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Publisher: APA   (Total: 86 journals)   [Sort by number of followers]

Showing 1 - 86 of 86 Journals sorted alphabetically
American J. of Orthopsychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.909, CiteScore: 2)
American Psychologist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 231, SJR: 1.594, CiteScore: 4)
Archives of Scientific Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Asian American J. of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.718, CiteScore: 1)
Behavior Analysis: Research and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Behavioral Development Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription  
Behavioral Neuroscience     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 61, SJR: 1.473, CiteScore: 3)
Canadian J. of Behavioural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.362, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian J. of Experimental Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.696, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian Psychology / Psychologie canadienne     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.602, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Practice in Pediatric Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.362, CiteScore: 1)
Consulting Psychology J. : Practice and Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.314, CiteScore: 1)
Couple and Family Psychology : Research and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.924, CiteScore: 2)
Decision     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 1.687, CiteScore: 2)
Developmental Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 48, SJR: 2.066, CiteScore: 4)
Dreaming     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.43, CiteScore: 1)
Emotion     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 42, SJR: 2.151, CiteScore: 4)
Evolutionary Behavioral Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.858, CiteScore: 2)
Experimental and Clinical Psychopharmacology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 1.176, CiteScore: 3)
Families, Systems, & Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.425, CiteScore: 1)
Group Dynamics : Theory, Research, and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.84, CiteScore: 2)
Health Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 53, SJR: 1.775, CiteScore: 4)
History of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.233, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Play Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.258, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Stress Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.879, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. Perspectives in Psychology : Research, Practice, Consultation     Full-text available via subscription  
J. of Abnormal Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 34, SJR: 2.864, CiteScore: 4)
J. of Applied Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 196, SJR: 4.694, CiteScore: 6)
J. of Comparative Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.925, CiteScore: 2)
J. of Consulting and Clinical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 47, SJR: 2.757, CiteScore: 5)
J. of Counseling Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 31, SJR: 1.59, CiteScore: 4)
J. of Educational Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 54, SJR: 2.93, CiteScore: 5)
J. of Experimental Psychology : Animal Learning and Cognition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.833, CiteScore: 2)
J. of Experimental Psychology : Applied     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 36, SJR: 1.102, CiteScore: 2)
J. of Experimental Psychology : General     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 73, SJR: 3.254, CiteScore: 5)
J. of Experimental Psychology : Human Perception and Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 52, SJR: 1.543, CiteScore: 2)
J. of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 171, SJR: 1.826, CiteScore: 3)
J. of Family Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.325, CiteScore: 3)
J. of Latina/o Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
J. of Neuroscience, Psychology, and Economics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.479, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Occupational Health Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 38, SJR: 2.817, CiteScore: 5)
J. of Personality and Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 308, SJR: 4.302, CiteScore: 6)
J. of Psychotherapy Integration     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.576, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Rural Mental Health     Full-text available via subscription  
J. of Threat Assessment and Management     Full-text available via subscription  
Law and Human Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 39, SJR: 1.734, CiteScore: 3)
Motivation Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Neuropsychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27, SJR: 1.472, CiteScore: 3)
Personality Disorders: Theory, Research, and Treatment     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 2.14, CiteScore: 3)
Practice Innovations     Full-text available via subscription  
Professional Psychology : Research and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.885, CiteScore: 2)
Psychiatric Rehabilitation J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.802, CiteScore: 2)
Psychoanalytic Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.647, CiteScore: 1)
Psychological Assessment     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.962, CiteScore: 3)
Psychological Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 269, SJR: 8.793, CiteScore: 16)
Psychological Methods     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21, SJR: 4.02, CiteScore: 6)
Psychological Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 190, SJR: 4.64, CiteScore: 7)
Psychological Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.788, CiteScore: 2)
Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19, SJR: 1.048, CiteScore: 2)
Psychology and Aging     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19, SJR: 1.661, CiteScore: 3)
Psychology of Addictive Behaviors     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.267, CiteScore: 3)
Psychology of Aesthetics, Creativity and the Arts     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 1.272, CiteScore: 3)
Psychology of Consciousness : Theory, Research, and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Psychology of Men and Masculinity     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24, SJR: 1.059, CiteScore: 2)
Psychology of Popular Media Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Psychology of Religion and Spirituality     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18, SJR: 1.034, CiteScore: 2)
Psychology of Sexual Orientation and Gender Diversity     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.156, CiteScore: 3)
Psychology of Violence     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.427, CiteScore: 2)
Psychology, Public Policy, and Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.431, CiteScore: 3)
Psychomusicology : Music, Mind, and Brain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Psychotherapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Qualitative Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.686, CiteScore: 2)
Rehabilitation Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.715, CiteScore: 2)
Review of General Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.25, CiteScore: 3)
Scholarship of Teaching and Learning in Psychology     Full-text available via subscription  
School Psychology Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.28, CiteScore: 3)
Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19, SJR: 1.126, CiteScore: 2)
Spirituality in Clinical Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.425, CiteScore: 1)
Sport, Exercise, and Performance Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.95, CiteScore: 2)
Stigma and Health     Full-text available via subscription  
The Humanistic Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.255, CiteScore: 0)
The Psychologist-Manager J.     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.351, CiteScore: 1)
Training and Education in Professional Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.584, CiteScore: 1)
Translational Issues in Psychological Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Traumatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.502, CiteScore: 1)
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Journal of Experimental Psychology : Human Perception and Performance
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.543
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 52  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0096-1523 - ISSN (Online) 1939-1277
Published by APA Homepage  [86 journals]
  • Familiarity does not inhibit image-specific encoding of faces.
    • Abstract: When matching and recognizing familiar faces, performance is unaffected by changes to image-specific details such as lighting, head angle, and expression. In contrast, these changes have a substantial impact on performance when faces are unfamiliar. What process can account for this difference' Recent evidence shows a memory disadvantage for remembering specific images of familiar people compared to unfamiliar people, suggesting that image invariance in familiar face processing may be supported by loss of image-specific details in memory. Here, we examine whether this cost results from loss of image specific details during encoding of familiar faces. Participants completed four tasks that required participants to retain image-specific information in working memory: duplicate detection (Experiment 1), change detection (Experiment 2), short-term recognition memory (Experiment 3 and 5), and visual search (Experiment 4). Across all experiments (combined n = 270), our results consistently show equivalent memory performance for specific images of familiar and unfamiliar faces. We conclude that familiarity does not influence encoding of pictorial details, suggesting that loss of image-specificity reported in previous work is a result of longer-term storage mechanisms. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Mon, 27 May 2019 04:00:00 GMT
       
  • Phase specific shape aftereffects explained by the tilt aftereffect.
    • Abstract: Aftereffects of adaptation are frequently used to infer mechanisms of human visual perception. Commonly, the properties of stimuli are repelled from properties of the adaptor. For example, in the tilt aftereffect a line is repelled in orientation from a previously experienced line. Perceived orientation is predicted by the centroid of the responses of a population of mechanisms individually tuned to limited ranges of orientation but collectively sensitive to the whole possible range. Aftereffects are also predictable if the mechanisms are allowed to adapt. Adaptation across radial frequency patterns, patterns deformed from circular by a sinusoidal modulation of radius, causes repulsive aftereffects, sensitive to the relative amplitudes and orientations of the patterns. Here we show that these shape aftereffects can be accounted for by the application of local tilt aftereffects around the shape contour. We suggest that fields of tilt aftereffects might provide a general mechanism for exaggerating the perceptual difference between successively experienced stimuli, making them more discriminable. If the human visual system does indeed exploit this possibility, then the conclusions often made by studies assuming adaptation within mechanisms sensitive to the shape of stimuli will need to be reconsidered. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 25 Apr 2019 04:00:00 GMT
       
  • Can we prepare to attend to one of two simultaneous voices'
    • Abstract: We can selectively attend to one of two simultaneous voices sharing a source location. Can we endogenously select the voice before speech is heard' Participants heard two digit names, spoken simultaneously by a male voice and a female voice, following a visual cue indicating which voice’s digit to classify as odd or even. There was a substantial cost in reaction time and errors when the target voice switched from one trial to the next. In Experiment 1, with a highly familiar pair of voices, the switch cost reduced by nearly half as the cue-stimulus interval increased from 50 to 800 ms, indicating (contrary to previous reports) effective endogenous preparation for a change of voice. No further reduction in switch cost occurred with a longer preparation interval—this “residual” switch cost may be attributable to attentional “inertia.” In Experiment 2, with previously unfamiliar voices, the pattern of switch costs was very similar, though repeated attention to the same target voice over a run of trials improved performance more. Delaying the onset of one voice by 366 ms improved performance, but the pattern of preparatory tuning effects was similar. Thus, endogenous preparation for a voice is possible, but it is limited in efficacy, as for some other attentional domains. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 25 Apr 2019 04:00:00 GMT
       
  • Manipulation of expended effort and intent does not affect estimates of
           slant or distance.
    • Abstract: It is well known that people overestimate the orientation of both geographical and man-made sloped surfaces by between 5°–20°. More recently, work has shown that when people are encumbered by wearing a heavy backpack they overestimate hills and distances even more than a group not wearing heavy backpacks; however, the backpack manipulation has since been shown to be a demand effect—that is, being encumbered does not affect perception—it only biases those people influenced by it to give estimates the experimenters are seeking. Here we first show that expended effort and intent have never actually been manipulated between subjects in any of the work on steepness estimates, and expended effort has never been explicitly manipulated between subjects for distance estimates. When they are, they do not affect steepness or distance estimates. Our work is the first to experimentally manipulate effort and intent, to do this between subjects, while controlling for demand characteristics and checking to see whether the effort manipulation was effective. The experimental manipulation of effort and especially intent may be of benefit to parsing out perceptual effects from more cognitive or postperceptual processes in future work. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Mon, 22 Apr 2019 04:00:00 GMT
       
  • Seeing social events: The visual specialization for dyadic
           human–human interactions.
    • Abstract: Detection and recognition of social interactions unfolding in the surroundings is as vital as detection and recognition of faces, bodies, and animate entities in general. We have demonstrated that the visual system is particularly sensitive to a configuration with two bodies facing each other as if interacting. In four experiments using backward masking on healthy adults, we investigated the properties of this dyadic visual representation. We measured the inversion effect (IE), the cost on recognition, of seeing bodies upside-down as opposed to upright, as an index of visual sensitivity: the greater the visual sensitivity, the greater the IE. The IE was increased for facing (vs. nonfacing) dyads, whether the head/face direction was visible or not, which implies that visual sensitivity concerns two bodies, not just two faces/heads. Moreover, the difference in IE for facing versus nonfacing dyads disappeared when one body was replaced by another object. This implies selective sensitivity to a body facing another body, as opposed to a body facing anything. Finally, the IE was reduced when reciprocity was eliminated (one body faced another, but the latter faced away). Thus, the visual system is sensitive selectively to dyadic configurations that approximate a prototypical social exchange with two bodies spatially close and mutually accessible to one another. These findings reveal visual configural representations encompassing multiple objects, which could provide fast and automatic parsing of complex relationships beyond individual faces or bodies. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 18 Apr 2019 04:00:00 GMT
       
  • Grab that face, hammer, or line: No effect of hands position on visual
           memory.
    • Abstract: Is visual memory enhanced near the hands' The embodied cognition framework postulates that body states and action greatly influence cognition. Accordingly, numerous studies have argued that hands position affects visual perception and attention. However, it is less clear whether this effect could be extended to visual memory. Thus, to examine the consequences of hands position on memory, more than 300 participants were tested in 7 experiments (including one direct replication) that investigated memory for information presented near and far from the hands. Because past studies argued that the hands position effect might be related to magnocellular and parvocellular processing, the to-be-remembered items included both high- and low-spatially filtered faces, simple colors and line orientations, as well as graspable objects. Overall, the data from all conditions tested in those experiments unequivocally showed no reliable impact of hands position on visual memory. Bayesian analyses provided further support for a credible lack of hands position impact on memory, regardless of the type of the presented stimuli or task demands. These data clearly suggest that hands position has no meaningful lasting impact, implying in turn that any effect of hands position on performance is limited and should be taken skeptically. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 18 Apr 2019 04:00:00 GMT
       
  • Evidence for a reduction of the rightward extent of the perceptual span
           when reading dynamic horizontally scrolling text.
    • Abstract: The dynamic horizontally scrolling text format produces a directional conflict in the allocation of attention for reading, with a necessity to track each word leftward (in the direction of movement) concurrently with normal rightward shifts made to progress through the text (in left-to-right orthographies such as English). The gaze-contingent window paradigm was used to compare the extent of the perceptual span in reading of scrolling and static sentences. Across two experiments, this investigation confirmed that the allocation of attentional resources to the right of fixation was compressed with scrolling text. There was no evidence for a reversal of the direction of asymmetry or a confounding shift of landing position. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 18 Apr 2019 04:00:00 GMT
       
  • Real-world size is automatically encoded in preschoolers’ object
           representations.
    • Abstract: When adults see a picture of an object, they automatically process how big the object typically is in the real world (Konkle & Oliva, 2012a). How much life experience is needed for this automatic size processing to emerge' Here, we ask whether preschoolers show this same signature of automatic size processing. We showed 3- and 4-year-olds displays with two pictures of objects and asked them to touch the picture that was smaller on the screen. Critically, the relative visual sizes of the objects could be either congruent with their relative real-world sizes (e.g., a small picture of a shoe next to a big picture of a car) or incongruent with their relative real-world sizes (e.g., a big picture of a shoe next to a small picture of a car). Across two experiments, we found that preschoolers were worse at making visual size judgments on incongruent trials, suggesting that real-world size was automatically activated and interfered with their performance. In addition, we found that both 4-year-olds and adults showed similar item-pair effects (i.e., showed larger Size-Stroop effects for a given pair of items, relative to other pairs). Furthermore, the magnitude of the item-pair Stroop effects in 4-year-olds did not depend on whether they could recognize the pictured objects, suggesting that the perceptual features of these objects were sufficient to trigger the processing of real-world size information. These results indicate that, by 3–4 years of age, children automatically extract real-world size information from depicted objects. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Mon, 15 Apr 2019 04:00:00 GMT
       
  • The relationship between working memory and the dual-target cost in visual
           search guidance.
    • Abstract: Searching for two targets produces a dual-target cost compared with single-target search, with reduced attentional guidance toward targets (Stroud, Menneer, Cave, & Donnelly, 2012). We explore the effect of holding a color in working memory (WM) on guidance in single-target search. In Experiments 1 and 2, participants searched for a T of a specific color while holding one of the following in WM: a color patch, a letter, a dot pattern, or an oriented bar. Only when holding a color in WM was guidance in single-target search affected as strongly as it is in dual-target search. In Experiment 3, the target changed color from trial to trial. A color in WM reduced guidance, but not to the extent of dual-target search. However, search and WM error rates were high, suggesting interference and incomplete engagement with the combined task. We conclude that the guidance cost in dual-target search is not solely due to attentional capture by the WM-color, because the WM-color can be effectively separated from search color, with little confusion between the two. However, WM load does cause substantial interference in guidance when both tasks involve color. These results illustrate the complex interactions between WM and attentional guidance. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Mon, 15 Apr 2019 04:00:00 GMT
       
 
 
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