Publisher: African Journals Online   (Total: 263 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 263 Journals sorted alphabetically
Abia State University Medical Students' Association J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Acta Structilia : J. for the Physical and Development Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Acta Theologica     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.282, CiteScore: 0)
Africa Development     Open Access   (Followers: 34, SJR: 0.155, CiteScore: 0)
Africa Sanguine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
African Anthropologist     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
African Crop Science J.     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
African Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.446, CiteScore: 1)
African J. of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
African J. of Biomedical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.145, CiteScore: 0)
African J. of Chemical Education     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
African J. of Clinical and Experimental Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.192, CiteScore: 0)
African J. of Cross-Cultural Psychology and Sport Facilitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
African J. of Drug and Alcohol Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.168, CiteScore: 0)
African J. of Economic Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
African J. of Educational Studies in Mathematics and Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
African J. of Food, Agriculture, Nutrition and Development     Open Access   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.115, CiteScore: 0)
African J. of Governance and Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
African J. of Health Professions Education     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
African J. of Infectious Diseases     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.243, CiteScore: 0)
African J. of Livestock Extension     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
African J. of Neurological Sciences     Open Access  
African J. of Physiotherapy and Rehabilitation Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
African J. of Reproductive Health     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.381, CiteScore: 1)
African J. of Rheumatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
African J. of Social Work     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
African J. of Sustainable Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
African J. of Traditional, Complementary and Alternative Medicines     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
African J. on Conflict Resolution     Open Access   (Followers: 27)
African Research Review     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
African Review of Economics and Finance     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
African Sociological Review : Revue Africaine de Sociologie     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Afrika Statistika     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Afrimedic J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Afrique Science : Revue Intl.e des Sciences et Technologie     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
AFRREV IJAH : An Intl. J. of Arts and Humanities     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
AFRREV LALIGENS : An Intl. J. of Language, Literature and Gender Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
AFRREV STECH : An Intl. J. of Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Agro-Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Agronomie Africaine     Full-text available via subscription  
Agrosearch     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Animal Research Intl.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Annales des Sciences Agronomiques     Full-text available via subscription  
Annals of African Surgery     Open Access  
Annals of Biomedical Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Annals of Humanities and Development Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Annals of Ibadan Postgraduate Medicine     Open Access  
Annals of Modern Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Arab J. of Nephrology and Transplantation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Archives of Medical and Biomedical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
ATBU J. of Environmental Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Bayero J. of Pure and Applied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Bio-Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Biokemistri     Open Access  
Botswana J. of Economics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Botswana J. of Technology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Bulletin of Animal Health and Production in Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Bulletin of the Chemical Society of Ethiopia     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.24, CiteScore: 1)
Cameroon J. of Experimental Biology     Open Access  
Central African J. of Medicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Communicate : J. of Library and Information Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 67)
Contemporary J. of African Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Counsellor (The)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Creative Artist : A J. of Theatre and Media Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Critical Studies in Teaching and Learning (CriSTaL)     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Dar Es Salaam Medical Students' J.     Open Access  
East African J. of Public Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
East African Medical J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.122, CiteScore: 0)
East African Orthopaedic J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
East and Central African J. of Pharmaceutical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
East and Central African J. of Surgery     Open Access  
Eastern Africa Social Science Research Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Ebonyi Medical J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Egyptian J. of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology     Full-text available via subscription  
Egyptian J. of Biology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Natural History     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
ESARBICA J. : J. of the Eastern and Southern Africa Regional Branch of the Intl. Council on Archives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Ethiopian J. of Agricultural Sciences     Open Access  
Ethiopian J. of Biological Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Ethiopian J. of Business and Economics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Ethiopian J. of Economics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Ethiopian J. of Education and Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Ethiopian J. of Environmental Studies and Management     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Ethiopian J. of Health Development     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.131, CiteScore: 0)
Ethiopian J. of Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.418, CiteScore: 1)
Ethiopian J. of Science and Technology     Open Access  
Ethiopian J. of the Social Sciences and Humanities     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Ethiopian Pharmaceutical J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Ethiopian Veterinary J.     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Filosofia Theoretica : J. of African Philosophy, Culture and Religions     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
FUTY J. of the Environment     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Ghana J. of Agricultural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Ghana J. of Development Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Ghana J. of Forestry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Ghana J. of Geography     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Ghana J. of Linguistics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ghana Library J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Ghana Medical J.     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.301, CiteScore: 1)
Ghana Mining J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Global Approaches to Extension Practice : A J. of Agricultural Extension     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Global J. of Agricultural Sciences     Full-text available via subscription  
Global J. of Educational Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Global J. of Engineering Research     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.109, CiteScore: 0)
Global J. of Environmental Sciences     Full-text available via subscription  
Global J. of Geological Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Global J. of Mathematical Sciences     Full-text available via subscription  
Global J. of Pure and Applied Sciences     Full-text available via subscription  
Global J. of Social Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Haramaya Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Highland Medical Research J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Huria : J. of the Open University of Tanzania     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Ibadan J. of Humanistic Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
IMTU Medical J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Information Manager (The)     Open Access   (Followers: 30)
Information Technologist (The)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Inkanyiso : J. of Humanities and Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Internet J. of Medical Update     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Applied Agriculture and Apiculture Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Basic, Applied and Innovative Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Community Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Engineering, Science and Technology     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Health Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Herbs and Pharmacological Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Medicine and Biomedical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.104, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Modern Anthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Pedagogy, Policy and ICT in Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Italian Studies in Southern Africa : Studi d’Italianistica nell’Africa Australe     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
J. de la Recherche Scientifique de l'Universite de Lome     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
J. for the Study of Religion     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
J. of Agricultural Extension     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.188, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Agricultural Research and Development     Full-text available via subscription  
J. of Agriculture and Food Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
J. of Agriculture and Social Research (JASR)     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
J. of Agriculture, Forestry and the Social Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
J. of Applied Biosciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Applied Science and Technology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
J. of Applied Sciences and Environmental Management     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Aquatic Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
J. of Community Medicine and Primary Health Care     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
J. of Computer Science and Its Application     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
J. of Development and Communication Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
J. of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Diabetes of South Africa     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.174, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Environmental Extension     Full-text available via subscription  
J. of Family Ecology and Consumer Sciences :Tydskrif vir Gesinsekologie en Verbruikerswetenskappe     Open Access  
J. of Health and Visual Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
J. of History and Diplomatic Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
J. of Language, Technology & Entrepreneurship in Africa     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Medical and Biomedical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.162, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Medicine and Biomedical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Meteorology and Climate Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
J. of Pharmaceutical and Allied Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
J. of Pharmacy & Bioresources     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.405, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Religion and Human Relations     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
J. of Research in Forestry, Wildlife and Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
J. of Research in National Development     Full-text available via subscription  
J. of Science and Sustainable Development     Full-text available via subscription  
J. of Science and Technology (Ghana)     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
J. of Social Development in Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
J. of the Ghana Science Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
J. of the South African Society of Archivists     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
J. of Tropical Microbiology and Biotechnology     Full-text available via subscription  
Jos J. of Medicine     Open Access  
KCA J. of Business Management     Open Access  
Kenya Veterinarian     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Kioo cha Lugha     Full-text available via subscription  
Lagos Historical Review     Full-text available via subscription  
Lagos Notes and Records     Full-text available via subscription  
Law, Democracy & Development     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Legon J. of the Humanities     Full-text available via subscription  
Lwati : A J. of Contemporary Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Madagascar Conservation & Development     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Makerere J. of Higher Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Malawi J. of Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Marang : J. of Language and Literature     Full-text available via subscription  
Medical J. of Zambia     Open Access  
Mizan Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Momona Ethiopian J. of Science     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
New Agenda : South African J. of Social and Economic Policy     Full-text available via subscription  
New Egyptian J. of Microbiology     Full-text available via subscription  
Nigeria Agricultural J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Nigerian Dental J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Nigerian Endocrine Practice     Full-text available via subscription  
Nigerian Food J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Nigerian Health J.     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Nigerian Hospital Practice     Full-text available via subscription  
Nigerian J. of Animal Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Nigerian J. of Biotechnology     Open Access  
Nigerian J. of Chemical Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Nigerian J. of Clinical Medicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Nigerian J. of Family Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Nigerian J. of Gastroenterology and Hepatology     Full-text available via subscription  
Nigerian J. of Guidance and Counselling     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Nigerian J. of Medicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Nigerian J. of Natural Products and Medicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Nigerian J. of Nutritional Sciences     Full-text available via subscription  
Nigerian J. of Paediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Nigerian J. of Parasitology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Nigerian J. of Physiological Sciences     Open Access   (SJR: 0.128, CiteScore: 0)
Nigerian J. of Psychiatry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)

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Animal Research International
Number of Followers: 8  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 1597-3115
Published by African Journals Online Homepage  [263 journals]
  • Cross-sectional survey of congenital and acquired genital disorders in
           sahraoui female camels (Camelus dromedarius) at El Oued abattoir,
           south-east Algeria
    • Authors: Djallel Eddine Gherissi, Zoubir Bouzebda, Farida Bouzebda Afri, Ramzi Lamraoui, Faycel Chacha
      Abstract: The present study was carried out to highlight the prevalence and the incidence of the genital tract abnormalities in Sahraoui female camels at south-east Algeria. One hundred and sixty five (165) animals were examined at El Oued abattoir before and after slaughter from February 2013 to August 2014. The prevalence of female camels with genital tract pathologies was 20.0 %. The total number of identified genital tract pathologies was 41, representing an incidence of 124.2 %. These pathological conditions were ranked in descending order of incidence: ovarian disorders (48.8 %), uterine pathologies (21.1 %), ovarian bursal pathologies (18.2 %) oviducts affections (18.2 %), adhesions (15.2 %) and pathology of the cervix (3.0 %). The prevalence of dominant pathologies was 7.9 % for ovarian cysts, 3.6 % for oviduct lesions, 2.4 % for infundibular cyst, 1.8 % for chronic endometritis and 1.8 % for tubo-ovarian adhesion. This study is the first report of uterine agenesis in camel from Algeria. The number of female camels with multiple pathologies (two or three pathologies) was 6, representing prevalence of 3.6 %. Higher prevalence of female camels with genital disorders was recorded in >10 years old, high BCS and during the dry season. However, a nonsignificant chi-square dependence test (p>0.05) was observed for the risk factors. In conclusion, the ovarian, uterine, and bursal pathologies were most commonly recorded in the genital tracts of the female camels from south east, Algeria. Their contribution in the reduction of fertility and fecundity of local herds needs further investigation.Keywords: Female camel, Camelus dromedarius, Genital disorders, Incidence, Prevalence, Risk factors
      PubDate: 2020-11-09
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • Melissopalynological and biochemical evaluation of the authenticity of
           Apis melifera adansonia honeys obtained from five states of Nigeria
    • Authors: Reginald Chukwuemeka Njokuocha
      Abstract: The study was conducted to determine the pollen composition, diversity and biochemical constituents of honey samples from five states of Nigeria. A total of 104 pollen types belonging to 57 plant families were recorded. The honey samples were classified into three botanical groups on basis of major contributing plants; Unifloral, bifloral and polyfloral honeys. Shannon-Wiener Diversity and Pielou’s Evenness Indices ranged from 1.987 – 2.676 and 0.580 – 0.705 respectively indicating high plant heterogeneity foraged by the honeybees. The common plant sources of nectar and pollen include CombretaceaeMelastomataceae, Phyllanthus muelerianus, Elaeis guineensis, Alchornea cordifolia and Syzygium guineense. The biochemical analyses conformed to the Codex and EU Council standard for all parameters tested except moisture content from Akpanya and Anyigba samples that exceeded the limit. The highest crude protein content was recorded in Calabar sample (1.71 ± 0.01 %) while ash content was highest in Anyigba (0.29 ± 0.02 %). Calabar and Akpanya samples had the highest fibre value (0.80 ± 0.01 %). The hydroxymethylfurfural value was highest in Abakaliki (4.46 ± 0.02 mg/kg). Sample from Calabar had the highest free acidity (0.12 ± 0.01 meg/kg), while electrical conductivity was highest in Akpanya (17.70 ± 0.01 µS/cm) sample. The pH and refractive index values, 4.72 ± 0.01 and 1.50 ± 0.01 respectively were highest in Abakaliki sample. The sum of fructose and glucose ranged from 68.8 ± 0.01 – 82.62 ± 0.01 % in the samples and had ratios greater than one in the samples making them subject to low crystallization.Keywords: Pollen analysis, Biochemical constituents, Honey, Pollen diversity
      PubDate: 2020-01-10
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • Incidence and consequence of surgical removal of gastric foreign bodies in
           West African Dwarf goats in Ibadan
    • Authors: Adenike Olusola Olatunji-Akioye, Christiana Mayokun Olawoyin, Matthew Olugbenga Oyeyemi
      Abstract: Gastric Foreign Body (GFB) in West African Dwarf (WAD) goats increased in cases presented to Ruminant section of a tertiary Veterinary institution. This study evaluates incidence and effects of surgical removal of GFB in WAD goats. Ambulatory cases during the dry season, cases presented to the Ruminant section and WAD goats acquired for this study were evaluated. GFB in the study goats were removed surgically and blood collected for both haematology and biochemistry weekly for three weeks after. Prevalence in ambulatory cases (n=809) was 43%, in cases presented to the clinic (n=70), 73% and the nineteen goats purchased for the study had nylon GFB (100%). The study revealed a significant neutrophilia following removal of nylon GFB. The blood biochemistry also revealed significant difference (p<0.05) in AST between the second and pre-surgical treatment, one and third week values. Protein values were also significantly different (p<0.05) in the first week to other values. These suggest that removal of nylon GFB causes significant changes in blood and biochemistry postoperatively. Thus removal of GFB in WAD goats requires post-operative nursing care. Enforcement of legislation to discourage littering with nylon and feed supplementation during scarcity of forage may reduce incidence of GFB in WAD goats.Keywords: Nylon gastric foreign body, Incidence, Surgical removal, West African Dwarf goat
      PubDate: 2020-01-10
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • Influence of dietary soya bean pomace on serum testosterone, reproductive
           trait development, growth performance and carcass quality characteristics
           of broiler roosters
    • Authors: Olubisi Oluseun Oyeleye, Adesola Elizabeth Ogundele, Olamide Blessing Adesokan
      Abstract: his study examines the effects of the use of agro by-product soya bean pomace to substitute some plant protein ingredients in the diet of male broilers on its serum testosterone, reproductive trait development, growth performance and carcass quality characteristics. 90 four weeks old male broilers were used in this study. Birds were allocated randomly into three treatment groups A (0 % soya bean pomace, soya bean meal), B (15 % soya bean pomace inclusion, 10 % soya bean meal) and C (25 % soya bean pomace, 0 % soya bean meal). Each group was distributed into 3 replicates with 10 birds per replicate. All the birds were fed for a period of twelve weeks. At the end of 12 weeks of feeding trial, the reproductive performance parameters, serum testosterone, growth performance and carcass quality characteristic were determined. The analysis of serum testosterone level showed that diet C had positive influence on the serum testosterone level which was not significantly different from the other two treatments, there were slight significant differences (p<0.05) in the reproductive performance parameters, their growth performance while carcass quality characteristics demonstrated no significant differences (p>0.05). Economic returns of the diet C had the least cost per weight gain. Diet C would be most economical to feed to animals. The study concluded that inclusion of soya bean pomace in rooster diets helped in their reproductive performance, enhancement of serum testosterone, growth performance as well as their carcass quality characteristics.Keywords: Dietary substitution, Soya bean pomace, Serum testosterone, Reproductive trait development, Broiler roosters
      PubDate: 2020-01-10
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • Antimotility effect of a southeast Nigerian polyherbal combination
           (Ajumbise): An in-vitro and in-vivo evaluation
    • Authors: Solomon Ijioma, Eme Osim, Azubike Nwankwo, Kingsley Kanu, Daniel Orieke, Johnson Ezike
      Abstract: The antimotility effect of Ajumbise polyherbal extract (APE) and its composite plants were evaluated in-vitro and in-vivo. In the in-vitro study, about 2 – 3 cm of a rabbit jejunum mounted in a 30 ml organ bath containing tyrode solution and bubbled with air was set up before the applications of graded doses of acetylcholine and extracts. In the in-vivo study, 16 groups of 5 rats each were pretreated with the extracts and atropine followed by charcoal meal after 30 minutes before being sacrificed 30 minutes later and opened up to assess gastrointestinal transit of the administered charcoal meal. Application of acetylcholine caused a dose dependent increase in the amplitude of contraction when compared with basal value (p<0.05), while APE on the same isolated tissue was inhibitory with each dose significantly lowering basal amplitudes of contraction (p<0.05). Extracts of the various plants constituents of Ajumbise also produced varying degrees of inhibitory activities (p<0.05) with Ceiba pentandra, Napoleona vogelii, Spondias mombin and Euphorbia convolvuloides producing high but short lived inhibitory activities while Uvaria chamae and Barteria fistulosa produced low effects. Results of the in-vivo study agreed completely with that of the in-vitro evaluation, as APE and extracts from the different plants constituents in the polyherbal significantly inhibited gastrointestinal motility and transit time in all treated rats when compared with control (p<0.05) but lower than that of atropine. Ajumbise polyherbal and its components inhibit normal peristaltic movement of the gastrointestinal tract and as such may be potential anti- diarrheal agents.Keywords: Acetylcholine, Ajumbise, Polyherbal extract, Gastrointestinal tract, Rabbit jejunum
      PubDate: 2020-01-10
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • Impaired epididymal function and changes in thyroid and adrenal glands
           morphology of heat stressed rats
    • Authors: Rita Ifeoma Odo, Lawrence Okonkwo Aka, Edmund Chidiebere Mbegbu, Mark Ebubechukwu Awachie, Casmir Onwuaso Igbokwe
      Abstract: Twenty mature male albino rats randomly assigned to two groups were used for the study. In group A rats, hyperthermia was induced exogenously by exposure to the sun, while group B rats were kept under a shade. The duration of the study was 28 days. At the end of the study the effects of heat stress on body weight (BW), body mass index (BMI), feed intake (FI), epididymal sperm reserve (ESR), thyroid and adrenal glands morphology were assessed. On day 28, rats that were exposed to heat stress showed significant (p<0.05) decreases in their mean BW and FI when compared to the unexposed. The BMI of the heat stress exposed rats and unexposed rats remained unchanged throughout the period of study. Epididymal sperm reserve was significantly reduced (p<0.05) in the heat stressed rats when compared to the unexposed rats. Histological examination of the thyroid and adrenal glands of the heat stressed rats revealed hypertrophy and hyperplasia of the thyroid and adrenal glands respectively when compared to unexposed rats.Keywords: Heat stress rat, Body weight, Body mass index, Epididymis, Thyroid gland, Adrenal gland
      PubDate: 2020-01-10
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • Soil-transmitted helminth infections among school aged children in Lagos
           State, Nigeria
    • Authors: Emmanuel Taiwo Idowu, Ifeoluwa Kayode Fagbohun, Omotayo Lukmon Sanyaolu, Karen Ololade Oguntuyi, Olubunmi Adetoro Otubanjo
      Abstract: An epidemiological investigation was carried out between February to July 2017 to investigate the prevalence of soil transmitted helminths (STHs) among primary school children aged 7 – 14 years in Lagos Island and Ajeromi-Ifelodun LGAs of Lagos State. The pupils were screened parasitologically for STHs, anthropometric data which includes the height (cm) and weight (kg) of each pupil were recorded using height scale and weighing balance respectively. Furthermore, questionnaires which probed into their knowledge of cause, symptoms, predisposing factors to infection, level of hygiene and sanitation of each respondent were administered. The parasitological examination of the 413 stool samples collected showed that 132(32%) were positive for STHs. The three STHs recorded were: Ascaris lumbricoides (50%), Trichuris trichiura (23%) and hookworm (3%). Co-infections prevalence of A. lumbricoides with T. trichiura and A. lumbricoides with hookworm were 23% and 1% respectively. There was no significant difference (p>0.05) in the prevalence of STHs among males and females, the prevalence between the two LGAs was significantly different (p<0.05). Prevalence of underweight, stunting and wasting were 10, 24.2 and 19.4% respectively. Majority of sampled children indicated washing their hands before food (98.1%), washing of fruits before eating (70.8%), washing of hands after toilet (98.6%), but only 25% of them actually wash their hands properly with soap. The high prevalence and impact of STH infections among school children can be attributed to poor hygienic condition and low socio-economic status of residents in the study area. Education on proper hygiene habits and regular deworming exercise is recommended.Keywords: Soil transmitted helminths, School aged children, Anthropometric data, Co-infections, Wasting, Stunting
      PubDate: 2020-01-10
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • Effects of artemisinin-based combination therapy on histopathology of the
           liver, kidney and spleen of mice infected with Plasmodium berghei
    • Authors: Ukamaka Elizabeth Okafor, Angela Nwogor Ufele, Ogonna Daniel Nwankwo
      Abstract: Malaria has remained one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in most developing countries. Artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) had been adopted for the management of the disease. This study evaluated the effects of therapeutic doses of artesunate + amodiaquine and dihydroartemisnin + piperaquine on the liver, kidney and spleen of mice infected with Plasmodium berghei. Sixty adult mice of eight weeks old with average weight of 22.5 ± 5.5 g were randomly divided into six groups of ten animals each. Plasmodium berghei was inoculated into the mice and observed for seven days, followed by three days oral administration of therapeutic doses of artesunate + amodiaquine (A&A) and dihydroartemisinin + piperaquine (D&P). Control groups were given water for the same period. Histopathology results revealed; periportal inflammatory cells, haemopoietic precursor cells, haemozoin pigmentation in the liver of the infected untreated and treated groups. The spleen showed haemozoin pigments, loss of the typical structure of the germinal centre, apoptotic lymphocytes with tinged macrophages, megakaryocytes and haemopoietic precursor cells in the infected untreated and treated groups. Inflammation of the renal pelvis was found in the kidney of the infected untreated group and the group treated with dihydroartemisinin + piperaquine. Cytoplasmic vacuolation was found in the liver after 28 days follow-up. Malaria infection and treatment with artesunate + amodiaquine (A&A) and dihydroartemisinin + piperaquine caused reversible damages to the liver, spleen and kidney.Keywords: Malaria, Artemisinin, Liver, Spleen, Kidney, Plasmodium berghei
      PubDate: 2020-01-10
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • Postmortem prevalence of Fasciolosis and Contagious Bovine Pleuropneumonia
           (CBP) and economic losses in cattle at Nsukka Abattoir, Nigeria
    • Authors: Innocent Okwundu Nwankwo, Joseph Ikechukwu Onunkwo, Chinedu Victor Onyema
      Abstract: Fasciolosis and Contagious Bovine Pleuropneumonia (CBP) are characterized by gross pathognomonic lesions in organ/offal of slaughtered cattle which result in condemnation of unsafe meat. Both are the major causes of bovine organ/offal condemnation in Nigeria. Postmortem detection with focus on Fasciola and CBP infections were made in cattle slaughtered at Ikpa market abattoir, Nsukka between May – July 2018. In addition, the economic losses associated with the disease conditions were assessed. Out of 474 cattle examined, 114(24 %) and 200(42.2 %), had gross lesions of fasciolosis and CBP respectively, while 66(13.9 %) were positive for the both conditions. Both lesions were observed in the three breeds of slaughtered cattle (White Fulani, Sokoto gudali and Ndama) irrespective of sex and age. The disease lesions were not significantly associated (p<0.05) with sex, age and breed of cattle. However, there was a significant relationship (p>0.05) between the prevalence of CBP and fasciolosis lesions in the slaughtered cattle. The economic loss due to condemnation of affected organs was estimated at N 1, 716,900.00 (US$ 4,769) in 24 days, approximately equivalent to N 71, 537.50 (US$ 198.8) on daily basis. The findings have revealed the high level of organ damages and financial losses due to fasciolosis and CBP in the study area. This portends dangers not limited to livestock production and the economy, but zoonosis and other public health issues. Public awareness campaign, appropriate surveillance and disease control programmes should be implemented in addition to adequate meat inspection and compensation for farmers.Keywords: Postmortem, Prevalence, Fasciolosis, Contagious bovine pleuropneumonia, Cattle, Nigeria
      PubDate: 2020-01-09
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • Awareness and perception of urinary schistosomiasis among the inhabitant
           of rural endemic communities in Bende Local Government Area, Abia state,
           Nigeria
    • Authors: Ofoma Cornelius Amoke, Anthonia Nnenna Chuks Amadi, Juliana Ugochukwu Eze
      Abstract: Research has put Nigeria as a country with the highest burden of schistosomiasis in Africa with about 29 million persons living with the disease. Lack of adequate information about the disease has increased the risk of infection in endemic areas. This study evaluated the knowledge and perceptions about urinary schistosomiasis in Bende Local Government Area (LGA) of Abia, where the disease is endemic. A cross-sectional study of 150 consented respondents comprised 30 persons per community (Igbere, Ozuitem, Akoli imenyi, Item and Alayi) were selected using simple random techniques. Structured questionnaires were used to obtain data on their socio-demographic characteristics and information bothering on the knowledge, attitude and perception about urinary schistosomiasis. Less than half 63(42.0 %) of the respondents had the knowledge of the disease. The majority of those who knew about the disease was ignorant of the intermediate host 52(82.5 %) and drug of choice for the treatment 51(81.0 %). A greater number 48(76.2 %) recognized their streams as the source of infection. 1.6 % perceived those living with the disease as people suffering from their wrongdoing. Interestingly, most respondents 99(66.0%) have regular contact with the water bodies in the area and often experience skin itch afterwards 28(18.7 %). The study suggests a low awareness of urinary schistosomiasis in the study area. Health education programmes with emphasis on the intermediate host and the praziquantel for the treatment is recommended for a sustainable elimination strategy.Keywords: Urinary Schistosomiasis, Schistosoma haematobium, Knowledge, Perception, Bende
      PubDate: 2020-01-09
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • Growth performance and carcass traits of broilers fed with Allium sativum
           powders supplemented finisher diets
    • Authors: Festus Otaka Abonyi, Chukwudumeje Ivan Oforah, Onyekachi Henry Duruike, Rita Ifeoma Odo
      Abstract: This study investigated the effects of dietary Allium sativum powder (ASP) on growth performance, haematology, carcass quality, serum biochemistry, and lipid profile of broilers. Before use, the ASP was phytochemically analyzed. 108 four-week old broilers were randomly assigned to four treatments (A, B, C and D) with three replicates of nine birds. They were fed for four weeks with broiler finisher diet supplemented with ASP at 0.00 (A, control), 20.00 (B), 30.00 (C) and (D) 40.00 g/kg. Weekly feed intake, weight gain, feed conversion ratio, haematology, serum biochemistry and lipid profile were determined. At week four, two birds from each replicate were randomly selected, humanely sacrificed and used to determine carcass quality. Ethanolic extract of ASP contained saponins, tannins, steroids and terpenoids. ASP supplemented groups consumed significantly more (p<0.05) feed on week three, had higher final body weight and recorded lower mortality. Low density lipoprotein (LDL) was significantly lower (p<0.05) in birds fed 20 g/kg/d than other ASP fed birds. The consumption of ASP had no significant effect (p>05) on cholesterol; high density lipoprotein (HDL), very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) and organ weights of broilers. White blood cell count was significantly higher (p<0.05) in birds fed 20.00 and 40.00 g/kg ASP. Red blood cell, haemoglobin, packed cell volume, total protein and albumin contents of the broilers were increased by the additive.Keywords: Antibiotics, Broilers, Carcass traits, Garlic, Lipid profile
      PubDate: 2020-01-09
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • Comparative study of the bacterial load and species diversity in the
           African catfish (Clarias gariepinus) cultured in contrasting aquaculture
           tanks in Uyo, Nigeria
    • Authors: Mmandu Uwem Effiong, Imoh Nathaniel Isaac
      Abstract: Comparative study on bacterial load and diversity on the intestine, skin and gills of cultured Clarias gariepinus from concrete and tarpaulin tanks were investigated. Determination of bacterial loads, species characterization and composition in fish parts were done using standard microbiological procedures. Results of the assay showed high bacterial count in intestine and gills of fish from both culture tanks. Heterotrophic bacteria count ranged from 1.7 x 104 cfu/ml on skin of catfish cultured in tarpaulin tank to 2.6 x 104 cfu/ml in gills of catfish from both systems, while the total coliform count ranged from 1.2 x 104 cfu/ml in the gills to 3.9 x 104 cfu/ml in the intestine. The Salmonella count was higher in the intestine of catfish in both systems, while the highest vibrio counts of 4.2 – 4.6 x 104 cfu/ml was recorded in the gills of catfish from tarpaulin tank. In both culture systems, Pseudomonas, Salmonella and Escherichia coli, were not observed on fish skin. The Bacterial organisms isolated included: Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Vibrio anguillarum, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Serratia liquefaciens, Bacillus licheniformis, Shigella sonnei, Lactobacillus plantarum, Enterobacter aerogenes, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Proteus volgaris. S. epidermidis accounted for the highest frequency of occurrence (75.0 %) in concrete tank, while K. pneumoniae had the least frequency of occurrence (2.0 %) in tarpaulin tank. The bacterial flora recovered composed of potential pathogenic organisms of public health interest.Keywords: Aquaculture, Bacterial load, Catfish, Concrete and tarpaulin tanks
      PubDate: 2020-01-09
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • Baseline haematological parameters reference ranges of dogs in the Ashanti
           region of Ghana
    • Authors: Tony Opoku-Agyemang, Charlotte Oppong, Samuel Asamoah Sakyi, Esther Amemor, Daniel Dakolgo Sia, Benjamin Obukowho Emikpe
      Abstract: This study was conducted using sixty (60) clinically healthy dogs from different districts in the Ashanti Region of Ghana., Haematological parameters reference ranges was established and the influence of sex, breed and age on haematological indices of dogs in the Ashanti, Ghana was equally studied. Blood samples were collected from the dogs and analysed using a Mindray 5 parts automated haematologic analyser. Data obtained were compiled in Excel 2013 and analysed using Graphpad Prism 6. Results of the current study showed significant variations (p<0.05) in some indices from established haematological indices. A higher mean lymphocyte count was recorded. The mean MCV values obtained in this study were notably towards the upper limit of the accepted ranges; whilst the mean MCHC recorded was lower than documented norm. The study recorded significant (p<0.05) sex related differences in RDW, MCHC, MCV and RBC; as well as breed related variations in platelet counts. Results of the current study will provide baseline reference data for haematological tests of dogs and could be very useful in veterinary clinical practice, especially in precise diagnosis of canine problems requiring haematology, in the sub region.Keywords: Reference ranges, Haematological indices, dogs, Ashanti region, Ghana
      PubDate: 2019-01-10
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 3 (2019)
       
 
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