for Journals by Title or ISSN
for Articles by Keywords
help

Publisher: Hindawi   (Total: 335 journals)

 A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

        1 2 | Last   [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

Showing 1 - 200 of 335 Journals sorted alphabetically
Abstract and Applied Analysis     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.343, CiteScore: 1)
Active and Passive Electronic Components     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.136, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Acoustics and Vibration     Open Access   (Followers: 33, SJR: 0.147, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Aerospace Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 53)
Advances in Agriculture     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Artificial Intelligence     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Advances in Astronomy     Open Access   (Followers: 37, SJR: 0.257, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Bioinformatics     Open Access   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.565, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Chemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
Advances in Civil Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 39, SJR: 0.539, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Computer Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Condensed Matter Physics     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.315, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Decision Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.303, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Electrical Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
Advances in Electronics     Open Access   (Followers: 68)
Advances in Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Endocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Environmental Chemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Epidemiology     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Fuzzy Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.161, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Geology     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Advances in Geriatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Hematology     Open Access   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.661, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Hepatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Advances in High Energy Physics     Open Access   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.866, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Human-Computer Interaction     Open Access   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.186, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Materials Science and Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 30, SJR: 0.315, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Mathematical Physics     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.218, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.48, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Multimedia     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.173, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Nonlinear Optics     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Numerical Analysis     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
Advances in Operations Research     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.205, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Optical Technologies     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.214, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Optics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Advances in OptoElectronics     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.141, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Orthopedics     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.922, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Pharmacological Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.591, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Physical Chemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.179, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Power Electronics     Open Access   (Followers: 29, SJR: 0.184, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Preventive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 23)
Advances in Software Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Advances in Statistics     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Toxicology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Tribology     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.265, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.51, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Virology     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.838, CiteScore: 2)
AIDS Research and Treatment     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.758, CiteScore: 2)
Analytical Cellular Pathology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.886, CiteScore: 2)
Anatomy Research Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Anemia     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.669, CiteScore: 2)
Anesthesiology Research and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.501, CiteScore: 1)
Applied and Environmental Soil Science     Open Access   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.451, CiteScore: 1)
Applied Bionics and Biomechanics     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.288, CiteScore: 1)
Applied Computational Intelligence and Soft Computing     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Archaea     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.852, CiteScore: 2)
Arthritis     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.454, CiteScore: 1)
Autism Research and Treatment     Open Access   (Followers: 25)
Autoimmune Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.805, CiteScore: 2)
Behavioural Neurology     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.786, CiteScore: 2)
Biochemistry Research Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.437, CiteScore: 2)
Bioinorganic Chemistry and Applications     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.419, CiteScore: 2)
BioMed Research Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.935, CiteScore: 3)
Biotechnology Research Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Bone Marrow Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.531, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian J. of Gastroenterology & Hepatology     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.867, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian J. of Infectious Diseases and Medical Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.548, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian Respiratory J.     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.474, CiteScore: 1)
Cardiology Research and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.237, CiteScore: 4)
Case Reports in Anesthesiology     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Case Reports in Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.219, CiteScore: 0)
Case Reports in Critical Care     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Case Reports in Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.229, CiteScore: 0)
Case Reports in Dermatological Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Case Reports in Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Case Reports in Endocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.209, CiteScore: 1)
Case Reports in Gastrointestinal Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Case Reports in Genetics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Case Reports in Hematology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Case Reports in Hepatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Case Reports in Immunology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Case Reports in Infectious Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Case Reports in Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Case Reports in Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Case Reports in Neurological Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Case Reports in Obstetrics and Gynecology     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Case Reports in Oncological Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.204, CiteScore: 1)
Case Reports in Ophthalmological Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Case Reports in Orthopedics     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Case Reports in Otolaryngology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Case Reports in Pathology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Case Reports in Pediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Case Reports in Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Case Reports in Pulmonology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Case Reports in Radiology     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Case Reports in Rheumatology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Case Reports in Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Case Reports in Transplantation     Open Access  
Case Reports in Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Case Reports in Vascular Medicine     Open Access  
Case Reports in Veterinary Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Child Development Research     Open Access   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.144, CiteScore: 0)
Chinese J. of Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.114, CiteScore: 0)
Chinese J. of Mathematics     Open Access  
Cholesterol     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.424, CiteScore: 1)
Chromatography Research Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Complexity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.531, CiteScore: 2)
Computational and Mathematical Methods in Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.403, CiteScore: 1)
Computational Intelligence and Neuroscience     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.326, CiteScore: 1)
Contrast Media & Molecular Imaging     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.842, CiteScore: 3)
Critical Care Research and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.499, CiteScore: 1)
Current Gerontology and Geriatrics Research     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.512, CiteScore: 2)
Depression Research and Treatment     Open Access   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.816, CiteScore: 2)
Dermatology Research and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.806, CiteScore: 2)
Diagnostic and Therapeutic Endoscopy     Open Access   (SJR: 0.201, CiteScore: 1)
Discrete Dynamics in Nature and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.279, CiteScore: 1)
Disease Markers     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.9, CiteScore: 2)
Economics Research Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Education Research Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Emergency Medicine Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.298, CiteScore: 1)
Enzyme Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.653, CiteScore: 3)
Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.683, CiteScore: 2)
Game Theory     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Gastroenterology Research and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.768, CiteScore: 2)
Genetics Research Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.61, CiteScore: 2)
Geofluids     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.952, CiteScore: 2)
Hepatitis Research and Treatment     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.389, CiteScore: 2)
HPB Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.824, CiteScore: 2)
Infectious Diseases in Obstetrics and Gynecology     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.27, CiteScore: 2)
Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Infectious Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.627, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Aerospace Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 73, SJR: 0.232, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Agronomy     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.311, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Alzheimer's Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.787, CiteScore: 3)
Intl. J. of Analysis     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Analytical Chemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.285, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Antennas and Propagation     Open Access   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.233, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Atmospheric Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
Intl. J. of Biodiversity     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Biomaterials     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.511, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Biomedical Imaging     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.501, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Breast Cancer     Open Access   (Followers: 13, SJR: 1.025, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Cell Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.887, CiteScore: 4)
Intl. J. of Chemical Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.327, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Chronic Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Combinatorics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Computer Games Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.287, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Corrosion     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.194, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.649, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Differential Equations     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.191, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Digital Multimedia Broadcasting     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.296, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Electrochemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Intl. J. of Endocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.012, CiteScore: 3)
Intl. J. of Engineering Mathematics     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Intl. J. of Food Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.44, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Forestry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.373, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Genomics     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.868, CiteScore: 3)
Intl. J. of Geophysics     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.182, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Hepatology     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.874, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Hypertension     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.578, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Inflammation     Open Access   (SJR: 1.264, CiteScore: 3)
Intl. J. of Inorganic Chemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Manufacturing Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Mathematics and Mathematical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.177, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Medicinal Chemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.31, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Metals     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.662, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Microwave Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.136, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Navigation and Observation     Open Access   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.267, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.697, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Oceanography     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Intl. J. of Optics     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.231, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Otolaryngology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Partial Differential Equations     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Pediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Intl. J. of Peptides     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.46, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Photoenergy     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.341, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Plant Genomics     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.583, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Polymer Science     Open Access   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.298, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Population Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Quality, Statistics, and Reliability     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Intl. J. of Reconfigurable Computing     Open Access   (SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Reproductive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Rheumatology     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.645, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Rotating Machinery     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.193, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Spectroscopy     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Intl. J. of Stochastic Analysis     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.279, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Surgical Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.573, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Telemedicine and Applications     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.403, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Vascular Medicine     Open Access   (SJR: 0.782, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Zoology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.209, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. Scholarly Research Notices     Open Access   (Followers: 189)
ISRN Astronomy and Astrophysics     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
J. of Addiction     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
J. of Advanced Transportation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.581, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Aerodynamics     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
J. of Aging Research     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.573, CiteScore: 2)

        1 2 | Last   [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

Journal Cover
Case Reports in Nephrology
Number of Followers: 4  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Print) 2090-6641 - ISSN (Online) 2090-665X
Published by Hindawi Homepage  [335 journals]
  • De Novo Atypical Haemolytic Uremic Syndrome after Kidney Transplantation

    • Abstract: De novo thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) can occur after kidney transplantation. An abnormality of the alternative pathway of complement must be suspected and searched for, even in presence of a secondary cause. We report the case of a 23-year-old female patient who was transplanted with a kidney from her mother for end-stage renal disease secondary to Hinman syndrome. Early after transplantation, she presented with 2 episodes of severe pyelonephritis, associated with acute kidney dysfunction and biological and histological features of TMA. Investigations of the alternative pathway of the complement system revealed atypical haemolytic uremic syndrome secondary to complement factor I mutation, associated with mutations in CD46 and complement factor H related protein genes. Plasma exchanges followed by eculizumab injections allowed improvement of kidney function without, however, normalization of creatinine.
      PubDate: Wed, 14 Mar 2018 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Colonic Mucosal Ulceration and Gastrointestinal Bleeding Associated with
           Sevelamer Crystal Deposition in a Patient with End Stage Renal Disease

    • Abstract: End stage renal disease (ESRD) population account for 1.9 per patient year of hospital admissions annually. ESRD population are at increased risk of bleeding secondary to use of anticoagulation during hemodialysis and uremia induced platelet dysfunction. Gastrointestinal bleeding accounts for 3–7% of all deaths in ESRD population. Lower gastrointestinal bleeding refers to blood loss from a site in the gastrointestinal tract distal to the ligament of Treitz. It is usually suspected when a patient complains of hematochezia. It is different from patients presenting with hematemesis that suggests bleeding from upper gastrointestinal tract. Common causes of lower gastrointestinal bleed include diverticulosis, ischemia, hemorrhoids, neoplasia, angiodysplasia, and inflammatory bowel disease. ESRD patients are known to retain phosphate alone or in combination with calcium which has been associated with high mortality. Sevelamer is a phosphate binder used widely in ESRD population. The known side effects of sevelamer include metabolic acidosis, vomiting, nausea, diarrhea, dyspepsia, abdominal pain, constipation, flatulence, fecal impaction, and skin rash. We are reporting a unique case of a 56-year-old female with end stage renal disease on sevelamer hydrochloride who presented with gastrointestinal bleeding and underwent a right hemicolectomy found to have sevelamer-induced mucosal ulceration and crystal deposition in the colonic mucosa. This case report highlights the fact that, with widespread use of this medication in the patients with chronic kidney diseases, physicians should be aware of this underrecognized entity in the differential diagnosis of gastrointestinal bleed in ESRD patients.
      PubDate: Wed, 28 Feb 2018 11:08:23 +000
       
  • Fatal Pneumococcus Sepsis after Treatment of Late Antibody-Mediated Kidney
           Graft Rejection

    • Abstract: Antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) is a major cause of late renal allograft dysfunction and graft loss. Risks and benefits of treatment of late ABMR have not been evaluated in randomized clinical trials. We report on a 35-year-old patient with deterioration in renal function and progressive proteinuria 15 years after transplantation. Recurrent infections after a splenectomy following traumatic splenic rupture 3 years earlier had led to reduction of immunosuppression. Renal transplant biopsy showed glomerular double contours, 40% fibrosis/tubular atrophy, peritubular capillaritis, and positive C4d staining indicating chronic-active ABMR. ABMR treatment was initiated with steroids, plasmapheresis, and rituximab. Fourteen days later, she presented to the emergency department with fever, diarrhea, vomiting, and hypotension. Despite antibiotic treatment she deteriorated with progressive hypotension, capillary leak with pleural effusion, peripheral edema, and progressive respiratory insufficiency. She died due to septic shock five days after admission. Blood cultures showed Streptococcus pneumoniae, consistent with a diagnosis of overwhelming postsplenectomy infection syndrome, despite protective pneumococcus vaccination titers. We assume that the infection was caused by one of the strains not covered by the Pneumovax 23 vaccination. The increased immunosuppression with B cell depletion may have contributed to the overwhelming course of this infection.
      PubDate: Wed, 28 Feb 2018 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Posttransplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder Presenting as Testicular
           Lymphoma in a Kidney Transplant Recipient: A Case Report and Review of the
           Literature

    • Abstract: Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a malignancy caused by the immunosuppression that occurs after transplantation. It is primarily a nodal lesion but frequently it involves extranodal masses. Treatment is usually by reducing immunosuppressive therapy. Testicular lymphoma as PTLD is notably rare in documented literature and there is limited evidence of definitive treatment guidelines. This manuscript describes a patient who developed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of his right testis one year following kidney transplantation. A diagnosis of PTLD was made and treatment with rituximab, locoregional radiotherapy, and intrathecal methotrexate in addition to the standard reduction of immunosuppression resulted in complete remission until now. We submit this case along with literature review of similar cases in the past and a review of specific peculiarities of our case with emphasis on our treatment plan to further the understanding of this diversiform disease.
      PubDate: Wed, 14 Feb 2018 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Clinical Relapses of Atypical HUS on Eculizumab: Clinical Gap for
           Monitoring and Individualised Therapy

    • Abstract: Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is caused by dysregulation of the complement system. A humanised anti-C5 monoclonal antibody (eculizumab) is available for the treatment of aHUS. We present the first description of atypical HUS in a child with a coexistent diagnosis of a POL-III leukodystrophy. On standard eculizumab dosing regime, there was evidence of ongoing C5 cleavage and clinical relapses when immunologically challenged. Eculizumab is an effective therapy for aHUS, but the recommended doses may not be adequate for all patients, highlighting the need for ongoing efforts to develop a strategy for monitoring of treatment efficacy and potential individualisation of therapy.
      PubDate: Tue, 06 Feb 2018 00:00:00 +000
       
  • A Rare Benign Tumor in a 14-Year-Old Girl

    • Abstract: Background. Oncocytomas are the second most common benign renal neoplasm but, unfortunately, they are difficult to differentiate from renal cell carcinoma. Renal oncocytomas are rare and have mostly been reported in adults. To our knowledge, this is only the sixth pediatric reported case of renal oncocytoma worldwide. Case Presentation. A 14-year-old Yemeni girl with a recurrent history of urinary tract infections came to our clinic complaining of left flank pain with a frontal headache. Ultrasound showed a 3 cm, well-defined echogenic lesion with mild vascularity. This lesion increased in size on her subsequent follow-ups. Computed tomography showed no intralesional fat, vessels invasion, or enlarged lymph nodes. The patient underwent laparoscopic radical nephrectomy, and a pathology report confirmed the diagnosis of renal oncocytoma. Conclusion and Recommendations. We present the rare occurrence of renal oncocytoma in a pediatric patient and highlight the importance of considering oncocytomas in the diagnosis of a renal mass.
      PubDate: Wed, 31 Jan 2018 14:01:51 +000
       
  • Acquired Perforating Dermatosis in a Patient on Peritoneal Dialysis: A
           Case Report and Review of the Literature

    • Abstract: Acquired perforating dermatosis (APD) is a debilitating and itchy skin disease. Its diagnosis is based on biopsy and the treatment is not very clear. It is not well established as to how wide spread it is in patients on peritoneal dialysis (PD) and its implications in this population have not been well studied. Here we present a case of APD that developed in a patient on PD. Its pathology and treatment options are reviewed. More studies are needed to assess the prevalence of APD in PD population.
      PubDate: Mon, 22 Jan 2018 07:39:36 +000
       
  • A Rare Case of Transient Proximal Renal Tubular Acidosis in Pregnancy

    • Abstract: Renal tubular acidosis (RTA) is a disorder that has improper function of renal acid-base regulation and is rarely encountered during pregnancy. Currently, there is no clear evidence on management and outcomes in patients with this condition. We report a case of a previously healthy 23-year-old female at 30 weeks of gestation who presented with proximal RTA and had spontaneous resolution of the condition shortly after delivery.
      PubDate: Wed, 29 Nov 2017 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Bilateral Testicular Infarction from IgA Vasculitis of the Spermatic Cords

    • Abstract: A 51-year-old man with type 2 diabetes mellitus and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease presented to the emergency room with increasing bilateral leg pain, rash, and scrotal swelling with pain. Skin biopsy from his thigh revealed IgA-associated vasculitis. Due to hematuria, a renal biopsy was performed and showed an IgA glomerulonephritis with focal fibrinoid necrosis and neutrophil accumulation. Bilateral orchiectomies were performed in two separate procedures ten and thirteen days after the renal biopsy, as a result of uncontrolled abscess formation in testicles. Microscopically, both testicles revealed large abscess formation destroying almost the entire testicular parenchyma without tumor cells. Spermatic cord margins were further scrutinized microscopically to show bilateral vasculitis in many small size vessels, confirmed by positive endothelial staining for IgA. Some of the affected arteries revealed central organizing thrombi with recanalization features, highly suggestive of vasculitis-associated thrombi formation, resulting in testicular ischemic infarction and abscess formation. We conclude that this adult patient developed a severe form of Henoch-Schönlein purpura, with vasculitis affecting multiple organs, including the most serious and unusual complication of bilateral testicular infarction.
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Nov 2017 09:18:33 +000
       
  • Cetuximab-Associated Crescentic Diffuse Proliferative Glomerulonephritis

    • Abstract: Cetuximab-induced nephrotoxicity is very rare, occurring in less than 1% of colorectal cancer patients and not defined in other populations. We report a rare case of crescentic diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis (GN) that developed in close temporal association with cetuximab treatment. A 65-year-old female recently completed chemotherapy with cetuximab treatment for moderately differentiated oral squamous cell carcinoma. She was admitted with acute renal failure and nephrotic-range proteinuria. Laboratory data showed serum creatinine of 6.6 mg/dl and urinalysis showed proteinuria, moderate hemoglobinuria, hyaline casts (41/LPF), WBC (28/HPF), and RBC (81/HPF). Serologic studies were negative for ANA, anti-GBM, ANCA, hepatitis B, and hepatitis C. Serum C3 and C4 level were normal. Renal biopsy showed crescentic diffuse proliferative GN with focal features of thrombotic microangiopathy. Patient was started on cyclophosphamide and steroids. Her renal function did not improve on day 8 and she was started on hemodialysis. Previous reports suggest that EGFR-targeting medications can possibly trigger or exacerbate an IgA-mediated glomerular process leading to renal failure. This case suggests that cetuximab therapy may have triggered or exacerbated a severe glomerular injury with an unfavorable outcome. Treating physicians should maintain a high degree of caution and monitor renal function in patients on EGFR inhibitors.
      PubDate: Thu, 16 Nov 2017 07:21:08 +000
       
  • A Case of Proliferative Glomerulonephritis with Monoclonal IgG Deposits
           That Showed Predominantly Membranous Features

    • Abstract: In 2004, the novel category of monoclonal IgG deposition disease has been proposed and termed “proliferative glomerulonephritis with monoclonal IgG deposits” (PGNMID). This disease is characterized by membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis and staining for a single light-chain isotype and gamma heavy-chain subclass. A 76-year-old male who had monoclonal gammopathy was referred to our hospital because of proteinuria. The renal biopsy showed diffuse thickening of the glomerular capillary walls with focal mesangial proliferation. On immunofluorescence study, only IgG1 among the four subclasses and lambda light chains were detected mainly in the glomerular capillary walls. From these results, we diagnosed our case as PGNMID showing predominantly membranous features. Almost all pathological findings on light microscopy of PGNMID are membranoproliferative GN or endocapillary proliferative GN, while membranous GN cases are rare. Here, we present the case of PGNMID that showed predominantly membranous features on light microscopy.
      PubDate: Wed, 25 Oct 2017 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Large Retroperitoneal Haemorrhage Following Cyst Rupture in a Patient with
           Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    • Abstract: The complications of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) include cyst rupture and haemorrhage leading to loin pain and frank haematuria. Risk factors include large kidney volume, hypertension, and renal impairment. We present a case of a young male who, following trauma to the kidney, had a life threatening bleed from his polycystic kidney. The case was initially treated with fluid resuscitation and blood transfusion but necessitated radiological embolization of bleeding source to control the blood loss. We review the risk factors and management of cyst haemorrhage in patients with ADPKD. Contact sports should be avoided as cyst rupture can lead to severe life threatening haemorrhage.
      PubDate: Wed, 18 Oct 2017 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Ureteropelvic Junction Obstruction and Parathyroid Adenoma: A Case Report
           and Literature Review

    • Abstract: Congenital ureteropelvic junction obstruction (UPJO) is the most common cause of upper urinary tract obstruction in children. It is generally diagnosed in the routine work-up during antenatal period and is characterized by spontaneous recovery. It can be associated with urolithiasis; hence further investigation should be carried out. We report the case of a 15-year-old boy, who is known to have right UPJO, presented with right renal colic and discovered to have bilateral kidney stones. Further studies showed primary hyperparathyroidism and genetic analysis revealed a CDC73 mutation (initially HRPT2). We believe that association of UPJO and PHPT is a rare coincidence that can be linked. Careful work-up of children with UPJO and urolithiasis is recommended to exclude an underlying metabolic disease. Surgical correction can be evitable as treatment of the primary cause can lead to complete dissolution of kidney stones and improvement of the medical condition.
      PubDate: Tue, 17 Oct 2017 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Discontinuation of Hemodialysis in a Patient with Anti-GBM Disease by the
           Treatment with Corticosteroids and Plasmapheresis despite Several
           Predictors for Dialysis-Dependence

    • Abstract: A 26-year-old man highly suspected of having antiglomerular basement membrane (GBM) disease was treated with corticosteroid pulse therapy 9 days after initial infection-like symptoms with high procalcitonin value. The patient required hemodialysis the next day of the treatment due to oliguria. In addition to corticosteroid therapy, plasmapheresis was introduced and the patient could discontinue hemodialysis 43 days after the treatment. Kidney biopsy after initiation of hemodialysis confirmed anti-GBM disease with 86.3% crescent formation. Physician should keep in mind that active anti-GBM disease shows even high procalcitonin value in the absence of infection. To pursue recovery of renal function, the challenge of the immediate and persistent treatment with high-dose corticosteroids plus plasmapheresis for highly suspected anti-GBM disease is vitally important despite the presence of reported predictors for dialysis-dependence including oliguria and requiring hemodialysis at presentation.
      PubDate: Wed, 11 Oct 2017 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Rhabdomyolysis Induced by Coadministration of Fusidic Acid and
           Atorvastatin: A Case Report and Comprehensive Review of the Literature

    • Abstract: Statins are among the most widely prescribed medications worldwide. Acute rhabdomyolysis constitutes a potentially life-threatening side effect regardless of whether statins are administered alone or in combination. The potentially fatal combination of a statin and fusidic acid has been well described in the literature. Acute renal failure can be a direct consequence of this drug-drug interaction. We present a case of a 79-year-old woman who presented to our Emergency Department with a one-week history of limb weakness, myalgia, and inability to stand and walk. The patient had been given fusidic acid to treat Methicillin-Sensitive Staphylococcus Aureus (MSSA) positive dermatitis in the 3 weeks prior to admission, while she continued to take her complete therapeutic regimen, which included atorvastatin. Thus, she developed rhabdomyolysis due to the interaction between fusidic acid and atorvastatin. Herein, we report a life-threatening complication of coadministration of fusidic acid and a statin, which is preventable and predictable. The exact mechanism of the interaction is not fully understood, but coadministration of these two medications must be avoided in clinical practice.
      PubDate: Sun, 08 Oct 2017 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Early Renal Involvement in a Girl with Classic Fabry Disease

    • Abstract: Fabry disease is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder resulting from the deficiency or absence of the enzyme alpha galactosidase A; this defect leads to the systemic accumulation of globotriaosylceramide and its metabolites. Organic involvement in men is well known, but in women it is controversial, mainly due to the random X-chromosome inactivation in each of their cells (Lyon hypothesis). This would explain why women (heterozygotes) present a wide variability in the severity of their phenotype. The manifestations are multisystemic and begin in early childhood, reaching a severe compromise in adulthood. Typical acroparesthesia in hands and feet, gastrointestinal symptoms, angiokeratomas, dyshidrosis, hearing loss, arrhythmias, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, cerebrovascular accidents, and renal failure can be observed. Nephropathy is one of the major complications of Fabry disease. Glomerular and vascular changes are present before progression to overt proteinuria and decreased glomerular filtration rate, even in pediatric patients. A case of incipient renal involvement in a girl with classic Fabry disease is reported.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Oct 2017 08:10:54 +000
       
  • Unusual Complication of Multidrug Resistant Tuberculosis

    • Abstract: Introduction. Capreomycin is a second-line drug often used for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis which can result in nephrotoxic effects similar to other aminoglycosides. We describe a case of capreomycin induced Bartter-like syndrome with hypocalcemic tetany. Case Report. 23-year-old female patient presented with carpopedal spasms and tingling sensations in hands. Patient was being treated with capreomycin for two months for tuberculosis. On further investigation, hypocalcemia, hyponatremia, hypomagnesemia, hypokalemia, and hypochloremic metabolic alkalosis were noted. Vitamin D and serum PTH levels were within normal limits. Hypercalciuria was confirmed by urine calcium/creatinine ratio. Calcium, potassium, and magnesium supplementation was given and capreomycin was discontinued. Electrolytes normalized in two days after cessation of capreomycin with no further abnormalities on repeat investigations. Discussion. Aminoglycosides can result in renal tubular dysfunction leading to Fanconi syndrome, Bartter syndrome, and distal tubular acidosis. Impaired mitochondrial function in the tubular cells has been hypothesized as the possible cause of these tubulopathies. Acquired Bartter-like syndrome phenotypically resembles autosomal dominant type 5 Bartter syndrome. Treatment consists of correction of electrolyte abnormalities, indomethacin, and potassium-sparing diuretics. Prompt diagnosis and treatment of severe dyselectrolytemia are warranted in patients on aminoglycoside therapy.
      PubDate: Mon, 18 Sep 2017 09:23:57 +000
       
  • Snakebite Induced Thrombotic Microangiopathy Leading to Renal Cortical
           Necrosis

    • Abstract: Renal complications from snakebite result in high mortality and morbidity. Acute kidney injury (AKI) occurs in 5–30% of cases. Renal manifestation could include acute tubular necrosis, cortical necrosis, interstitial nephritis, glomerulonephritis, and vasculitis. We present a case of thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) resulting in renal cortical necrosis. Renal biopsy showed fibrin thrombi in glomeruli and arterioles with cortical necrosis. Our patient progressed to end-stage renal disease.
      PubDate: Sun, 13 Aug 2017 06:23:09 +000
       
  • Acute Hypocalcemia and Metabolic Alkalosis in Children on Cation-Exchange
           Resin Therapy

    • Abstract: Background. Sodium polystyrene sulfonate (SPS) is a chelating agent used for the treatment of hyperkalemia. SPS has a wide range of exchange capacity requiring close monitoring of serum electrolytes. We observed two patients who developed acute hypocalcemia and increased metabolic alkalosis after initiating SPS therapy. We report these cases to draw attention to the potential risk of this medication in pediatric patients. Case Diagnosis/Treatment. Two children with chronic kidney disease on dialysis were started on SPS for hyperkalemia. Within a week after initiation of the medication, both patients developed hypocalcemia on routine labs without overt clinical manifestations. The hypocalcemia was rapidly corrected with oral supplementation and discontinuation of SPS. Conclusions. Severe hypocalcemia can develop after SPS therapy. The metabolic alkalosis in these patients associated with the hypocalcemia put them at increased risk for complications. Hence, careful attention must be paid to the state of calcium metabolism in all patients receiving SPS. Often calcium supplementation is required to maintain normal calcium levels.
      PubDate: Tue, 01 Aug 2017 07:01:17 +000
       
  • Therapeutic Approach to the Management of Severe Asymptomatic Hyponatremia

    • Abstract: Hyponatremia is an electrolyte imbalance encountered commonly in the hospital and ambulatory settings. It can be seen in isolation or present as a complication of other medical conditions. It is therefore a challenge to determine the appropriate therapeutic intervention. An understanding of the etiology is key in instituting the right treatment. Clinicians must not be too hasty to correct a random laboratory value without first understanding the physiologic principle. We present such a case of a patient who presented with sodium of 98 mmol/L, the lowest recorded in the current literature, and yet was asymptomatic. Following appropriate management driven by an understanding of the underlying pathophysiologic mechanism, the patient was managed to full recovery without any clinically significant neurological sequelae.
      PubDate: Thu, 27 Jul 2017 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Acinetobacter lwoffii Peritonitis in a Patient on Automated Peritoneal
           Dialysis: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    • Abstract: Acinetobacter lwoffii, a nonfermentative gram-negative aerobic bacillus, which presents in the normal flora of the oropharynx and skin, has recently been reported as a cause of human infection. Herein, the authors present a case report of peritonitis related to automated peritoneal dialysis caused by A. lwoffii.
      PubDate: Wed, 26 Jul 2017 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Successful Resuscitation of a Patient with Life-Threatening Metabolic
           Acidosis by Hemodialysis: A Case of Ethylene Glycol Intoxication

    • Abstract: Background. Ethylene glycol intoxication causes severe metabolic acidosis and acute kidney injury. Fomepizole has become available as its antidote. Nevertheless, a prompt diagnosis is not easy because patients are often unconscious. Here we present a case of ethylene glycol intoxication who successfully recovered with prompt hemodialysis. Case Presentation. A 52-year-old Japanese male was admitted to a local hospital due to suspected food poisoning. The patient presented with nausea and vomiting, but his condition rapidly deteriorated, with worsening conscious level, respiratory distress requiring mechanical ventilation, hypotension, and severe acute kidney injury. He was transferred to the university hospital; hemodialysis was initiated because of hyperkalemia and severe metabolic acidosis. On recovering consciousness, he admitted having ingested antifreeze solution. Thirty-seven days after admission, the patient was discharged without requiring HD. Conclusions. We reported a case of ethylene glycol intoxication who presented with a life-threatening metabolic acidosis. In a state of severe circulatory shock requiring catecholamines, hemodialysis should be avoided, and continuous hemodiafiltration may be a preferred approach. However, one should be aware of the possibility of intoxication by unknown causes, and hemodialysis could be life-saving with its superior ability to remove toxic materials in such cases.
      PubDate: Tue, 25 Jul 2017 10:42:27 +000
       
  • An Intact Dopamine Sensitivity in the Brain: A Necessity to Recover
           

    • Abstract: A female hemodialysis patient with galactorrhea due to hyperprolactinemia was treated with different dialysis modalities to assess the effect on prolactin levels. A single session of both high-flux hemodialysis and hemodiafiltration resulted in decreased prolactin levels (16,6% and 77,2%, resp.). However, baseline prolactin levels measured immediately before the next dialysis session did not change markedly. After cabergoline treatment was started, prolactin levels normalized and galactorrhea disappeared. Thus, dopaminergic inhibition of prolactin secretion might be reduced in patients with end-stage renal disease. This dopaminergic resistance could be an important mechanism of hyperprolactinemia in hemodialysis patients and its subsequent treatment strategies.
      PubDate: Sun, 16 Jul 2017 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Cisplatin-Induced Nephrotoxicity and HIV Associated Nephropathy: Mimickers
           of Myeloma-Like Cast Nephropathy

    • Abstract: Myeloma cast nephropathy is an obstructing disorder of renal tubules, caused by precipitation of Bence Jones proteins. Myeloma-like cast nephropathy (MLCN) has been reported in the literature to occur in various primary renal and nonrenal diseases. We present a series of three rare cases of cast nephropathy, two of which are HIV patients, and the third patient is receiving cisplatin-based chemotherapy. However, in all three patients plasma cell dyscrasia has been ruled out. A 30-year-old male was admitted to the hospital with facial cellulitis. The second patient is a 31-year-old male who presented with Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia. The third patient was treated with cisplatin-based chemotherapy for carcinoma. First two cases revealed foci of diffuse tubular dilatation containing hyaline casts and interstitial inflammatory infiltrate, in addition to globally sclerotic glomeruli with ultrastructural foot process fusion and mesangium expansion. The third case showed acute tubular injury and cast formation of irregular casts composed of amorphous or granular material of low density admixed with scattered high electron-dense globules. Myeloma-like cast nephropathy and true myeloma cast nephropathy pose similar destructive effects on renal parenchyma. This new pattern of HIV-related nephropathy should be considered in HIV patients with MLCN, once monoclonal gammopathy is ruled out.
      PubDate: Mon, 10 Jul 2017 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Extended Peritoneal Dialysis and Renal Recovery in HIV-Infected Patients
           with Prolonged AKI: A Report of 2 Cases

    • Abstract: Peritoneal dialysis (PD) has recently been established as a treatment option for renal replacement therapy (RRT) in patients with acute kidney injury (AKI). Its efficacy in providing fluid and small solute removal has also been demonstrated in clinical trials and is equivalent to hemodialysis (HD). However, effect of RRT modality on renal recovery after AKI remains a controversy. Moreover, the setting of human immunodeficiency virus- (HIV-) infected patients with AKI requiring RRT makes the decision on RRT initiation and modality selection more complicated. The authors report here 2 cases of HIV-infected patients presenting with severe AKI requiring protracted course of acute RRT. PD had been performed uneventfully in both cases for 4–9 months before partial renal recovery occurred. Both patients eventually became dialysis independent but were left in chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage 4. These cases highlight the example of renal recovery even after a prolonged course of dialysis dependence. Thus, PD might be a suitable option for HIV patients with protracted AKI.
      PubDate: Thu, 06 Jul 2017 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Transient Central Diabetes Insipidus and Marked Hypernatremia following
           Cardiorespiratory Arrest

    • Abstract: Central Diabetes Insipidus is often an overlooked complication of cardiopulmonary arrest and anoxic brain injury. We report a case of transient Central Diabetes Insipidus (CDI) following cardiopulmonary arrest. It developed 4 days after the arrest resulting in polyuria and marked hypernatremia of 199 mM. The latter was exacerbated by replacing the hypotonic urine by isotonic saline.
      PubDate: Mon, 03 Jul 2017 06:46:40 +000
       
  • Acute Pancreatitis and Rhabdomyolysis with Acute Kidney Injury following
           Multiple Wasp Stings

    • Abstract: Multiple wasp stings can induce multiple organ dysfunction by toxic reactions. However, acute pancreatitis is a rare manifestation in wasp sting injury. A 74-year-old woman visited the emergency department by anaphylactic shock because of multiple wasp stings. Acute kidney injury, rhabdomyolysis, hepatotoxicity, and coagulopathy were developed next day. Serum amylase and lipase were elevated and an abdominal computed tomography revealed an acute pancreatitis. Urine output was recovered after 16 days of oliguria (below 500 ml/day). Her kidney, liver, and pancreas injury gradually improved after sessions of renal replacement therapy.
      PubDate: Mon, 19 Jun 2017 00:00:00 +000
       
  • The Cushing Reflex: Oliguria as a Reflection of an Elevated Intracranial
           Pressure

    • Abstract: Oliguria is one of the clinical hallmarks of renal failure. The broad differential diagnosis is well known, but a rare cause of oliguria is intracranial hypertension (ICH). The actual knowledge to explain this relationship is scarce. Almost all literature is about animals where authors describe the Cushing reflex in response to ICH. We hypothesize that the Cushing reflex is translated towards the sympathetic nervous system and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system with a subsequent reduction in medullary blood flow and oliguria. Recently, we were confronted with a patient who had complicated pituitary surgery and displayed multiple times an oliguria while he developed ICH.
      PubDate: Mon, 15 May 2017 08:11:37 +000
       
  • Cisplatin-Induced Renal Salt Wasting Requiring over 12 Liters of 3%
           Saline Replacement

    • Abstract: Cisplatin is known to induce Fanconi syndrome and renal salt wasting (RSW). RSW typically only requires transient normal saline (NS) support. We report a severe RSW case that required 12 liters of 3% saline. A 57-year-old woman with limited stage small cell cancer was admitted for cisplatin (80 mg/m2) and etoposide (100 mg/m2) therapy. Patient’s serum sodium (SNa) decreased from 138 to 133 and 125 mEq/L within 24 and 48 hours of cisplatin therapy, respectively. A diagnosis of syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH) was initially made. Despite free water restriction, patient’s SNa continued to decrease in association with acute onset of headaches, nausea, and dizziness. Three percent saline (3%S) infusion with rates up to 1400 mL/day was required to correct and maintain SNa at 135 mEq/L. Studies to evaluate Fanconi syndrome revealed hypophosphatemia and glucosuria in the absence of serum hyperglycemia. The natriuresis slowed down by 2.5 weeks, but 3%S support was continued for a total volume of 12 liters over 3.5 weeks. Attempts of questionable benefits to slow down glomerular filtration included the administration of ibuprofen and benazepril. To our knowledge, this is the most severe case of RSW ever reported with cisplatin.
      PubDate: Wed, 10 May 2017 07:25:54 +000
       
  • Antiglomerular Basement Membrane Disease in a Pediatric Patient: A Case
           Report and Review of the Literature

    • Abstract: Goodpasture’s syndrome (GPS) remains a very rare disease entity in the pediatric population characterized by the presence of pulmonary hemorrhage and rapidly evolving glomerulonephritis. We hereby describe the case of a 2-year-old girl who presented with renal failure and was diagnosed with GPS. A brief review of the literature in regard to data on demographics, pathogenesis, clinical features, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis for renal recovery is also provided.
      PubDate: Tue, 09 May 2017 07:27:36 +000
       
 
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
Fax: +00 44 (0)131 4513327
 
Home (Search)
Subjects A-Z
Publishers A-Z
Customise
APIs
Your IP address: 54.196.38.114
 
About JournalTOCs
API
Help
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-