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Publisher: Hindawi   (Total: 338 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 338 Journals sorted alphabetically
Abstract and Applied Analysis     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.343, CiteScore: 1)
Active and Passive Electronic Components     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.136, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Acoustics and Vibration     Open Access   (Followers: 37, SJR: 0.147, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Aerospace Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 55)
Advances in Agriculture     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Artificial Intelligence     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Advances in Astronomy     Open Access   (Followers: 41, SJR: 0.257, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Bioinformatics     Open Access   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.565, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Advances in Chemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 27)
Advances in Civil Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 43, SJR: 0.539, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Computer Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Condensed Matter Physics     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.315, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Decision Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.303, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Electrical Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 37)
Advances in Electronics     Open Access   (Followers: 79)
Advances in Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Endocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Environmental Chemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Epidemiology     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Fuzzy Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.161, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Geology     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Advances in Geriatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Hematology     Open Access   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.661, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Hepatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Advances in High Energy Physics     Open Access   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.866, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Human-Computer Interaction     Open Access   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.186, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Materials Science and Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 30, SJR: 0.315, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Mathematical Physics     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.218, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.48, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Multimedia     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.173, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Nonlinear Optics     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Numerical Analysis     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 32)
Advances in Operations Research     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.205, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Optical Technologies     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.214, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Optics     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Advances in OptoElectronics     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.141, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Orthopedics     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.922, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Pharmacological Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.591, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Physical Chemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.179, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Polymer Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.299, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Power Electronics     Open Access   (Followers: 33, SJR: 0.184, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Preventive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
Advances in Regenerative Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Software Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Advances in Statistics     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Toxicology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Tribology     Open Access   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.265, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.51, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Virology     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.838, CiteScore: 2)
AIDS Research and Treatment     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.758, CiteScore: 2)
Analytical Cellular Pathology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.886, CiteScore: 2)
Anatomy Research Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Anemia     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.669, CiteScore: 2)
Anesthesiology Research and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.501, CiteScore: 1)
Applied and Environmental Soil Science     Open Access   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.451, CiteScore: 1)
Applied Bionics and Biomechanics     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.288, CiteScore: 1)
Applied Computational Intelligence and Soft Computing     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Archaea     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.852, CiteScore: 2)
Autism Research and Treatment     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Autoimmune Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.805, CiteScore: 2)
Behavioural Neurology     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.786, CiteScore: 2)
Biochemistry Research Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.437, CiteScore: 2)
Bioinorganic Chemistry and Applications     Open Access   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.419, CiteScore: 2)
BioMed Research Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.935, CiteScore: 3)
Biotechnology Research Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Bone Marrow Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.531, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian J. of Gastroenterology & Hepatology     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.867, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian J. of Infectious Diseases and Medical Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.548, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian Respiratory J.     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.474, CiteScore: 1)
Cardiology Research and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.237, CiteScore: 4)
Cardiovascular Therapeutics     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.075, CiteScore: 2)
Case Reports in Anesthesiology     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Case Reports in Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.219, CiteScore: 0)
Case Reports in Critical Care     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Case Reports in Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.229, CiteScore: 0)
Case Reports in Dermatological Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Case Reports in Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Case Reports in Endocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.209, CiteScore: 1)
Case Reports in Gastrointestinal Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Case Reports in Genetics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Case Reports in Hematology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Case Reports in Hepatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Case Reports in Immunology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Case Reports in Infectious Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Case Reports in Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Case Reports in Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Case Reports in Neurological Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Case Reports in Obstetrics and Gynecology     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Case Reports in Oncological Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.204, CiteScore: 1)
Case Reports in Ophthalmological Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Case Reports in Orthopedics     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Case Reports in Otolaryngology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Case Reports in Pathology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Case Reports in Pediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Case Reports in Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Case Reports in Pulmonology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Case Reports in Radiology     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Case Reports in Rheumatology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Case Reports in Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Case Reports in Transplantation     Open Access  
Case Reports in Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Case Reports in Vascular Medicine     Open Access  
Case Reports in Veterinary Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Child Development Research     Open Access   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.144, CiteScore: 0)
Chinese J. of Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.114, CiteScore: 0)
Chinese J. of Mathematics     Open Access  
Chromatography Research Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Complexity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.531, CiteScore: 2)
Computational and Mathematical Methods in Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.403, CiteScore: 1)
Computational Intelligence and Neuroscience     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.326, CiteScore: 1)
Contrast Media & Molecular Imaging     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.842, CiteScore: 3)
Critical Care Research and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.499, CiteScore: 1)
Current Gerontology and Geriatrics Research     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.512, CiteScore: 2)
Depression Research and Treatment     Open Access   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.816, CiteScore: 2)
Dermatology Research and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.806, CiteScore: 2)
Diagnostic and Therapeutic Endoscopy     Open Access   (SJR: 0.201, CiteScore: 1)
Discrete Dynamics in Nature and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.279, CiteScore: 1)
Disease Markers     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.9, CiteScore: 2)
Economics Research Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Education Research Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Emergency Medicine Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.298, CiteScore: 1)
Enzyme Research     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.653, CiteScore: 3)
Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.683, CiteScore: 2)
Game Theory     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Gastroenterology Research and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.768, CiteScore: 2)
Genetics Research Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.61, CiteScore: 2)
Geofluids     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.952, CiteScore: 2)
Hepatitis Research and Treatment     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.389, CiteScore: 2)
Heteroatom Chemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.333, CiteScore: 1)
HPB Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.824, CiteScore: 2)
Infectious Diseases in Obstetrics and Gynecology     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.27, CiteScore: 2)
Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Infectious Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.627, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Aerospace Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 74, SJR: 0.232, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Agronomy     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.311, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Alzheimer's Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.787, CiteScore: 3)
Intl. J. of Analytical Chemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.285, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Antennas and Propagation     Open Access   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.233, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Atmospheric Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
Intl. J. of Biodiversity     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Biomaterials     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.511, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Biomedical Imaging     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.501, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Breast Cancer     Open Access   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.025, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Cell Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.887, CiteScore: 4)
Intl. J. of Chemical Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.327, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Chronic Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Combinatorics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Computer Games Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.287, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Corrosion     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.194, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.649, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Differential Equations     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.191, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Digital Multimedia Broadcasting     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.296, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Electrochemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Intl. J. of Endocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.012, CiteScore: 3)
Intl. J. of Engineering Mathematics     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Intl. J. of Food Science     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.44, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Forestry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.373, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Genomics     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.868, CiteScore: 3)
Intl. J. of Geophysics     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.182, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Hepatology     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.874, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Hypertension     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.578, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Inflammation     Open Access   (SJR: 1.264, CiteScore: 3)
Intl. J. of Inorganic Chemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Manufacturing Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Mathematics and Mathematical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.177, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Medicinal Chemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.31, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Metals     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Intl. J. of Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.662, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Microwave Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.136, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Navigation and Observation     Open Access   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.267, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.697, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Oceanography     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Intl. J. of Optics     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.231, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Otolaryngology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Partial Differential Equations     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Pediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Intl. J. of Peptides     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.46, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Photoenergy     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.341, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Plant Genomics     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.583, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Polymer Science     Open Access   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.298, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Population Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Quality, Statistics, and Reliability     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Intl. J. of Reconfigurable Computing     Open Access   (SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Reproductive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Rheumatology     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.645, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Rotating Machinery     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.193, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Spectroscopy     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Intl. J. of Stochastic Analysis     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.279, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Surgical Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.573, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Telemedicine and Applications     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.403, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Vascular Medicine     Open Access   (SJR: 0.782, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Zoology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.209, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. Scholarly Research Notices     Open Access   (Followers: 202)
ISRN Astronomy and Astrophysics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
J. of Addiction     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
J. of Advanced Transportation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.581, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Aerodynamics     Open Access   (Followers: 12)

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Similar Journals
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Advances in Preventive Medicine
Number of Followers: 6  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Online) 2090-3499
Published by Hindawi Homepage  [338 journals]
  • Ingestion of Lycosome L-tug Formulation of Dark Chocolate Ameliorates
           Postprandial Hyperlipidemia and Hyperglycemia in Healthy Volunteers

    • Abstract: Twenty-eight healthy middle-aged volunteers (40-60 years old) with equal gender representation were randomized into 3 study groups to investigate the changes in postprandial glucose and lipids after ingestion of different formulations of dark chocolate (DC). The volunteers from the first group were requested to ingest 100 g of regular DC whereas the individuals from the third group were given 100 g of highly bioavailable lycosome formulated L-tug formulation of DC containing 23.3 mg of lycopene. A second group received a 23.3 mg lycopene capsule, a tomato-derived antioxidant carotenoid as a matching control. Serum specimens were obtained following 30 minutes as well as 1, 2, and 3 hours after study products intake. Ingestion of L-tug DC was accompanied by the reduced postprandial hyperglycemia with maximum difference seen at hour of the study and reduction of average values by 20% (P
      PubDate: Thu, 16 May 2019 13:30:03 +000
       
  • Pros and Cons of Aspirin Prophylaxis for Prevention of Cardiovascular
           Events in Kidney Transplantation and Review of Evidence

    • Abstract: Kidney transplant recipients have traditional and nontraditional risk factors which can lead to coronary artery disease and sudden death with a functional graft loss. Aspirin has been used traditionally for prevention of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular accidents. It has beneficial effects in secondary prevention of cardiovascular events in general population. Its use for primary prophylaxis is still disputed. Bleeding and theoretical risk of nephrotoxicity are the major concerns about its use. The data on aspirin in kidney transplant population is sparse. This review will focus on various pros and cons of aspirin use for prevention of cardiovascular events in kidney transplant recipients and a way forward.
      PubDate: Thu, 16 May 2019 07:05:05 +000
       
  • A Derived QSAR Model for Predicting Some Compounds as Potent Antagonist
           against Mycobacterium tuberculosis: A Theoretical Approach

    • Abstract: Development of more potent antituberculosis agents is as a result of emergence of multidrug resistant strains of M. tuberculosis. Novel compounds are usually synthesized by trial approach with a lot of errors, which is time consuming and expensive. QSAR is a theoretical approach, which has the potential to reduce the aforementioned problem in discovering new potent drugs against M. tuberculosis. This approach was employed to develop multivariate QSAR model to correlate the chemical structures of the 2,4-disubstituted quinoline analogues with their observed activities using a theoretical approach. In order to build the robust QSAR model, Genetic Function Approximation (GFA) was employed as a tool for selecting the best descriptors that could efficiently predict the activities of the inhibitory agents. The developed model was influenced by molecular descriptors: AATS5e, VR1_Dzs, SpMin7_Bhe, TDB9e, and RDF110s. The internal validation test for the derived model was found to have correlation coefficient () of 0.9265, adjusted correlation coefficient ( adj) value of 0.9045, and leave-one-out cross-validation coefficient () value of 0.8512, while the external validation test was found to have (R2 test) of 0.8034 and Y-randomization coefficient () of 0.6633. The proposed QSAR model provides a valuable approach for modification of the lead compound and design and synthesis of more potent antitubercular agents.
      PubDate: Thu, 02 May 2019 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Phytochemical Profiling and Larval Control of Erythrina variegata Methanol
           Fraction against Malarial and Filarial Vector

    • Abstract: Erythrina variegata (E. variegata) bioactive chemical has been the potential to be utilized as a good, eco-friendly approach for the control of mosquito population. In the present investigation, methanol extract using insecticidal compounds isolated against mosquito larvae kill assay was carried out. Secondary metabolism was characterized by thin layer chromatography, column chromatography, Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy, gas chromatography-mass spectral, and identification of compound. Mosquito immature third instar larval, Anopheles stephensi, and Culex quinquefasciatus have been exposed to different concentrations of 50-250 µg/ml. Totally, larvae were death rate 98.2% (significant value ) from methanol extract and it is significant toxicity against larvae of An. stephensi and Cx. quinquefasciatus with LC50/LC99 values were 157.69/339.55 µg/ml and 137.67/297.33 µg/ml, respectively. FT-IR analysis in the functional groups such as alcohol, amines, amides, alkenes, amines, aromatic amines, aliphatic amines, , amines, and alkyl halides searched the identity of secondary metabolites, which may act as 12-Octadecenoic acid, methyl ester compound and clearly indicates being phytochemical. Chemical constituents of twenty-five compounds were identified in the methanol extract. The major components were 12-Octadecenoic acid and methyl ester (37.31%). Compound molecules consist of carbon 19 atoms (gray), hydrogen 36 atoms (greenish blue), and oxygen 2 atoms (red), indicated by the different colors. The results were obtained suggesting that, in addition to their pharmaceutical and medicine sources, 12-Octadecenoic acid, methyl ester compound can also serve as a natural mosquito control.
      PubDate: Tue, 16 Apr 2019 13:05:30 +000
       
  • A Cox-Based Risk Prediction Model for Early Detection of Cardiovascular
           Disease: Identification of Key Risk Factors for the Development of a
           10-Year CVD Risk Prediction

    • Abstract: Background and Objective. Current cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk models are typically based on traditional laboratory-based predictors. The objective of this research was to identify key risk factors that affect the CVD risk prediction and to develop a 10-year CVD risk prediction model using the identified risk factors. Methods. A Cox proportional hazard regression method was applied to generate the proposed risk model. We used the dataset from Framingham Original Cohort of 5079 men and women aged 30-62 years, who had no overt symptoms of CVD at the baseline; among the selected cohort 3189 had a CVD event. Results. A 10-year CVD risk model based on multiple risk factors (such as age, sex, body mass index (BMI), hypertension, systolic blood pressure (SBP), cigarettes per day, pulse rate, and diabetes) was developed in which heart rate was identified as one of the novel risk factors. The proposed model achieved a good discrimination and calibration ability with C-index (receiver operating characteristic (ROC)) being 0.71 in the validation dataset. We validated the model via statistical and empirical validation. Conclusion. The proposed CVD risk prediction model is based on standard risk factors, which could help reduce the cost and time required for conducting the clinical/laboratory tests. Healthcare providers, clinicians, and patients can use this tool to see the 10-year risk of CVD for an individual. Heart rate was incorporated as a novel predictor, which extends the predictive ability of the past existing risk equations.
      PubDate: Tue, 09 Apr 2019 13:05:14 +000
       
  • Smokeless Tobacco and Its Adverse Effects on Hematological Parameters: A
           Cross-Sectional Study

    • Abstract: Background. Smokeless tobacco (SLT) as a drug substance has been used throughout the world although it has dangerous effects on human health. Among the 28 known carcinogens in SLT, tobacco-specific nitrosamines are considered to be the most potent. This has challenged the metabolic condition leading to a rise in the inflammatory status, increased apoptosis, and red blood cell (RBC) membrane damage. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to evaluate the adverse effects of SLT on hematological parameters and establish a correlation between them. Materials and Methods. A total of 100 subjects (50 SLT users and 50 nonusers) were selected for the study. Complete demographic data and history were taken and clinical examination was done to evaluate any oral mucosal changes. Venous blood samples were taken to analyze the hematological parameters. Results. Significant changes were observed in the complete blood profile in SLT users when compared to nonusers. All the hematological parameters had a negative correlation with form of SLT except for total leucocyte count which had a positive correlation. Conclusion. The current study confers an imperative role into SLT mediated effects on a complete hemogram and might be beneficial in spreading awareness against its usage. It also serves as a forewarning alarm among the population consuming SLT as an alternative to smoking tobacco.
      PubDate: Mon, 01 Apr 2019 11:05:23 +000
       
  • Body Mass Index Change as a Predictor of Biometric Changes following an
           Intensive Lifestyle Modification Program

    • Abstract: The initial benefits of lifestyle modification programs such as reduction in chronic and cardiovascular diseases (CVD) risk factors have been well documented. However, such positive effects may deteriorate over time following relapse into inactivity. Timely detection of weight regain leading to the deterioration of the accrued benefits could trigger early resumption of intensive lifestyle intervention. To date, no known cost-effective, noninvasive approach for monitoring long-term outcomes has yet been established. The purpose of this study was to determine if body mass index (BMI) change predicted changes in other CVD biometric markers during an intensive lifestyle modification program. This study was an observational, retrospective review of records of participants from the Complete Health Improvement Program (CHIP). Biomarker changes of participants in this community-based Intensive Therapeutic Lifestyle Modification Program (ITLMP) offered in Athens, Ohio, a rural Appalachian college town, between April 2011 and June 2017 were reviewed retrospectively. BMI, heart rate (Pulse), systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and fasting blood levels of total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), high-density lipoprotein (HDL), triglycerides (TG), and glucose (FBS) were monitored before and after program completion. Data were analyzed using a multivariate general linear model. The sample analyzed consisted of 620 participants (mean age of 52.3±13.0 years, 74.5% female). Controlling for age and gender, BMI change significantly predicted 5 out of the 8 biomarker changes measured [Wilk’s λ = 0.939, F(8,526) = 4.29, p
      PubDate: Sun, 24 Mar 2019 13:30:08 +000
       
  • Prevention of Calcium Nephrolithiasis: The Influence of Diuresis on
           Calcium Oxalate Crystallization in Urine

    • Abstract: A high fluid intake is still the most evidence-based measure for the prevention of idiopathic stone disease. The recommendation of current guidelines on urolithiasis to increase diuresis to 2–2.5 L/day is mainly based on a single clinical study. The present paper shows the influence of diuresis on calcium oxalate (CaOx) crystallization and especially aggregation (AGN) which can explain the initial development of Ca stones on papillary calcifications as well as stone growth in the renal pelvic system. Diuresis determines the urinary transit time (UT) through the kidney and together with the afflux of Ca and Ox the state of urinary saturation with respect to CaOx being the most frequent stone mineral. High supersaturation inducing crystallization during UT and a high urinary ion concentration interfering with the inhibition of crystal AGN by urinary macromolecules seem to be critical parameters for stone formation. Using data from the literature the influence of diuresis on these parameters is evaluated for short-term recurrent stone formers (RSF), idiopathic stone patients, and healthy controls, the latter two collectives with and without excessive oxalate ingestion. This investigation suggests that a diuresis of 2 L/day may protect from stone formation even after dietary Ox excesses and in RSF. However, in RSF with a continuously high Ca and Ox afflux into urine a permanent high diuresis is required which is difficult to sustain over 24 hours.
      PubDate: Thu, 21 Mar 2019 07:05:16 +000
       
  • Liver Flukes Egg Infection and Associated Risk Factors in White Fulani
           Cattle Slaughtered in Wukari, Southern Taraba State, Nigeria

    • Abstract: Fasciola, Fascioloides, and Dicrocoelium cause liver fluke diseases in ruminants and are of zoonotic and economic importance. This cross-sectional study aimed to determine the prevalence of liver fluke egg infection in White Fulani Cattle slaughtered in Wukari Cattle market abattoir in Wukari, Taraba State. A total of 262 gallbladders were collected and their contents were analyzed for the presence of eggs of liver flukes using sedimentation technique. Descriptive analysis was done using SPSS version 20 for window and Pearson’s Chi-Square (χ2) was used to evaluate the association between variables. Fasciola and Dicrocoelium eggs were encountered. Only 74 (28.2%) samples were positive for Fasciola egg and 211 (80.5%) for Dicrocoelium. The prevalence of liver fluke infection revealed 25% and 28.6% Fasciola eggs for male and female animals, respectively, while lancet fluke had 83.3% for male and 80.3% for female. Fasciola eggs were recovered in 20.8% of animals aged less 3 years (
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Mar 2019 10:05:23 +000
       
  • Seroprevalence of Hepatitis B Virus and Associated Factors among Health
           Professionals in University of Gondar Hospital, Northwest Ethiopia

    • Abstract: Introduction. Hepatitis B virus infection is one of the commonest occupational risks in healthcare workers. However; there is limited evidence regarding the prevalence of hepatitis in health professionals in Ethiopia. Objective. This study was aimed at assessing the prevalence of hepatitis B and associated factors in health professionals. Methods. Institution based cross-sectional study was conducted among health professionals at University of Gondar Hospital from January to February, 2015. Self-administered questionnaire was used to collect sociodemographic variables and blood sample was also taken to determine hepatitis B virus sero-status. Chi square test with 95% confidence interval (CI) was computed to assess the associations of different factors with hepatitis B infection. Result. A total of 332 health professionals (with a response rate of 92.2%) participated in the study. Most (98.5%) of health professionals were not vaccinated for hepatitis B. The prevalence of hepatitis B in health professionals at UOG hospital was found to be 4.52% (95% CI: 2.4, 6.5). Hepatitis B infection was more common among males (P value =0.0299).  Conclusion. The prevalence of hepatitis B in health professionals in this study was comparable with other studies done in Ethiopia among health professionals. Males were more affected than females for hepatitis B infection. Hepatitis B virus vaccine, treatment for the infected, and training on infection prevention should be more available for healthcare workers.
      PubDate: Sun, 03 Mar 2019 13:05:16 +000
       
  • Association of Endothelial Function with Parental Hypertension in
           Normotensive-Obese African-American Women: A Pilot Study

    • Abstract: Obese African-American (AA) women are at high risk of hypertension (HT) and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Flow-mediated dilation (FMD) and arterial augmentation index (AI) are measures of endothelial function and arterial stiffness. Whether endothelial function and arterial stiffness predict risk of HT or CVD in obese African-American women with, versus without, parental histories of HT and whether aerobic exercise is an effective countermeasure remain unclear. The capacity for FMD is partly heritable. Therefore, we tested the hypotheses that less FMD and greater AI may be found in normotensive-obese, young-adult (18-26 year-old) AA women with hypertensive parents (n=10) than in a matched control group with normotensive parents (n=10) and that a single bout of aerobic exercise improves both endothelial function and arterial stiffness, with less improvement in the women with hypertensive parents. We studied each subject while at rest, 20 min before and 20 min after, 30 min of aerobic exercise. The exercise-induced changes and parental hypertension-related differences in AI were not significant. The exercise increased FMD in both of the groups with no significant difference in magnitude between the women with hypertensive and normotensive parents. FMD was significantly less in the women with hypertensive parents than in the women with normotensive parents after, but not before, the exercise (mean ±95% confidence interval of 11.3 ± 4.9% vs. 15.6 ± 4.9%, P=0.05). These findings suggest that a 30-min bout of aerobic exercise may improve FMD and unmask endothelial dysfunction in normotensive-obese, young-adult AA women with parental histories of HT. Future studies should determine whether regular aerobic exercise protects obese AA women from the endothelial dysfunction associated with diabetes and prevents CVD in this high-risk population.
      PubDate: Sun, 03 Feb 2019 00:10:02 +000
       
  • Effect of Participation with Accompanying Household Member in the Complete
           Health Improvement Program in Appalachia

    • Abstract: Intensive therapeutic lifestyle modification programs, such as the Complete Health Improvement Program (CHIP), reduce cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors. However, there are little data on how participation in CHIP with a household member can affect CVD biomarkers. This study focuses on the benefit of joint participation of household members in CHIP in order to have a better outcome in improving CVD risk factors compared with lone or individual participation. Data from 20 CHIP classes offered from 2011 to 2015 in Athens, Ohio, where each class was conducted over 2-4 months, consisting of 16-18 sessions, were collected. Body mass index (BMI), blood pressure, fasting glucose, and lipid profiles were measured before and near the completion of each class. A statistically significant greater reduction in BMI (p = 0.003) in those who attended with a household member compared to those who attended as individuals was found. CHIP has some effect on various CVD risk factors for those who attend intensive therapeutic lifestyle modification programs with an accompanying household member. Hence, encouragement of participation with a family member or a “buddy” may be prudent, especially if weight reduction is a key program participation goal. Further evaluation of the “buddy effect” involving both of those residing in the same household and those who do not but nevertheless provide mutual support is warranted.
      PubDate: Tue, 29 Jan 2019 07:05:27 +000
       
  • Telemedicine and Cardiology in the Elderly in France: Inventory of
           Experiments

    • Abstract: Telemedicine is now in vogue, allowing through computer and communication tools to be deployed in the field of health, such as cardiology, area in which it has shown interest, in international studies. As the population ages, older people are increasingly concerned with this innovative practice. We take a look at telemedicine projects in France concerning the elderly, in the field of cardiology.
      PubDate: Mon, 21 Jan 2019 14:15:05 +000
       
  • Nasal Carriage Rate, Antimicrobial Susceptibility Pattern, and Associated
           Factors of Staphylococcus aureus with Special Emphasis on MRSA among Urban
           and Rural Elementary School Children in Gondar, Northwest Ethiopia: A
           Comparative Cross-Sectional Study

    • Abstract: Introduction. Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive, catalase-positive, and coagulase-positive bacterial species commonly found on the skin and in the nose of most healthy individuals. The anterior nares of nose are the most frequent carriage sites for S. aureus in both adults and children. Methicillin resistance among S. aureus isolates has steadily increased worldwide. Objective. The main objective of this study was to determine nasal carriage rate, antimicrobial susceptibility pattern, and associated risk factors of Staphylococcus aureus with special emphasis on MRSA among urban and rural elementary school children in Gondar, Northwest Ethiopia. Method. A community based comparative cross-sectional study was conducted on 622 urban and rural elementary school children in Gondar from January to March , 2018. Data was collected using a questionnaire and nasal swab samples were collected by sterile cotton tip swab moistened with sterile normal saline. Collected samples were inoculated on mannitol salt agar and incubated aerobically at 37°C for 24 hrs. S. aureus was confirmed by observing colony characteristics and biochemical tests. MRSA was detected using cefoxitin disc by Modified Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion technique. Finally data was entered, cleared, and checked using Epi-info version 7 and exported to SPSS version 20 for analysis. Odds ratio and logistic regression were used for statistical association. P-value ≤ 0.05 at 95% CI was considered for statistical association. Result. Of the 622 school children, the overall prevalence of S. aureus was 143/622 (23%). Of them, 14/143 (9.79%) were MRSA. The carriage rate in urban schools was 83/622 (13.3%) whereas it was 60/622 (9.6%) in rural schools. The prevalence of MRSA among urban schools, 9.1%, was higher than their urban counterparts, 0.7%. Gentamycin, clindamycin, and ciprofloxacin were the most effective whereas penicillin and tetracycline were resistant. Children’s fathers’ educational status and number of children in class room were significantly associated with S. aureus but only living in urban of children significantly associated with MRSA. Conclusion. This study showed high prevalence of S. aureus and MRSA, 143/622 (23%) and 14/143 (9.79%), respectively. So, decolonization of nasal carriers of MRSA and reducing the number of students per classroom should be addressed. Moreover, regular large scale survey should be conducted to assess the burden and intervene accordingly.
      PubDate: Tue, 11 Dec 2018 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Knowledge and Practices of Hand Washing among Health Professionals in
           Dubti Referral Hospital, Dubti, Afar, Northeast Ethiopia

    • Abstract: Introduction. Nosocomial infections due to poor hand hygiene are a major cause of increasing morbidity, mortality, and health care costs among hospitalized patients worldwide. Hand hygiene is mandatory to prevent the transmission of health care associated infections especially where infectious diseases are common like Sub-Saharan Africa. Hand washing compliance among health professionals in general is unacceptably low especially in developing countries like Ethiopia. Method. Institution-based cross-sectional study design was used to assess the knowledge and practice of hand washing among health professionals working in Dubti Referral Hospital. Structured self-administered pretested questionnaires were used. The data obtained were analyzed using SPSS version 23. Result. Out of 91 respondents, majority, 60 (65.9%), of them were knowledgeable and 31 (34.1%) were not knowledgeable. However, the majority of health professionals, 51 (56.0%), had poor practice and 40 (43.0%) of them had good practice of hand washing. Conclusion. Majority of health professionals were knowledgeable. However, they had poor practice of hand washing.
      PubDate: Thu, 22 Nov 2018 09:41:31 +000
       
  • Personal Oral Infection Control, Low Birthweight, and Preterm Births in
           Appalachia West Virginia: A Cross-Sectional Study

    • Abstract: Introduction. Appalachia West Virginia has a higher prevalence of preterm and low birthweight babies than the US national prevalence. Many factors have been studied which are known to influence preterm births and low birthweight babies. There are limited interventions that are available to decrease the likelihood of preterm and low birthweight babies; however oral health and personal oral infection control may be helpful. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the association of limited personal oral infection control among pregnant West Virginia Appalachian women and poor birth outcomes (preterm and low birthweight babies). Methods. A secondary data analysis of data from the West Virginia Healthy Start Helping Appalachian Parents and Infants (HAPI) Project from 2005 to 2016 was conducted. The researchers determined the odds ratio of personal oral infection control with a powered toothbrush (use of the brush fewer than 13 times per week versus use of the brush 13 or more times per week) on poor birth outcomes. Results. There were 845 women who completed the oral health program within the HAPI project. In unadjusted logistic regression, women who used the powered toothbrush and brushed less frequently had greater odds of poor birth outcomes than women who brushed more frequently (odds ratio of 2.07 [1.18, 3.62] P = 0.011 for low birthweight babies; and an odds ratio of 1.78 [1.04, 3.02] P = 0.034 for preterm birth). The results remained positive but were no longer significant in adjusted analysis. Conclusion. There is a need to identify interventions that will benefit pregnant women so that their pregnancies result in healthy pregnancy outcomes.
      PubDate: Tue, 07 Aug 2018 07:34:01 +000
       
  • Effect of Lycosome-Formulated Phosphatidylcholine on Parameters of
           Biological Oxidation after Single Intake of Moderate Amount of Alcohol

    • Abstract: Ingestion of a single dose of alcohol, ranging from the intake of a moderate amount alcohol to binge drinking, is the most frequent form of alcohol consumption with poorly understood medical consequences and obscure prophylactics. The study was aimed to determine whether lycosome formulated phosphatidylcholine (PC-Lyc) containing two highly bioavailable antioxidants (PC and lycopene) ingested shortly before the alcohol-containing beverage may alleviate the biochemical markers of liver damage and parameters of biological oxidation associated with the intake of a moderate amount of alcohol. Healthy middle-aged volunteers were requested to consume a moderate amount of alcohol – 0.5 ml/kg or 1.0 ml/kg shortly after ingestion of a capsule containing 450 mg of regular phosphatidylcholine (PC, n=10), PC-Lyc (n=10), or placebo pill (PP, n=10). Serum levels of ethanol (EtOH), acetaldehyde (AA), liver-specific enzymes, total antioxidant capacity of serum (TAC), oxidized LDL (LDL-Px), and malonic dialdehyde (MDA) were measured at 1, 2.5, and 5 hours after dosing with alcohol. Ingestion of PC regardless of the formulation used had no effect on serum EtOH concentration dynamics. However, volunteers supplemented with PC-Lyc showed a better clearance of AA in serum as compared to other groups. There was a reduction in serum TAC values by 18.5% and 16.1% in both placebo groups ingesting 0.5 and 1.0 ml/kg of alcohol, respectively, at the end of observational period. This decline was preventable by supplementation of volunteers with PC and especially with PC-Lyc. Moreover, PC-Lyc promoted a reduction of serum MDA and reversed an increase in serum LDL-Px. In addition, ingestion of alcohol at 1.0 ml/kg dose caused a transient increase in serum alanine-aminotransferase activity which was abolished by both formulations of PC. Therefore, combinatory lycosomal formulation of PC and lycopene may prevent some metabolic abnormalities associated with single intake of moderate amount of alcohol. This trial is registered with ACTRN12617001335381.
      PubDate: Mon, 30 Jul 2018 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Beyond Statins: Emerging Evidence for HDL-Increasing Therapies and Diet in
           Treating Cardiovascular Disease

    • Abstract: Coronary heart disease continues to be the leading cause of death in the United States. Current attempts to treat atherosclerosis and coronary artery disease often involve pharmaceutical and surgical treatments. While these treatments are successful in managing the pain from coronary heart disease, they do little to prevent or stop it. There are a number of clinical strategies that are currently being researched to treat atherosclerosis through HDL-increasing therapies. These clinical studies have shown positive effects through nutritional intervention, exercise, stress reduction, and tobacco and alcohol cessation. These treatment options are explored in greater detail, including their potential to halt and even reverse atherosclerosis. The results from these recent studies and how they relate to the mechanism of reverse cholesterol transport are also critically examined. Reverse cholesterol transport is a multistep process resulting in the net movement of cholesterol from peripheral tissues back to the liver via the plasma. The mechanism of reverse cholesterol transport is also further explored in this review.
      PubDate: Mon, 09 Jul 2018 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Feasibility of Ideal Cardiovascular Health Evaluation in a Pediatric
           Clinic Setting

    • Abstract: The feasibility of “point-of-care” screening for ideal cardiovascular health was explored in a pediatric specialty clinic setting. Children and adolescents aged 9–18 years (n=91) with treated and stabilized diseases were recruited at a pediatric endocrinology clinic. A table-top device was used to assay fingerstick samples for non-HDL cholesterol (non-HDL-C), which was used to divide participants into two groups based on the non-HDL-C threshold for comparison of the remaining metrics between groups. A significant number of children had low scores, and score frequency distribution was similar to larger retrospective studies, with few participants achieving none or all of the health metrics. Healthy diet was the metric least often achieved. Those with a non-HDL-C above the ideal threshold of 3.1 mmol/L (120 mg/dl) had a higher BMI percentile (p
      PubDate: Tue, 12 Jun 2018 08:10:44 +000
       
 
 
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