to improve frequency of use of information sources relating to appropriate  crop and animal technologies will ultimately increase their adoption of these technologies.Keywords: Farming household, Information sources, Technologies and Imo state
      PubDate: 2018-02-05
      Issue No: Vol. 22, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Determinants of edible insects consumption level in Kogi State, Nigeria

    • Authors: Nkiru T. Meludu, M. Nelson Onoja
      Abstract: The study investigated the determinants of edible insects’ consumption level in Kogi State, Nigeria. It specifically carried an inventory of indigenous species of edible insects available to the respondents; ascertained the people’s knowledge level of the functional value of insects; their level of consumption and perception of insect farming in the state and identified the constraints to insects’ consumption among the population. The study adopted multistage sampling procedure to select a total of 160 rural dwellers from the four ADP zones in the state. Data were collected with the aid of interview schedules and analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Finding shows that cricket, termite, palm weevil, yam beetle, caterpillar, silkworm, and locust respectively were the identified indigenous species of insects being consumed by the people of Kogi State. However, low level of insect consumption was recorded in the state as a result of poor level of knowledge of their functional values and negative perception of insect farming and consumption. The regression analysis results identified respondents’ age (β=0.140, P=0.00), main occupation (β=3.224, P=0.00) and perceived constraints (β=7.255, P=0.00) as determinants of the consumption level of insects. The study concludes that insect consumption is a common practice in Kogi State even though on a low scale and therefore recommends among other things, heavy public awareness creation and public education on the health and nutritional benefits of edible insects to mankind and establishment of insects farming training centres by the state Government.Keywords: Edible insect consumption
      PubDate: 2018-02-05
      Issue No: Vol. 22, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Food security and productivity among urban farmers in Kaduna State,
           Nigeria

    • Authors: M.K. Saleh, A.S. Mustafa
      Abstract: This study to investigated food security and productivity among urban farmers’ in Kaduna State Two-stage sampling procedure was used to select 213 respondents for the study. Interview schedule was used to collect data. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics (food security index, food insecurity/ surplus gap index and productivity index) and multiple regression model. The results show that 54.5% of the households were food insecure. The average daily per capita calorie intake for food secure households was 65516.28 kcal. The mean age of the respondents was 46 years old, 46% had tertiary education and average farm size was 1.25 ha. Regression model predicted food security status at 70.3% accuracy with MacFadden R-square of 0.13. This implies that all variables were able to explain 64% of the variation in food security status of the households, implying that on average, the probability of urban farming households will be food secure at 51%. The log-likelihood was significant at 1% and the average marginal effect was 0.51. All the variables included were able to explain 64% of the variation in food security status of the households. Therefore, it recommended that viral extension services and appropriate measures to be implemented to change behaviour of urban farmers and boost their productivity, thereby reducing food insecurity and increase income of urban farmers in the area.Keywords: Food security, urban agricultural productivity, farming household
      PubDate: 2018-02-05
      Issue No: Vol. 22, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Indigenous knowledge of rural communities for combating climate change
           impacts in west central Ethiopia

    • Authors: Zerihun Yohannes Amare
      Abstract: The study examined how local knowledge of climate change plays a role in adjusting to changing climate and how these beliefs may influence future decision making about how to go about adjusting to climate change at a local level. The study was conducted in west central Ethiopia at the edge of the Blue Nile. The current indigenous knowledge practiced by the local community in adopting the changing environmental conditions was discussed. Rural communities have local knowledge in areas such as weather and seasonal forecasting (44%), drought forecasting (20.9%), crop pest & disease (47%), and weed (99.7%) control methods to adapt to some of the climate change impacts. Not all households have the same levels and types of indigenous knowledge. Therefore, awareness creation and experience sharing among community members are important in increasing the application of indigenous knowledge for climate change adaptation.Keywords: Climate change adaptation, Climate change impacts, Ethiopia, Indigenous knowledge
      PubDate: 2018-02-05
      Issue No: Vol. 22, No. 1 (2018)
       
 
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