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Publisher: Hindawi   (Total: 292 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 293 Journals sorted alphabetically
Abstract and Applied Analysis     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.512, h-index: 32)
Active and Passive Electronic Components     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.157, h-index: 15)
Advances in Acoustics and Vibration     Open Access   (Followers: 33, SJR: 0.259, h-index: 6)
Advances in Aerospace Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 52)
Advances in Agriculture     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Artificial Intelligence     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Advances in Astronomy     Open Access   (Followers: 36, SJR: 0.351, h-index: 17)
Advances in Bioinformatics     Open Access   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.421, h-index: 8)
Advances in Chemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Advances in Civil Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 38, SJR: 0.338, h-index: 8)
Advances in Condensed Matter Physics     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.248, h-index: 10)
Advances in Decision Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.231, h-index: 6)
Advances in Electrical Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
Advances in Electronics     Open Access   (Followers: 63)
Advances in Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Advances in Endocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Fuzzy Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.258, h-index: 7)
Advances in Hematology     Open Access   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.892, h-index: 18)
Advances in High Energy Physics     Open Access   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.892, h-index: 19)
Advances in Human-Computer Interaction     Open Access   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.439, h-index: 9)
Advances in Materials Science and Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 30, SJR: 0.263, h-index: 11)
Advances in Mathematical Physics     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.332, h-index: 10)
Advances in Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.498, h-index: 10)
Advances in Multimedia     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.191, h-index: 10)
Advances in Nonlinear Optics     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Numerical Analysis     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
Advances in Operations Research     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.343, h-index: 7)
Advances in Optical Technologies     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.283, h-index: 16)
Advances in OptoElectronics     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.973, h-index: 16)
Advances in Orthopedics     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Pharmacological Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.695, h-index: 13)
Advances in Physical Chemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.297, h-index: 7)
Advances in Power Electronics     Open Access   (Followers: 29, SJR: 0.26, h-index: 6)
Advances in Preventive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
Advances in Software Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Advances in Tribology     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.267, h-index: 6)
Advances in Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.629, h-index: 16)
Advances in Virology     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 1.04, h-index: 12)
AIDS Research and Treatment     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.125, h-index: 14)
Analytical Cellular Pathology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.334, h-index: 12)
Anatomy Research Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Anemia     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.991, h-index: 11)
Anesthesiology Research and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.513, h-index: 12)
Applied and Environmental Soil Science     Open Access   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.53, h-index: 9)
Applied Bionics and Biomechanics     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.23, h-index: 13)
Applied Computational Intelligence and Soft Computing     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Archaea     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.248, h-index: 27)
Arthritis     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Autism Research and Treatment     Open Access   (Followers: 25)
Autoimmune Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.909, h-index: 17)
Behavioural Neurology     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.696, h-index: 34)
Biochemistry Research Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.085, h-index: 17)
Bioinorganic Chemistry and Applications     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.286, h-index: 19)
BioMed Research Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.725, h-index: 59)
Biotechnology Research Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Bone Marrow Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Canadian J. of Gastroenterology & Hepatology     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.856, h-index: 53)
Canadian J. of Infectious Diseases and Medical Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.409, h-index: 25)
Canadian Respiratory J.     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.503, h-index: 42)
Cardiology Research and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.941, h-index: 17)
Case Reports in Anesthesiology     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Case Reports in Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Case Reports in Critical Care     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Case Reports in Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Case Reports in Dermatological Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Case Reports in Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Case Reports in Endocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.326, h-index: 1)
Case Reports in Gastrointestinal Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Case Reports in Genetics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Case Reports in Hematology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Case Reports in Hepatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Case Reports in Immunology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Case Reports in Infectious Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Case Reports in Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Case Reports in Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Case Reports in Neurological Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Case Reports in Obstetrics and Gynecology     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Case Reports in Oncological Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Case Reports in Ophthalmological Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Case Reports in Orthopedics     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Case Reports in Otolaryngology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Case Reports in Pathology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Case Reports in Pediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Case Reports in Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Case Reports in Pulmonology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Case Reports in Radiology     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Case Reports in Rheumatology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Case Reports in Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Case Reports in Transplantation     Open Access  
Case Reports in Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Case Reports in Vascular Medicine     Open Access  
Case Reports in Veterinary Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Child Development Research     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Chinese J. of Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Chinese J. of Mathematics     Open Access  
Cholesterol     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.906, h-index: 12)
Chromatography Research Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Complexity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.526, h-index: 27)
Computational and Mathematical Methods in Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.415, h-index: 22)
Computational Intelligence and Neuroscience     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.232, h-index: 30)
Contrast Media & Molecular Imaging     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.932, h-index: 34)
Critical Care Research and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.916, h-index: 14)
Current Gerontology and Geriatrics Research     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.8, h-index: 12)
Depression Research and Treatment     Open Access   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.77, h-index: 11)
Dermatology Research and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.576, h-index: 15)
Diagnostic and Therapeutic Endoscopy     Open Access   (SJR: 0.651, h-index: 18)
Discrete Dynamics in Nature and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.323, h-index: 24)
Disease Markers     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.774, h-index: 49)
Education Research Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Emergency Medicine Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Enzyme Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.457, h-index: 18)
Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.615, h-index: 50)
Experimental Diabetes Research     Open Access   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.591, h-index: 30)
Gastroenterology Research and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.664, h-index: 21)
Genetics Research Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Geofluids     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.693, h-index: 38)
HPB Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.798, h-index: 22)
Infectious Diseases in Obstetrics and Gynecology     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.976, h-index: 34)
Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Infectious Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.763, h-index: 15)
Intl. J. of Aerospace Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 72, SJR: 0.241, h-index: 6)
Intl. J. of Agronomy     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.223, h-index: 2)
Intl. J. of Alzheimer's Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.193, h-index: 25)
Intl. J. of Analysis     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Analytical Chemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.157, h-index: 2)
Intl. J. of Antennas and Propagation     Open Access   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.385, h-index: 15)
Intl. J. of Atmospheric Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
Intl. J. of Biodiversity     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Biomaterials     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.485, h-index: 10)
Intl. J. of Biomedical Imaging     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.581, h-index: 23)
Intl. J. of Breast Cancer     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Intl. J. of Cell Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 2.658, h-index: 25)
Intl. J. of Chemical Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.361, h-index: 10)
Intl. J. of Chronic Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Computer Games Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.213, h-index: 12)
Intl. J. of Corrosion     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.19, h-index: 7)
Intl. J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.558, h-index: 11)
Intl. J. of Differential Equations     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.363, h-index: 11)
Intl. J. of Digital Multimedia Broadcasting     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.144, h-index: 10)
Intl. J. of Electrochemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Intl. J. of Endocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.961, h-index: 24)
Intl. J. of Engineering Mathematics     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Intl. J. of Food Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Forestry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Genomics     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.721, h-index: 7)
Intl. J. of Hepatology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Hypertension     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.823, h-index: 20)
Intl. J. of Inflammation     Open Access   (SJR: 0.876, h-index: 14)
Intl. J. of Inorganic Chemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Mathematics and Mathematical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.346, h-index: 27)
Intl. J. of Medicinal Chemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Intl. J. of Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.006, h-index: 18)
Intl. J. of Navigation and Observation     Open Access   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.411, h-index: 7)
Intl. J. of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.926, h-index: 14)
Intl. J. of Oceanography     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Intl. J. of Optics     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.262, h-index: 7)
Intl. J. of Otolaryngology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Partial Differential Equations     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Pediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Intl. J. of Peptides     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.73, h-index: 16)
Intl. J. of Photoenergy     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.348, h-index: 28)
Intl. J. of Plant Genomics     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.578, h-index: 20)
Intl. J. of Polymer Science     Open Access   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.265, h-index: 11)
Intl. J. of Population Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Quality, Statistics, and Reliability     Open Access   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.345, h-index: 4)
Intl. J. of Reconfigurable Computing     Open Access   (SJR: 0.182, h-index: 8)
Intl. J. of Reproductive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Rheumatology     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.015, h-index: 18)
Intl. J. of Rotating Machinery     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.402, h-index: 19)
Intl. J. of Spectroscopy     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Intl. J. of Stochastic Analysis     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.234, h-index: 19)
Intl. J. of Surgical Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.753, h-index: 11)
Intl. J. of Telemedicine and Applications     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.757, h-index: 14)
Intl. J. of Vascular Medicine     Open Access   (SJR: 0.865, h-index: 16)
Intl. J. of Zoology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.389, h-index: 8)
Intl. Scholarly Research Notices     Open Access   (Followers: 197)
ISRN Astronomy and Astrophysics     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
J. of Addiction     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
J. of Advanced Transportation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.911, h-index: 24)
J. of Aerodynamics     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
J. of Aging Research     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.259, h-index: 23)
J. of Analytical Methods in Chemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.296, h-index: 13)
J. of Anthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
J. of Applied Chemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
J. of Applied Mathematics     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.341, h-index: 22)
J. of Biomedical Education     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
J. of Blood Transfusion     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Botany     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.101, h-index: 2)
J. of Cancer Epidemiology     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.427, h-index: 12)
J. of Chemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.225, h-index: 11)
J. of Combustion     Open Access   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.27, h-index: 8)
J. of Complex Analysis     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
J. of Composites     Open Access   (Followers: 80)
J. of Computer Networks and Communications     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.257, h-index: 8)
J. of Construction Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
J. of Control Science and Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.299, h-index: 9)
J. of Criminology     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
J. of Diabetes Research     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.024, h-index: 13)

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Journal Cover Analytical Cellular Pathology
  [SJR: 0.334]   [H-I: 12]   [2 followers]  Follow
    
  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
   ISSN (Print) 2210-7177 - ISSN (Online) 2210-7185
   Published by Hindawi Homepage  [292 journals]
  • Stromal Caveolin-1 and Caveolin-2 Expression in Primary Tumors and Lymph
           Node Metastases

    • Abstract: The expression of caveolin-1 (CAV1) in both tumor cell and cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) has been found to correlate with tumor aggressiveness in different epithelial tumor entities, whereas less is known for caveolin-2 (CAV2). The aim of this study was to investigate the clinicopathological significance and prognostic value of stromal CAV1 and CAV2 expression in lung cancer. The expression of these two genes was investigated at protein level on a tissue microarray (TMA) consisting of 161 primary tumor samples. 50.7% of squamous cell lung cancer (SCC) tumors showed strong expression of CAV1 in the tumor-associated stromal cells, whereas only 15.1% of adenocarcinomas (AC) showed a strong CAV1 expression (). A strong CAV2 stromal expression was found in 46.0% of the lung tumor specimens, with no significant difference between the subtypes. Neither CAV1 nor CAV2 stromal expression was associated with any other clinicopathological factor including survival. When the stromal expression in matched primary tumors and lymph node metastases was compared, both CAV1 and CAV2 expressions were frequently found lost in the corresponding stroma of the lymph node metastasis (40.6%, and 38.4%, , resp.). Loss of stromal CAV2 in the lymph node metastases was also significantly associated with earlier death (). In conclusion, in contrast to the expression patterns in the tumor tissue of lung cancer, stromal expression of CAV1 in primary tumors was not associated with clinical outcome whereas the stromal expression of especially CAV2 in the metastatic lymph nodes could be associated with lung cancer pathogenesis.
      PubDate: Tue, 10 Apr 2018 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Biochemical and Ultrastructural Cardiac Changes Induced by High-Fat Diet
           in Female and Male Prepubertal Rabbits

    • Abstract: Early weight gain induced by high-fat diet has been identified as a predictor for cardiac disease, one of the most serious public health problems. Our goal is to study the influence of a HFD on biochemical, oxidant stress parameters, and the cardiac ultrastructure in both male and female prepubertal models. Experiments were carried on 24 prepubertal New Zealand white rabbits, randomly assigned to male and female control (MC and FC, resp.) or HFD (MHFD and FHFD, resp.) groups () for 3 months. Body and heart weights and some biochemical and oxidative stress parameters such as lipids, calcium, CKMB, MDA, uric acid, ascorbic acid, and AOA are evaluated in plasma and the left ventricle. Under HFD effect, plasma parameters, such as lipids (TL, PL, and LDL-C), MDA, and CK-MB, increase more significantly in male than in female groups, when AA decreases. Some cardiac parameters such as TG and UA increase, when AA and AOA decrease; these variations are more significant in FHFD. In both male and female rabbits, HFD caused changes in heart ultrastructure, junctional complexes, mitochondria size and form, and so on. Early HFD feeding induced overweight, oxidative stress, and metabolic alterations in plasma and the heart of prepubertal rabbits, whereas lipotoxicity has especially a negative impact on male plasma but affects more the female heart ultrastructure.
      PubDate: Wed, 04 Apr 2018 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Prognostic Significance of Cyclins A2, B1, D1, and E1 and CCND1 Numerical
           Aberrations in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinomas

    • Abstract: We analysed the expression of cyclins A2, B1, D1, and E1 by immunohistochemistry and numerical aberrations in CCND1 gene by fluorescence in situ hybridization technique in 67 primary oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC). Cyclin A2 expression was observed in 54 (83.1%) tumours, cyclin D1 in 58 (89.2%), cyclin B1 in 39 (60%), and cyclin E in 21 (32.8%). CCND1 region analysis revealed 26 (43.3%) tumours with the presence of numerical aberrations which were correlated with cyclin D1 high expression (Rho = 0.48; ). Twenty-nine (45.3%) tumours were classified as high proliferative tumours assessed by Ki-67 protein expression and correlated with tumours with high expression of cyclin A2 (Rho = 0.30; ) and cyclin B1 (Rho = 0.37; ). In multivariate analysis for an overall five-year survival (OS), we found an adverse independent prognostic value for cyclin A2 high expression () and for advanced tumour stage (). Our results confirm that several cyclins are commonly expressed in OSCC. CCND1 gene is abnormal in more than one-third of the cases and is frequently associated with cyclin D1 high expression. Moreover, cyclin A2 high expression is an independent indicator of worse OS suggesting that this protein may serve as a reliable biological marker to identify high-risk subgroups with poor prognosis.
      PubDate: Tue, 27 Mar 2018 00:00:00 +000
       
  • High PINCH1 Expression in Human Laryngeal Carcinoma Associates with Poor
           Prognosis

    • Abstract: Focal adhesion signaling to actin cytoskeleton is critically implicated in cell migration and cancer invasion and metastasis. Actin-binding proteins cofilin and N-WASP regulate actin filament turnover, and focal adhesion proteins parvins and PINCH mediate integrin signaling to the actin cytoskeleton. Altered expression of these proteins has been implicated in human cancer. This study addresses their expression and prognostic significance in human laryngeal carcinoma. Protein expressions of cofilin, N-WASP, α-parvin, β-parvin, and PINCH1 were examined by immunohistochemistry in 72 human laryngeal squamous cell carcinomas. Correlations with clinicopathological data and survival were evaluated. All proteins examined were overexpressed in human laryngeal carcinomas compared to adjacent nonneoplastic epithelium. High expression of PINCH1 was associated significantly with high grade, lymph node-positive, and advanced stage disease. Moreover, high PINCH1 expression significantly associated with poor overall and disease-free survival and high cytoplasmic PINCH1 expression was shown by multivariate analysis to independently predict poor overall survival. In conclusion, we provide novel evidence that focal adhesion signaling to actin cytoskeleton is implicated in human laryngeal carcinogenesis and PINCH1 has prognostic significance in the disease.
      PubDate: Tue, 20 Mar 2018 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Parity-Dependent Hemosiderin and Lipofuscin Accumulation in the
           Reproductively Aged Mouse Ovary

    • Abstract: The progressive decline of the ovarian follicle pool leads to reproductive ageing. The latter is accompanied by age-related disorders, including various types of cancer. In fact, the highest rates of ovarian cancer (OC) occur at postmenopause while OC risk is significantly modulated by parity records during previous fertile life. We approached the age-parity relationship in the C57BL/6 mouse model and herein describe the presence of nonheme iron (hemosiderin) and deposits of the “age pigment” lipofuscin in reproductively aged mouse ovaries by applying conventional histochemical methods and autofluorescence. In addition, the 8-OHdG adduct was evaluated in ovarian genomic DNA. Both hemosiderin and lipofuscin were significantly higher in virgin compared to multiparous ovaries. The same pattern was observed for 8-OHdG. We conclude that nulliparity induces a long-term accumulation of iron and lipofuscin with concomitant oxidative damage to DNA in the mouse ovary. Since lipofuscin is a widely accepted senescence marker and given the recently postulated role of lipofuscin-associated iron as a source of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in senescent cells, these findings suggest a possible pathogenic mechanism by which nulliparity contributes to an increased OC risk in the postmenopausal ovary.
      PubDate: Thu, 15 Mar 2018 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Identification of Malignancy-Associated Changes in Histologically Normal
           Tumor-Adjacent Epithelium of Patients with HPV-Positive Oropharyngeal
           Cancer

    • Abstract: The incidence of HPV-positive oropharyngeal cancer (HPV+ OPC) is increasing, thus presenting new challenges for disease detection and management. Noninvasive methods involving brush biopsies of diseased tissues were recently reported as insufficient for tumor detection in HPV+ OPC patients, likely due to differences between the site of tumor initiation at the base of involuted crypts and the site of brush biopsy at the crypt surface. We hypothesized that histologically normal surface epithelial cells in the oropharynx contain changes in nuclear morphology that arise due to tumor proximity. We analyzed the nuclear phenotype of matched tumor, tumor-adjacent normal, and contralateral normal tissues from biopsies of nine HPV+ OPC patients. Measurements of 89 nuclear features were used to train a random forest-based classifier to discriminate between normal and tumor nuclei. We then extracted voting scores from the trained classifier, which classify nuclei on a continuous scale from zero (“normal-like”) to one (“tumor-like”). In each case, the average score of the adjacent normal nuclei was intermediate between the tumor and contralateral normal nuclei. These results provide evidence for the existence of phenotypic changes in histologically normal, tumor-adjacent surface epithelial cells, which could be used as brush biopsy-based biomarkers for HPV+ OPC detection.
      PubDate: Sun, 11 Mar 2018 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Liquid Biopsy in Rare Cancers: Lessons from Hemangiopericytoma

    • Abstract: Hemangiopericytoma (HPT) is a rare mesenchymal tumor of fibroblastic type and for its rarity is poorly studied. The most common sites of metastatic disease in patients with intracranial HPT are the bone, liver, and lung, suggestive for an hematogenous dissemination; for this reason, we investigated, for the first time, the presence of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in hemangiopericytoma patient by CellSearch® and SceenCell® devices. Peripheral blood samples were drawn and processed by CellSearch, an EpCAM-dependent device, and ScreenCell®, a device size based. We found nontypical CTCs by CellSearch system and the immunofluorescence analysis performed on CTCs isolate by ScreenCell demonstrated the presence of single CTCs and CTC clusters. The molecular characterization of single CTCs and CTC clusters, using antibodies directed against EpCAM, CD34, cytokeratins (8, 18, and 19), and CD45, showed a great heterogeneity in CTC clusters. We believe that the present study may open a new scenario in the rare tumors: the introduction of the liquid biopsy and the molecular characterization of circulating tumor cells could lead to personalized targeted treatments and also for rare tumors.
      PubDate: Wed, 07 Mar 2018 00:00:00 +000
       
  • MicroRNA-378 Promotes Osteogenesis-Angiogenesis Coupling in BMMSCs for
           Potential Bone Regeneration

    • Abstract: Bone tissue regeneration was closely associated with osteogenesis and angiogenesis. The harmonious regulation of osteogenetic and angiogenic growth factors would enhance bone regeneration, while the imbalance of that would lead to local excessive bone formation or vascular mass due to exogenous delivery. Therefore, microRNA is believed to regulate multiple metabolism progress through endogenous signaling pathways on the gene level. In this work, we identified microRNA 378 as a positive regulator of osteogenesis and angiogenesis simultaneously and also observed an increase of microRNA 378 than control in human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMMSCs) after osteoblast induction. Besides, osteogenetic and angiogenic gene expression increased simultaneously after overexpression of microRNA 378. Moreover, alizarin red staining and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) staining enhanced, and secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) increased. In this way, we believed miR378 was an ideal target to osteogenesis-angiogenesis coupling for bone regeneration, which provides a potential tool for the gene therapy of bone regeneration.
      PubDate: Thu, 01 Mar 2018 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Molecular Detection of EMT Markers in Circulating Tumor Cells from
           Metastatic Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients: Potential Role in Clinical
           Practice

    • Abstract: Background. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most common cause of cancer-related mortality; nevertheless, there are few data regarding detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in NSCLC, compared to other kinds of cancers in which their prognostic roles have already been defined. This difference is likely due to detection methods based on the epithelial marker expression which ignore CTCs undergoing epithelial-mesenchymal transition (CTCsEMT). Methods. After optimization of the test with spiking experiments of A549 cells undergoing TGF-β1-induced EMT (A549EMT), the CTCsEMT were enriched by immunomagnetic depletion of leukocytes and then characterized by a RT-PCR assay based on the retrieval of epithelial and EMT-related genes. Blood samples from ten metastatic NSCLC patients before starting treatment and during chemotherapy were used to test this approach by longitudinal monitoring. Ten age- and sex-matched healthy subjects were also enrolled as controls. Results. Recovery experiments of spiked A549EMT cells showed that the RT-PCR assay is a reliable method for detection of CTCsEMT. CTCsEMT were detected in three patients at baseline and in six patients after four cycles of cysplatin-based chemotherapy. Longitudinal monitoring of three patients showed that the CTCsEMT detection is related to poor therapeutic response. Conclusions. The RT-PCR-based approach for the evaluation of CTCsEMT phenotype could be a promising and inexpensive tool to predict the prognosis and the therapeutic response in NSCLC patients.
      PubDate: Tue, 27 Feb 2018 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Role of Muramyl Dipeptide in Lipopolysaccharide-Mediated Biological
           Activity and Osteoclast Activity

    • Abstract: Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is an endotoxin and bacterial cell wall component that is capable of inducing inflammation and immunological activity. Muramyl dipeptide (MDP), the minimal essential structural unit responsible for the immunological activity of peptidoglycans, is another inflammation-inducing molecule that is ubiquitously expressed by bacteria. Several studies have shown that inflammation-related biological activities were synergistically induced by interactions between LPS and MDP. MDP synergistically enhances production of proinflammatory cytokines that are induced by LPS exposure. Injection of MDP induces lethal shock in mice challenged with LPS. LPS also induces osteoclast formation and pathological bone resorption; MDP enhances LPS induction of both processes. Furthermore, MDP enhances the LPS-induced receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) expression and toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) expression both in vivo and in vitro. Additionally, MDP enhances LPS-induced mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling in stromal cells. Taken together, these findings suggest that MDP plays an important role in LPS-induced biological activities. This review discusses the role of MDP in LPS-mediated biological activities, primarily in relation to osteoclastogenesis.
      PubDate: Wed, 14 Feb 2018 05:42:32 +000
       
  • Phytochemical Screening and Biological Activity of Mentha × piperita
           L. and Lavandula angustifolia Mill. Extracts

    • Abstract: The present study aimed to investigate the phytochemical composition of Mentha × piperita L. (MP) and Lavandula angustifolia Mill. (LA) extracts in terms of hydroxycinnamic acid (HCAs) content, in particular, caffeic (CA), p-cumaric (CU), ferulic (FE), and rosmarinic (RS) acids using LC-MS. Also, the in vitro antimicrobial effect against Staphylococcus aureus and the antiproliferative activity against two cancerous cell lines (A375 and MDA-MB-231) using the MTT assay were tested. The extracts were prepared using aromatic water which resulted from the extraction of oils from plants as extraction medium, with/without acid. The results showed that RS and FE represent the majority of HCAs compounds; the highest content of FE is found in LA (7.47 mg·g–1d.m.), and the maximum content of RS in MP (6.36 mg·g–1d.m.). Regarding the antimicrobial effect against Staphylococcus aureus, the two extracts showed a simulative role on the growth rate of Staphyloccocus aureus, but a slightly inhibitory effect (69.12%) can be attributed to the acidic environment. In terms of biological activity against MDA-MB-231 breast carcinoma cell line, and A375 human melanoma cell line, at the highest employed concentration, 150 μg·mL–1, the tested extracts present a weak antiproliferative effect.
      PubDate: Wed, 10 Jan 2018 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Mesenchymal Stem Cells as New Therapeutic Agents for the Treatment of
           Primary Biliary Cholangitis

    • Abstract: Primary biliary cholangitis (PBC) is a chronic autoimmune cholestatic liver disease characterized by the progressive destruction of small- and medium-sized intrahepatic bile ducts with resultant cholestasis and progressive fibrosis. Ursodeoxycholic acid and obethicholic acid are the only agents approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of PBC. However, for patients with advanced, end-stage PBC, liver transplantation is still the most effective treatment. Accordingly, the alternative approaches, such as mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) transplantation, have been suggested as an effective alternative therapy for these patients. Due to their immunomodulatory characteristics, MSCs are considered as promising therapeutic agents for the therapy of autoimmune liver diseases, including PBC. In this review, we have summarized the therapeutic potential of MSCs for the treatment of these diseases, emphasizing molecular and cellular mechanisms responsible for MSC-based effects in an animal model of PBC and therapeutic potential observed in recently conducted clinical trials. We have also presented several outstanding problems including safety issues regarding unwanted differentiation of transplanted MSCs which limit their therapeutic use. Efficient and safe MSC-based therapy for PBC remains a challenging issue that requires continuous cooperation between clinicians, researchers, and patients.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Dec 2017 07:21:54 +000
       
  • Sevoflurane Ameliorates Myocardial Cell Injury by Inducing Autophagy via
           the Deacetylation of LC3 by SIRT1

    • Abstract: Misfolded and aberrant proteins have been found to be associated with myocardial cell injury. Thus, increased clearance of misfolded or aggregated proteins via autophagy might be a potential option in preventing myocardial cell injury. Sevoflurane may ameliorate myocardial cell injury by affecting sirtuin 1- (SIRT1-) mediated autophagy. Rat models with myocardial cell injury were induced by limb ischemia reperfusion. The model rats received different treatments: sevoflurane, nicotinamide, and autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA). Autophagy was observed by SEM. The levels of SIRT1 and microtubule-associated protein 1A/1B-light chain 3 (LC3) were measured. Present findings demonstrated that limb ischemia reperfusion induced autophagy. Sevoflurane increased the level of SIRT1, which deacetylated LC3 and further increased autophagic rates. On the other hand, the autophagy was inhibited by sevoflurane and or the inhibitors of SIRT1 and LC3. Present results demonstrated a novel molecular mechanism by which sevoflurane induced autophagy by increasing the level of SIRT1 and reducing the acetylation of LC3.
      PubDate: Tue, 26 Sep 2017 05:16:37 +000
       
  • A Sensitive and Rapid Method for Detecting Formaldehyde in Brain Tissues

    • Abstract: The existing methods for detecting formaldehyde (FA) in brain samples are expensive and require sophisticated experimental procedures. Here, we established a highly sensitive and selective spectrophotometric method, which is based on a reaction in which FA reacts with colorless reagent 4-amino-3-penten-2-one (Fluoral-P) to produce a yellow compound, 3,5-diacetyl-1,4-dihydrolutidine (DDL), which can be detected by a spectrophotometer at 420 nm at room temperature. The sensitive response time point was found to be at the first hour, and the optimal pH of derivative reaction was pH 6.0. The limit of detection (LOD) and the limits of quantization (LOQ) for detecting FA were 0.5 μM and 2.5 μM, respectively. Using this method, an abnormally high level of FA was detected in both the brains of FA-injected mice and autopsy hippocampus tissues from patients with Alzheimer’s disease. This finding suggests that the modified Fluoral-P method is effective for measuring levels of FA in the brains.
      PubDate: Sun, 24 Sep 2017 00:00:00 +000
       
  • The Efficacy of Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy for HER-2-Positive Locally
           Advanced Breast Cancer and Survival Analysis

    • Abstract: To provide reference data, we retrospectively investigated the effects of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) on 119 patients with HER-2+ locally advanced breast cancer, treated from November 2010 to July 2016, with respect to influencing factors and survival. They were divided into the pathological complete response (pCR; ; 12.6%) and non-pCR (; 87.4%) groups. We used Χ2 and logistic tests to the analyze effect and influencing factors. Survival rate was analyzed by the Kaplan-Meier method and Log-rank test. We lost 12 patients (including 1 pCR patient) and followed 107 patients, of whom 31 (all in the non-pCR group) had local recurrences or distant metastasis. The two groups significantly differed in 3-year disease-free survival (pCR group: 100%; non-pCR group: 59.0%; ); pCR was significantly affected by histological grade, PR status, Ki67 index, primary tumor size, clinical staging, and number of trastuzumab cycles. The model was tested, and the difference was statistically significant (Χ2 = 31.938, ). Patients with HER-2+ locally advanced breast cancer with pCR responses to NAC have improved prognoses. Patients without pCR have increased risk for relapse. The use of a combination of NAC, such as trastuzumab and chemotherapy, and more cycles should be considered to increase the likelihood of pCR.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Sep 2017 07:01:33 +000
       
  • The Recent Advances on Liver Cancer Stem Cells: Biomarkers, Separation,
           and Therapy

    • Abstract: As the third major reason of mortality related to cancer in the world, liver cancer is also the fifth most frequent cancer. Unluckily, a majority of patients succumb and relapse though many progresses have been made in detection and therapy of liver cancer. It has been put forward that in liver cancer, cancer stem cells (CSCs) hold main responsibility for the formation, invasion, metastasis, and recurrence of tumor. Strategies that are intended to target liver CSCs are playing a more and more significant role in supervising the development of liver cancer treatment and assessing new therapeutic methods. Herein, a brief review about molecule markers, signal pathways, separation, and treatment on liver cancer stem cells (LCSCs) is provided in this paper.
      PubDate: Thu, 27 Jul 2017 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Different Cytokine and Chemokine Expression Patterns in Malignant Compared
           to Those in Nonmalignant Renal Cells

    • Abstract: Objective. Cytokines and chemokines are widely involved in cancer cell progression and thus represent promising candidate factors for new biomarkers. Methods. Four renal cell cancer (RCC) cell lines (Caki-1, 786-O, RCC4, and A498) and a nonmalignant renal cell line (RC-124) were examined with respect to their proliferation. The cytokine and chemokine expression pattern was examined by a DNA array (Human Cytokines & Chemokines RT2 Profiler PCR Array; Qiagen, Hilden, Germany), and expression profiles were compared. Results. Caki-1 and 786-O cells exhibited significantly increased proliferation rates, whereas RCC4 and A498 cells demonstrated attenuated proliferation, compared to nonmalignant RC-124 cells. Expression analysis revealed 52 cytokines and chemokines primarily involved in proliferation and inflammation and differentially expressed not only in malignant and nonmalignant renal cells but also in the four RCC cell lines. Conclusion. This is the first study examining the expression of 84 cytokines and chemokines in four RCC cell lines compared to that in a nonmalignant renal cell line. VEGFA, NODAL, and BMP6 correlated with RCC cell line proliferation and, thus, may represent putative clinical biomarkers for RCC progression as well as for RCC diagnosis and prognosis.
      PubDate: Sun, 09 Jul 2017 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Aloesin Suppresses Cell Growth and Metastasis in Ovarian Cancer SKOV3
           Cells through the Inhibition of the MAPK Signaling Pathway

    • Abstract: Aloesin is an active constituent of the herb aloe vera and plays a crucial role in anti-inflammatory activity, ultraviolet protection, and antibacterium. We investigated the role and possible mechanisms of aloesin in the cell growth and metastasis of ovarian cancer. It was found that aloesin inhibited cell viability and cell clonality in a dose-dependent manner. It arrests the cell cycle at the S-phase and induced apoptosis in SKOV3 cells. In an in vivo experiment, it was observed that aloesin inhibited tumor growth. Moreover, it inhibited migration and invasion of cancer in SKOV3 cells. Interestingly, members from the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling family became less phosphorylated as the aloesin dose increased. This suggests that aloesin exerts its anticancer effect through the MAPK signaling pathway. Our data also highlights the possibility of using aloesin as a novel therapeutic drug for ovarian cancer treatment.
      PubDate: Sun, 18 Jun 2017 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Effects of Acute Toluene Toxicity on Different Regions of Rabbit Brain

    • Abstract: The acute phase effects of toluene on the brain have been investigated in this study using rabbit brain via histopathological, immunohistochemical, and biochemical methods. A total of 20 male rabbits were used as control and experimental groups. Moreover, nerve growth factor (NGF), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), dopamine (DA), and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) tests were performed in order to designate the severity of the biochemical damage. In the biochemical evaluation of the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, hypothalamus, substantia nigra, and entorhinal cortex, the TNF-alpha levels in the brain were found to be significantly higher than in the control group. Levels of dopamine, secreted from the substantia nigra, nerve growth factor (NGF) developed from the hippocampal neurons, and GFAP, secreted from astrocyte cells, were detected to be significantly lower in the toluene-administration group than in the control group (). In addition, areas of focal vacuolar degeneration (abscess formation), gliosis, and perivascular demyelination, many pyknotic cells and necrosis were observed. In the toluene-administration group compared to the control group, distinct excessive expansions of the blood vessels and severe degeneration in the structure of cells and also dispersed cell borders were observed. Furthermore, abnormal malformations of the nuclei structure of the oligodendrocyte cells were seen. Bodies of the sequential neurons of the hippocampus in the toluene-administration group were distinctly structurally damaged compared to the control group. In addition, cytoplasm of the cortex cell showed serious immune reactivity in the experimental group.
      PubDate: Sun, 26 Mar 2017 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Corrigendum to “A Simple Method to Assess In Vivo Proliferation in Lung
           Vasculature with EdU: The Case of MMC-Induced PVOD in Rat”

    • PubDate: Mon, 06 Feb 2017 06:42:24 +000
       
  • Cell Therapies in Cardiomyopathy: Current Status of Clinical Trials

    • Abstract: Because the human heart has limited potential for regeneration, the loss of cardiomyocytes during cardiac myopathy and ischaemic injury can result in heart failure and death. Stem cell therapy has emerged as a promising strategy for the treatment of dead myocardium, directly or indirectly, and seems to offer functional benefits to patients. The ideal candidate donor cell for myocardial reconstitution is a stem-like cell that can be easily obtained, has a robust proliferation capacity and a low risk of tumour formation and immune rejection, differentiates into functionally normal cardiomyocytes, and is suitable for minimally invasive clinical transplantation. The ultimate goal of cardiac repair is to regenerate functionally viable myocardium after myocardial infarction (MI) to prevent or heal heart failure. This review provides a comprehensive overview of treatment with stem-like cells in preclinical and clinical studies to assess the feasibility and efficacy of this novel therapeutic strategy in ischaemic cardiomyopathy.
      PubDate: Tue, 17 Jan 2017 10:10:44 +000
       
  • Texture Analysis of Abnormal Cell Images for Predicting the Continuum of
           Colorectal Cancer

    • Abstract: Abnormal cell (ABC) is a markedly heterogeneous tissue area and can be categorized into three main types: benign hyperplasia (BH), carcinoma (Ca), and intraepithelial neoplasia (IN) or precursor cancerous lesion. In this study, the goal is to determine and characterize the continuum of colorectal cancer by using a 3D-texture approach. ABC was segmented in preprocessing step using an active contour segmentation technique. Cell types were analyzed based on textural features extracted from the gray level cooccurrence matrices (GLCMs). Significant texture features were selected using an analysis of variance (ANOVA) of ABC with a value cutoff of . Features selected were reduced with a principal component analysis (PCA), which accounted for 97% of the cumulative variance from significant features. The simulation results identified 158 significant features based on ANOVA from a total of 624 texture features extracted from GLCMs. Performance metrics of ABC discrimination based on significant texture features showed 92.59% classification accuracy, 100% sensitivity, and 94.44% specificity. These findings suggest that texture features extracted from GLCMs are sensitive enough to discriminate between the ABC types and offer the opportunity to predict cell characteristics of colorectal cancer.
      PubDate: Tue, 17 Jan 2017 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Long Noncoding RNA MIR4697HG Promotes Cell Growth and Metastasis in Human
           Ovarian Cancer

    • Abstract: Ovarian cancer is one of the three most common gynecological malignant tumors worldwide. The prognosis of patients suffering from this malignancy remains poor because of limited therapeutic strategies. Herein, we investigated the role of a long noncoding RNA named MIR4697 host gene (MIR4697HG) in the cell growth and metastasis of ovarian cancer. Results showed that the transcriptional level of MIR4697HG in cancerous tissues increased twofold compared with that in adjacent noncancerous tissues. MIR4697HG was differentially expressed in ovarian cancer cell lines, with the highest levels in OVCAR3 and SKOV3 cells. MIR4697HG knockdown by specific shRNA significantly inhibited cell proliferation and colony formation in both OVCAR3 and SKOC3 cells. Consistently, in a xenograft model of ovarian cancer, MIR4697HG depletion also significantly restricted tumor volumes and weights. Furthermore, MIR4697HG knockdown inhibited cell migration and invasion capacities. Invasion ability was inhibited by 58% in SKOV3 cells and 40% in OVCAR3 cells, and migration ability was inhibited by 73% in SKOV3 cells and 62% in OVCAR3 cells after MIR4697HG knockdown. MIR4697HG knockdown also caused a decrease in matrix metalloprotease-9, phosphorylated ERK, and phosphorylated AKT. These data suggested that MIR4697HG promoted ovarian cancer growth and metastasis. The aggressive role of MIR4697HG in ovarian cancer may be related to the ERK and AKT signaling pathways.
      PubDate: Tue, 10 Jan 2017 00:00:00 +000
       
 
 
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