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Publisher: John Wiley and Sons   (Total: 1583 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 1583 Journals sorted alphabetically
Abacus     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.48, h-index: 22)
About Campus     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Academic Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53, SJR: 1.385, h-index: 91)
Accounting & Finance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43, SJR: 0.547, h-index: 30)
ACEP NOW     Free  
Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50, SJR: 1.02, h-index: 88)
Acta Archaeologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 133, SJR: 0.101, h-index: 9)
Acta Geologica Sinica (English Edition)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.552, h-index: 41)
Acta Neurologica Scandinavica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.203, h-index: 74)
Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.197, h-index: 81)
Acta Ophthalmologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.112, h-index: 1)
Acta Paediatrica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54, SJR: 0.794, h-index: 88)
Acta Physiologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 1.69, h-index: 88)
Acta Polymerica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35, SJR: 2.518, h-index: 113)
Acta Zoologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.459, h-index: 29)
Acute Medicine & Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Addiction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32, SJR: 2.086, h-index: 143)
Addiction Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 2.091, h-index: 57)
Adultspan J.     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.127, h-index: 4)
Advanced Energy Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 6.411, h-index: 86)
Advanced Engineering Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.81, h-index: 81)
Advanced Functional Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48, SJR: 5.21, h-index: 203)
Advanced Healthcare Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.232, h-index: 7)
Advanced Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 247, SJR: 9.021, h-index: 345)
Advanced Materials Interfaces     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.177, h-index: 10)
Advanced Optical Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 2.488, h-index: 21)
Advanced Science     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Advanced Synthesis & Catalysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 2.729, h-index: 121)
Advances in Polymer Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.344, h-index: 31)
Africa Confidential     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Africa Research Bulletin: Economic, Financial and Technical Series     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Africa Research Bulletin: Political, Social and Cultural Series     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
African Development Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33, SJR: 0.275, h-index: 17)
African J. of Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.477, h-index: 39)
Aggressive Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.391, h-index: 66)
Aging Cell     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 4.374, h-index: 95)
Agribusiness : an Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.627, h-index: 14)
Agricultural and Forest Entomology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.925, h-index: 43)
Agricultural Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44, SJR: 1.099, h-index: 51)
AIChE J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 1.122, h-index: 120)
Alcoholism and Drug Abuse Weekly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Alcoholism Clinical and Experimental Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 1.416, h-index: 125)
Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33, SJR: 2.833, h-index: 138)
Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics Symposium Series     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Allergy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49, SJR: 3.048, h-index: 129)
Alternatives to the High Cost of Litigation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
American Anthropologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 129, SJR: 0.951, h-index: 61)
American Business Law J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.205, h-index: 17)
American Ethnologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 89, SJR: 2.325, h-index: 51)
American J. of Economics and Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.211, h-index: 26)
American J. of Hematology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 1.761, h-index: 77)
American J. of Human Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.018, h-index: 58)
American J. of Industrial Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.993, h-index: 85)
American J. of Medical Genetics Part A     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.115, h-index: 61)
American J. of Medical Genetics Part B: Neuropsychiatric Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.771, h-index: 107)
American J. of Medical Genetics Part C: Seminars in Medical Genetics     Partially Free   (Followers: 5, SJR: 2.315, h-index: 79)
American J. of Orthopsychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.756, h-index: 69)
American J. of Physical Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35, SJR: 1.41, h-index: 88)
American J. of Political Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 237, SJR: 5.101, h-index: 114)
American J. of Primatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.197, h-index: 63)
American J. of Reproductive Immunology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.347, h-index: 75)
American J. of Transplantation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.792, h-index: 140)
American J. on Addictions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.843, h-index: 57)
Anaesthesia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 115, SJR: 1.404, h-index: 88)
Analyses of Social Issues and Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.397, h-index: 18)
Analytic Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Anatomia, Histologia, Embryologia: J. of Veterinary Medicine Series C     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.295, h-index: 27)
Anatomical Sciences Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.633, h-index: 24)
Andrologia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.528, h-index: 45)
Andrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.979, h-index: 14)
Angewandte Chemie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 154)
Angewandte Chemie Intl. Edition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 205, SJR: 6.229, h-index: 397)
Animal Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 1.576, h-index: 62)
Animal Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.957, h-index: 67)
Animal Science J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.569, h-index: 24)
Annalen der Physik     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.46, h-index: 40)
Annals of Anthropological Practice     Partially Free   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.187, h-index: 5)
Annals of Applied Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.816, h-index: 56)
Annals of Clinical and Translational Neurology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Human Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.191, h-index: 67)
Annals of Neurology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42, SJR: 5.584, h-index: 241)
Annals of Noninvasive Electrocardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.531, h-index: 38)
Annals of Public and Cooperative Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.336, h-index: 23)
Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 2.389, h-index: 189)
Annual Bulletin of Historical Literature     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Annual Review of Information Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Anthropology & Education Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.72, h-index: 31)
Anthropology & Humanism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.137, h-index: 3)
Anthropology News     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Anthropology of Consciousness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.172, h-index: 5)
Anthropology of Work Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.256, h-index: 5)
Anthropology Today     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 92, SJR: 0.545, h-index: 15)
Antipode     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45, SJR: 2.212, h-index: 69)
Anz J. of Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.432, h-index: 59)
Anzeiger für Schädlingskunde     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Apmis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.855, h-index: 73)
Applied Cognitive Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 66, SJR: 0.754, h-index: 69)
Applied Organometallic Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.632, h-index: 58)
Applied Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 128, SJR: 1.023, h-index: 64)
Applied Psychology: Health and Well-Being     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47, SJR: 0.868, h-index: 13)
Applied Stochastic Models in Business and Industry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.613, h-index: 24)
Aquaculture Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 1.025, h-index: 55)
Aquaculture Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31, SJR: 0.807, h-index: 60)
Aquatic Conservation Marine and Freshwater Ecosystems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 1.047, h-index: 57)
Arabian Archaeology and Epigraphy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.453, h-index: 11)
Archaeological Prospection     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.922, h-index: 21)
Archaeology in Oceania     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.745, h-index: 18)
Archaeometry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.809, h-index: 48)
Archeological Papers of The American Anthropological Association     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.156, h-index: 2)
Architectural Design     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.261, h-index: 9)
Archiv der Pharmazie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.628, h-index: 43)
Archives of Drug Information     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Archives of Insect Biochemistry and Physiology     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.768, h-index: 54)
Area     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.938, h-index: 57)
Art History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 203, SJR: 0.153, h-index: 13)
Arthritis & Rheumatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48, SJR: 1.984, h-index: 20)
Arthritis Care & Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 2.256, h-index: 114)
Artificial Organs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.872, h-index: 60)
ASHE Higher Education Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Asia & the Pacific Policy Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Asia Pacific J. of Human Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 321, SJR: 0.494, h-index: 19)
Asia Pacific Viewpoint     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.616, h-index: 26)
Asia-Pacific J. of Chemical Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.345, h-index: 20)
Asia-pacific J. of Clinical Oncology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.554, h-index: 14)
Asia-Pacific J. of Financial Studies     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.241, h-index: 7)
Asia-Pacific Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.377, h-index: 7)
Asian Economic J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.234, h-index: 21)
Asian Economic Policy Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.196, h-index: 12)
Asian J. of Control     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.862, h-index: 34)
Asian J. of Endoscopic Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.394, h-index: 7)
Asian J. of Organic Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.443, h-index: 19)
Asian J. of Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.665, h-index: 37)
Asian Politics and Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.207, h-index: 7)
Asian Social Work and Policy Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.318, h-index: 5)
Asian-pacific Economic Literature     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.168, h-index: 15)
Assessment Update     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Astronomische Nachrichten     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.701, h-index: 40)
Atmospheric Science Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 29, SJR: 1.332, h-index: 27)
Austral Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.095, h-index: 66)
Austral Entomology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.524, h-index: 28)
Australasian J. of Dermatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.714, h-index: 40)
Australasian J. On Ageing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.39, h-index: 22)
Australian & New Zealand J. of Statistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.275, h-index: 28)
Australian Accounting Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.709, h-index: 14)
Australian and New Zealand J. of Family Therapy (ANZJFT)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.382, h-index: 12)
Australian and New Zealand J. of Obstetrics and Gynaecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42, SJR: 0.814, h-index: 49)
Australian and New Zealand J. of Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.82, h-index: 62)
Australian Dental J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.482, h-index: 46)
Australian Economic History Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.171, h-index: 12)
Australian Economic Papers     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.23, h-index: 9)
Australian Economic Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.357, h-index: 21)
Australian Endodontic J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.513, h-index: 24)
Australian J. of Agricultural and Resource Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.765, h-index: 36)
Australian J. of Grape and Wine Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.879, h-index: 56)
Australian J. of Politics & History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.203, h-index: 14)
Australian J. of Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.384, h-index: 30)
Australian J. of Public Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 383, SJR: 0.418, h-index: 29)
Australian J. of Rural Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.43, h-index: 34)
Australian Occupational Therapy J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 64, SJR: 0.59, h-index: 29)
Australian Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.331, h-index: 31)
Australian Veterinary J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.459, h-index: 45)
Autism Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31, SJR: 2.126, h-index: 39)
Autonomic & Autacoid Pharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.371, h-index: 29)
Banks in Insurance Report     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Basic & Clinical Pharmacology & Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.539, h-index: 70)
Basic and Applied Pathology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.113, h-index: 4)
Basin Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.54, h-index: 60)
Bauphysik     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.194, h-index: 5)
Bauregelliste A, Bauregelliste B Und Liste C     Hybrid Journal  
Bautechnik     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.321, h-index: 11)
Behavioral Interventions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.297, h-index: 23)
Behavioral Sciences & the Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.736, h-index: 57)
Berichte Zur Wissenschaftsgeschichte     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.11, h-index: 5)
Beton- und Stahlbetonbau     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.493, h-index: 14)
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.311, h-index: 26)
Bioelectromagnetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.568, h-index: 64)
Bioengineering & Translational Medicine     Open Access  
BioEssays     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 3.104, h-index: 155)
Bioethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.686, h-index: 39)
Biofuels, Bioproducts and Biorefining     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.725, h-index: 56)
Biological J. of the Linnean Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.172, h-index: 90)
Biological Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 6.469, h-index: 114)
Biologie in Unserer Zeit (Biuz)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44, SJR: 0.12, h-index: 1)
Biology of the Cell     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.812, h-index: 69)
Biomedical Chromatography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.572, h-index: 49)
Biometrical J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.784, h-index: 44)
Biometrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37, SJR: 1.906, h-index: 96)
Biopharmaceutics and Drug Disposition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.715, h-index: 44)
Biopolymers     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 1.199, h-index: 104)
Biotechnology and Applied Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45, SJR: 0.415, h-index: 55)
Biotechnology and Bioengineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 134, SJR: 1.633, h-index: 146)
Biotechnology J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 1.185, h-index: 51)
Biotechnology Progress     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 0.736, h-index: 101)
Biotropica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 1.374, h-index: 71)
Bipolar Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 2.592, h-index: 100)
Birth     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33, SJR: 0.763, h-index: 64)
Birth Defects Research Part A : Clinical and Molecular Teratology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.727, h-index: 77)
Birth Defects Research Part B: Developmental and Reproductive Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.468, h-index: 47)
Birth Defects Research Part C : Embryo Today : Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 1.513, h-index: 55)

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Journal Cover American Journal of Medical Genetics Part C: Seminars in Medical Genetics
  [SJR: 2.315]   [H-I: 79]   [5 followers]  Follow
    
   Partially Free Journal Partially Free Journal
   ISSN (Online) 1552-4876
   Published by John Wiley and Sons Homepage  [1583 journals]
  • Cover Image, Volume 175C, Number 1, March 2017
    • Abstract: The cover image, by Brad Tinkle et al., is based on the Research Article Hypermobile Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (a.k.a. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome Type III and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type): Clinical description and natural history,
      DOI : 10.1002/ajmg.c.31538.
      PubDate: 2017-03-17T09:02:09.482857-05:
       
  • Mast cell disorders in Ehlers–Danlos syndrome
    • Authors: Suranjith L. Seneviratne; Anne Maitland, Lawrence Afrin
      Abstract: Well known for their role in allergic disorders, mast cells (MCs) play a key role in homeostatic mechanisms and surveillance, recognizing and responding to different pathogens, and tissue injury, with an array of chemical mediators. After being recruited to connective tissues, resident MCs progenitors undergo further differentiation, under the influence of signals from surrounding microenvironment. It is the differential tissue homing and local maturation factors which result in a diverse population of resident MC phenotypes. An abundance of MC reside in connective tissue that borders with the external world (the skin as well as gastrointestinal, respiratory, and urogenital tracts). Situated near nerve fibers, lymphatics, and blood vessels, as well as coupled with their ability to secrete potent mediators, MCs can modulate the function of local and distant structures (e.g., other immune cell populations, fibroblasts, angiogenesis), and MC dysregulation has been implicated in immediate and delayed hypersensitivity syndromes, neuropathies, and connective tissue disorders (CTDs). This report reviews basic biology of mast cells and mast cell activation as well as recent research efforts, which implicate a role of MC dysregulation beyond atopic disorders and in a cluster of Ehlers–Danlos Syndromes, non-IGE mediated hypersensitivity disorders, and dysautonomia. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
      PubDate: 2017-03-06T00:55:27.640396-05:
      DOI: 10.1002/ajmg.c.31555
       
  • Neurological and spinal manifestations of the Ehlers–Danlos
           syndromes
    • Authors: Fraser C. Henderson; Claudiu Austin, Edward Benzel, Paolo Bolognese, Richard Ellenbogen, Clair A. Francomano, Candace Ireton, Petra Klinge, Myles Koby, Donlin Long, Sunil Patel, Eric L. Singman, Nicol C. Voermans
      Abstract: The Ehlers–Danlos syndromes (EDS) are a heterogeneous group of heritable connective tissue disorders characterized by joint hypermobility, skin extensibility, and tissue fragility. This communication briefly reports upon the neurological manifestations that arise including the weakness of the ligaments of the craniocervical junction and spine, early disc degeneration, and the weakness of the epineurium and perineurium surrounding peripheral nerves. Entrapment, deformation, and biophysical deformative stresses exerted upon the nervous system may alter gene expression, neuronal function and phenotypic expression. This report also discusses increased prevalence of migraine, idiopathic intracranial hypertension, Tarlov cysts, tethered cord syndrome, and dystonia, where associations with EDS have been anecdotally reported, but where epidemiological evidence is not yet available. Chiari Malformation Type I (CMI) has been reported to be a comorbid condition to EDS, and may be complicated by craniocervical instability or basilar invagination. Motor delay, headache, and quadriparesis have been attributed to ligamentous laxity and instability at the atlanto-occipital and atlantoaxial joints, which may complicate all forms of EDS. Discopathy and early degenerative spondylotic disease manifest by spinal segmental instability and kyphosis, rendering EDS patients prone to mechanical pain, and myelopathy. Musculoskeletal pain starts early, is chronic and debilitating, and the neuromuscular disease of EDS manifests symptomatically with weakness, myalgia, easy fatigability, limited walking, reduction of vibration sense, and mild impairment of mobility and daily activities. Consensus criteria and clinical practice guidelines, based upon stronger epidemiological and pathophysiological evidence, are needed to refine diagnosis and treatment of the various neurological and spinal manifestations of EDS. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
      PubDate: 2017-02-21T01:25:36.423351-05:
      DOI: 10.1002/ajmg.c.31549
       
  • Ehlers–Danlos syndrome, classical type
    • Authors: Jessica M. Bowen; Glenda J. Sobey, Nigel P. Burrows, Marina Colombi, Mark E. Lavallee, Fransiska Malfait, Clair A. Francomano
      Abstract: Classical EDS is a heritable disorder of connective tissue. Patients are affected with joint hypermobility, skin hyperextensibilty, and skin fragility leading to atrophic scarring and significant bruising. These clinical features suggest consideration of the diagnosis which then needs to be confirmed, preferably by genetic testing. The most recent criteria for the diagnosis of EDS were devised in Villefranche in 1997. [Beighton et al. (1998); Am J Med Genet 77:31-37]. The aims set out in the Villefranche Criteria were: to enable diagnostic uniformity for clinical and research purposes, to understand the natural history of each subtype of EDS, to inform management and genetic counselling, and to identify potential areas of research. The authors recognized that the criteria would need updating, but viewed the Villefranche nosology as a good starting point. Since 1997, there have been major advances in the molecular understanding of classical EDS. Previous question marks over genetic heterogeneity have been largely surpassed by evidence that abnormalities in type V collagen are the cause. Advances in molecular testing have made it possible to identify the causative mutation in the majority of patients. This has aided the further clarification of this diagnosis. The aim of this literature review is to summarize the current knowledge and highlight areas for future research. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
      PubDate: 2017-02-13T12:10:28.783568-05:
      DOI: 10.1002/ajmg.c.31548
       
  • Oral and mandibular manifestations in the Ehlers–Danlos syndromes
    • Authors: John Mitakides; Brad T. Tinkle
      Abstract: The Ehlers–Danlos syndromes (EDS) are hereditary disorders that affect the connective tissue and collagen structures in the body. Several types of EDS have been identified. Oral and mandibular structures, which include oral soft tissue, dentition, facial and head pain, and the functioning of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), are variably affected in the various types of EDS. These various manifestations of EDS have been noted for many years, but newer diagnostic techniques and studies are shedding additional light on the challenges faced by EDS patients in the area of oral and mandibular disorders. Further, the impact of temporomandibular disorder (TMD) on musculoskeletal dysfunction and vice versa, make this an important feature to recognize. Oral and mandibular hypermobility of the TMJ with associated consequences of EDS are noted. These features, diagnostic parameters and treatment procedures are presented. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
      PubDate: 2017-02-13T12:10:26.875345-05:
      DOI: 10.1002/ajmg.c.31541
       
  • Orthopaedic management of the Ehlers–Danlos syndromes
    • Authors: William B. Ericson; Roger Wolman
      Abstract: The role of orthopedic surgery in Ehlers–Danlos syndrome is inherently controversial, opaque to most patients and many medical providers, and difficult to discern from available medical literature. Non-operative treatment is preferable, but for carefully selected patients, specific joint stabilization and nerve decompression procedures can provide symptomatic relief when conservative measures fail. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
      PubDate: 2017-02-13T12:10:23.710823-05:
      DOI: 10.1002/ajmg.c.31551
       
  • Gastrointestinal involvement in the Ehlers–Danlos syndromes
    • Authors: Asma Fikree; Gisela Chelimsky, Heidi Collins, Katcha Kovacic, Qasim Aziz
      Abstract: Current evidence suggests that an association exists between non-inflammatory hereditary disorders of connective tissue such as the Ehlers–Danlos syndromes (EDS) and gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms. Patients with EDS can present with both structural problems such as hiatus hernias, visceroptosis, rectoceles, and rectal prolapse as well as functional problems such as disordered gut motility. It has recently been demonstrated that patients with hypermobile EDS (hEDS) present with GI symptoms related to the fore and hind-gut and these patients frequently meet the criteria for functional gastrointestinal disorders such as functional dyspepsia and irritable bowel syndrome. Presence of GI symptoms in EDS patients influences their quality of life. Specific evidence based management guidelines for the management of GI symptoms in EDS patients do not exist and these patients are often treated symptomatically. There is, however, recognition that certain precautions need to be taken for those patients undergoing surgical treatment. Future studies are required to identify the mechanisms that lead to GI symptoms in patients with EDS and more specific treatment guidelines are required. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
      PubDate: 2017-02-10T08:27:14.551243-05:
      DOI: 10.1002/ajmg.c.31546
       
  • Psychiatric and psychological aspects in the Ehlers–Danlos syndromes
    • Authors: Antonio Bulbena; Carolina Baeza-Velasco, Andrea Bulbena-Cabré, Guillem Pailhez, Hugo Critchley, Pradeep Chopra, Nuria Mallorquí-Bagué, Charissa Frank, Stephen Porges
      Abstract: There is increasing amount of evidence pointing toward a high prevalence of psychiatric conditions among individuals with hypermobile type of Ehlers–Danlos syndrome (JHS/hEDS). A literature review confirms a strong association between anxiety disorders and JHSh/hEDS, and there is also limited but growing evidence that JHSh/hEDS is also associated with depression, eating, and neuro-developmental disorders as well as alcohol and tobacco misuse. The underlying mechanisms behind this association include genetic risks, autonomic nervous system dysfunction, increased exteroceptive and interoceptive mechanisms and decreased proprioception. Recent neuroimaging studies have also shown an increase response in emotion processing brain areas which could explain the high affective reactivity seen in JHS/hEDS. Management of these patients should include psychiatric and psychological approaches, not only to relieve the clinical conditions but also to improve abilities to cope through proper drug treatment, psychotherapy, and psychological rehabilitation adequately coupled with modern physiotherapy. A multidimensional approach to this “neuroconnective phenotype” should be implemented to ensure proper assessment and to guide for more specific treatments. Future lines of research should further explore the full dimension of the psychopathology associated with JHS/hEDS to define the nature of the relationship. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
      PubDate: 2017-02-10T08:27:12.871721-05:
      DOI: 10.1002/ajmg.c.31544
       
  • Pain management in the Ehlers–Danlos syndromes
    • Authors: Pradeep Chopra; Brad Tinkle, Claude Hamonet, Isabelle Brock, Anne Gompel, Antonio Bulbena, Clair Francomano
      Abstract: Chronic pain in the Ehlers–Danlos syndromes (EDS) is common and may be severe. According to one study, nearly 90% of patients report some form of chronic pain. Pain, which is often one of the first symptoms to occur, may be widespread or localized to one region such as an arm or a leg. Studies on treatment modalities are few and insufficient to guide management. The following is a discussion of the evidence regarding the underlying mechanisms of pain in EDS. The causes of pain in this condition are multifactorial and include joint subluxations and dislocations, previous surgery, muscle weakness, proprioceptive disorders, and vertebral instability. Affected persons may also present with generalized body pain, fatigue, headaches, gastrointestinal pain, temporomandibular joint pain, dysmenorrhea, and vulvodynia. Pain management strategies may be focused around treating the cause of the pain (e.g., dislocation of a joint, proprioceptive disorder) and minimizing the sensation of pain. Management strategies for chronic pain in EDS includes physical therapy, medications, as well as durable medical equipment such as cushions, compressive garments, and braces. The different modalities are discussed in this paper. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
      PubDate: 2017-02-10T08:27:08.306304-05:
      DOI: 10.1002/ajmg.c.31554
       
  • Chronic fatigue in Ehlers–Danlos syndrome—hypermobile type
    • Authors: Alan Hakim; Inge De Wandele, Chris O'Callaghan, Alan Pocinki, Peter Rowe
      Abstract: Chronic fatigue is an important contributor to impaired health-related quality of life in Ehlers–Danlos syndrome. There is overlap in the symptoms and findings of EDS and chronic fatigue syndrome. A proportion of those with CFS likely have EDS that has not been identified. The evaluation of chronic fatigue in EDS needs to include a careful clinical examination and laboratory testing to exclude common causes of fatigue including anemia, hypothyroidisim, and chronic infection, as well as dysfunction of major physiological or organ systems. Other problems that commonly contribute to fatigue in EDS include sleep disorders, chronic pain, deconditioning, cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction, bowel and bladder dysfunction, psychological issues, and nutritional deficiencies. While there is no specific pharmacological treatment for fatigue, many medications are effective for specific symptoms (such as headache, menstrual dysfunction, or myalgia) and for co-morbid conditions that result in fatigue, including orthostatic intolerance and insomnia. Comprehensive treatment of fatigue needs to also evaluate for biomechanical problems that are common in EDS, and usually involves skilled physical therapy and attention to methods to prevent deconditioning. In addition to managing specific symptoms, treatment of fatigue in EDS also needs to focus on maintaining function and providing social, physical, and nutritional support, as well as providing on-going medical evaluation of new problems and review of new evidence about proposed treatments. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
      PubDate: 2017-02-10T08:26:51.650203-05:
      DOI: 10.1002/ajmg.c.31542
       
  • Cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction in Ehlers–Danlos
           syndrome—hypermobile type
    • Authors: Alan Hakim; Chris O'Callaghan, Inge De Wandele, Lauren Stiles, Alan Pocinki, Peter Rowe
      Abstract: Autonomic dysfunction contributes to health-related impairment of quality of life in the hypermobile type of Ehlers–Danlos syndrome (hEDS). Typical signs and symptoms include tachycardia, hypotension, gastrointestinal dysmotility, and disturbed bladder function and sweating regulation. Cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction may present as Orthostatic Intolerance, Orthostatic Hypotension, Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome, or Neurally Mediated Hypotension. The incidence, prevalence, and natural history of these conditions remain unquantified, but observations from specialist clinics suggest they are frequently seen in hEDS. There is growing understanding of how hEDS-related physical and physiological pathology contributes to the development of these conditions. Evaluation of cardiovascular symptoms in hEDS should include a careful history and clinical examination. Tests of cardiovascular function range from clinic room observation to tilt-table assessment to other laboratory investigations such as supine and standing catecholamine levels. Non-pharmacologic treatments include education, managing the environment to reduce exposure to triggers, improving cardiovascular fitness, and maintaining hydration. Although there are limited clinical trials, the response to drug treatments in hEDS is supported by evidence from case and cohort observational data, and short-term physiological studies. Pharmacologic therapy is indicated for patients with moderate-severe impairment of daily function and who have inadequate response or tolerance to conservative treatment. Treatment in hEDS often requires a focus on functional maintenance. Also, the negative impact of cardiovascular symptoms on physical and psycho-social well-being may generate a need for a more general evaluation and on-going management and support. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
      PubDate: 2017-02-04T03:20:27.255992-05:
      DOI: 10.1002/ajmg.c.31543
       
  • Hypermobile Ehlers–Danlos syndrome (a.k.a. Ehlers–Danlos syndrome Type
           III and Ehlers–Danlos syndrome hypermobility type): Clinical description
           and natural history
    • Authors: Brad Tinkle; Marco Castori, Britta Berglund, Helen Cohen, Rodney Grahame, Hanadi Kazkaz, Howard Levy
      Abstract: The hypermobile type of Ehlers–Danlos syndrome (hEDS) is likely the most common hereditary disorder of connective tissue. It has been described largely in those with musculoskeletal complaints including joint hypermobility, joint subluxations/dislocations, as well as skin and soft tissue manifestations. Many patients report activity-related pain and some go on to have daily pain. Two undifferentiated syndromes have been used to describe these manifestations—joint hypermobility syndrome and hEDS. Both are clinical diagnoses in the absence of other causation. Current medical literature further complicates differentiation and describes multiple associated symptoms and disorders. The current EDS nosology combines these two entities into the hypermobile type of EDS. Herein, we review and summarize the literature as a better clinical description of this type of connective tissue disorder. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
      PubDate: 2017-02-01T06:50:45.707109-05:
      DOI: 10.1002/ajmg.c.31538
       
  • A framework for the classification of joint hypermobility and related
           conditions
    • Authors: Marco Castori; Brad Tinkle, Howard Levy, Rodney Grahame, Fransiska Malfait, Alan Hakim
      Abstract: In the last decade, growing attention has been placed on joint hypermobility and related disorders. The new nosology for Ehlers–Danlos syndrome (EDS), the best-known and probably the most common of the disorders featuring joint hypermobility, identifies more than 20 different types of EDS, and highlights the need for a single set of criteria to substitute the previous ones for the overlapping EDS hypermobility type and joint hypermobility syndrome. Joint hypermobility is a feature commonly encountered in many other disorders, both genetic and acquired, and this finding is attracting the attention of an increasing number of medical and non-medical disciplines. In this paper, the terminology of joint hypermobility and related disorders is summarized. Different types of joint hypermobility, its secondary musculoskeletal manifestations and a simplified categorization of genetic syndromes featuring joint hypermobility are presented. The concept of a spectrum of pathogenetically related manifestations of joint hypermobility intersecting the categories of pleiotropic syndromes with joint hypermobility is introduced. A group of hypermobility spectrum disorders is proposed as diagnostic labels for patients with symptomatic joint hypermobility but not corresponding to any other syndromes with joint hypermobility. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
      PubDate: 2017-02-01T06:50:40.349224-05:
      DOI: 10.1002/ajmg.c.31539
       
  • Table of Contents, Volume 175C, Number 1, March 2017
    • First page: 1
      PubDate: 2017-03-17T09:02:12.40037-05:0
      DOI: 10.1002/ajmg.c.31514
       
  • Publication schedule for 2017
    • First page: 3
      PubDate: 2017-03-17T09:02:06.434715-05:
      DOI: 10.1002/ajmg.c.31515
       
  • The international consortium on the Ehlers–Danlos syndromes
    • Authors: Lara Bloom; Peter Byers, Clair Francomano, Brad Tinkle, Fransiska Malfait,
      First page: 5
      Abstract: Since 1998, two developments have led to concerns that the EDS nosology needs to be substantially revised. The first development was the clinical and molecular characterization of several new EDS variants, which substantially broadened the molecular basis underlying EDS. The second was the growing concern, in the absence of genetic diagnosis, that the hypermobile type of EDS had an expanded phenotype, may be genetically heterogeneous, and that the diagnostic criteria currently in use were inadequate. Furthermore, there is a dire need for the development of guidelines for management for each type of EDS to allow both the specialist and the generalist to care for affected individuals and their families. We have been meeting together as an international consortium over the past 2 years to establish these new criteria and management and care guidelines © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
      PubDate: 2017-03-17T09:02:06.474339-05:
      DOI: 10.1002/ajmg.c.31547
       
  • The 2017 international classification of the Ehlers–Danlos syndromes
    • Authors: Fransiska Malfait; Clair Francomano, Peter Byers, John Belmont, Britta Berglund, James Black, Lara Bloom, Jessica M. Bowen, Angela F. Brady, Nigel P. Burrows, Marco Castori, Helen Cohen, Marina Colombi, Serwet Demirdas, Julie De Backer, Anne De Paepe, Sylvie Fournel-Gigleux, Michael Frank, Neeti Ghali, Cecilia Giunta, Rodney Grahame, Alan Hakim, Xavier Jeunemaitre, Diana Johnson, Birgit Juul-Kristensen, Ines Kapferer-Seebacher, Hanadi Kazkaz, Tomoki Kosho, Mark E. Lavallee, Howard Levy, Roberto Mendoza-Londono, Melanie Pepin, F. Michael Pope, Eyal Reinstein, Leema Robert, Marianne Rohrbach, Lynn Sanders, Glenda J. Sobey, Tim Van Damme, Anthony Vandersteen, Caroline van Mourik, Nicol Voermans, Nigel Wheeldon, Johannes Zschocke, Brad Tinkle
      First page: 8
      Abstract: The Ehlers–Danlos syndromes (EDS) are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of heritable connective tissue disorders (HCTDs) characterized by joint hypermobility, skin hyperextensibility, and tissue fragility. Over the past two decades, the Villefranche Nosology, which delineated six subtypes, has been widely used as the standard for clinical diagnosis of EDS. For most of these subtypes, mutations had been identified in collagen-encoding genes, or in genes encoding collagen-modifying enzymes. Since its publication in 1998, a whole spectrum of novel EDS subtypes has been described, and mutations have been identified in an array of novel genes. The International EDS Consortium proposes a revised EDS classification, which recognizes 13 subtypes. For each of the subtypes, we propose a set of clinical criteria that are suggestive for the diagnosis. However, in view of the vast genetic heterogeneity and phenotypic variability of the EDS subtypes, and the clinical overlap between EDS subtypes, but also with other HCTDs, the definite diagnosis of all EDS subtypes, except for the hypermobile type, relies on molecular confirmation with identification of (a) causative genetic variant(s). We also revised the clinical criteria for hypermobile EDS in order to allow for a better distinction from other joint hypermobility disorders. To satisfy research needs, we also propose a pathogenetic scheme, that regroups EDS subtypes for which the causative proteins function within the same pathway. We hope that the revised International EDS Classification will serve as a new standard for the diagnosis of EDS and will provide a framework for future research purposes. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
      PubDate: 2017-03-17T09:02:11.755565-05:
      DOI: 10.1002/ajmg.c.31552
       
  • Diagnosis, natural history, and management in vascular Ehlers–Danlos
           syndrome
    • Authors: Peter H. Byers; John Belmont, James Black, Julie De Backer, Michael Frank, Xavier Jeunemaitre, Diana Johnson, Melanie Pepin, Leema Robert, Lynn Sanders, Nigel Wheeldon
      First page: 40
      Abstract: Vascular Ehlers Danlos syndrome (vEDS) is an uncommon genetic disorders characterized by arterial aneurysm, dissection and rupture, bowel rupture, and rupture of the gravid uterus. The frequency is estimated as 1/50,000–1/200,000 and results from pathogenic variants in COL3A1, which encodes the chains of type III procollagen, a major protein in vessel walls and hollow organs. Initial diagnosis depends on the recognitions of clinical features, including family history. Management is complex and requires multiple specialists who can respond to and manage the major complications. A summary of recommendations for management include: Identify causative variants in COL3A1 prior to application of diagnosis, modulate life style to minimize injury, risk of vessel/organ rupture, identify and create care team, provide individual plans for emergency care (“vascular EDS passport”) with diagnosis and management plan for use when traveling, centralize management at centers of excellence (experience) when feasible, maintain blood pressure in the normal range and treat hypertension aggressively, surveillance of vascular tree by doppler ultrasound, CTA (low radiation alternatives) or MRA if feasible on an annual basis. These recommendations represent a consensus of an international group of specialists with a broad aggregate experience in the care of individuals with vascular EDS that will need to be assessed on a regular basis as new information develops. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
      PubDate: 2017-03-17T09:02:13.625457-05:
      DOI: 10.1002/ajmg.c.31553
       
  • The Ehlers–Danlos syndromes, rare types
    • Authors: Angela F. Brady; Serwet Demirdas, Sylvie Fournel-Gigleux, Neeti Ghali, Cecilia Giunta, Ines Kapferer-Seebacher, Tomoki Kosho, Roberto Mendoza-Londono, Michael F. Pope, Marianne Rohrbach, Tim Van Damme, Anthony Vandersteen, Caroline van Mourik, Nicol Voermans, Johannes Zschocke, Fransiska Malfait
      First page: 70
      Abstract: The Ehlers–Danlos syndromes comprise a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of heritable connective tissue disorders, which are characterized by joint hypermobility, skin hyperextensibility, and tissue friability. In the Villefranche Nosology, six subtypes were recognized: The classical, hypermobile, vascular, kyphoscoliotic, arthrochalasis, and dermatosparaxis subtypes of EDS. Except for the hypermobile subtype, defects had been identified in fibrillar collagens or in collagen-modifying enzymes. Since 1997, a whole spectrum of novel, clinically overlapping, rare EDS-variants have been delineated and genetic defects have been identified in an array of other extracellular matrix genes. Advances in molecular testing have made it possible to now identify the causative mutation for many patients presenting these phenotypes. The aim of this literature review is to summarize the current knowledge on the rare EDS subtypes and highlight areas for future research. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
      PubDate: 2017-03-17T09:02:06.974867-05:
      DOI: 10.1002/ajmg.c.31550
       
  • Measurement properties of clinical assessment methods for classifying
           generalized joint hypermobility—A systematic review
    • Authors: Birgit Juul-Kristensen; Karoline Schmedling, Lies Rombaut, Hans Lund, Raoul H. H. Engelbert
      First page: 116
      Abstract: The purpose was to perform a systematic review of clinical assessment methods for classifying Generalized Joint Hypermobility (GJH), evaluate their clinimetric properties, and perform the best evidence synthesis of these methods. Four test assessment methods (Beighton Score [BS], Carter and Wilkinson, Hospital del Mar, Rotes-Querol) and two questionnaire assessment methods (Five-part questionnaire [5PQ], Beighton Score-self reported [BS-self]) were identified on children or adults. Using the Consensus-based Standards for selection of health Measurement Instrument (COSMIN) checklist for evaluating the methodological quality of the identified studies, all included studies were rated “fair” or “poor.” Most studies were using BS, and for BS the reliability most of the studies showed limited positive to conflicting evidence, with some shortcomings on studies for the validity. The three other test assessment methods lack satisfactory information on both reliability and validity. For the questionnaire assessment methods, 5PQ was the most frequently used, and reliability showed conflicting evidence, while the validity had limited positive to conflicting evidence compared with test assessment methods. For BS-self, the validity showed unknown evidence compared with test assessment methods. In conclusion, following recommended uniformity of testing procedures, the recommendation for clinical use in adults is BS with cut-point of 5 of 9 including historical information, while in children it is BS with cut-point of at least 6 of 9. However, more studies are needed to conclude on the validity properties of these assessment methods, and before evidence-based recommendations can be made for clinical use on the “best” assessment method for classifying GJH. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
      PubDate: 2017-03-17T09:02:04.893184-05:
      DOI: 10.1002/ajmg.c.31540
       
  • The evidence-based rationale for physical therapy treatment of children,
           adolescents, and adults diagnosed with joint hypermobility
           syndrome/hypermobile Ehlers Danlos syndrome
    • Authors: Raoul H.H. Engelbert; Birgit Juul-Kristensen, Verity Pacey, Inge de Wandele, Sandy Smeenk, Nicoleta Woinarosky, Stephanie Sabo, Mark C. Scheper, Leslie Russek, Jane V. Simmonds
      First page: 158
      Abstract: New insights into the phenotype of Joint Hypermobility Syndrome (JHS) and Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome-hypermobile type (hEDS) have raised many issues in relation to classification, diagnosis, assessment, and treatment. Within the multidisciplinary team, physical therapy plays a central role in management of individuals with hypermobility related disorders. However, many physical therapists are not familiar with the diagnostic criteria, prevalence, common clinical presentation, and management. This guideline aims to provide practitioners with the state of the art regarding the assessment and management of children, adolescents, and adults with JHS/hEDS. Due to the complexity of the symptoms in the profile of JHS/hEDS, the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) is adopted as a central framework whereby the umbrella term of disability is used to encompass functions, activities and participation, as well as environmental and personal factors. The current evidence-based literature regarding the management of JHS/hEDS is limited in size and quality and there is insufficient research exploring the clinical outcomes of a number of interventions. Multicenter randomized controlled trials are warranted to assess the clinical and cost-effectiveness of interventions for children and adults. Until further multicenter trials are conducted, clinical decision-making should be based on theoretical and the current limited research evidence. For all individuals diagnosed with JHS/hEDS, international consensus and combined efforts to identify risk profiles would create a better understanding of the pathological mechanisms and the potential for optimizing health care for affected individuals. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
      PubDate: 2017-03-17T09:02:08.6567-05:00
      DOI: 10.1002/ajmg.c.31545
       
  • A practical guide for evaluating gonadal germ cell tumor predisposition in
           differences of sex development
    • Abstract: Differences of Sex Development (DSD) includes a wide spectrum of etiologies and phenotypes. A subset of individuals with DSDs are predisposed to gonadal germ cell tumor (GCT). In this setting, GCT risk varies widely, depending on the DSD molecular etiology and penetrance. Prognostication based on molecular diagnosis remains challenging, as natural history data specific to recently identified molecular causes of DSD is lacking. In this review, we provide a framework for the clinical geneticist to consider GCT tumor risk in the patient with DSD. We discuss germ cell development and etiology of GCT growth, along with parameters to consider when recommending prophylactic gonadectomy including fertility, hormonal output, and malignant GTC treatment outcomes. Shortly after the 2006 reorganization of DSD nomenclature, literature reviews of natural history publications stratified GCT risk by a chromosomal, pathological, and hormonal taxonomy. Our 2017 literature review reveals a larger body of publications. However, the broad DSD GCT risk stratification within the 2006 taxonomy remains stable. We discuss precise GCT risk assessment for specific diagnoses, including androgen insensitivity, Smith–Lemli–Opitz, and 46,XY with MAP3K1 mutations and gonadal dysgenesis, as examples. We also examine the GCT risk in non-DSD syndromes, in addition to the cancer risks in DSD patients with dimorphic gonads and genitalia. This review is intended to provide a nuanced assessment of relative germ cell tumor risk in the DSD patient, including modern precise molecular diagnosis, for use by the clinical geneticist.
       
  • Unexpected ethical dilemmas in sex assignment in 46,XY DSD due to 5-alpha
           reductase type 2 deficiency
    • Abstract: Sex assignment at birth remains one of the most clinically challenging and controversial topics in 46,XY disorders of sexual development (DSD). This is particularly challenging in deficiency of 5-alpha reductase type 2 given that external genitalia are typically undervirilized at birth but typically virilize at puberty to a variable degree. Historically, most individuals with 5-alpha reductase deficiency were raised females. However, reports that over half of patients who underwent a virilizing puberty adopted an adult male gender identity have challenged this practice. Consensus guidelines on assignment of sex of rearing at birth are equivocal or favor male assignment in the most virilized cases. While a male sex of rearing assignment may avoid lifelong hormonal therapy and/or allow the potential for fertility, female sex assignment may be more consistent with external anatomy in the most severely undervirilized cases. Herein, we describe five patients with 46,XY DSD due 5-alpha-reductase type 2 deficiency, all with a severe phenotype. An inter-disciplinary DSD medical team at one of two academic centers evaluated each patient. This case series illustrates the complicated decision-making process of assignment of sex of rearing at birth in 5-alpha reductase type 2 deficiency and the challenges that arise when the interests of the child, parental wishes, recommendations of the medical team, and state law collide.
       
  • Gynecological challenges in the diagnosis and care of patients with DSD:
           The role of the obstetrician gynecologist in the multidisciplinary
           approach to the patient
    • Abstract: Disorders (differences) of sex development (DSD) are identified when there is atypical chromosomal, gonadal, or anatomic sex. Given the complexity of DSD conditions, the consensus guidelines recommend that affected individuals be evaluated and cared for by teams with expertise in DSD conditions. Obstetrician gynecologists are experts in genital and reproductive anatomy, hormonal function, fertility, sexuality, and obstetrics, allowing them to provide a unique and essential function within the DSD team. Furthermore, obstetrician gynecologists with expertise in Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology may follow individuals from birth into adulthood and provide reproductive health care for all ages, allowing these patients to “grow up” with them. Thus it is essential that gynecologists be part of a multidisciplinary team from birth through the reproductive lifespan. The purpose of this paper is to describe the role that the obstetrician gynecologist plays in the care of individuals with DSD conditions.
       
  • MAP3K1-related gonadal dysgenesis: Six new cases and review of the
           literature
    • Abstract: Investigation of disorders of sex development (DSD) has resulted in the discovery of multiple sex-determining genes. MAP3K1 encodes a signal transduction regulator in the sex determination pathway and is emerging as one of the more common genes responsible for 46,XY DSD presenting as complete or partial gonadal dysgenesis. Clinical assessment, endocrine evaluation, and genetic analysis were performed in six individuals from four unrelated families with 46,XY DSD. All six individuals were found to have likely pathogenic MAP3K1 variants. Three of these individuals presented with complete gonadal dysgenesis, characterized by bilateral streak gonads with typical internal and external female genitalia, while the other three presented with partial gonadal dysgenesis, characterized by incomplete testicular development, resulting in clitoral hypertrophy with otherwise typical female external genitalia. Testing for MAP3K1 variants should be considered in patients with 46,XY complete or partial gonadal dysgenesis, particularly in families with multiple members affected with 46,XY DSD. Identification of a MAP3K1 variant should prompt an evaluation for DSD in female siblings of the proband.
       
 
 
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