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Publisher: Hindawi   (Total: 333 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 333 Journals sorted alphabetically
Abstract and Applied Analysis     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.512, h-index: 32)
Active and Passive Electronic Components     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.157, h-index: 15)
Advances in Acoustics and Vibration     Open Access   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.259, h-index: 6)
Advances in Agriculture     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Artificial Intelligence     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Advances in Artificial Neural Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Astronomy     Open Access   (Followers: 34, SJR: 0.351, h-index: 17)
Advances in Bioinformatics     Open Access   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.421, h-index: 8)
Advances in Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Chemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Advances in Civil Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 32, SJR: 0.338, h-index: 8)
Advances in Condensed Matter Physics     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.248, h-index: 10)
Advances in Decision Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.231, h-index: 6)
Advances in Ecology     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Advances in Electrical Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Advances in Endocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Fuzzy Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.258, h-index: 7)
Advances in Hematology     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.892, h-index: 18)
Advances in High Energy Physics     Open Access   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.892, h-index: 19)
Advances in Human-Computer Interaction     Open Access   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.439, h-index: 9)
Advances in Materials Science and Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.263, h-index: 11)
Advances in Mathematical Physics     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.332, h-index: 10)
Advances in Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.498, h-index: 10)
Advances in Multimedia     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.191, h-index: 10)
Advances in Neuroscience     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Nonlinear Optics     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Numerical Analysis     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
Advances in Operations Research     Open Access   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.343, h-index: 7)
Advances in Optical Technologies     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.283, h-index: 16)
Advances in OptoElectronics     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.973, h-index: 16)
Advances in Orthopedic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Orthopedics     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Pharmacological Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.695, h-index: 13)
Advances in Physical Chemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.297, h-index: 7)
Advances in Power Electronics     Open Access   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.26, h-index: 6)
Advances in Preventive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Advances in Software Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Advances in Tribology     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.267, h-index: 6)
Advances in Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.629, h-index: 16)
Advances in Virology     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.04, h-index: 12)
AIDS Research and Treatment     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.125, h-index: 14)
Analytical Cellular Pathology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.334, h-index: 12)
Anatomy Research Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Anemia     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.991, h-index: 11)
Anesthesiology Research and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.513, h-index: 12)
Applied and Environmental Soil Science     Open Access   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.53, h-index: 9)
Applied Bionics and Biomechanics     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.23, h-index: 13)
Applied Computational Intelligence and Soft Computing     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Archaea     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.248, h-index: 27)
Arthritis     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Autism Research and Treatment     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Autoimmune Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.909, h-index: 17)
Behavioural Neurology     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.696, h-index: 34)
Biochemistry Research Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.085, h-index: 17)
Bioinorganic Chemistry and Applications     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.286, h-index: 19)
BioMed Research Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.725, h-index: 59)
Biotechnology Research Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Bone Marrow Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Canadian J. of Gastroenterology & Hepatology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.856, h-index: 53)
Canadian J. of Infectious Diseases and Medical Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.409, h-index: 25)
Canadian Respiratory J.     Open Access   (SJR: 0.503, h-index: 42)
Cardiology Research and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.941, h-index: 17)
Cardiovascular Psychiatry and Neurology     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.091, h-index: 14)
Case Reports in Anesthesiology     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Case Reports in Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Case Reports in Critical Care     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Case Reports in Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Case Reports in Dermatological Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Case Reports in Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Case Reports in Endocrinology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.326, h-index: 1)
Case Reports in Gastrointestinal Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Case Reports in Genetics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Case Reports in Hematology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Case Reports in Hepatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Case Reports in Immunology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Case Reports in Infectious Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Case Reports in Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Case Reports in Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Case Reports in Neurological Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Case Reports in Obstetrics and Gynecology     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Case Reports in Oncological Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Case Reports in Ophthalmological Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Case Reports in Orthopedics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Case Reports in Otolaryngology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Case Reports in Pathology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Case Reports in Pediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Case Reports in Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Case Reports in Pulmonology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Case Reports in Radiology     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Case Reports in Rheumatology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Case Reports in Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Case Reports in Transplantation     Open Access  
Case Reports in Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Case Reports in Vascular Medicine     Open Access  
Case Reports in Veterinary Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Chemotherapy Research and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Child Development Research     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Chinese J. of Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Chinese J. of Mathematics     Open Access  
Cholesterol     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.906, h-index: 12)
Chromatography Research Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Computational and Mathematical Methods in Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.415, h-index: 22)
Computational Intelligence and Neuroscience     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.232, h-index: 30)
Critical Care Research and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.916, h-index: 14)
Current Gerontology and Geriatrics Research     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.8, h-index: 12)
Dataset Papers in Science     Open Access  
Depression Research and Treatment     Open Access   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.77, h-index: 11)
Dermatology Research and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.576, h-index: 15)
Diagnostic and Therapeutic Endoscopy     Open Access   (SJR: 0.651, h-index: 18)
Discrete Dynamics in Nature and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.323, h-index: 24)
Disease Markers     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.774, h-index: 49)
Economics Research Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Education Research Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Emergency Medicine Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Enzyme Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.457, h-index: 18)
Epidemiology Research Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Epilepsy Research and Treatment     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.615, h-index: 50)
Experimental Diabetes Research     Open Access   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.591, h-index: 30)
Gastroenterology Research and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.664, h-index: 21)
Genetics Research Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Hepatitis Research and Treatment     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
HPB Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.798, h-index: 22)
Indian J. of Materials Science     Open Access  
Infectious Diseases in Obstetrics and Gynecology     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.976, h-index: 34)
Influenza Research and Treatment     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Infectious Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.763, h-index: 15)
Intl. J. of Aerospace Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 64, SJR: 0.241, h-index: 6)
Intl. J. of Agronomy     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.223, h-index: 2)
Intl. J. of Alzheimer's Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.193, h-index: 25)
Intl. J. of Analysis     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Analytical Chemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.157, h-index: 2)
Intl. J. of Antennas and Propagation     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.385, h-index: 15)
Intl. J. of Atmospheric Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 23)
Intl. J. of Bacteriology     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Biodiversity     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Biomaterials     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.485, h-index: 10)
Intl. J. of Biomedical Imaging     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.581, h-index: 23)
Intl. J. of Breast Cancer     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Intl. J. of Carbohydrate Chemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Intl. J. of Cell Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 2.658, h-index: 25)
Intl. J. of Chemical Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.361, h-index: 10)
Intl. J. of Chronic Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Combinatorics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Computer Games Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.213, h-index: 12)
Intl. J. of Corrosion     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.19, h-index: 7)
Intl. J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.558, h-index: 11)
Intl. J. of Differential Equations     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.363, h-index: 11)
Intl. J. of Digital Multimedia Broadcasting     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.144, h-index: 10)
Intl. J. of Ecology     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.8, h-index: 11)
Intl. J. of Electrochemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Intl. J. of Endocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.961, h-index: 24)
Intl. J. of Engineering Mathematics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Evolutionary Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Intl. J. of Family Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Food Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Forestry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Genomics     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.721, h-index: 7)
Intl. J. of Geophysics     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.416, h-index: 8)
Intl. J. of Hepatology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Hypertension     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.823, h-index: 20)
Intl. J. of Inflammation     Open Access   (SJR: 0.876, h-index: 14)
Intl. J. of Inorganic Chemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Manufacturing Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Mathematics and Mathematical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.346, h-index: 27)
Intl. J. of Medicinal Chemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Intl. J. of Metals     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.006, h-index: 18)
Intl. J. of Microwave Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.167, h-index: 5)
Intl. J. of Molecular Imaging     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Navigation and Observation     Open Access   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.411, h-index: 7)
Intl. J. of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.926, h-index: 14)
Intl. J. of Oceanography     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Intl. J. of Optics     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.262, h-index: 7)
Intl. J. of Otolaryngology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Pediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Peptides     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.73, h-index: 16)
Intl. J. of Photoenergy     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.348, h-index: 28)
Intl. J. of Plant Genomics     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.578, h-index: 20)
Intl. J. of Polymer Science     Open Access   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.265, h-index: 11)
Intl. J. of Population Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Proteomics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Quality, Statistics, and Reliability     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.345, h-index: 4)
Intl. J. of Reconfigurable Computing     Open Access   (SJR: 0.182, h-index: 8)
Intl. J. of Reproductive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Intl. J. of Rheumatology     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.015, h-index: 18)
Intl. J. of Rotating Machinery     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.402, h-index: 19)
Intl. J. of Spectroscopy     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Intl. J. of Stochastic Analysis     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.234, h-index: 19)
Intl. J. of Surgical Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.753, h-index: 11)
Intl. J. of Telemedicine and Applications     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.757, h-index: 14)
Intl. J. of Vascular Medicine     Open Access   (SJR: 0.865, h-index: 16)
Intl. J. of Vehicular Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.169, h-index: 6)
Intl. J. of Zoology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.389, h-index: 8)
Intl. Scholarly Research Notices     Open Access   (Followers: 189)
ISRN Astronomy and Astrophysics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
J. of Addiction     Open Access   (Followers: 9)

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Journal Cover BioMed Research International
  [SJR: 0.725]   [H-I: 59]   [7 followers]  Follow
    
  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
   ISSN (Print) 2314-6133 - ISSN (Online) 2314-6141
   Published by Hindawi Homepage  [333 journals]
  • Curcumin Analogue CA15 Exhibits Anticancer Effects on HEp-2 Cells via
           Targeting NF-κB

    • Abstract: Laryngeal carcinoma remains one of the most common malignancies, and curcumin has been proven to be effective against head and neck cancers in vitro. However, it has not yet been applied in clinical settings due to its low stability. In the current study, we synthesized 34 monocarbonyl analogues of curcumin with stable structures. CA15, which exhibited a stronger inhibited effect on laryngeal cancer cells HEp-2 but a lower toxicity on hepatic cells HL-7702 in MTT assay, was selected for further analysis. The effects of CA15 on cell viability, proliferation, migration, apoptosis, and NF-κB activation were measured using MTT, Transwell migration, flow cytometry, Western blot, and immunofluorescence assays in HEp-2 cells. An NF-κB inhibitor, BMS-345541, as well as curcumin was also tested. Results showed that CA15 induced decreased toxicity towards HL-7702 cells compared to curcumin and BMS-345541. However, similar to BMS-345541 and curcumin, CA15 not only significantly inhibited proliferation and migration and induced caspase-3-dependent apoptosis but also attenuated TNF-α-induced NF-κB activation in HEp-2 cells. These results demonstrated that curcumin analogue CA15 exhibited anticancer effects on laryngeal cancer cells via targeting of NF-κB.
      PubDate: Mon, 20 Mar 2017 08:33:09 +000
       
  • Ferulic Acid Suppresses Amyloid β Production in the Human Lens Epithelial
           Cell Stimulated with Hydrogen Peroxide

    • Abstract: It is well known that oxidative stresses induce the production of amyloid β (Aβ) in the brain, lens, and retina, leading to age-related diseases. In the present study, we investigated the effects of ferulic acid on the Aβ levels in H2O2-stimulated human lens epithelial (HLE) SRA 01/04 cells. Three types of Aβ peptides (Aβ1-40, Aβ1-42, and Aβ1-43) were measured by ELISA, and the levels of mRNA for the expressed proteins related to Aβ production (APP, BACE1, and PS proteins) and degradation (ADAM10, NEP, and ECE1 proteins) were determined by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. H2O2 stimulation augmented gene expression of the proteins related to Aβ production, resulting in the production of three types of Aβ peptides. Treatment with 0.1 μM ferulic acid attenuated the augmentations of gene expression and production of the proteins related to the secretion of three types of Aβ peptides in the H2O2-stimulated HLE cells. These results provided evidence of antioxidative functions of ferulic acid for lens epithelial cells.
      PubDate: Mon, 20 Mar 2017 07:49:45 +000
       
  • The Association between Imaging Parameters of the Paraspinal Muscles,
           Spinal Degeneration, and Low Back Pain

    • Abstract: This narrative review investigated imaging parameters of the paraspinal muscles and their association with spinal degenerative features and low back pain (LBP) found in the literature. Three principal signs of muscle degeneration were detected on imaging: decreased muscle size, decreased radiographic density, and increased fat deposits. Men have a higher density of paraspinal muscles than women, younger individuals have a higher density than older ones, and lean individuals have a higher density than those with an increased body mass index. Fatty infiltration appears to be a late stage of muscular degeneration and can be measured noninvasively by an MRI scan. Fatty infiltration in the lumbar multifidus is common in adults and is strongly associated with LBP, especially in women, independent of body composition. Fatty infiltration develops in areas where most degenerative changes are found. MR spectroscopy studies have corroborated that the lumbar multifidus in LBP subjects has a significantly higher fat content than asymptomatic controls. There is a strong need for establishing uniform methods of evaluating normal parameters and degenerative changes of the paraspinal muscles. Additional imaging studies are needed to improve the understanding of the association and causal relationships between LBP, spinal degeneration, and changes in the paraspinal muscles.
      PubDate: Mon, 20 Mar 2017 07:47:31 +000
       
  • Preservation of Myocardial Perfusion and Function by Keeping Hypertrophied
           Heart Empty and Beating for Valve Surgery: An In Vivo MR Study of Pig
           Hearts

    • Abstract: Objectives. Normothermic hyperkalemic cardioplegia arrest (NHCA) may not effectively preserve hypertrophied myocardium during open-heart surgery. Normothermic normokalemic beating perfusion (NNBP), keeping hearts empty-beating, was utilized as an alternative to evaluate its cardioprotective role. Materials and Methods. Twelve hypertrophied pig hearts at 58.6 ± 7.2 days after ascending aorta banding underwent NNBP and NHCA, respectively. Near infrared myocardial perfusion imaging with indocyanine green (ICG) was conducted to assess myocardial perfusion. Left ventricular (LV) contractile function was assessed by cine MRI. TUNEL staining and western blotting for caspase-3 cleavage and cardiac troponin I (cTnI) degradation were conducted in LV tissue samples. Results. Ascending aortic diameter was reduced by at approximately fifty-eight days after banding. LV wall thickness was significantly higher in aorta banding than in sham operation. Myocardial blood flow reflected by maximum ICG absorbance value was markedly higher in NNBP than in NHCA. The amount of apoptotic cardiomyocyte was significantly lower in NNBP than in NHCA. NNBP alleviated caspase-3 cleavage and cTnI degradation associated with NHCA. NNBP displayed a substantially increased postoperative ejection fraction relative to NHCA. Conclusions. NNBP was better than NHCA in enhancing myocardial perfusion, inhibiting cardiomyocyte apoptosis, and preserving LV contractile function for hypertrophied hearts.
      PubDate: Mon, 20 Mar 2017 07:11:39 +000
       
  • Suspected Fetal Growth Restriction at 37 Weeks: A Comparison of Doppler
           and Placental Pathology

    • Abstract: Objective. Our objective was determining if abnormal Doppler evaluation had a higher prevalence of placental pathology compared to normal Doppler in suspected fetal growth restriction (FGR) of cases delivered at 37 weeks. Study Design. This retrospective cohort study of suspected FGR singletons with antenatal Doppler evaluation delivered at 37 weeks had a primary outcome of the prevalence of placental pathology related to FGR. Significance was defined as . Results. Of 100 pregnancies 46 and 54 were in the abnormal and normal Doppler cohorts, respectively. Placental pathology was more prevalent with any abnormal Doppler, 84.8% versus 55.6%, odds ratio (OR) 4.46, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.55, 13.22, and . Abnormal middle cerebral artery (MCA) Doppler had a higher prevalence: 96.2% versus 54.8%, OR 20.7, 95% CI: 2.54, 447.1, and . Conclusion. Abnormal Doppler was associated with more placental pathology in comparison to normal Doppler in fetuses with suspected FGR. Abnormal MCA Doppler had the strongest association.
      PubDate: Mon, 20 Mar 2017 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Nutritional Composition and Phytochemical, Antioxidative, and Antifungal
           Activities of Pergularia tomentosa L.

    • Abstract: Crude extracts from a medicinal Tunisian plant, Pergularia tomentosa L., were the investigated natural material. Butanolic extract of roots analyzed with IR spectra revealed the presence of hydroxyl, alcoholic, and carboxylic groups and sugars units. Analysis of some secondary metabolites, total phenolic, flavonoids, flavonols, and procyanidins, was performed using different solvents following the increased gradient of polarity. Fruits and leaves contained the highest amounts of all these compounds. Antioxidant properties were evaluated by the determination of free radical scavenging activity and the reducing power of methanolic extracts. Fruits and leaf extracts were the most powerful antioxidants for the two-assay in vitro system. Stems and fruits extracts exhibit an antifungal activity against Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici which could become an alternative to synthetic fungicide to control Solanum species fungal diseases.
      PubDate: Mon, 20 Mar 2017 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Metformin Use Is Associated with Reduced Incidence and Improved Survival
           of Endometrial Cancer: A Meta-Analysis

    • Abstract: Studies have suggested that metformin can potentially decrease the incidence of cancer and improve survival outcomes. However, the association between metformin use and the incidence and survival of endometrial cancer (EC) remains controversial. So, a meta-analysis was performed. An electronic search was conducted using PubMed, EMBASE, and Web of Science. The outcome measures were relative risks (RRs) or hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) comparing the EC incidence and survival in patients treated with and without metformin. Eleven studies involving 766,926 participants were included in this study. In the pooled analysis of five studies which evaluated the association of metformin use with the incidence of EC, we found that metformin use was associated with a 13% reduction in EC risk among patients with diabetes (RR = 0.87, 95% CI: 0.80–0.95; ). In the pooled analysis of six retrospective cohort studies evaluating the effect of metformin on the survival of EC patients, we found that, relative to nonuse, metformin use significantly improved the survival of EC patients (HR = 0.63, 95% CI: 0.45–0.87; ). This study showed that metformin use was significantly associated with a decreased incidence of EC in diabetes and a favorable survival outcome of EC patients.
      PubDate: Mon, 20 Mar 2017 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Joint Covariate Detection on Expression Profiles for Selecting Prognostic
           miRNAs in Glioblastoma

    • Abstract: An important application of expression profiles is to stratify patients into high-risk and low-risk groups using limited but key covariates associated with survival outcomes. Prior to that, variables considered to be associated with survival outcomes are selected. A combination of single variables, each of which is significantly related to survival outcomes, is always regarded to be candidates for posterior patient stratification. Instead of individually significant variables, a combination that contains not only significant but also insignificant variables is supposed to be concentrated on. By means of bottom-up enumeration on each pair of variables, we propose a joint covariate detection strategy to select candidates that not only correspond to close association with survival outcomes but also help to make a clear stratification of patients. Experimental results on a publicly available dataset of glioblastoma multiforme indicate that the selected pair composed of an individually significant and an insignificant miRNA keeps a better performance than the combination of significant single variables. The selected miRNA pair is ultimately regarded to be associated with the prognosis of glioblastoma multiforme by further pathway analysis.
      PubDate: Mon, 20 Mar 2017 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Engineering of Systematic Elimination of a Targeted Chromosome in Human
           Cells

    • Abstract: Embryonic trisomy leads to abortion or congenital genetic disorders in humans. The most common autosomal chromosome abnormalities are trisomy of chromosomes 13, 18, and 21. Although alteration of gene dosage is thought to contribute to disorders caused by extra copies of chromosomes, genes associated with specific disease phenotypes remain unclear. To generate a normal cell from a trisomic cell as a means of etiological analysis or candidate therapy for trisomy syndromes, we developed a system to eliminate a targeted chromosome from human cells. Chromosome 21 was targeted by integration of a DNA cassette in HeLa cells that harbored three copies of chromosome 21. The DNA cassette included two inverted loxP sites and a herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-tk) gene. This system causes missegregation of chromosome 21 after expression of Cre recombinase and subsequently enables the selection of cells lacking the chromosome by culturing in a medium that includes ganciclovir (GCV). Cells harboring only two copies of chromosome 21 were efficiently induced by transfection of a Cre expression vector, indicating that this approach is useful for eliminating a targeted chromosome.
      PubDate: Sun, 19 Mar 2017 09:13:53 +000
       
  • Histological Identification of Propionibacterium acnes in Nonpyogenic
           Degenerated Intervertebral Discs

    • Abstract: Purpose. Low-virulence anaerobic bacteria, especially the Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes), have been thought to be a new pathogeny for a series of disc diseases. However, until now, there has been no histological evidence to confirm this link. The purpose of this study was to confirm the presence of P. acnes in nonpyogenic intervertebral discs via histological observation. Method. Degenerated intervertebral discs were harvested from 76 patients with low back pain and/or sciatica but without any symptoms of discitis or spondylodiscitis. The samples were cultured under anaerobic conditions and then examined using 16S rDNA PCR to screen for P. acnes. Samples found to be positive for P. acnes were stained with hematoxylin-eosin (HE) and modified Brown-Brenn staining and observed under a microscope. Results. Here, 16 intervertebral discs were found to be positive for P. acnes via 16S rDNA PCR and the prevalence was 21.05% (16/76). Among them, 7 samples had visible microbes stained with HE and modified Brown-Brenn staining. Morphological examination showed the bacteria to be Gram-positive and rod-shaped, so they were considered P. acnes. Conclusion. P. acnes is capable of colonizing some degenerated intervertebral discs without causing discitis, and its presence could be further confirmed by histological evidence. Targeting these bacteria may be a promising therapy method for some disc diseases.
      PubDate: Sun, 19 Mar 2017 09:09:22 +000
       
  • Posttransplant Anemia as a Prognostic Factor of Mortality in
           Kidney-Transplant Recipients

    • Abstract: Background. Findings on the association between posttransplant anemia (PTA) and mortality in posttransplant patients are scarce. This study explored whether PTA shortly after kidney transplantation (KT) predicts mortality at up to 10 years’ follow-up, stratified for chronic kidney disease (CKD) stages. Methods. PTA was divided into 3 categories according to the hemoglobin (Hb) value: severe (Hb < 10 g/dl), mild (10.0 g/dl ≤ Hb < 11.9 g/dl), or no PTA (Hb ≥ 12 g/dl). CKD stages were estimated using the CKD-EPI formula and divided into 2 groups: CKD1-2 and CKD3–5. Cox regression, stratified according to CKD, was performed to identify whether different categories of PTA predicted mortality in KT recipients. Results. Age, being female, and both mild and severe PTA contributed significantly to the Cox regression model on mortality in CKD1-2. In the Cox regression model for mortality in CKD3–5, age and severe PTA contributed significantly to this model. Conclusion. PTA shortly after KT increased the risk of mortality at up to 10 years’ follow-up. Even mild PTA is associated with a 6-fold higher risk of mortality and severe PTA with a 10-fold higher risk of mortality in CKD1-2. Clinical evaluation and treatment of anemia might reduce the higher risk of mortality in patients with PTA in early stages of CKD after KT.
      PubDate: Sun, 19 Mar 2017 08:34:21 +000
       
  • Hypodontia: An Update on Its Etiology, Classification, and Clinical
           Management

    • Abstract: Hypodontia, or tooth agenesis, is the most prevalent craniofacial malformation in humans. It may occur as part of a recognised genetic syndrome or as a nonsyndromic isolated trait. Excluding third molars, the reported prevalence of hypodontia ranges from 1.6 to 6.9%, depending on the population studied. Most affected individuals lack only one or two teeth, with permanent second premolars and upper lateral incisors the most likely to be missing. Both environmental and genetic factors are involved in the aetiology of hypodontia, with the latter playing a more significant role. Hypodontia individuals often present a significant clinical challenge for orthodontists because, in a number of cases, the treatment time is prolonged and the treatment outcome may be compromised. Hence, the identification of genetic and environmental factors may be particularly useful in the early prediction of this condition and the development of prevention strategies and novel treatments in the future.
      PubDate: Sun, 19 Mar 2017 07:46:22 +000
       
  • Corrigendum to “Dual Inhibiting Senescence and Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal
           Transition by Erythropoietin Preserve Tubular Epithelial Cell Regeneration
           and Ameliorate Renal Fibrosis in Unilateral Ureteral Obstruction”

    • PubDate: Sun, 19 Mar 2017 00:00:00 +000
       
  • New Insights into the Epigenetics of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    • Abstract: Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most predominant malignancies with high fatality rate. This deadly cancer is rising at an alarming rate because it is quite resistant to radio- and chemotherapy. Different epigenetic mechanisms such as histone modifications, DNA methylation, chromatin remodeling, and expression of noncoding RNAs drive the cell proliferation, invasion, metastasis, initiation, progression, and development of HCC. These epigenetic alterations because of potential reversibility open way towards the development of biomarkers and therapeutics. The contribution of these epigenetic changes to HCC development has not been thoroughly explored yet. Further research on HCC epigenetics is necessary to better understand novel molecular-targeted HCC treatment and prevention. This review highlights latest research progress and current updates regarding epigenetics of HCC, biomarker discovery, and future preventive and therapeutic strategies to combat the increasing risk of HCC.
      PubDate: Sun, 19 Mar 2017 00:00:00 +000
       
  • White Matter Integrity in Genetic High-Risk Individuals and First-Episode
           Schizophrenia Patients: Similarities and Disassociations

    • Abstract: White matter (WM) neuroimaging studies have shown varied findings at different stages of schizophrenia (SZ). Understanding these variations may elucidate distinct markers of genetic vulnerability and conversion to psychosis. To examine the similarities and differences in WM connectivity between those at-risk for and in early stages of SZ, a cross-sectional diffusion tensor imaging study of 48 individuals diagnosed with first-episode SZ (FE-SZ), 37 nonpsychotic individuals at a high genetic risk of SZ (GHR-SZ), and 67 healthy controls (HC) was conducted. Decreased fractional anisotropy (FA) in the corpus callosum (CC), anterior cingulum (AC), and uncinate fasciculus (UF) was observed in both the GHR-SZ and FE-SZ groups, while decreased FAs in the superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF) and the fornix were only seen in the FE-SZ participants. Additionally, both GHR-SZ and FE-SZ showed worse executive performance than HC. The left SLF III FA was significantly positively correlated with hallucinations, and right SLF II was positively correlated with thought disorder. The presence of shared WM deficits in both FE-SZ and GHR-SZ individuals may reflect the genetic liability to SZ, while the disparate FA changes in the FE-SZ group may represent symptom-generating circuitry that mediates perceptual and cognitive disturbances of SZ and ultimately culminates in the onset of psychotic episodes.
      PubDate: Sun, 19 Mar 2017 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Cytotoxicity and Antimicrobial Activity of Oral Rinses In Vitro

    • Abstract: While oral rinses used for cosmetic purposes only do not necessarily have to be antiseptic, antimicrobial activity is required for medical indications, including oral and periodontal surgery. So the question arises—is the antimicrobial activity of oral rinses associated with any destructive changes in cell viability in vitro? To answer this question, we examined twelve oral rinses with respect to their antimicrobial and cytotoxic activity. Antimicrobial activity was screened against five bacterial strains using disc diffusion. Cytotoxicity was determined by mitochondrial reductase activity with primary gingival fibroblasts, L929 cells, and HSC-2 epithelial cells. Phase contrast microscopy and trypan blue staining were then performed to reveal cell morphology. Cells remained vital after exposure to oral rinses that were only used for cosmetic purposes. Moderate cytotoxic effects were observed for oral rinses containing 0.05% chlorhexidine, ethanol, or pegylated hydrogenated castor oil and sodium dodecyl sulfate. Other oral rinses containing 0.2% chlorhexidine and cocamidopropyl betaine exhibited strong cytotoxic and antimicrobial activity. Strong cytotoxic but moderate antimicrobial activity was observed in oral rinses containing cetylpyridinium chloride. The in vitro data show that oral rinses are heterogeneous with respect to their cytotoxic and antimicrobial effects. Based on their respective properties, oral rinses can be selected either to reduce the microbial load or for cosmetic purposes.
      PubDate: Sun, 19 Mar 2017 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Identification of Streptococcus pneumoniae: Development of a Standardized
           Protocol for Optochin Susceptibility Testing Using Total Lab Automation

    • Abstract: Purpose. Optochin susceptibility is one parameter used in the laboratory to identify Streptococcus pneumoniae. However, a single standardized procedure does not exist. Optochin is included neither in the current EUCAST breakpoint tables nor in the CLSI performance standards for antimicrobial susceptibility testing. We wanted to establish an evidence-based protocol for optochin testing for our Total Lab Automation. Methods. We tested seven different agars and four different reading time points (7 h, 12 h, 18 h, and 24 h). To accommodate for serotype diversity, all tests were done with 99 different strains covering 34 different serotypes of S. pneumoniae. We calculated a multivariable linear regression using data from 5544 inhibition zones. Results. Reading was possible for all strains at 12 h. Agar type and manufacturer influenced the size of the inhibition zones by up to 2 mm and they varied considerably depending on serotype (up to 3 mm for serotype 3). Depending on agar and reading time point, up to 38% of inhibition zones were smaller than the cut-off of 14 mm; that is, the result of the test was false-negative. Conclusions. Shortening incubation time from 24 h to 12 h for optochin susceptibility testing is feasible. Agar and incubation time have to be chosen carefully to avoid false-negative results.
      PubDate: Sun, 19 Mar 2017 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Management of Hepple Stage V Osteochondral Lesion of the Talus with a
           Platelet-Rich Plasma Scaffold

    • Abstract: There has been no consensus on the treatment or prognosis of Hepple stage V osteochondral lesions of the talus (OLTs), especially for lesions greater than 1.5 cm2 in size. The objective of this study was to investigate the clinical outcomes achieved upon application of a platelet-rich plasma (PRP) scaffold with a cancellous bone autograft for Hepple stage V OLTs. Fourteen patients (mean age, 39 years) were treated with a cancellous bone graft and a PRP scaffold between 2013 and 2015. The mean time to surgical treatment was 23.5 months. Ankle X-ray and magnetic resonance imaging were performed at the final follow-up. Functional outcomes were evaluated according to the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) score, American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) score, and Short Form 36 (SF-36) score. The range of motion (ROM) of the ankle joint and complications also were recorded. Thirteen patients completed the full follow-up, with a mean follow-up duration of 18 months. MRI demonstrated the complete regeneration of subchondral bone and cartilage in all patients. The postoperative VAS, AOFAS ankle and hindfoot, and SF-36 scores were improved significantly (all ) without obvious complications. We suggest that, for the Hepple stage V OLTs, management with cancellous bone graft and PRP scaffold may be a safe and effective treatment.
      PubDate: Thu, 16 Mar 2017 10:01:37 +000
       
  • Hemodynamic Analysis of Pediatric Septic Shock and Cardiogenic Shock Using
           Transpulmonary Thermodilution

    • Abstract: Septic shock and cardiogenic shock are the two most common types of shock in children admitted to pediatric intensive care units (PICUs). The aim of the study was to investigate which hemodynamic variables were associated with mortality in children with shock. We retrospectively analyzed 50 children with shock (37 septic shock cases and 13 cardiogenic shock cases) in the PICU and monitored their hemodynamics using transpulmonary thermodilution from 2003 to 2016. Clinical factors were analyzed between the patients with septic and cardiogenic shock. In addition, hemodynamic parameters associated with mortality were analyzed. The 28-day mortality was significantly higher in the septic group than in the cardiogenic group (). Initially, the parameters of cardiac output and cardiac contractility were higher in the septic group () while the parameters of preload and afterload were all higher in the cardiogenic group (). Cardiac index was significantly lower in the nonsurvivors of cardiogenic shock at the time of initial admission and after the first 24 hours (both ), while systemic vascular resistance index (SVRI) was significantly lower in the nonsurvivors of septic shock (). Therefore, during the first 24 hours after intensive care, SVRI and cardiac index are the most important hemodynamic parameters associated with mortality.
      PubDate: Thu, 16 Mar 2017 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Meta-Analysis of the Relationship between NM23 Expression to Gastric
           Cancer Risk and Clinical Features

    • Abstract: The prognostic value of reduced NM23 expression for gastric cancer (GC) patients is still contradictory. Thus, we conducted a meta-analysis to quantitatively evaluate the association of NM23 expression with GC risk and clinical features by analyzing 27 publications. The result of our meta-analysis indicated that NM23 expression is markedly reduced in gastric cancer tissues (OR = 3.15; 95% CI = 1.97–5.03; ). Furthermore, NM23 expression was negatively correlated with N stage, TNM stage, and histological grade. However, NM23 expression was not correlated with T stage, lymphatic invasion, vascular invasion, and 5-year overall survival rate. In conclusion, reduced NM23 expression correlated with gastric cancer risk, but its association with GC clinical features remains inconclusive. Therefore, large-scale and well-designed studies, which use uniform antibody and criterion of NM23 positive expression, are required to further validate the role of the NM23 in predicting GC progression.
      PubDate: Thu, 16 Mar 2017 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Computational Identification and Characterization of a Promiscuous T-Cell
           Epitope on the Extracellular Protein 85B of Mycobacterium spp. for
           Peptide-Based Subunit Vaccine Design

    • Abstract: Tuberculosis (TB) is a reemerging disease that remains as a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in humans. To identify and characterize a T-cell epitope suitable for vaccine design, we have utilized the Vaxign server to assess all antigenic proteins of Mycobacterium spp. recorded to date in the Protegen database. We found that the extracellular protein 85B displayed the most robust antigenicity among the proteins identified. Computational tools for identifying T-cell epitopes predicted an epitope, 181-QQFIYAGSLSALLDP-195, that could bind to at least 13 major histocompatibility complexes, revealing the promiscuous nature of the epitope. Molecular docking simulation demonstrated that the epitope could bind to the binding groove of MHC II and MHC I molecules by several hydrogen bonds. Molecular docking analysis further revealed that the epitope had a distinctive binding pattern to all DRB1 and A and B series of MHC molecules and presented almost no polymorphism in its binding site. Moreover, using “Allele Frequency Database,” we checked the frequency of HLA alleles in the worldwide population and found a higher frequency of both class I and II HLA alleles in individuals living in TB-endemic regions. Our results indicate that the identified peptide might be a universal candidate to produce an efficient epitope-based vaccine for TB.
      PubDate: Thu, 16 Mar 2017 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Estrogen Replacement Regulates Vaginal Innervations in Ovariectomized
           Adult Virgin Rats: A Histological Study

    • Abstract: Background. Our previous Gräfenberg spot findings confirmed that the distal-third areas of the anterior vaginal wall bore a significantly greater number of nerves and sexual hormone may have certain degree of influence on these significant differences. However, the role of estrogen in vaginal innervations remains controversial. Methods. To investigate whether hormonal-neural interactions occur in the vagina, sixty rats were randomly divided into six groups: Sham-operated, ovariectomy, and 4 treatment groups. After 2 weeks of treatment, vaginal biopsies were prepared with hematoxylin and eosin and PGP9.5 using immunohistochemistry. Results. The density of small nerve fibers was significantly higher in the distal-half areas of intact vaginal walls than the proximal-half areas (). In contrast, the overall PGP 9.5-ir fiber innervation density was significantly decreased in the OVX rats subjected to surgical menopause. Sustained estrogen administration for 2 weeks resulted in nerve fiber proliferation, with values reaching normal levels in the low-dose estradiol valerate group. Conclusion. Our findings indicate that systemic hormonal therapy with low-dose estradiol valerate is effective and safe for treating deficient vaginal innervation caused by low level of estrogen activity in menopausal women and may aid studies to identify an optimal estradiol dose to provide relief from vaginal discomfort.
      PubDate: Thu, 16 Mar 2017 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Dental Age in Orthodontic Patients with Different Skeletal Patterns

    • Abstract: Objective. To evaluate the difference between chronological and dental age, calculated by Willems and Cameriere methods, in various skeletal patterns according to Steiner’s ANB Classification. Methods. This retrospective cross-sectional study comprised the sample of 776 participants aged between 7 and 15 years (368 males and 408 females). For each participant, panoramic images (OPT) and laterolateral cephalograms (LC) were collected from the medical database. On LC ANB angle was measured; on OPT dental age (DA) was calculated while chronological age (CA) and sex were recorded. The sample was divided into three subgroups (Class I, Class II, and Class III) with similar distribution based on the chronological age and ANB angle. CA was calculated as the difference between the date of OPT imaging and the date of birth, while DA was evaluated using Willems and Cameriere methods. ANB angle was measured on LC by two independent investigators using the cephalometric software. Differences between sexes and the difference between dental and chronological age were tested by independent and paired samples -test, respectively; one-way ANOVA was used to test differences among ANB classes with Tukey post hoc test to compare specific pairs of ANB classes. Results. The significant difference was found between Class III and other two skeletal classes in males using both dental age estimation methods. In Class III males dental age was ahead averagely by 0.41 years when using Willems method, while Cameriere method overestimated CA for 0.22 years. Conclusion. In males with Class III skeletal pattern, dental development is faster than in Classes I and II skeletal pattern. This faster development is not present in females.
      PubDate: Thu, 16 Mar 2017 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Metals Are Important Contact Sensitizers: An Experience from Lithuania

    • Abstract: Background. Metals are very frequent sensitizers causing contact allergy and allergic contact dermatitis worldwide; up-to-date data based on patch test results has proved useful for the identification of a problem. Objectives. In this retrospective study prevalence of contact allergy to metals (nickel, chromium, palladium, gold, cobalt, and titanium) in Lithuania is analysed. Patients/Methods. Clinical and patch test data of 546 patients patch tested in 2014–2016, in Vilnius University Hospital Santariskiu Klinikos, was analysed and compared with previously published data. Results. Almost third of tested patients (29.56%) were sensitized to nickel. Younger women were more often sensitized to nickel than older ones (36% versus 22.8%, ). Women were significantly more often sensitized to nickel than men (33% versus 6.1%, ). Younger patients were more often sensitized to cobalt (11.6% versus 5.7%, ). Sensitization to cobalt was related to sensitization to nickel (). Face dermatitis and oral discomfort were related to gold allergy (28% versus 6.9% dermatitis of other parts, ). Older patients were patch test positive to gold(I) sodium thiosulfate statistically significantly more often than younger ones (44.44% versus 21.21%, ). Conclusions. Nickel, gold, cobalt, and chromium are leading metal sensitizers in Lithuania. Cobalt sensitization is often accompanied by sensitization to nickel. Sensitivity rate to palladium and nickel indicates possible cross-reactivity. No sensitization to titanium was found.
      PubDate: Thu, 16 Mar 2017 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Collagen Sponge Functionalized with Chimeric Anti-BMP-2 Monoclonal
           Antibody Mediates Repair of Critical-Size Mandibular Continuity Defects in
           a Nonhuman Primate Model

    • Abstract: Antibody-mediated osseous regeneration (AMOR) has been introduced by our research group as a tissue engineering approach to capture of endogenous growth factors through the application of specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) immobilized on a scaffold. Specifically, anti-Bone Morphogenetic Protein- (BMP-) 2 mAbs have been demonstrated to be efficacious in mediating bone repair in a number of bone defects. The present study sought to investigate the application of AMOR for repair of mandibular continuity defect in nonhuman primates. Critical-sized mandibular continuity defects were created in Macaca fascicularis locally implanted with absorbable collagen sponges (ACS) functionalized with chimeric anti-BMP-2 mAb or isotype control mAb. 2D and 3D analysis of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging demonstrated increased bone density and volume observed within mandibular continuity defects implanted with collagen scaffolds functionalized with anti-BMP-2 mAb, compared with isotype-matched control mAb. Both CBCT imaging and histologic examination demonstrated de novo bone formation that was in direct apposition to the margins of the resected bone. It is hypothesized that bone injury may be necessary for AMOR. This is evidenced by de novo bone formation adjacent to resected bone margins, which may be the source of endogenous BMPs captured by anti-BMP-2 mAb, in turn mediating bone repair.
      PubDate: Thu, 16 Mar 2017 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Evaluation of Mobile Phone and Cordless Phone Use and Glioma Risk Using
           the Bradford Hill Viewpoints from 1965 on Association or Causation

    • Abstract: Objective. Bradford Hill’s viewpoints from 1965 on association or causation were used on glioma risk and use of mobile or cordless phones. Methods. All nine viewpoints were evaluated based on epidemiology and laboratory studies. Results. Strength: meta-analysis of case-control studies gave odds ratio (OR) = 1.90, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.31–2.76 with highest cumulative exposure. Consistency: the risk increased with latency, meta-analysis gave in the 10+ years’ latency group OR = 1.62, 95% CI = 1.20–2.19. Specificity: increased risk for glioma was in the temporal lobe. Using meningioma cases as comparison group still increased the risk. Temporality: highest risk was in the 20+ years’ latency group, OR = 2.01, 95% CI =1.41–2.88, for wireless phones. Biological gradient: cumulative use of wireless phones increased the risk. Plausibility: animal studies showed an increased incidence of glioma and malignant schwannoma in rats exposed to radiofrequency (RF) radiation. There is increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) from RF radiation. Coherence: there is a change in the natural history of glioma and increasing incidence. Experiment: antioxidants reduced ROS production from RF radiation. Analogy: there is an increased risk in subjects exposed to extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields. Conclusion. RF radiation should be regarded as a human carcinogen causing glioma.
      PubDate: Thu, 16 Mar 2017 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Carvedilol Attenuates the Progression of Hepatic Fibrosis Induced by Bile
           Duct Ligation

    • Abstract: Background. The sympathetic nervous system (SNS) is responsible for hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) activation and the accumulation of collagen that occurs in hepatic fibrogenesis. Carvedilol has been widely used for the complication of hepatic cirrhosis in the clinic. Furthermore, it has powerful antioxidant properties. We assessed the potential antifibrotic effects of carvedilol and the underlying mechanisms that may further enhance its clinical benefits. Methods. Using a bile duct ligation rat model of hepatic fibrosis, we studied the effects of carvedilol on the fibrosis, collagen deposition, and oxidative stress based on histology, immunohistochemistry, western blot, and RT-PCR analyses. Results. Carvedilol attenuated liver fibrosis, as evidenced by reduced hydroxyproline content and the accumulation of collagen, downregulated TIMP-1 and TIMP-2, and upregulated MMP-13. MMP-2 was an exception, which was decreased after carvedilol treatment for 2 weeks and upregulated after carvedilol treatment for 4 weeks. Carvedilol reduced the activation of HSCs, decreased the induction of collagen, transforming growth factor-β1, and MDA content, and strengthened the SOD activity. The antifibrotic effects were augmented as dosages increased. Conclusions. The study indicates that carvedilol attenuated hepatic fibrosis in a dose-dependent manner. It can decrease collagen accumulation and HSCs activation by the amelioration of oxidative stress.
      PubDate: Wed, 15 Mar 2017 08:39:49 +000
       
  • Biomaterials for Dental Applications

    • PubDate: Wed, 15 Mar 2017 08:26:31 +000
       
  • Bioinformatic Approaches for Fungal Omics

    • PubDate: Wed, 15 Mar 2017 07:44:21 +000
       
  • Molecular Mechanism of Rheumatic Diseases and Efficacy of Current
           Therapies

    • PubDate: Wed, 15 Mar 2017 07:12:32 +000
       
 
 
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