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Publisher: Johns Hopkins University Press (Total: 23 journals)   [Sort by number of followers]

Showing 1 - 23 of 23 Journals sorted alphabetically
African American Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
American Imago     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.121, CiteScore: 0)
American J. of Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 3.171, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Philology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.186, CiteScore: 0)
American Jewish History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.118, CiteScore: 0)
American Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.385, CiteScore: 0)
Arethusa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.119, CiteScore: 0)
ariel : A Review of Intl. English Literature     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.113, CiteScore: 0)
ASAP / J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Book History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 137)
Bookbird: A J. of Intl. Children's Literature     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Bulletin of the History of Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.421, CiteScore: 1)
Callaloo     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.114, CiteScore: 0)
CEA Critic     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Children's Literature     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Children's Literature Association Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Classical World     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 31, SJR: 0.116, CiteScore: 0)
College Literature     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Configurations     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.165, CiteScore: 0)
Dante Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
diacritics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.139, CiteScore: 0)
Eighteenth-Century Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.16, CiteScore: 0)
Journal Cover
Children's Literature Association Quarterly
Number of Followers: 17  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0885-0429 - ISSN (Online) 1553-1201
Published by Johns Hopkins University Press Homepage  [23 journals]
  • Introduction: Migration, Refugees, and Diaspora in Children's Literature
    • Abstract: This special issue is about displacement—voluntary, involuntary, cultural, emotional, geographical—and its effects on children.Today, 244 million people live outside the country of their birth. Of that number, 65.6 million have been forced to leave their homes. Nearly 22.5 million are refugees. Over half of all refugees are under the age of eighteen. Of the world's 10 million stateless people, one third are children. The numbers of refugees, asylum-seekers, the internally displaced, and the stateless are so extreme that "We are now witnessing the highest levels of displacement on record," according to the United Nations High Commissioner on Refugees (UNHCR). Indicating the severity of this crisis, the UNHCR ... Read More
      Keywords: Children's literature; Immigrant children; Illustrated children's books; Belonging (Social psychology) in children; Translating and interpreting; Emigration and immigration; Young adults; Melville, Herman,; Children; Fiction; Reading; Children's stor
      PubDate: 2018-12-03T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Seeing the Human Face: Refugee and Asylum Seeker Narratives and an Ethics
           of Care in Recent Australian Picture Books
    • Abstract: While working on the final stages of this essay, I went to a local children's bookstore to look for a retelling of The Tempest to assist the eleven-year-old in my life with a drama audition.1 The audition required him to memorize the monologue in which Trinculo finds Caliban on the beach and asks, "What have we here' a man or a fish' dead or alive'" (2.2.24–25). The owner of the shop—who knows my field of research and advises me when new books arrive that she thinks would interest me—asked whether I had seen the latest Armin Greder book, The Mediterranean, which had arrived in her shop that week. I had not, so she brought the book over to me. The only words in the narrative appear on the first page: "After he had ... Read More
      Keywords: Children's literature; Immigrant children; Illustrated children's books; Belonging (Social psychology) in children; Translating and interpreting; Emigration and immigration; Young adults; Melville, Herman,; Children; Fiction; Reading; Children's stor
      PubDate: 2018-12-03T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • "I be home": Childhood Belonging and Un/becoming in Hawai'i
    • Abstract: When the figure of the child is evoked in social and moral debates, it often serves as the nexus of belonging, citizenship, and the nation. Popular discourse surrounding children, crystallized in the common saying "the children are our future," demarcates them as future or not-yet citizens who need to be protected from social ills but, at the same time, socialized into their political community so as to be able to inherit the nation upon reaching adulthood and attaining full political citizenship. Because children, in Judith (Jack) Halberstam's phrase, "have been deployed as part of a hetero-logic of futurity" (120), they cannot simply be children but must undergo a process of becoming that is closely monitored and ... Read More
      Keywords: Children's literature; Immigrant children; Illustrated children's books; Belonging (Social psychology) in children; Translating and interpreting; Emigration and immigration; Young adults; Melville, Herman,; Children; Fiction; Reading; Children's stor
      PubDate: 2018-12-03T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • "Mother Tells Me to Forget": Nostalgic Re-presentations, Re-membering, and
           Re-telling the Child Migrant's Identity and Agency in Children's
           Literature
    • Abstract: "When a war ends, it does not go away," [my mother] says. "It hides inside us. . . . Just forget!" . . .But I do not want to do what Mother says. . . . I want to remember.I like to tell stories. I'm going to tell you a story about a girl who didn't want to belong. . . . I put it down on paper and then the ghost does not ache so much. I write it down and Mango says goodbye sometimes. She does not hold me with both arms. She sets me free.It is precisely at this juncture that we begin to see autobiographical memory serving as a vehicle for tracing the trajectory of a life and, via narrative, giving it meaning. Historicity, autobiographical memory, and narrative identity therefore emerge as an interlocking discursive ... Read More
      Keywords: Children's literature; Immigrant children; Illustrated children's books; Belonging (Social psychology) in children; Translating and interpreting; Emigration and immigration; Young adults; Melville, Herman,; Children; Fiction; Reading; Children's stor
      PubDate: 2018-12-03T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Reassembling Sacred Relics: Translation, Diaspora, and Andriy Chaikovsky's
           Za Sestroyu
    • Abstract: As scholars of translation often observe, there is a rich link between translation and metaphor,1 not least because both are predicated on acts of relation. After all, translation involves the relationship between two discrete languages and their immanent cultural sensibilities, just as metaphor involves the implicit and illuminating connection between two distinct objects or images. In fact, as Peter Cole observes, the etymology of "translation" (from the Latin translatio) corresponds to that of "metaphor" (from the Greek metaphora) insofar as both suggest a "ferrying or carrying across" (15). Building on this etymological correspondence, which he renders as "to move from one place to another," Eliot Weinberger ... Read More
      Keywords: Children's literature; Immigrant children; Illustrated children's books; Belonging (Social psychology) in children; Translating and interpreting; Emigration and immigration; Young adults; Melville, Herman,; Children; Fiction; Reading; Children's stor
      PubDate: 2018-12-03T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • A Mediterranean Melville: Representing Migration for Young Adult Readers
           in Francesco D'Adamo's Storia di Ismael che ha attraversato il mare
    • Abstract: Chiamatemi Ismael. Mia madre era una beduina delle sabbie, mio padre un pescatore berbero della costa. (Call me Ismael. My mother was a Bedouin of the sand, my father a Berber fisherman of the coast.)Francesco D'Adamo opens his 2009 young adult novel Storia di Ismael che ha attraversato il mare (The Story of Ismael Who Crossed the Sea) by conjuring and immediately displacing Melville's classic text.1 Ismael lives with his family on the western coast of North Africa, learning the trade of working the sea from his father. Pollution generated by a factory in the city forces Ismael's father to sail ever farther from the coast to find uncontaminated fish. At fourteen, Ismael, along with his mother and two younger ... Read More
      Keywords: Children's literature; Immigrant children; Illustrated children's books; Belonging (Social psychology) in children; Translating and interpreting; Emigration and immigration; Young adults; Melville, Herman,; Children; Fiction; Reading; Children's stor
      PubDate: 2018-12-03T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Diving into the Past: Cognitive Tools for Developing Resistant Literacy in
           a Postcolonial Dutch-Antillean Hybrid Novel
    • Abstract: "Children's literature and culture are among the best places to imagine a better future," Philip Nel writes in Was the Cat in the Hat Black' The Hidden Racism of Children's Literature, and the Need for Diverse Books (224). Nel's claim works particularly well if we accept that one of the main functions of children's literature is to socialize its readers. Scholars of such literature, including myself, generally do adhere to that premise. This vantage point entails a belief in both the transformative power of literature—that is, in its potential to mediate in social matters—and the ability of readers to adopt an active subject position. In Foucauldian terms, as expressed by Stuart Hall, the latter concept refers to ... Read More
      Keywords: Children's literature; Immigrant children; Illustrated children's books; Belonging (Social psychology) in children; Translating and interpreting; Emigration and immigration; Young adults; Melville, Herman,; Children; Fiction; Reading; Children's stor
      PubDate: 2018-12-03T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Books Received
    • Abstract: Charles Perrault: The Complete Fairy Tales. By Charles Perrault. Edited and translated by Christopher Betts. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2018.First published in 2009, this reissued collection of Perrault's fairy tales includes a scholarly introduction and explanatory notes by Christopher Betts, who also provides a detailed chronology of important events and milestones in Perrault's life.More Than True: The Wisdom of Fairy Tales. By Robert Bly. New York: Holt, 2018.Known primarily as a poet, Robert Bly is also a cultural critic associated with the mythopoetic movement. In this short volume, he discusses the cultural and psychological messages embedded in six traditional fairy tales: "The Six Swans," "The Frog ... Read More
      Keywords: Children's literature; Immigrant children; Illustrated children's books; Belonging (Social psychology) in children; Translating and interpreting; Emigration and immigration; Young adults; Melville, Herman,; Children; Fiction; Reading; Children's stor
      PubDate: 2018-12-03T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Twenty-First-Century Feminisms in Children's and Adolescent Literature by
           Roberta Seelinger Trites (review)
    • Abstract: Roberta Seelinger Trites begins this volume with a definition of feminism that has much in common with the one that she used in Waking Sleeping Beauty: Feminist Voices in Children's Novels (1997). She also admits that she continues to "believe that most aspects of life are mediated by language and discourse" (xvi). Despite these links to her earlier work, however, Twenty-First-Century Feminisms offers a strikingly different theoretical perspective on children's and adolescent literature. It has much to offer anyone interested in how the principles of material feminism inform various contemporary feminisms and how reading literature for young people through the lens of material feminism can bring into focus ... Read More
      Keywords: Children's literature; Immigrant children; Illustrated children's books; Belonging (Social psychology) in children; Translating and interpreting; Emigration and immigration; Young adults; Melville, Herman,; Children; Fiction; Reading; Children's stor
      PubDate: 2018-12-03T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Graphic Girlhoods: Visualizing Education and Violence by Elizabeth
           Marshall (review)
    • Abstract: In this slim but high-impact volume, Elizabeth Marshall examines a number of graphic texts—some written for girls, some written about girlhoods—in order to construct a complex, compelling argument about the role of violence in girls' education. Focusing primarily on texts from the United States and Canada, she argues "that violence is a key element of the girl's education, and that this curriculum, and resistance to it, circulates in familiar storylines and images across visual culture, especially in texts for or about the girl" (4). The intersection of graphic texts, pedagogies of girlhood, and feminist lenses for reading allows Marshall to maintain a narrow focus while creating space for sometimes surprising ... Read More
      Keywords: Children's literature; Immigrant children; Illustrated children's books; Belonging (Social psychology) in children; Translating and interpreting; Emigration and immigration; Young adults; Melville, Herman,; Children; Fiction; Reading; Children's stor
      PubDate: 2018-12-03T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Heroes, Heroines, and Everything in Between: Challenging Gender and
           Sexuality Stereotypes in Children's Entertainment Media ed. by CarrieLynn
           D. Reinhard and Christopher J. Olson (review)
    • Abstract: In 2014, Ellen Oh and over twenty other writers and publishing professionals launched the sorely needed We Need More Diverse Books movement. The campaign's definition of "diversity" is quite expansive and thereby, like this anthology, inclusive of the LGBTQIA+ community. However, while the former includes many historically disenfranchised groups of people and focuses exclusively on literature, the latter is concerned with representations of gender and sexuality in children's media, literature, and material culture.Separated into an introduction, thirteen chapters by different scholars, and a conclusion, Heroes, Heroines, and Everything in Between references a broad array of media: television shows, film ... Read More
      Keywords: Children's literature; Immigrant children; Illustrated children's books; Belonging (Social psychology) in children; Translating and interpreting; Emigration and immigration; Young adults; Melville, Herman,; Children; Fiction; Reading; Children's stor
      PubDate: 2018-12-03T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Writing Youth: Young Adult Fiction as Literacy Sponsorship by Jonathan
           Alexander (review)
    • Abstract: Jonathan Alexander's Writing Youth provides a much-needed analysis of young adult fiction not just as textual productions, but also as complex multimodal and multimedia webs in which young people actively participate. Alexander takes as his starting point the realization that such fiction is not only "a marketing and reading phenomenon" but can also be seen as "a powerful form of literacy sponsorship, one that guides young people's reading interests and promotes engagement with certain notions of what it means to be literate in contemporary capitalist and increasingly neoliberalized cultures" (4). From this starting point, he explores the ways in which literature for adolescents "sponsors" literacy both through ... Read More
      Keywords: Children's literature; Immigrant children; Illustrated children's books; Belonging (Social psychology) in children; Translating and interpreting; Emigration and immigration; Young adults; Melville, Herman,; Children; Fiction; Reading; Children's stor
      PubDate: 2018-12-03T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Tales of Literacy for the 21st Century by Maryanne Wolf, with Stephanie
           Gottwald (review)
    • Abstract: Today's mass literacy campaigns can take advantage of affordable technology and an interdisciplinary understanding of the developing mind. The present volume draws upon both, though not necessarily in harmony with each other. Maryanne Wolf is a driving force in a "Global Literacy Collaborative," originally spearheaded by the Tufts Center for Reading and Language Research (which she chairs), the MIT Media Lab teams built around Nicholas Negroponte and Cynthia Breazeal that also included the famous One Laptop Per Child initiative, and Robin Morris of Georgia State University.Tales of Literacy for the 21st Century is a programmatic account of the neurocognitive, developmental, and humanitarian underpinnings and aims ... Read More
      Keywords: Children's literature; Immigrant children; Illustrated children's books; Belonging (Social psychology) in children; Translating and interpreting; Emigration and immigration; Young adults; Melville, Herman,; Children; Fiction; Reading; Children's stor
      PubDate: 2018-12-03T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Oz Behind the Iron Curtain: Aleksandr Volkov and His Magic Land Series by
           Erika Haber (review)
    • Abstract: Erika Haber's study, a recent addition to the University Press of Mississippi's Children's Literature Association series, presents a fascinating and largely unexplored case of Cold War intertextuality. In 1939, just after Stalin's Great Terror subsided, an unknown Soviet mathematician, teacher, and aspiring children's author named Aleksandr Volkov (1891–1977) managed, through one of those publishing miracles that seem strangely common in the history of Russian literature, to bring out a free adaptation of L. Frank Baum's The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. Volkov called his book Wizard of the Emerald City, and despite a fine-print line on the copyright page identifying it as a reworking of the American story, most readers ... Read More
      Keywords: Children's literature; Immigrant children; Illustrated children's books; Belonging (Social psychology) in children; Translating and interpreting; Emigration and immigration; Young adults; Melville, Herman,; Children; Fiction; Reading; Children's stor
      PubDate: 2018-12-03T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • A Literature of Questions: Nonfiction for the Critical Child by Joe
           Sutliff Sanders (review)
    • Abstract: I have been waiting for a book like Joe Sutliff Sanders's A Literature of Questions for a long time. A deeply layered, complex scholarly study of literary nonfiction for children and young adults (aka trade nonfiction), it fills a gap in the study of the genres of literature for children and young adults by creating a structure for understanding nonfiction that parallels the deep and complex discussions of fiction and poetry. It identifies salient features and delimits tools and techniques for analysis, while it also models ways of working with them. Perhaps even more importantly, it makes a highly convincing argument for reconceptualizing how we think about nonfiction and its purposes.Over the course of an ... Read More
      Keywords: Children's literature; Immigrant children; Illustrated children's books; Belonging (Social psychology) in children; Translating and interpreting; Emigration and immigration; Young adults; Melville, Herman,; Children; Fiction; Reading; Children's stor
      PubDate: 2018-12-03T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Children's Literature Collections: Approaches to Research ed. by Keith
           O'Sullivan and Pádraic Whyte (review)
    • Abstract: Children's Literature Collections: Approaches to Research is a valuable addition to scholarship on the origin and development of Irish children's literature. The twelve essays in the volume grew out of the National Collection of Children's Books (NCCB) project, which culminated in an online union catalog and database of over 250,000 children's books from five libraries in Dublin, dating from the sixteenth century up to 2014. The book's title is suggestive of methodological contributions, but the real focus and strength of this essay collection is that it builds an understanding of the history of children's texts, reading, and education upon a rich heritage of primary materials held in Dublin. The disjuncture ... Read More
      Keywords: Children's literature; Immigrant children; Illustrated children's books; Belonging (Social psychology) in children; Translating and interpreting; Emigration and immigration; Young adults; Melville, Herman,; Children; Fiction; Reading; Children's stor
      PubDate: 2018-12-03T00:00:00-05:00
       
 
 
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