for Journals by Title or ISSN
for Articles by Keywords
help

Publisher: Hindawi   (Total: 298 journals)

 A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

        1 2 | Last   [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

Showing 1 - 200 of 298 Journals sorted alphabetically
Abstract and Applied Analysis     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.512, h-index: 32)
Active and Passive Electronic Components     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.157, h-index: 15)
Advances in Acoustics and Vibration     Open Access   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.259, h-index: 6)
Advances in Agriculture     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Artificial Intelligence     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Advances in Astronomy     Open Access   (Followers: 37, SJR: 0.351, h-index: 17)
Advances in Bioinformatics     Open Access   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.421, h-index: 8)
Advances in Chemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Advances in Civil Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 33, SJR: 0.338, h-index: 8)
Advances in Condensed Matter Physics     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.248, h-index: 10)
Advances in Decision Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.231, h-index: 6)
Advances in Electrical Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Advances in Fuzzy Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.258, h-index: 7)
Advances in Hematology     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.892, h-index: 18)
Advances in High Energy Physics     Open Access   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.892, h-index: 19)
Advances in Human-Computer Interaction     Open Access   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.439, h-index: 9)
Advances in Materials Science and Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 32, SJR: 0.263, h-index: 11)
Advances in Mathematical Physics     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.332, h-index: 10)
Advances in Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.498, h-index: 10)
Advances in Multimedia     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.191, h-index: 10)
Advances in Nonlinear Optics     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Numerical Analysis     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Operations Research     Open Access   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.343, h-index: 7)
Advances in Optical Technologies     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.283, h-index: 16)
Advances in OptoElectronics     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.973, h-index: 16)
Advances in Orthopedic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Orthopedics     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Pharmacological Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.695, h-index: 13)
Advances in Physical Chemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.297, h-index: 7)
Advances in Power Electronics     Open Access   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.26, h-index: 6)
Advances in Preventive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Advances in Tribology     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.267, h-index: 6)
Advances in Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.629, h-index: 16)
Advances in Virology     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 1.04, h-index: 12)
AIDS Research and Treatment     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.125, h-index: 14)
Analytical Cellular Pathology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.334, h-index: 12)
Anatomy Research Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Anemia     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.991, h-index: 11)
Anesthesiology Research and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.513, h-index: 12)
Applied and Environmental Soil Science     Open Access   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.53, h-index: 9)
Applied Bionics and Biomechanics     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.23, h-index: 13)
Applied Computational Intelligence and Soft Computing     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Archaea     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.248, h-index: 27)
Arthritis     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Autism Research and Treatment     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Autoimmune Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.909, h-index: 17)
Behavioural Neurology     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.696, h-index: 34)
Biochemistry Research Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.085, h-index: 17)
Bioinorganic Chemistry and Applications     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.286, h-index: 19)
BioMed Research Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.725, h-index: 59)
Biotechnology Research Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Bone Marrow Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Canadian J. of Gastroenterology & Hepatology     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.856, h-index: 53)
Canadian J. of Infectious Diseases and Medical Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.409, h-index: 25)
Canadian Respiratory J.     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.503, h-index: 42)
Cardiology Research and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.941, h-index: 17)
Cardiovascular Psychiatry and Neurology     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.091, h-index: 14)
Case Reports in Anesthesiology     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Case Reports in Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Case Reports in Critical Care     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Case Reports in Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Case Reports in Dermatological Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Case Reports in Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Case Reports in Endocrinology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.326, h-index: 1)
Case Reports in Gastrointestinal Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Case Reports in Genetics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Case Reports in Hematology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Case Reports in Hepatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Case Reports in Immunology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Case Reports in Infectious Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Case Reports in Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Case Reports in Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Case Reports in Neurological Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Case Reports in Obstetrics and Gynecology     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Case Reports in Oncological Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Case Reports in Ophthalmological Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Case Reports in Orthopedics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Case Reports in Otolaryngology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Case Reports in Pathology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Case Reports in Pediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Case Reports in Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Case Reports in Pulmonology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Case Reports in Radiology     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Case Reports in Rheumatology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Case Reports in Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Case Reports in Transplantation     Open Access  
Case Reports in Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Case Reports in Vascular Medicine     Open Access  
Case Reports in Veterinary Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Chemotherapy Research and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Child Development Research     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Chinese J. of Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Chinese J. of Mathematics     Open Access  
Cholesterol     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.906, h-index: 12)
Complexity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.526, h-index: 27)
Computational and Mathematical Methods in Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.415, h-index: 22)
Computational Intelligence and Neuroscience     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.232, h-index: 30)
Contrast Media & Molecular Imaging     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.932, h-index: 34)
Critical Care Research and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.916, h-index: 14)
Current Gerontology and Geriatrics Research     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.8, h-index: 12)
Depression Research and Treatment     Open Access   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.77, h-index: 11)
Dermatology Research and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.576, h-index: 15)
Diagnostic and Therapeutic Endoscopy     Open Access   (SJR: 0.651, h-index: 18)
Discrete Dynamics in Nature and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.323, h-index: 24)
Disease Markers     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.774, h-index: 49)
Education Research Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Emergency Medicine Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Enzyme Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.457, h-index: 18)
Epilepsy Research and Treatment     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.615, h-index: 50)
Experimental Diabetes Research     Open Access   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.591, h-index: 30)
Gastroenterology Research and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.664, h-index: 21)
Genetics Research Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Geofluids     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.693, h-index: 38)
Hepatitis Research and Treatment     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
HPB Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.798, h-index: 22)
Indian J. of Materials Science     Open Access  
Infectious Diseases in Obstetrics and Gynecology     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.976, h-index: 34)
Influenza Research and Treatment     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Infectious Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.763, h-index: 15)
Intl. J. of Aerospace Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 66, SJR: 0.241, h-index: 6)
Intl. J. of Agronomy     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.223, h-index: 2)
Intl. J. of Alzheimer's Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.193, h-index: 25)
Intl. J. of Analysis     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Analytical Chemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.157, h-index: 2)
Intl. J. of Antennas and Propagation     Open Access   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.385, h-index: 15)
Intl. J. of Bacteriology     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Biodiversity     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Biomaterials     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.485, h-index: 10)
Intl. J. of Biomedical Imaging     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.581, h-index: 23)
Intl. J. of Breast Cancer     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Intl. J. of Cell Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 2.658, h-index: 25)
Intl. J. of Chemical Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.361, h-index: 10)
Intl. J. of Chronic Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Computer Games Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.213, h-index: 12)
Intl. J. of Corrosion     Open Access   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.19, h-index: 7)
Intl. J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.558, h-index: 11)
Intl. J. of Differential Equations     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.363, h-index: 11)
Intl. J. of Digital Multimedia Broadcasting     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.144, h-index: 10)
Intl. J. of Electrochemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Intl. J. of Endocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.961, h-index: 24)
Intl. J. of Engineering Mathematics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Evolutionary Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Intl. J. of Family Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Food Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Forestry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Genomics     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.721, h-index: 7)
Intl. J. of Hepatology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Hypertension     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.823, h-index: 20)
Intl. J. of Inflammation     Open Access   (SJR: 0.876, h-index: 14)
Intl. J. of Mathematics and Mathematical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.346, h-index: 27)
Intl. J. of Medicinal Chemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Intl. J. of Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.006, h-index: 18)
Intl. J. of Microwave Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.167, h-index: 5)
Intl. J. of Molecular Imaging     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Navigation and Observation     Open Access   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.411, h-index: 7)
Intl. J. of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.926, h-index: 14)
Intl. J. of Optics     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.262, h-index: 7)
Intl. J. of Otolaryngology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Pediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Intl. J. of Peptides     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.73, h-index: 16)
Intl. J. of Photoenergy     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.348, h-index: 28)
Intl. J. of Plant Genomics     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.578, h-index: 20)
Intl. J. of Polymer Science     Open Access   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.265, h-index: 11)
Intl. J. of Population Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Proteomics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Reconfigurable Computing     Open Access   (SJR: 0.182, h-index: 8)
Intl. J. of Reproductive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Intl. J. of Rheumatology     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.015, h-index: 18)
Intl. J. of Rotating Machinery     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.402, h-index: 19)
Intl. J. of Spectroscopy     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Intl. J. of Stochastic Analysis     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.234, h-index: 19)
Intl. J. of Surgical Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.753, h-index: 11)
Intl. J. of Telemedicine and Applications     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.757, h-index: 14)
Intl. J. of Vascular Medicine     Open Access   (SJR: 0.865, h-index: 16)
Intl. J. of Vehicular Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.169, h-index: 6)
Intl. J. of Zoology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.389, h-index: 8)
Intl. Scholarly Research Notices     Open Access   (Followers: 199)
ISRN Astronomy and Astrophysics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
J. of Addiction     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
J. of Advanced Transportation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.911, h-index: 24)
J. of Aging Research     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 1.259, h-index: 23)
J. of Allergy     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
J. of Amino Acids     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Analytical Methods in Chemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.296, h-index: 13)
J. of Anthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
J. of Applied Chemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
J. of Applied Mathematics     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.341, h-index: 22)
J. of Biomarkers     Open Access  
J. of Biomedical Education     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Biophysics     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.22, h-index: 5)
J. of Blood Transfusion     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Botany     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.101, h-index: 2)
J. of Cancer Epidemiology     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 1.427, h-index: 12)
J. of Chemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.225, h-index: 11)
J. of Combustion     Open Access   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.27, h-index: 8)
J. of Complex Analysis     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
J. of Computational Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 1)

        1 2 | Last   [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

Journal Cover International Journal of Genomics
  [SJR: 0.721]   [H-I: 7]   [2 followers]  Follow
    
  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
   ISSN (Print) 2314-436X - ISSN (Online) 2314-4378
   Published by Hindawi Homepage  [298 journals]
  • Haplotypes for Type, Degree, and Rate of Marbling in Cattle Are Syntenic
           with Human Muscular Dystrophy

    • Abstract: Traditional analyses of a QTL on Bota 19 implicate a surfeit of candidates, but each is of marginal significance in explaining the deposition of healthy, low melting temperature fat within marbled muscle of Wagyu cattle. As an alternative approach, we have used genomic, multigenerational segregation to identify 14 conserved, ancestral 20 Mb haplotypes. These determine the degree and rate of marbling in Wagyu and other breeds of cattle. The melting temperature of intramuscular fat is highly heritable and traceable by haplotyping. Fortunately, for the production of healthy beef, some of these haplotypes are sufficiently penetrant to be expressed in heterozygous crossbreds, thereby allowing selection of sires which will improve the healthiness of beef produced under even harsh climatic conditions. The region of Bota 19 is syntenic to a region of Hosa 17 known to be important in muscle metabolism and in determining susceptibility to a form of human muscular dystrophy.
      PubDate: Thu, 17 Aug 2017 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Comparative Genomic In Situ Hybridization and the Possible Role of
           Retroelements in the Karyotypic Evolution of Three Akodontini Species

    • Abstract: South American Akodontini rodents are characterized by a large number of chromosome rearrangements. Among them, the genus Akodon has been extensively analyzed with classical and molecular cytogenetics, which allowed the identification of a large number of intra- and interspecific chromosomal variation due to Robertsonian rearrangements, pericentric inversions, and heterochromatin additions/deletions. In order to shed some light on the cause of these rearrangements, we comparatively analyzed the karyotypes of three Akodontini species, Akodon cursor (2n = 14, FN = 19), A. montensis (2n = 24, FN = 42), and Necromys lasiurus (2n = 34, FN = 34), after GTG- and CBG-banding. The karyotypes differed by Robertsonian rearrangements, pericentric inversions, centromere repositioning, and heterochromatin variation. Genome comparisons were performed through interspecific fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with total genomic DNAs of each species as probes (GISH). Our results revealed considerable conservation of the euchromatic portions among the three karyotypes suggesting that they mostly differ in their heterochromatic regions. FISH was also performed to assess the distribution of telomeric sequences, long and short interspersed repetitive elements (LINE-1 and B1 SINE) and of the endogenous retrovirus mysTR in the genomes of the three species. The results led us to infer that transposable elements have played an important role in the enormous chromosome variation found in Akodontini.
      PubDate: Wed, 16 Aug 2017 07:04:52 +000
       
  • Aquatic Plant Genomics: Advances, Applications, and Prospects

    • Abstract: Genomics is a discipline in genetics that studies the genome composition of organisms and the precise structure of genes and their expression and regulation. Genomics research has resolved many problems where other biological methods have failed. Here, we summarize advances in aquatic plant genomics with a focus on molecular markers, the genes related to photosynthesis and stress tolerance, comparative study of genomes and genome/transcriptome sequencing technology.
      PubDate: Wed, 16 Aug 2017 03:36:32 +000
       
  • Serum and Brain Metabolomic Variations Reveal Perturbation of Sleep
           Deprivation on Rats and Ameliorate Effect of Total Ginsenoside Treatment

    • Abstract: Sleep loss or sleep deprivation (SD) refers to shorter sleep than average baseline need, and SD has been a serious problem of modern societies which affects health and well-being. Panax ginseng is a well-known traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). Our previous study has demonstrated that total ginsenosides (GS), the extracts from Panax ginseng, could effectively improve cognition and behavior on SD rats. However, little is known about its metabolomic study. In this study, serum and brain metabolomic method based on gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC/MS) was employed to evaluate the efficacy and study the mechanism of GS on a rat model of SD. With pattern recognition analysis of serum and brain tissue metabolite profile, a clear separation of the model group and control group was acquired for serum and brain tissue samples; the MGS (model + GS) group showed a tendency of recovering when compared to control group, which was consistent with behavioral and biochemical parameters. 39 and 40 potential biomarkers of brain tissues and serum samples, respectively, were identified and employed to explore the possible mechanism. Our work revealed that GS has significant protective effects on SD, and metabolomics is a useful tool for evaluating efficacy and elucidating mechanism in TCM.
      PubDate: Wed, 16 Aug 2017 00:00:00 +000
       
  • miRNA Expression Profile and Effect of Wenxin Granule in Rats with
           Ligation-Induced Myocardial Infarction

    • Abstract: Wenxin Granule (WXKL) is a traditional Chinese medicine used for treatment of myocardial infarction (MI) and arrhythmias. However, the genomic pathological mechanisms of MI and mechanisms of WXKL are largely unknown. This study aims to investigate a comprehensive miRNA expression profile, and the predicted correlation pathways to be targeted by differentially expressed miRNAs in MI, and mechanisms of WXKL from a gene level. MI rat model was established by a coronary artery ligation surgery. miRNA expression microarrays were performed and the data were deposited in Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO number GSE95855). And, pathway analysis was performed by using the DIANA-miRPath v3.0 online tool. The expressions of miR-1, miR-133, Cx43, and Cx45 were detected by quantitative real-time PCR. It was found that 35 differentially expressed miRNAs and 23 predicted pathways, including miR-1, miR-133, and gap junction pathway, are involved in the pathogenesis of MI. And, WXKL increased the expressions of miR-1 and miR-133, while also increased the mRNA levels of Cx43 and Cx45, and, especially, recovered the Cx43/Cx45 ratio near to normal level. The results suggest that regulatory effects on miR-1, miR-133, Cx43, and Cx45 might be a possible mechanism of WXKL in the treatment of MI at the gene level.
      PubDate: Tue, 15 Aug 2017 00:00:00 +000
       
  • MicroRNA Profiling in Cartilage Ageing

    • Abstract: Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common age-related joint disorder in man. MicroRNAs (miRNA), a class of small noncoding RNAs, are potential therapeutic targets for regulating molecular mechanisms in both disease and ageing. Whilst there is an increasing amount of research on the roles of miRNAs in ageing, there has been scant research on age-related changes in miRNA in a cartilage. We undertook a microarray study on young and old human cartilages. Findings were validated in an independent cohort. Contrasts between these samples identified twenty differentially expressed miRNAs in a cartilage from old donors, derived from an OA environment which clustered based on OA severity. We identified a number of recognised and novel miRNAs changing in cartilage ageing and OA including miR-126: a potential new candidate with a role in OA pathogenesis. These analyses represent important candidates that have the potential as cartilage ageing and OA biomarkers and therapeutic targets.
      PubDate: Mon, 14 Aug 2017 00:00:00 +000
       
  • The Role of miRNAs as Biomarkers for Pregnancy Outcomes: A Comprehensive
           Review

    • Abstract: Several studies showed that altered expression of the miRNA-ome in maternal circulation or in placental tissue may reflect not only gestational disorders, such as preeclampsia, spontaneous abortion, preterm birth, low birth weight, or macrosomia, but also prenatal exposure to environmental pollutants. Generally, the relationships between environmental exposure, changes in miRNA expression, and gestational disorders are explored separately, producing conflicting findings. However, validation of tissue-accessible biomarkers for the monitoring of adverse pregnancy outcomes needs a systematic methodological approach that takes also into account early-life environmental exposure. To achieve this goal, exposure to xenochemicals, endogenous agents, and diet should be assessed. This study has the aim to provide a comprehensive review on the role of miRNAs as potential biomarkers for adverse pregnancy outcomes and prenatal environmental exposure.
      PubDate: Sun, 13 Aug 2017 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Transcriptome Analysis of Two Different Developmental Stages of Paeonia
           lactiflora Seeds

    • Abstract: Paeonia lactiflora is a herbaceous flower in the family Paeoniaceae with both hypocotyl and epicotyl dormant seeds. We used high-throughput transcriptome sequencing on two different developmental stages of P. lactiflora seeds to identify seed dormancy and germination-related genes. We performed de novo assembly and annotated a total of 123,577 unigenes, which encoded 24,688 putative proteins with 47 GO categories. A total of 10,714 unigenes were annotated in the KEGG database, and 258 pathways were involved in the annotations. A total of 1795 genes were differentially expressed in the functional enrichment analysis. The key genes for seed germination and dormancy, such as GAI1 and ARF, were confirmed by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis. This is the first report of sequencing the P. lactiflora seed transcriptome. Our results provide fundamental frame work and technical support for further selective breeding and cultivation of Paeonia. Our transcriptomic data also serves as the basis for future genetics and genomics research on Paeonia and its closely related species.
      PubDate: Mon, 07 Aug 2017 07:19:12 +000
       
  • Mapping QTL for Root and Shoot Morphological Traits in a Durum
           Wheat × T. dicoccum Segregating Population at Seedling Stage

    • Abstract: A segregating population of 136 recombinant inbred lines derived from a cross between the durum wheat cv. “Simeto” and the T. dicoccum accession “Molise Colli” was grown in soil and evaluated for a number of shoot and root morphological traits. A total of 17 quantitative trait loci (QTL) were identified for shoot dry weight, number of culms, and plant height and for root dry weight, volume, length, surface area, and number of forks and tips, on chromosomes 1B, 2A, 3A, 4B, 5B, 6A, 6B, and 7B. LODs were 2.1 to 21.6, with percent of explained phenotypic variability between 0.07 and 52. Three QTL were mapped to chromosome 4B, one of which corresponds to the Rht-B1 locus and has a large impact on both shoot and root traits (LOD 21.6). Other QTL that have specific effects on root morphological traits were also identified. Moreover, meta-QTL analysis was performed to compare the QTL identified in the “Simeto” × “Molise Colli” segregating population with those described in previous studies in wheat, with three novel QTL defined. Due to the complexity of phenotyping for root traits, further studies will be helpful to validate these regions as targets for breeding programs for optimization of root function for field performance.
      PubDate: Sun, 06 Aug 2017 00:00:00 +000
       
  • A Pilot Genome-Wide Association Study in Postmenopausal Mexican-Mestizo
           Women Implicates the RMND1/CCDC170 Locus Is Associated with Bone Mineral
           Density

    • Abstract: To identify genetic variants influencing bone mineral density (BMD) in the Mexican-Mestizo population, we performed a GWAS for femoral neck (FN) and lumbar spine (LS) in Mexican-Mestizo postmenopausal women. In the discovery sample, 300,000 SNPs were genotyped in a cohort of 411 postmenopausal women and seven SNPs were analyzed in the replication cohort (). The combined results of a meta-analysis from the discovery and replication samples identified two loci, RMND1 (rs6904364, ) and CCDC170 (rs17081341, ), associated with FN BMD. We also compared our results with those of the Genetic Factors for Osteoporosis (GEFOS) Consortium meta-analysis. The comparison revealed two loci previously reported in the GEFOS meta-analysis: SOX6 (rs7128738) and PKDCC (rs11887431) associated with FN and LS BMD, respectively, in our study population. Interestingly, rs17081341 rare in Caucasians (minor allele frequency 
      PubDate: Thu, 03 Aug 2017 00:00:00 +000
       
  • A New Network-Based Strategy for Predicting the Potential miRNA-mRNA
           Interactions in Tumorigenesis

    • Abstract: MicroRNA (miRNA) plays an important role in the degradation and inhibition of mRNAs and is a kind of essential drug targets for cancer therapy. To facilitate the clinical cancer research, we proposed a network-based strategy to identify the cancer-related miRNAs and to predict their targeted genes based on the gene expression profiles. The strategy was validated by using the data sets of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), breast invasive carcinoma (BRCA), and kidney renal clear cell carcinoma (KIRC). The results showed that in the top 20 miRNAs ranked by their degrees, 90.0% (18/20), 70.0% (14/20), and 70.0% (14/20) miRNAs were found to be associated with the cancers for AML, BRCA, and KIRC, respectively. The KEGG pathways and GO terms enriched with the genes that were predicted as the targets of the cancer-related miRNAs were significantly associated with the biological processes of cancers. In addition, several genes, which were predicted to be regulated by more than three miRNAs, were identified to be the potential drug targets annotated by using the human protein atlas database. Our results demonstrated that the proposed strategy can be helpful for predicting the miRNA-mRNA interactions in tumorigenesis and identifying the cancer-related miRNAs as the potential drug targets.
      PubDate: Wed, 02 Aug 2017 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Uncover the Underlying Mechanism of Drug-Induced Myopathy by Using Systems
           Biology Approaches

    • Abstract: Drug-induced myopathy (DIM) is a rare side effect; however, the consequence could be fatal. There are few reports to systematically assess the underlying mechanism of DIM. In this study, we curated the comprehensive DIM drug list based on structured labeling products (SPLs) and carried out the analysis based on chemical structure space, drug protein interaction, side effect space, and transcriptomic profiling space. Some key features are enriched from each of analysis. Specifically, the similarity of DIM drugs is more significant than random chance, which shows that the chemical structure could distinguish the DIM-positive drugs from negatives. The cytochrome P450 (CYP) was identified to be shared by DIM drugs, which indicated the important role of metabolism in DIM. Three pathways including pathways in cancer, MAPK signaling pathway, and GnRH signaling pathway enriched based on transcriptomic analysis may explain the underlying mechanism of DIM. Although the DIM is the current focus of the study, the proposed approaches could be applied to other toxicity assessments and facilitate the safety evaluation.
      PubDate: Mon, 31 Jul 2017 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Genome-Wide Identification and Transcriptional Expression Analysis of
           Cucumber Superoxide Dismutase (SOD) Family in Response to Various Abiotic
           Stresses

    • Abstract: Superoxide dismutase (SOD) proteins are widely present in the plant kingdom and play important roles in different biological processes. However, little is known about the SOD genes in cucumber. In this study, night SOD genes were identified from cucumber (Cucumis sativus) using bioinformatics-based methods, including 5 Cu/ZnSODs, 3 FeSODs, and 1 MnSOD. Gene structure and motif analysis indicated that most of the SOD genes have relatively conserved exon/intron arrangement and motif composition. Phylogenetic analyses with SODs from cucumber and several other species revealed that these SOD proteins can be traced back to two ancestral SODs before the divergence of monocot and dicot plants. Many cis-elements related to stress responses and plant hormones were found in the promoter sequence of each CsSOD gene. Gene expression analysis revealed that most of the CsSOD genes are expressed in almost all the tested tissues. qRT-PCR analysis of 8 selected CsSOD genes showed that these genes could respond to heat, cold, osmotic, and salt stresses. Our results provide a basis for further functional research on SOD gene family in cucumber and facilitate their potential applications in the genetic improvement of cucumber.
      PubDate: Thu, 20 Jul 2017 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Differential MicroRNA Analyses of Burkholderia pseudomallei- and
           Francisella tularensis-Exposed hPBMCs Reveal Potential Biomarkers

    • Abstract: Increasing evidence that microRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in the immune response against infectious agents suggests that miRNA might be exploitable as signatures of exposure to specific infectious agents. In order to identify potential early miRNA biomarkers of bacterial infections, human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hPBMCs) were exposed to two select agents, Burkholderia pseudomallei K96243 and Francisella tularensis SHU S4, as well as to the nonpathogenic control Escherichia coli DH5α. RNA samples were harvested at three early time points, 30, 60, and 120 minutes postexposure, then sequenced. RNAseq analyses identified 87 miRNAs to be differentially expressed (DE) in a linear fashion. Of these, 31 miRNAs were tested using the miScript miRNA qPCR assay. Through RNAseq identification and qPCR validation, we identified differentially expressed miRNA species that may be involved in the early response to bacterial infections. Based upon its upregulation at early time points postexposure in two different individuals, hsa-mir-30c-5p is a miRNA species that could be studied further as a potential biomarker for exposure to these gram-negative intracellular pathogens. Gene ontology functional analyses demonstrated that programmed cell death is the first ranking biological process associated with miRNAs that are upregulated in F. tularensis-exposed hPBMCs.
      PubDate: Sun, 16 Jul 2017 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Transcriptome-Based Modeling Reveals that Oxidative Stress Induces
           Modulation of the AtfA-Dependent Signaling Networks in Aspergillus
           nidulans

    • Abstract: To better understand the molecular functions of the master stress-response regulator AtfA in Aspergillus nidulans, transcriptomic analyses of the atfA null mutant and the appropriate control strains exposed to menadione sodium bisulfite- (MSB-), t-butylhydroperoxide- and diamide-induced oxidative stresses were performed. Several elements of oxidative stress response were differentially expressed. Many of them, including the downregulation of the mitotic cell cycle, as the MSB stress-specific upregulation of FeS cluster assembly and the MSB stress-specific downregulation of nitrate reduction, tricarboxylic acid cycle, and ER to Golgi vesicle-mediated transport, showed AtfA dependence. To elucidate the potential global regulatory role of AtfA governing expression of a high number of genes with very versatile biological functions, we devised a model based on the comprehensive transcriptomic data. Our model suggests that an important function of AtfA is to modulate the transduction of stress signals. Although it may regulate directly only a limited number of genes, these include elements of the signaling network, for example, members of the two-component signal transduction systems. AtfA acts in a stress-specific manner, which may increase further the number and diversity of AtfA-dependent genes. Our model sheds light on the versatility of the physiological functions of AtfA and its orthologs in fungi.
      PubDate: Sun, 09 Jul 2017 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Blood Transcriptional Signatures for Disease Progression in a Rat Model of
           Osteoarthritis

    • Abstract: Biomarkers of osteoarthritis (OA) that can accurately diagnose the disease at the earliest stage would significantly support efforts to develop treatments for prevention and early intervention. We have sought to determine the time course of alterations in peripheral blood gene expression profile associated with the development of OA. Blood samples were collected from a tail vein of individual rats with monosodium iodoacetate- (MIA-) induced OA (2, 14, 21, and 28 days after the treatment). We used whole-genome microarrays to reveal OA-related transcriptional alterations of 72 transcripts. Three main groups of coexpressed genes revealed diverse time-dependent profiles of up- and downregulation. Functional links that connect expression of the gradually downregulated genes to the G13 signaling pathway were indicated. The mRNA abundance levels of the identified transcripts were further analyzed in publicly available gene expression dataset obtained from a GARP study cohort of OA patients. We revealed three-gene signature differentially expressed in both rat and human blood (TNK2, KCTD2, and WDR37). The alterations in expression of the selected transcripts in peripheral blood samples of the patients indicate heterogeneity of the OA profiles potentially related to disease progress and severity of clinical symptoms. Our study identifies several potential stage-specific biomarkers of OA progression.
      PubDate: Mon, 03 Jul 2017 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Differential Analysis of Genetic, Epigenetic, and Cytogenetic
           Abnormalities in AML

    • Abstract: Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a haematological malignancy characterized by the excessive proliferation of immature myeloid cells coupled with impaired differentiation. Many AML cases have been reported without any known cytogenetic abnormalities and carry no mutation in known AML-associated driver genes. In this study, 200 AML cases were selected from a publicly available cohort and differentially analyzed for genetic, epigenetic, and cytogenetic abnormalities. Three genes (FLT3, DNMT3A, and NPMc) are found to be predominantly mutated. We identified several aberrations to be associated with genome-wide methylation changes. These include Del (5q), T (15; 17), and NPMc mutations. Four aberrations—Del (5q), T (15; 17), T (9; 22), and T (9; 11)—are significantly associated with patient survival. Del (5q)-positive patients have an average survival of less than 1 year, whereas T (15; 17)-positive patients have a significantly better prognosis. Combining the methylation and mutation data reveals three distinct patient groups and four clusters of genes. We speculate that combined signatures have the better potential to be used for subclassification of AML, complementing cytogenetic signatures. A larger sample cohort and further investigation of the effects observed in this study are required to enable the clinical application of our patient classification aided by DNA methylation.
      PubDate: Tue, 20 Jun 2017 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Recent Advances in High Throughput Sequencing Analysis

    • PubDate: Mon, 19 Jun 2017 07:42:32 +000
       
  • Antioxidant System Response and cDNA-SCoT Marker Profiling in Phoenix
           dactylifera L. Plant under Salinity Stress

    • Abstract: Many Phoenix dactylifera (date palm) cultivars are grown in the arid and semiarid regions of the world, including Saudi Arabia. P. dactylifera is highly tolerant to salinity stress. To investigate the response of Khalas cultivar of P. dactylifera, two-month-old plants were treated with sodium chloride (50, 100, and 150 mM NaCl) for three months. Our result showed that proline content was higher in all treated plants compared to control plants. Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) were increased at 100 and 150 mM NaCl treatments; however, the result was found nonsignificant between control and plants treated at 50 mM NaCl. Similarly, enzyme activities of catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were 0.805 and 0.722 U/mg protein/min, respectively, and were greater at 100 and 150 mM NaCl treatments compared to the control plants. Total chlorophyll content and fresh weight of shoots and roots decreased substantially with the increase of salinity. A cDNA start codon-targeted (cDNA-SCoT) marker showed a variation in different gene expressions profiling between treated and untreated plants under various NaCl concentrations.
      PubDate: Sun, 18 Jun 2017 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Coexpression Analysis of Transcriptome on AIDS and Other Human Disease
           Pathways by Canonical Correlation Analysis

    • Abstract: Acquired immune deficiency syndrome is a severe disease in humans caused by human immunodeficiency virus. Several human genes were characterized as host genetic factors that impact the processes of AIDS disease. Recent studies on AIDS patients revealed a series disease is complicating with AIDS. To resolve gene interaction between AIDS and complicating diseases, a canonical correlation analysis was used to identify the global correlation between AIDS and other disease pathway genes expression. The results showed that HLA-B, HLA-A, MH9, ZNED1, IRF1, TLR8, TSG101, NCOR2, and GML are the key AIDS-restricted genes highly correlated with other disease pathway genes. Furthermore, pathway genes in several diseases such as asthma, autoimmune thyroid disease, and malaria were globally correlated with ARGs. It suggests that these diseases are a high risk in AIDS patients as complicating diseases.
      PubDate: Wed, 14 Jun 2017 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Discovery of MicroRNAs and Their Target Genes Related to Drought in
           Paulownia “Yuza 1” by High-Throughput Sequencing

    • Abstract: Understanding the role of miRNAs in regulating the molecular mechanisms responsive to drought stress was studied in Paulownia “yuza 1.” Two small RNA libraries and two degradome libraries were, respectively, constructed and sequenced in order to detect miRNAs and their target genes associated with drought stress. A total of 107 miRNAs and 42 putative target genes were identified in this study. Among them, 77 miRNAs were differentially expressed between drought-treated Paulownia “yuza 1” and the control (60 downregulated and 17 upregulated). The predicted target genes were annotated using the GO, KEGG, and Nr databases. According to the functional classification of the target genes, Paulownia “yuza 1” may respond to drought stress via plant hormone signal transduction, photosynthesis, and osmotic adjustment. Furthermore, the expression levels of seven miRNAs (ptf-miR157b, ptf-miR159b, ptf-miR398a, ptf-miR9726a, ptf-M2153, ptf-M2218, and ptf-M24a) and their corresponding target genes were validated by quantitative real-time PCR. The results provide relevant information for understanding the molecular mechanism of Paulownia resistance to drought and reference data for researching drought resistance of other trees.
      PubDate: Sun, 11 Jun 2017 06:32:18 +000
       
  • An Exploration of Gene-Gene Interactions and Their Effects on Hypertension

    • Abstract: Hypertension tends to perpetuate in families and the heritability of hypertension is estimated to be around 20–60%. So far, the main proportion of this heritability has not been found by single-locus genome-wide association studies. Therefore, the current study explored gene-gene interactions that have the potential to partially fill in the missing heritability. A two-stage discovery-confirmatory analysis was carried out in the Framingham Heart Study cohorts. The first stage was an exhaustive pairwise search performed in 2320 early-onset hypertensive cases with matched normotensive controls from the offspring cohort. Then, identified gene-gene interactions were assessed in an independent set of 694 subjects from the original cohort. Four unique gene-gene interactions were found to be related to hypertension. Three detected genes were recognized by previous studies, and the other 5 loci/genes (MAN1A1, LMO3, NPAP1/SNRPN, DNAL4, and RNA5SP455/KRT8P5) were novel findings, which had no strong main effect on hypertension and could not be easily identified by single-locus genome-wide studies. Also, by including the identified gene-gene interactions, more variance was explained in hypertension. Overall, our study provides evidence that the genome-wide gene-gene interaction analysis has the possibility to identify new susceptibility genes, which can provide more insights into the genetic background of blood pressure regulation.
      PubDate: Wed, 31 May 2017 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Chimeric Genes in Deletions and Duplications Associated with Intellectual
           Disability

    • Abstract: We report on three nonrelated patients with intellectual disability and CNVs that give rise to three new chimeric genes. All the genes forming these fusion transcripts may have an important role in central nervous system development and/or in gene expression regulation, and therefore not only their deletion or duplication but also the resulting chimeric gene may contribute to the phenotype of the patients. Deletions and duplications are usually pathogenic when affecting dose-sensitive genes. Alternatively, a chimeric gene may also be pathogenic by different gain-of-function mechanisms that are not restricted to dose-sensitive genes: the emergence of a new polypeptide that combines functional domains from two different genes, the deregulated expression of any coding sequence by the promoter region of a neighboring gene, and/or a putative dominant-negative effect due to the preservation of functional domains of partially truncated proteins. Fusion oncogenes are well known, but in other pathologies, the search for chimeric genes is disregarded. According to our findings, we hypothesize that the frequency of fusion transcripts may be much higher than suspected, and it should be taken into account in the array-CGH analyses of patients with intellectual disability.
      PubDate: Wed, 24 May 2017 08:53:26 +000
       
  • Evidence of Divergent Amino Acid Usage in Comparative Analyses of R5- and
           X4-Associated HIV-1 Vpr Sequences

    • Abstract: Vpr is an HIV-1 accessory protein that plays numerous roles during viral replication, and some of which are cell type dependent. To test the hypothesis that HIV-1 tropism extends beyond the envelope into the vpr gene, studies were performed to identify the associations between coreceptor usage and Vpr variation in HIV-1-infected patients. Colinear HIV-1 Env-V3 and Vpr amino acid sequences were obtained from the LANL HIV-1 sequence database and from well-suppressed patients in the Drexel/Temple Medicine CNS AIDS Research and Eradication Study (CARES) Cohort. Genotypic classification of Env-V3 sequences as X4 (CXCR4-utilizing) or R5 (CCR5-utilizing) was used to group colinear Vpr sequences. To reveal the sequences associated with a specific coreceptor usage genotype, Vpr amino acid sequences were assessed for amino acid diversity and Jensen-Shannon divergence between the two groups. Five amino acid alphabets were used to comprehensively examine the impact of amino acid substitutions involving side chains with similar physiochemical properties. Positions 36, 37, 41, 89, and 96 of Vpr were characterized by statistically significant divergence across multiple alphabets when X4 and R5 sequence groups were compared. In addition, consensus amino acid switches were found at positions 37 and 41 in comparisons of the R5 and X4 sequence populations. These results suggest an evolutionary link between Vpr and gp120 in HIV-1-infected patients.
      PubDate: Tue, 23 May 2017 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Neurodevelopmental Disorders and Environmental Toxicants: Epigenetics as
           an Underlying Mechanism

    • Abstract: The increasing prevalence of neurodevelopmental disorders, especially autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), calls for more research into the identification of etiologic and risk factors. The Developmental Origin of Health and Disease (DOHaD) hypothesizes that the environment during fetal and childhood development affects the risk for many chronic diseases in later stages of life, including neurodevelopmental disorders. Epigenetics, a term describing mechanisms that cause changes in the chromosome state without affecting DNA sequences, is suggested to be the underlying mechanism, according to the DOHaD hypothesis. Moreover, many neurodevelopmental disorders are also related to epigenetic abnormalities. Experimental and epidemiological studies suggest that exposure to prenatal environmental toxicants is associated with neurodevelopmental disorders. In addition, there is also evidence that environmental toxicants can result in epigenetic alterations, notably DNA methylation. In this review, we first focus on the relationship between neurodevelopmental disorders and environmental toxicants, in particular maternal smoking, plastic-derived chemicals (bisphenol A and phthalates), persistent organic pollutants, and heavy metals. We then review studies showing the epigenetic effects of those environmental factors in humans that may affect normal neurodevelopment.
      PubDate: Mon, 08 May 2017 10:10:35 +000
       
  • Evolution of the Apicomplexan Sugar Transporter Gene Family Repertoire

    • Abstract: Apicomplexan protist parasites utilize host sugars transported into the parasite by sugar transporter proteins for use as an energy source. We performed a phylum-wide phylogenetic analysis of the apicomplexan sugar transporter repertoire. Phylogenetic analyses revealed six major subfamilies of apicomplexan sugar transporters. Transporters in one subfamily have undergone expansions in Piroplasma species and Gregarina niphandrodes, while other subfamilies are highly divergent and contain genes found in only one or two species. Analyses of the divergent apicomplexan subfamilies revealed their presence in ciliates, indicating their alveolate ancestry and subsequent loss in chromerids and many apicomplexans.
      PubDate: Sun, 07 May 2017 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Comparative Transcriptome Analyses of Resistant and Susceptible
           Near-Isogenic Wheat Lines following Inoculation with Blumeria graminis f.
           sp. tritici

    • Abstract: Powdery mildew is one of the most important diseases of wheat. In this study, the leaf RNA samples of wheat NILs carrying powdery mildew resistant and susceptible Pm2 alleles (L031 and Chancellor) and its F1 hybrid at two time points (16 h and 96 h postinoculation) were used for RNA-seq analysis. We carry comparison between similar materials at different times and between different materials at same times. The overlapping DEGs between the dominant phenotypes (L031 and F1 hybrid) and the recessive phenotype (Chancellor) were 1028 and 2214 DEGs, which were clearly lower than those between the dominant and recessive parents and thus could provide relatively accurate and valuable information. GO and KEGG enrichment analysis of DEGs revealed that other than the expected defense-related genes, differential up- and downregulation of genes from many other signaling networks were also involved. Comparative transcriptome analysis also revealed that early-stage postinoculation is important and suitable time points to study expression profiles and signaling pathways of resistance-related genes following fungal inoculation. qRT-PCR analyses showed highly consistent expression patterns of genes with RNA-seq data. The results will aid in the identification of genes and signaling pathways involved in powdery mildew response in wheat.
      PubDate: Tue, 02 May 2017 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Genome-Wide Identification of bZIP Family Genes Involved in Drought and
           Heat Stresses in Strawberry (Fragaria vesca)

    • Abstract: Basic leucine zipper (bZIP) genes are known to play a crucial role in response to various processes in plant as well as abiotic or biotic stress challenges. We have performed an identification and characterization of 50 bZIP genes across the woodland strawberry (Fragaria vesca) genome, which were divided into 10 clades according to the phylogenetic relationship of the strawberry bZIP proteins with those in Arabidopsis and rice. Five categories of intron patterns were observed within basic and hinge regions of the bZIP domains. Some additional conserved motifs have been found with the group specificity. Further, we predicted DNA-binding specificity of the basic and hinge regions as well as dimerization properties of leucine zipper regions, which was consistent with our phylogenetic clade and classified into 20 subfamilies. Across the different developmental stages of 15 organs and two types of fruits, the clade A bZIP members showed different tissue-specific expression patterns and the duplicated genes were differentially regulated, indicating a functional diversification coupled with the expansion of this gene family in strawberry. Under normal growth conditions, mrna11837 and mrna30280 of clade A showed very weak expression levels in organs and fruits, respectively; but higher expression was observed with different set of genes following drought and heat treatment, which may be caused by the separate response pathway between drought and heat treatments.
      PubDate: Tue, 11 Apr 2017 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Naturally Occurring Canine Invasive Urinary Bladder Cancer: A
           Complementary Animal Model to Improve the Success Rate in Human Clinical
           Trials of New Cancer Drugs

    • Abstract: Genomic analyses are defining numerous new targets for cancer therapy. Therapies aimed at specific genetic and epigenetic targets in cancer cells as well as expanded development of immunotherapies are placing increased demands on animal models. Traditional experimental models do not possess the collective features (cancer heterogeneity, molecular complexity, invasion, metastasis, and immune cell response) critical to predict success or failure of emerging therapies in humans. There is growing evidence, however, that dogs with specific forms of naturally occurring cancer can serve as highly relevant animal models to complement traditional models. Invasive urinary bladder cancer (invasive urothelial carcinoma (InvUC)) in dogs, for example, closely mimics the cancer in humans in pathology, molecular features, biological behavior including sites and frequency of distant metastasis, and response to chemotherapy. Genomic analyses are defining further intriguing similarities between InvUC in dogs and that in humans. Multiple canine clinical trials have been completed, and others are in progress with the aim of translating important findings into humans to increase the success rate of human trials, as well as helping pet dogs. Examples of successful targeted therapy studies and the challenges to be met to fully utilize naturally occurring dog models of cancer will be reviewed.
      PubDate: Sun, 09 Apr 2017 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Chromosome 1 Sequence Analysis of C57BL/6J-Chr1KM Mouse Strain

    • Abstract: The Chinese Kunming (KM) mouse is a widely used outbred mouse stock in China. However, its genetic structure remains unclear. In this study, we sequenced the genome of the C57BL/6J-Chr1KM (B6-Chr1KM) strain, the chromosome 1 (Chr 1) of which was derived from one KM mouse. With 36.6× average coverage of the entire genome, 0.48 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 96,679 indels were detected on Chr 1 through comparison with reference strain C57BL/6J. Moreover, 46,590 of them were classified as novel mutations. Further functional annotation identified 155 genes harboring potentially functional variants, among which 27 genes have been associated with human diseases. We then performed sequence similarity and Bayesian concordance analysis using the SNPs identified on Chr 1 and their counterparts in three subspecies, Mus musculus domesticus, M. m. musculus, and M. m. castaneus. Both analyses suggested that the Chr 1 sequence of B6-Chr1KM was predominantly derived from M. m. domesticus while 9.7% of the sequence was found to be from M. m. musculus. In conclusion, our analysis provided a detailed description of the genetic variations on Chr 1 of B6-Chr1KM and a new perspective on the subspecies origin of KM mouse which can be used to guide further genetic studies with this mouse strain.
      PubDate: Sun, 09 Apr 2017 00:00:00 +000
       
 
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
Fax: +00 44 (0)131 4513327
 
Home (Search)
Subjects A-Z
Publishers A-Z
Customise
APIs
Your IP address: 54.159.71.232
 
About JournalTOCs
API
Help
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-2016