for Journals by Title or ISSN
for Articles by Keywords
help

Publisher: APA   (Total: 86 journals)   [Sort by number of followers]

Showing 1 - 86 of 86 Journals sorted alphabetically
American J. of Orthopsychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.909, CiteScore: 2)
American Psychologist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 227, SJR: 1.594, CiteScore: 4)
Archives of Scientific Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Asian American J. of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.718, CiteScore: 1)
Behavior Analysis: Research and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Behavioral Development Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription  
Behavioral Neuroscience     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 58, SJR: 1.473, CiteScore: 3)
Canadian J. of Behavioural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.362, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian J. of Experimental Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.696, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian Psychology / Psychologie canadienne     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.602, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Practice in Pediatric Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.362, CiteScore: 1)
Consulting Psychology J. : Practice and Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.314, CiteScore: 1)
Couple and Family Psychology : Research and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.924, CiteScore: 2)
Decision     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.687, CiteScore: 2)
Developmental Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 48, SJR: 2.066, CiteScore: 4)
Dreaming     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.43, CiteScore: 1)
Emotion     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 41, SJR: 2.151, CiteScore: 4)
Evolutionary Behavioral Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.858, CiteScore: 2)
Experimental and Clinical Psychopharmacology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 1.176, CiteScore: 3)
Families, Systems, & Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.425, CiteScore: 1)
Group Dynamics : Theory, Research, and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.84, CiteScore: 2)
Health Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 53, SJR: 1.775, CiteScore: 4)
History of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.233, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Play Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.258, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Stress Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.879, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. Perspectives in Psychology : Research, Practice, Consultation     Full-text available via subscription  
J. of Abnormal Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 34, SJR: 2.864, CiteScore: 4)
J. of Applied Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 187, SJR: 4.694, CiteScore: 6)
J. of Comparative Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.925, CiteScore: 2)
J. of Consulting and Clinical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 47, SJR: 2.757, CiteScore: 5)
J. of Counseling Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 31, SJR: 1.59, CiteScore: 4)
J. of Educational Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 53, SJR: 2.93, CiteScore: 5)
J. of Experimental Psychology : Animal Learning and Cognition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.833, CiteScore: 2)
J. of Experimental Psychology : Applied     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 35, SJR: 1.102, CiteScore: 2)
J. of Experimental Psychology : General     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 73, SJR: 3.254, CiteScore: 5)
J. of Experimental Psychology : Human Perception and Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 52, SJR: 1.543, CiteScore: 2)
J. of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 169, SJR: 1.826, CiteScore: 3)
J. of Family Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.325, CiteScore: 3)
J. of Latina/o Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
J. of Neuroscience, Psychology, and Economics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.479, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Occupational Health Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 37, SJR: 2.817, CiteScore: 5)
J. of Personality and Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 307, SJR: 4.302, CiteScore: 6)
J. of Psychotherapy Integration     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.576, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Rural Mental Health     Full-text available via subscription  
J. of Threat Assessment and Management     Full-text available via subscription  
Law and Human Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 42, SJR: 1.734, CiteScore: 3)
Motivation Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Neuropsychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27, SJR: 1.472, CiteScore: 3)
Personality Disorders: Theory, Research, and Treatment     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 2.14, CiteScore: 3)
Practice Innovations     Full-text available via subscription  
Professional Psychology : Research and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.885, CiteScore: 2)
Psychiatric Rehabilitation J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.802, CiteScore: 2)
Psychoanalytic Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.647, CiteScore: 1)
Psychological Assessment     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.962, CiteScore: 3)
Psychological Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 261, SJR: 8.793, CiteScore: 16)
Psychological Methods     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21, SJR: 4.02, CiteScore: 6)
Psychological Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 190, SJR: 4.64, CiteScore: 7)
Psychological Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.788, CiteScore: 2)
Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19, SJR: 1.048, CiteScore: 2)
Psychology and Aging     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19, SJR: 1.661, CiteScore: 3)
Psychology of Addictive Behaviors     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.267, CiteScore: 3)
Psychology of Aesthetics, Creativity and the Arts     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.272, CiteScore: 3)
Psychology of Consciousness : Theory, Research, and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Psychology of Men and Masculinity     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24, SJR: 1.059, CiteScore: 2)
Psychology of Popular Media Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Psychology of Religion and Spirituality     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18, SJR: 1.034, CiteScore: 2)
Psychology of Sexual Orientation and Gender Diversity     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.156, CiteScore: 3)
Psychology of Violence     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 1.427, CiteScore: 2)
Psychology, Public Policy, and Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.431, CiteScore: 3)
Psychomusicology : Music, Mind, and Brain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Psychotherapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Qualitative Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.686, CiteScore: 2)
Rehabilitation Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.715, CiteScore: 2)
Review of General Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.25, CiteScore: 3)
Scholarship of Teaching and Learning in Psychology     Full-text available via subscription  
School Psychology Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.28, CiteScore: 3)
Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19, SJR: 1.126, CiteScore: 2)
Spirituality in Clinical Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.425, CiteScore: 1)
Sport, Exercise, and Performance Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.95, CiteScore: 2)
Stigma and Health     Full-text available via subscription  
The Humanistic Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.255, CiteScore: 0)
The Psychologist-Manager J.     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.351, CiteScore: 1)
Training and Education in Professional Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.584, CiteScore: 1)
Translational Issues in Psychological Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Traumatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.502, CiteScore: 1)
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Journal of Experimental Psychology : Human Perception and Performance
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.543
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 52  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0096-1523 - ISSN (Online) 1939-1277
Published by APA Homepage  [86 journals]
  • Precise movements in awkward postures: A direct test of the precision
           hypothesis of the end-state comfort effect.
    • Abstract: When humans manipulate an object, they prefer to grasp the object in a way that allows to terminate the manipulation in a comfortable posture. The reasons for this end-state comfort effect have remained elusive so far. One explanation assumes that comfortable end-states are not preferred per se, but rather because they come with increased movement precision, which is typically required by the end of an object manipulation. Five experiments were conducted to test this hypothesis and yielded 3 main results. First, grasps that increase control over an object are preferred irrespective of the resulting arm postures. Second, differences in the controllability associated with comfortable and uncomfortable postures are sufficient to elicit the end-state comfort effect. Third, grasps that optimize control are preferred even when this implies adopting uncomfortable end-states. Altogether, these findings directly support the hypothesis that the end-state comfort emerges because it maximizes the control over the manipulated object at the end of object manipulations. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Mon, 08 Apr 2019 04:00:00 GMT
       
  • Cross-modal interference-control is reduced in childhood but maintained in
           aging: A cohort study of stimulus- and response-interference in
           cross-modal and unimodal Stroop tasks.
    • Abstract: Interference-control is the ability to exclude distractions and focus on a specific task or stimulus. However, it is currently unclear whether the same interference-control mechanisms underlie the ability to ignore unimodal and cross-modal distractions. In 2 experiments we assessed whether unimodal and cross-modal interference follow similar trajectories in development and aging and occur at similar processing levels. In Experiment 1, 42 children (6–11 years), 31 younger adults (18–25 years) and 32 older adults (60–84 years) identified color rectangles with either written (unimodal) or spoken (cross-modal) distractor-words. Stimuli could be congruent, incongruent but mapped to the same response (stimulus-incongruent), or incongruent and mapped to different responses (response-incongruent); thus, separating interference occurring at early (sensory) and late (response) processing levels. Unimodal interference was worst in childhood and old age; however, older adults maintained the ability to ignore cross-modal distraction. Unimodal but not cross-modal response-interference also reduced accuracy. In Experiment 2 we compared the effect of audition on vision and vice versa in 52 children (6–11 years), 30 young adults (22–33 years) and 30 older adults (60–84 years). As in Experiment 1, older adults maintained the ability to ignore cross-modal distraction arising from either modality, and neither type of cross-modal distraction limited accuracy in adults. However, cross-modal distraction still reduced accuracy in children and children were more slowed by stimulus-interference compared with adults. We conclude that; unimodal and cross-modal interference follow different life span trajectories and differences in stimulus- and response-interference may increase cross-modal distractibility in childhood. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 04 Apr 2019 04:00:00 GMT
       
  • How low can you go' Detecting style in extremely low resolution
           images.
    • Abstract: Humans can see through the complexity of scenes, faces, and objects by quickly extracting their redundant low-spatial and low-dimensional global properties, or their style. It remains unclear, however, whether semantic coding is necessary, or whether visual stylistic information is sufficient, for people to recognize and discriminate complex images and categories. In two experiments, we systematically reduce the resolution of hundreds of unique paintings, birds, and faces, and test people’s ability to discriminate and recognize them. We show that the stylistic information retained at extremely low image resolutions is sufficient for visual recognition of images and visual discrimination of categories. Averaging over the 3 domains, people were able to reliably recognize images reduced down to a single pixel, with large differences from chance discriminability across 8 different image resolutions. People were also able to discriminate categories substantially above chance with an image resolution as low as 2 × 2 pixels. We situate our findings in the context of contemporary computational accounts of visual recognition and contend that explicit encoding of the local features in the image, or knowledge of the semantic category, is not necessary for recognizing and distinguishing complex visual stimuli. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 04 Apr 2019 04:00:00 GMT
       
  • Automatic imitation remains unaffected under cognitive load.
    • Abstract: Automaticity has been argued to be a core feature of the mental processes that guide social interactions, such as those underpinning imitative behaviors. To date, however, there is little known about the automaticity of imitative tendencies. In the current study, we used a finger movement stimulus-response compatibility task to index processes associated with controlling the urge to copy other people’s actions. In addition, we manipulated the level of load placed on a secondary cognitive task to test if there is a capacity limit in the systems that filter distractor finger movement stimuli. Across three experiments, we showed that whether letter strings (Experiment 1), faces (Experiment 2), or hand postures (Experiment 3) are held in working memory, there was no impact on compatibility effects in the main task. These findings show that the cognitive operations that generate imitative tendencies are relatively efficient in that they operate the same whether or not a central resource is taxed heavily with nonsocial (letter strings) or social stimuli (faces and hand postures). Therefore, in the sense of persisting in the presence of a demanding cognitive load, this type of imitation behavior can be considered automatic. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 04 Apr 2019 04:00:00 GMT
       
  • Complexity drives speech sound development: Evidence from artificial
           language training.
    • Abstract: Traditionally, learning is assumed to take place with exposure to simpler elements first followed by exposure to elements with increasing levels of difficulty. Recent reports suggest that exposure to complex elements leads to more widespread changes. However, whether learning via exposure to complex or to simple elements is more beneficial is a matter of ongoing debate. In the current study, using behavioral and electrophysiological measures, we aimed at understanding this by comparing subjects trained with complex speech sounds with those trained with simple speech sounds in a 5-day pseudoword-picture training paradigm. We found that though the subjects learned both complex and simple speech sounds to similar degrees, subjects who were trained with complex stimuli demonstrated more generalizations to novel complex and simple stimuli, whereas those trained with simple stimuli exhibited generalization only to simple but not to complex stimuli (Experiment 1). Along with behavioral measures, using mismatch negativity, we found that training with complex stimuli can lead to more extensive neural changes for both complex and simple stimuli as compared with training with simple stimuli (Experiment 2). In artificial language learning, learning with complex stimuli appears to be more effective than training with simple stimuli as far as generalization is concerned. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 04 Apr 2019 04:00:00 GMT
       
  • The allocation of resources in visual working memory and multiple
           attentional templates.
    • Abstract: In a visual search task, sensory input is matched to a representation of the search target in visual working memory (VWM). This representation is referred to as attentional template. We investigated the conditions that allow for more than a single attentional template. The attentional template of color targets was measured by means of the contingent attentional capture paradigm. We found that attentional templates did not differ between search with 1 and 2 memorized target colors, suggesting that dual target search allowed for multiple attentional templates. In the same paradigm, we asked participants to memorize target and distractor color with equal precision. Both were presented before the search task. An attentional template was set up for the target, but not for the distractor color, suggesting that keeping a color in VWM does not automatically result in the creation of multiple attentional templates. Importantly, the precision of recall of the distractor color was worse than the precision of recall of the target color, regardless of instructions, suggesting that participants always allocated fewer VWM resources to the distractor color. Thus, 2 attentional templates may be set up, but only when the 2 colors receive an equal amount of resources in VWM (i.e., in dual target search). In contrast, when 1 item is deprioritized because of task demands, it receives fewer resources in VWM and multiple attentional templates cannot be established. Thus, unequal roles in the search task prevented the simultaneous operation of multiple attentional templates in VWM. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 28 Mar 2019 04:00:00 GMT
       
  • Does depth-cue combination yield identical biases in perception and
           grasping'
    • Abstract: Grasping critically depends on stereo information. We previously found that binocular disparities yield a distorted visual space, in which objects close to the observer are grasped and perceived as if they were more elongated than farther objects. Such lack of shape constancy results from the inaccurate estimate of the viewing distance, which affects the estimated depth-to-width ratio of an object. This is because (1) depth from binocular disparities scales with the square of the distance and (2) width from retinal size scales linearly with distance. Conversely, depth from monocular cues (i.e., motion and texture gradients) scales linearly with distance, hence the overall shape from these signals should not be affected by errors in egocentric estimates of object location. We therefore reasoned that adding these cues to stereo information should improve shape constancy. Contrary to expectations, in four experiments we found that stereo-texture and stereo-motion stimuli appeared even more distorted than stereo stimuli. More remarkably, results revealed that grasping execution showed identical biases, which were corrected only late in the movement through online control mechanisms, but only if both grasping digits could be visually guided on their respective contact locations. On the contrary, when the index was occluded by the object, biases in shape estimation continued to affect grasping execution until movement completion. Moreover, while the initial part of the grasp showed evidence of collision avoidance, a control experiment suggested that the above biases could have emerged as early as at movement planning, consistent with previous evidence. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 28 Mar 2019 04:00:00 GMT
       
  • Evaluative social presence can improve vigilance performance, but
           vigilance is still hard work and is stressful.
    • Abstract: Vigilance is the ability to sustain attention over a period of time. Previous research has indicated that vigilance tasks are hard work and are stressful for human operators. Performance tends to decline with time on task, and workload and stress typically increase during the course of the vigil. Methods that could be used to overcome the adverse effects of vigilance (i.e., stress, workload, poor performance) includes social facilitation factors, such as performing the task while under observation. Thus, the present experiments examined the effects of multiple forms of social facilitation on vigilance, as well as the stress and workload associated with performing the task. Over 2 experiments, 284 participants completed a 24-min cognitive vigilance task. The results indicated that evaluative-based forms of social presence (i.e., direct monitoring, electronic performance monitoring) were associated with improved detection performance. The mere social presence of a monitor did not significantly influence vigilance performance. The results also demonstrated that social facilitation (in any form) did not impose additional stress or workload on the observers. These novel results have both important practical and theoretical implications for both vigilance performance and social facilitation. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 21 Mar 2019 04:00:00 GMT
       
  • Temporal expectancies affect accuracy in standard-comparison judgments of
           duration, but neither pitch height, nor timbre, nor loudness.
    • Abstract: Presenting a stimulus at the most expected point in time should benefit its perceptual processing (Jones, 1976; Large & Jones, 1999). For example, accuracy decreases when comparing the pitch of two tones separated by a sequence of temporally regular distractors if the final tone is shifted away from the expected time (Jones, Moynihan, MacKenzie, & Puente, 2002). However, recent research could not replicate this effect (Bauer, Jaeger, Thorne, Bendixen, & Debener, 2015), so we explored possible explanations. First, we varied the size and probability of timing shifts of the comparison tone in 7 experimental combinations (N = 16 in each). Second, we strengthened temporal expectancies by using a rhythmically rich distractor sequence, either repeating the standard tone at the end of the sequence (N = 26) or not (N = 28). Third, we had listeners compare either the timbre (N = 55) or the loudness (N = 24) instead of pitch. No effects of temporal expectancy (nor interactions with musical training) emerged in these experiments; however, they did occur when participants judged the relative duration of time intervals (N = 38). That is, a temporal expectancy profile was only observable in the context of a temporal task, and did not generalize to other domains. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Mon, 18 Mar 2019 04:00:00 GMT
       
 
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
Fax: +00 44 (0)131 4513327
 
About JournalTOCs
API
Help
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-