Publisher: APA   (Total: 86 journals)   [Sort by number of followers]

Showing 1 - 86 of 86 Journals sorted alphabetically
American J. of Orthopsychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.909, CiteScore: 2)
American Psychologist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 276, SJR: 1.594, CiteScore: 4)
Archives of Scientific Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Asian American J. of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.718, CiteScore: 1)
Behavior Analysis: Research and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Behavioral Development Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription  
Behavioral Neuroscience     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 64, SJR: 1.473, CiteScore: 3)
Canadian J. of Behavioural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.362, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian J. of Experimental Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.696, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian Psychology / Psychologie canadienne     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.602, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Practice in Pediatric Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.362, CiteScore: 1)
Consulting Psychology J. : Practice and Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.314, CiteScore: 1)
Couple and Family Psychology : Research and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.924, CiteScore: 2)
Decision     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.687, CiteScore: 2)
Developmental Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 49, SJR: 2.066, CiteScore: 4)
Dreaming     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.43, CiteScore: 1)
Emotion     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 42, SJR: 2.151, CiteScore: 4)
Evolutionary Behavioral Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.858, CiteScore: 2)
Experimental and Clinical Psychopharmacology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 1.176, CiteScore: 3)
Families, Systems, & Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.425, CiteScore: 1)
Group Dynamics : Theory, Research, and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.84, CiteScore: 2)
Health Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 56, SJR: 1.775, CiteScore: 4)
History of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.233, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Play Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.258, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Stress Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.879, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. Perspectives in Psychology : Research, Practice, Consultation     Full-text available via subscription  
J. of Abnormal Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 35, SJR: 2.864, CiteScore: 4)
J. of Applied Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 229, SJR: 4.694, CiteScore: 6)
J. of Comparative Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.925, CiteScore: 2)
J. of Consulting and Clinical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 48, SJR: 2.757, CiteScore: 5)
J. of Counseling Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 31, SJR: 1.59, CiteScore: 4)
J. of Educational Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 56, SJR: 2.93, CiteScore: 5)
J. of Experimental Psychology : Animal Learning and Cognition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.833, CiteScore: 2)
J. of Experimental Psychology : Applied     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 38, SJR: 1.102, CiteScore: 2)
J. of Experimental Psychology : General     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 84, SJR: 3.254, CiteScore: 5)
J. of Experimental Psychology : Human Perception and Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 57, SJR: 1.543, CiteScore: 2)
J. of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 198, SJR: 1.826, CiteScore: 3)
J. of Family Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.325, CiteScore: 3)
J. of Latina/o Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
J. of Neuroscience, Psychology, and Economics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.479, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Occupational Health Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 41, SJR: 2.817, CiteScore: 5)
J. of Personality and Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 350, SJR: 4.302, CiteScore: 6)
J. of Psychotherapy Integration     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.576, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Rural Mental Health     Full-text available via subscription  
J. of Threat Assessment and Management     Full-text available via subscription  
Law and Human Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 35, SJR: 1.734, CiteScore: 3)
Motivation Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Neuropsychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29, SJR: 1.472, CiteScore: 3)
Personality Disorders: Theory, Research, and Treatment     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.14, CiteScore: 3)
Practice Innovations     Full-text available via subscription  
Professional Psychology : Research and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.885, CiteScore: 2)
Psychiatric Rehabilitation J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.802, CiteScore: 2)
Psychoanalytic Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.647, CiteScore: 1)
Psychological Assessment     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.962, CiteScore: 3)
Psychological Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 300, SJR: 8.793, CiteScore: 16)
Psychological Methods     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21, SJR: 4.02, CiteScore: 6)
Psychological Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 233, SJR: 4.64, CiteScore: 7)
Psychological Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.788, CiteScore: 2)
Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20, SJR: 1.048, CiteScore: 2)
Psychology and Aging     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19, SJR: 1.661, CiteScore: 3)
Psychology of Addictive Behaviors     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.267, CiteScore: 3)
Psychology of Aesthetics, Creativity and the Arts     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.272, CiteScore: 3)
Psychology of Consciousness : Theory, Research, and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Psychology of Men and Masculinity     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24, SJR: 1.059, CiteScore: 2)
Psychology of Popular Media Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Psychology of Religion and Spirituality     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 1.034, CiteScore: 2)
Psychology of Sexual Orientation and Gender Diversity     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.156, CiteScore: 3)
Psychology of Violence     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18, SJR: 1.427, CiteScore: 2)
Psychology, Public Policy, and Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.431, CiteScore: 3)
Psychomusicology : Music, Mind, and Brain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Psychotherapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Qualitative Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.686, CiteScore: 2)
Rehabilitation Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.715, CiteScore: 2)
Review of General Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.25, CiteScore: 3)
Scholarship of Teaching and Learning in Psychology     Full-text available via subscription  
School Psychology Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.28, CiteScore: 3)
Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19, SJR: 1.126, CiteScore: 2)
Spirituality in Clinical Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.425, CiteScore: 1)
Sport, Exercise, and Performance Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.95, CiteScore: 2)
Stigma and Health     Full-text available via subscription  
The Humanistic Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.255, CiteScore: 0)
The Psychologist-Manager J.     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.351, CiteScore: 1)
Training and Education in Professional Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.584, CiteScore: 1)
Translational Issues in Psychological Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Traumatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.502, CiteScore: 1)
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Journal of Experimental Psychology : Human Perception and Performance
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.543
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 57  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0096-1523 - ISSN (Online) 1939-1277
Published by APA Homepage  [86 journals]
  • Reconciling cognitive-control and episodic-retrieval accounts of
           sequential conflict modulation: Binding of control-states into
           event-files.
    • Abstract: How do we manage to shield our goals against distraction' Traditionally, this ability has been attributed to top-down cognitive control, which is assumed to monitor for and intervene in case of response conflicts. However, this account has been challenged by episodic-retrieval views, which attribute sequential modulations of conflict effects to bottom-up memory for stimulus and response features. Here we tested a new theory suggesting that that control and retrieval accounts are no alternatives but, rather, 2 sides of the same coin. According to this view, the control parameter can become stored in event files, together with stimulus, response, and context codes, so that cognitive control operations, independently from the stimulus-response codes the operate on, can come under mnemonic control. Using a novel design that eliminates any stimulus and response binding and at the same time disentangles conflict and retrieval of control states, we provide the strongest evidence to date that abstract control parameters are stored into trial-specific event files. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Mon, 05 Aug 2019 04:00:00 GMT
       
  • Complexity can facilitate visual and auditory perception.
    • Abstract: Visual and auditory inputs vary in complexity. For example, driving in a city versus the country or listening to the radio versus not are experiences that differ in complexity. How does such complexity impact perception' One possibility is that complex stimuli demand resources that exceed attentional or working memory capacities, reducing sensitivity to perceptual changes. Alternatively, complexity may allow for richer and more distinctive representations, increasing such sensitivity. We performed five experiments to test the nature of the relationship between complexity and perceptual sensitivity during movie clip viewing. Experiment 1 revealed higher sensitivity to global changes in audio or video streams for clips with greater complexity, defined both subjectively (judgments by independent coders) and objectively (information-theoretic redundancy). Experiment 2 replicated this finding but found no evidence that it resulted from complexity drawing attention. Experiment 3 provided a boundary condition by showing that change detection was unaffected by complexity when the changes were superimposed on, rather than dispersed throughout, the clips. Experiment 4 suggested that the effect of complexity, at least when defined objectively, was present without the working memory demands of the preceding experiments. Experiment 5 suggested that complexity led to richer representations of the clips, as reflected in enhanced long-term memory. Collectively, these findings show that, despite increasing informational load, complexity can serve to ground and facilitate perceptual sensitivity. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 18 Jul 2019 04:00:00 GMT
       
  • Incidental memory following rapid object processing: The role of attention
           allocation strategies.
    • Abstract: When observers search for multiple (rather than singular) targets, they are slower and less accurate, yet have better incidental memory for nontarget items encountered during the task (Hout & Goldinger, 2010). One explanation for this may be that observers titrate their attention allocation based on the expected difficulty suggested by search cues. Difficult search cues may implicitly encourage observers to narrow their attention, simultaneously enhancing distractor encoding and hindering peripheral processing. Across three experiments, we manipulated the difficulty of search cues preceding passive visual search for real-world objects, using a Rapid Serial Visual Presentation (RSVP) task to equate item exposure durations. In all experiments, incidental memory was enhanced for distractors encountered while participants monitored for difficult targets. Moreover, in key trials, peripheral shapes appeared at varying eccentricities off center, allowing us to infer the spread and precision of participants’ attentional windows. Peripheral item detection and identification decreased when search cues were difficult, even when the peripheral items appeared before targets. These results were not an artifact of sustained vigilance in miss trials, but instead reflect top-down modulation of attention allocation based on task demands. Implications for individual differences are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 20 Jun 2019 04:00:00 GMT
       
  • Intentional binding as Bayesian cue combination: Testing predictions with
           trait individual differences.
    • Abstract: We investigated differences in intentional binding in high and low hypnotizable groups to explore two questions relating to (a) trait differences in the availability of motor intentions to metacognitive processes and (b) a proposed cue combination model of binding. An experience of involuntariness is central to hypnotic responding and may arise from strategically being unaware of one’s intentions. Trait differences in the ability to respond to hypnotic suggestion may reflect differing levels of access to motor intentions. Intentional binding refers to the subjective compression of the time between an action and its outcome, indicated by a forward shift in the judged time of an action toward its outcome (action binding) and the backward shift of an outcome toward a causal action (outcome binding). Intentional binding is sensitive to intentional action without requiring explicit reflection upon agency. One way of explaining the sensitivity of intentional binding is to see it as a simple case of multisensory cue combination in which awareness of intentions increases knowledge of the timing of actions. Here we present results consistent with such a mechanism. In a contingent presentation of action and outcome events, low hypnotizable had more precise timing judgments of actions and also showed weaker action binding than highs. These results support the theory that trait hypnotizability is related to access to information related to motor intentions, and that intentional binding reflects the Bayesian combination of cross-modal cues. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 20 Jun 2019 04:00:00 GMT
       
  • Temporal reproduction within and across senses: Testing the supramodal
           property of the pacemaker-counter model.
    • Abstract: The human ability to compare time between sensory modalities implies a supramodal representation of time. This notion is consistent with the pacemaker-counter model (PCM), the core architecture of prominent timing theories. Some theorists, however, have promoted modality-specific timing mechanisms, which might hamper crossmodal temporal comparison. This study tested whether PCM is sufficient to account for intra- as well as crossmodal timing. To account for modality-specific timing differences, we proceeded from the common assumption that the pacemaker runs faster for auditory than for visual stimuli. Participants reproduced short and long standards (800 vs. 2,400 ms) by terminating a comparison stimulus. In Experiment 1, in each trial the sensory modalities (auditory vs. visual) of the standard and the comparison were the same (congruent) or different (incongruent). PCM implies that timing performance depends on modality order. However, there should be virtually no congruency effects on overall performance. Although the results largely matched the predictions of PCM, there were substantial congruency effects on reproduction variability especially in the subsecond range. Three intramodal control experiments, however, showed that similar congruency effects can be observed when the standard and the comparison differ in intramodal characteristics. This suggests that temporal representations are not isolated from nontemporal stimulus characteristics, even when these are subtle and within the same modality. The present results can be interpreted as evidence for sensory timing within the subsecond range. Nevertheless, we used computer simulations to evaluate extensions of PCM that could account for the present result pattern, while retaining PCM’s supramodal property. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 20 Jun 2019 04:00:00 GMT
       
  • Geometric categories in cognition.
    • Abstract: At the scale in which we live, space is continuous. Nevertheless, our perception and cognition parse the world into categories, whether physical, like scene or object, or abstract, like infinitesimal point or 7. The present study focuses on 2 categories of special angles in planar geometry, parallels and perpendiculars, and we evaluate how these categories might be reflected in adults’ basic angle discrimination. In the first experiment, participants were most precise when detecting 2 parallel or perpendicular lines among other pairs of lines at different relative orientations. Detection was also enhanced for 2 connected lines whose angle approached 90°, with precision peaking at 90°. These patterns emerged despite large variations in the scales and orientations of the angle exemplars. In the second experiment, the enhanced detection of perpendiculars persisted when stimuli were rotated in depth, indicating a capacity to discriminate shapes based on perpendicularity in 3 dimensions despite large variation in angles’ 2-dimensional projections. The results suggest that 2 categorical concepts which lie at the foundation of Euclidean geometry, parallelism and perpendicularity, are reflected in our discrimination of simple visual forms, and they pave the way for future studies exploring the developmental and evolutionary origins of these cognitive categories. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 20 Jun 2019 04:00:00 GMT
       
  • Specifying the precision of guiding features for visual search.
    • Abstract: Visual search is the task of finding things with uncertain locations. Despite decades of research, the features that guide visual search remain poorly specified, especially in realistic contexts. This study tested the role of two features—shape and orientation—both in the presence and absence of hue information. We conducted five experiments to describe preview–target mismatch effects, decreases in performance caused by differences between the image of the target as it appears in the preview and as it appears in the actual search display. These mismatch effects provide direct measures of feature importance, with larger performance decrements expected for more important features. Contrary to previous conclusions, our data suggest that shape and orientation only guide visual search when color is not available. By varying the probability of mismatch in each feature dimension, we also show that these patterns of feature guidance do not change with the probability that the previewed feature will be invalid. We conclude that the target representations used to guide visual search are much less precise than previously believed, with participants encoding and using color and little else. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 20 Jun 2019 04:00:00 GMT
       
  • The roles of relevance and expectation for the control of attention in
           visual search.
    • Abstract: Representations of target-defining features (attentional templates) control the allocation of attention during visual search. We investigated whether template-guided attentional selectivity is sensitive not only to the relevance of visual features, but also to expectations about their probability. Search displays could contain a target in an expected (80%) or unexpected (20%) color. They were preceded by spatially uninformative cues that matched either the expected or unexpected target color. These color cues attracted attention, reflected by behavioral spatial cueing effects and by cue-elicited N2pc components obtained via EEG measured during task performance. Critically, these attentional capture effects were identical for both color cues, suggesting that preparatory attentional templates only reflect relevance, and are insensitive to expectations about target color probabilities. In contrast, RTs and N2pc components to search targets in the unexpected color were delayed, showing that expectations modulated the speed of attentional target selection within search displays. This dissociation between the effects of relevance and expectation on attentional preparation versus target selection suggests that these 2 parameters for attentional control are represented differently. Task relevance is likely to be specified at the level of individual features, whereas expectations could be represented in an object-based fashion. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Mon, 03 Jun 2019 04:00:00 GMT
       
  • Binding processes in the control of nonroutine action sequences.
    • Abstract: Although human behavior obviously includes routine and nonroutine action sequences, there is a great lack of knowledge regarding any processes relevant for the control of nonroutine action sequences. We propose that processes known to play a role in individual nonroutine actions might contribute to the control of nonroutine sequential action, as well. In particular, binding between simultaneously occurring stimuli and responses (SR-binding) has been discussed as one basic process in action control (Henson, Eckstein, Waszak, Frings, & Horner, 2014). All binding related studies up to this point focused on very short events, including a maximum of two directly contiguous responses. By contrast, most elements in sequential actions share no point of direct contact. In three experiments we analyzed the structure of bindings in sequences of two and three responses and found identical bindings between contiguous and noncontiguous responses. This pattern suggests a network-like representation of action sequences and with that decisively extents the situations in which binding plays a role as a basic process for action control. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 30 May 2019 04:00:00 GMT
       
  • Probability cueing of singleton-distractor locations in visual search:
           Priority-map- versus dimension-based inhibition'
    • Abstract: Observers can learn the likely locations of salient distractors in visual search, reducing their potential to cause interference. Although there is agreement that this involves positional suppression of the likely distractor location(s), it is contentious at which stage the suppression operates: the search-guiding priority map, which integrates feature-contrast signals (e.g., generated by a red among green or a diamond among circular items) across dimensions, or the distractor-defining dimension. On the latter, dimension-based account (Sauter, Liesefeld, Zehetleitner, & Müller, 2018), processing of, say, a shape-defined target should be unaffected by distractor suppression when the distractor is defined by color, because in this case only color signals would be suppressed. At odds with this, Wang and Theeuwes (2018a) found slowed processing of the target when it appeared at the likely (vs. an unlikely) distractor location, consistent with priority-map–based suppression. Adopting their paradigm, the present study replicated this target location effect. Crucially, however, changing the paradigm by making the target appear as likely at the frequent as at any of the rare distractor locations and making the distractor/nondistractor color assignment consistent abolished the target location effect, without impacting the reduced interference for distractors at the frequent location. These findings support a flexible locus of spatial distractor suppression—priority-map– or dimension-based—depending on the prominence of distractor cues provided by the paradigm. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 30 May 2019 04:00:00 GMT
       
  • The standard posture of the hand.
    • Abstract: Perceived limb position is known to rely on sensory signals and motor commands. Another potential source of input is a standard representation of body posture, which may bias perceived limb position toward more stereotyped positions. Recent results show that tactile stimuli are processed more efficiently when delivered to a thumb in a relatively low position or an index finger in a relatively high position. This observation suggests that we may have a standard posture of the body that promotes a more efficient interaction with the environment. In this study, we mapped the standard posture of the entire hand by characterizing the spatial associations of all 5 digits. Moreover, we show that the effect is not an artifact of intermanual integration. Results showed that the thumb is associated with low positions, while the other fingers are associated with upper locations. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 30 May 2019 04:00:00 GMT
       
 
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