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Publisher: Hindawi   (Total: 334 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 334 Journals sorted alphabetically
Abstract and Applied Analysis     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.512, h-index: 32)
Active and Passive Electronic Components     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.157, h-index: 15)
Advances in Acoustics and Vibration     Open Access   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.259, h-index: 6)
Advances in Agriculture     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Artificial Intelligence     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Advances in Artificial Neural Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Astronomy     Open Access   (Followers: 34, SJR: 0.351, h-index: 17)
Advances in Bioinformatics     Open Access   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.421, h-index: 8)
Advances in Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Chemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Civil Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 33, SJR: 0.338, h-index: 8)
Advances in Condensed Matter Physics     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.248, h-index: 10)
Advances in Decision Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.231, h-index: 6)
Advances in Ecology     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Advances in Electrical Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Advances in Endocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Fuzzy Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.258, h-index: 7)
Advances in Hematology     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.892, h-index: 18)
Advances in High Energy Physics     Open Access   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.892, h-index: 19)
Advances in Human-Computer Interaction     Open Access   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.439, h-index: 9)
Advances in Materials Science and Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 30, SJR: 0.263, h-index: 11)
Advances in Mathematical Physics     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.332, h-index: 10)
Advances in Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.498, h-index: 10)
Advances in Multimedia     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.191, h-index: 10)
Advances in Neuroscience     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Nonlinear Optics     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Numerical Analysis     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
Advances in Operations Research     Open Access   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.343, h-index: 7)
Advances in Optical Technologies     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.283, h-index: 16)
Advances in OptoElectronics     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.973, h-index: 16)
Advances in Orthopedic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Orthopedics     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Pharmacological Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.695, h-index: 13)
Advances in Physical Chemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.297, h-index: 7)
Advances in Power Electronics     Open Access   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.26, h-index: 6)
Advances in Preventive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Advances in Software Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Advances in Tribology     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.267, h-index: 6)
Advances in Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.629, h-index: 16)
Advances in Virology     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 1.04, h-index: 12)
AIDS Research and Treatment     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.125, h-index: 14)
Analytical Cellular Pathology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.334, h-index: 12)
Anatomy Research Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Anemia     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.991, h-index: 11)
Anesthesiology Research and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.513, h-index: 12)
Applied and Environmental Soil Science     Open Access   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.53, h-index: 9)
Applied Bionics and Biomechanics     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.23, h-index: 13)
Applied Computational Intelligence and Soft Computing     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Archaea     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.248, h-index: 27)
Arthritis     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Autism Research and Treatment     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Autoimmune Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.909, h-index: 17)
Behavioural Neurology     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.696, h-index: 34)
Biochemistry Research Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.085, h-index: 17)
Bioinorganic Chemistry and Applications     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.286, h-index: 19)
BioMed Research Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.725, h-index: 59)
Biotechnology Research Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Bone Marrow Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Canadian J. of Gastroenterology & Hepatology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.856, h-index: 53)
Canadian J. of Infectious Diseases and Medical Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.409, h-index: 25)
Canadian Respiratory J.     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.503, h-index: 42)
Cardiology Research and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.941, h-index: 17)
Cardiovascular Psychiatry and Neurology     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.091, h-index: 14)
Case Reports in Anesthesiology     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Case Reports in Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Case Reports in Critical Care     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Case Reports in Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Case Reports in Dermatological Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Case Reports in Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Case Reports in Endocrinology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.326, h-index: 1)
Case Reports in Gastrointestinal Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Case Reports in Genetics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Case Reports in Hematology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Case Reports in Hepatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Case Reports in Immunology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Case Reports in Infectious Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Case Reports in Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Case Reports in Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Case Reports in Neurological Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Case Reports in Obstetrics and Gynecology     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Case Reports in Oncological Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Case Reports in Ophthalmological Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Case Reports in Orthopedics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Case Reports in Otolaryngology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Case Reports in Pathology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Case Reports in Pediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Case Reports in Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Case Reports in Pulmonology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Case Reports in Radiology     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Case Reports in Rheumatology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Case Reports in Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Case Reports in Transplantation     Open Access  
Case Reports in Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Case Reports in Vascular Medicine     Open Access  
Case Reports in Veterinary Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Chemotherapy Research and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Child Development Research     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Chinese J. of Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Chinese J. of Mathematics     Open Access  
Cholesterol     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.906, h-index: 12)
Chromatography Research Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Computational and Mathematical Methods in Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.415, h-index: 22)
Computational Intelligence and Neuroscience     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.232, h-index: 30)
Critical Care Research and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.916, h-index: 14)
Current Gerontology and Geriatrics Research     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.8, h-index: 12)
Dataset Papers in Science     Open Access  
Depression Research and Treatment     Open Access   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.77, h-index: 11)
Dermatology Research and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.576, h-index: 15)
Diagnostic and Therapeutic Endoscopy     Open Access   (SJR: 0.651, h-index: 18)
Discrete Dynamics in Nature and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.323, h-index: 24)
Disease Markers     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.774, h-index: 49)
Economics Research Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Education Research Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Emergency Medicine Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Enzyme Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.457, h-index: 18)
Epidemiology Research Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Epilepsy Research and Treatment     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.615, h-index: 50)
Experimental Diabetes Research     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.591, h-index: 30)
Gastroenterology Research and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.664, h-index: 21)
Genetics Research Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Hepatitis Research and Treatment     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
HPB Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.798, h-index: 22)
Indian J. of Materials Science     Open Access  
Infectious Diseases in Obstetrics and Gynecology     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.976, h-index: 34)
Influenza Research and Treatment     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Infectious Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.763, h-index: 15)
Intl. J. of Aerospace Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 65, SJR: 0.241, h-index: 6)
Intl. J. of Agronomy     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.223, h-index: 2)
Intl. J. of Alzheimer's Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.193, h-index: 25)
Intl. J. of Analysis     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Analytical Chemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.157, h-index: 2)
Intl. J. of Antennas and Propagation     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.385, h-index: 15)
Intl. J. of Atmospheric Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 23)
Intl. J. of Bacteriology     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Biodiversity     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Biomaterials     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.485, h-index: 10)
Intl. J. of Biomedical Imaging     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.581, h-index: 23)
Intl. J. of Breast Cancer     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Intl. J. of Carbohydrate Chemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Intl. J. of Cell Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 2.658, h-index: 25)
Intl. J. of Chemical Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.361, h-index: 10)
Intl. J. of Chronic Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Combinatorics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Computer Games Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.213, h-index: 12)
Intl. J. of Corrosion     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.19, h-index: 7)
Intl. J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.558, h-index: 11)
Intl. J. of Differential Equations     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.363, h-index: 11)
Intl. J. of Digital Multimedia Broadcasting     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.144, h-index: 10)
Intl. J. of Ecology     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.8, h-index: 11)
Intl. J. of Electrochemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Intl. J. of Endocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.961, h-index: 24)
Intl. J. of Engineering Mathematics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Evolutionary Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Intl. J. of Family Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Food Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Forestry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Genomics     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.721, h-index: 7)
Intl. J. of Geophysics     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.416, h-index: 8)
Intl. J. of Hepatology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Hypertension     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.823, h-index: 20)
Intl. J. of Inflammation     Open Access   (SJR: 0.876, h-index: 14)
Intl. J. of Inorganic Chemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Manufacturing Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Mathematics and Mathematical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.346, h-index: 27)
Intl. J. of Medicinal Chemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Intl. J. of Metals     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.006, h-index: 18)
Intl. J. of Microwave Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.167, h-index: 5)
Intl. J. of Molecular Imaging     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Navigation and Observation     Open Access   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.411, h-index: 7)
Intl. J. of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.926, h-index: 14)
Intl. J. of Oceanography     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Intl. J. of Optics     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.262, h-index: 7)
Intl. J. of Otolaryngology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Pediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Peptides     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.73, h-index: 16)
Intl. J. of Photoenergy     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.348, h-index: 28)
Intl. J. of Plant Genomics     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.578, h-index: 20)
Intl. J. of Polymer Science     Open Access   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.265, h-index: 11)
Intl. J. of Population Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Proteomics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Quality, Statistics, and Reliability     Open Access   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.345, h-index: 4)
Intl. J. of Reconfigurable Computing     Open Access   (SJR: 0.182, h-index: 8)
Intl. J. of Reproductive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Intl. J. of Rheumatology     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.015, h-index: 18)
Intl. J. of Rotating Machinery     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.402, h-index: 19)
Intl. J. of Spectroscopy     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Intl. J. of Stochastic Analysis     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.234, h-index: 19)
Intl. J. of Surgical Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.753, h-index: 11)
Intl. J. of Telemedicine and Applications     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.757, h-index: 14)
Intl. J. of Vascular Medicine     Open Access   (SJR: 0.865, h-index: 16)
Intl. J. of Vehicular Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.169, h-index: 6)
Intl. J. of Zoology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.389, h-index: 8)
Intl. Scholarly Research Notices     Open Access   (Followers: 199)
ISRN Astronomy and Astrophysics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
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Journal Cover International Journal of Nephrology
  [SJR: 0.926]   [H-I: 14]   [2 followers]  Follow
    
  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
   ISSN (Online) 2090-2158
   Published by Hindawi Homepage  [334 journals]
  • Expression of uPAR in Urinary Podocytes of Patients with Fabry Disease

    • Abstract: Background. Despite enzyme replacement therapy, Fabry nephropathy still progresses. Podocyturia is an irreversible event that antedates proteinuria and leads to chronic renal failure. We evaluated a potential mechanism of podocyte detachment via the expression of the urokinase-type Plasminogen Activator Receptor (uPAR) in urinary podocytes of Fabry patients. Methods. This is a cross-sectional study that included controls () and Fabry patients () either untreated () or treated with agalsidase-β (). Variables. Variables are estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), urinary protein : creatinine ratio, and urinary uPAR+ podocyte : creatinine ratio. uPAR mRNA expression in response to lyso-Gb3, a bioactive glycolipid accumulated in Fabry disease, was studied in cultured human podocytes. Results. Controls and Fabry patients had similar age, gender, and renal function. Urinary uPAR+ podocytes were higher in patients than in controls. Untreated patients were significantly younger; had more females, and presented lower urinary protein : creatinine ratios and significantly higher urinary uPAR+ podocytes than treated subjects. In treated patients, urinary uPAR+ podocytes correlated with urinary protein : creatinine ratio (; ). Lyso-Gb3 at concentrations found in the circulation of Fabry patients increased uPAR expression in cultured podocytes. Conclusions. Urinary podocytes expressing uPAR are increased in Fabry patients, especially in untreated patients. The potential contribution of uPAR expression to podocyte detachment merits further studies.
      PubDate: Mon, 24 Apr 2017 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Febuxostat Attenuates Renal Damage besides Exerting Hypouricemic Effect in
           Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats

    • Abstract: Aim. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effects of febuxostat, a novel inhibitor of xanthine oxidase (XO), on renal damage in streptozotocin- (STZ-) induced diabetic rats. Methods. Diabetes was induced by the intraperitoneal injection of STZ in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Sham-injected rats served as controls. The control and diabetic rats were treated with and without febuxostat for 8 weeks, respectively. Fasting blood and 24-h urine samples were collected every 4 weeks. Rat livers were extracted for detecting gene expression, content, and bioactivity of XO. Results. Diabetic rats showed significantly increased serum uric acid (SUA), serum creatinine (SCr), and urea nitrogen (BUN) levels. Daily urinary albumin (UAE), uric acid (UUA), and creatinine (UCr) excretion were also significantly increased in these rats. In diabetic rats, at week 8, febuxostat decreased SUA by 18.9%, while UAA was increased by 52.0%. However, UCr and urinary urea nitrogen (UUN) levels remained unchanged, while SCr and BUN levels decreased by >30% in these rats. Although hepatic gene expression, content, and activity of XO increased significantly in diabetic rats, febuxostat only slightly decreased its content. Conclusions. Febuxostat significantly attenuated renal damage in STZ-induced diabetic rats in addition to exerting hypouricemic effect.
      PubDate: Wed, 19 Apr 2017 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Incidence and Risk Factors for Early Acute Kidney Injury in Nonsurgical
           Patients: A Cohort Study

    • Abstract: Introduction. Detecting acute kidney injury (AKI) in the first days of hospitalization could prevent potentially fatal complications. However, epidemiological data are scarce, especially on nonsurgical patients. Objectives. To determine the incidence and risk factors associated with AKI within five days of hospitalization (EAKI). Methods. Prospective cohort of patients hospitalized in the Internal Medicine Department. Results. A total of 16% of 400 patients developed EAKI. The associated risk factors were prehospital treatment with nephrotoxic drugs (2.21 OR; 95% CI 1.12–4.36, ), chronic kidney disease (CKD) in stages 3 to 5 (3.56 OR; 95% CI 1.55–8.18, ), and venous thromboembolism (VTE) at admission (5.05 OR; 95% CI 1.59–16.0, ). The median length of hospital stay was higher among patients who developed EAKI (8 [IQR 5–14] versus 6 [IQR 4–10], ) and was associated with an increased requirement for dialysis (4.87 OR 95% CI 2.54 to 8.97, ) and in-hospital death (3.45 OR; 95% CI 2.18 to 5.48, ). Conclusions. The incidence of EAKI in nonsurgical patients is similar to the worldwide incidence of AKI. The risk factors included CKD from stage 3 onwards, prehospital treatment with nephrotoxic drugs, and VTE at admission. EAKI is associated with prolonged hospital stay, increased mortality rate, and dialysis requirement.
      PubDate: Tue, 11 Apr 2017 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Renal Function and Death in Older Women: Which eGFR Formula Should We
           Use'

    • Abstract: Background. The Berlin Initiative Study (BIS) eGFR equations were developed specifically for aged populations, but their predictive validity compared to standard formulae is unknown in older women. Methods. In a prospective study of 1289 community-dwelling older women (mean age 79.5 years), we compared the performance of the BIS1 SCr-based equation to the CKD- and the BIS2 SCr- and Scysc-based equation to the CKD- to predict cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. Results. Prevalence of specific eGFR category (i.e., ≥75, 60–74, 45–59, and
      PubDate: Wed, 29 Mar 2017 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Factors Predicting Renal Function Outcome after Augmentation Cystoplasty

    • Abstract: We determined the cause of renal deterioration after augmentation cystoplasty (AC). Twenty-nine adult patients with refractory bladder dysfunction and who underwent ileocystoplasty from 2004 to 2015 were studied. Patients with a decline in glomerular filtration rate (GFR) after augmentation were reviewed. The primary outcome was to determine the factors that might lead to deterioration of estimated GFR. Median follow-up was years. Significant bladder capacity, end filling pressure, and bladder compliance were achieved from median to  ml (), to  cm H2O (), and to (), respectively. Renal function remained stable and improved in 22 () patients from median eGFR to  ml/min/1.73 m2 (). Significant deterioration was found in 7 () patients from median eGFR to (). The causes of renal deterioration were noncompliance to self-catheterization (2 patients), posterior urethral valve/dysplastic kidneys (2 patients), and reflux/infection (2 patients). On multivariate analysis, recurrent pyelonephritis (OR 3.87, ) and noncompliance (OR 30.78, ) were significant. We concluded that AC is not the cause of progression to end-stage renal disease in patients with renal insufficiency.
      PubDate: Mon, 06 Mar 2017 09:20:01 +000
       
  • Forecasting the Incidence and Prevalence of Patients with End-Stage Renal
           Disease in Malaysia up to the Year 2040

    • Abstract: Background. The incidence of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) requiring dialysis has been growing rapidly in Malaysia from 18 per million population (pmp) in 1993 to 231 pmp in 2013. Objective. To forecast the incidence and prevalence of ESRD patients who will require dialysis treatment in Malaysia until 2040. Methodology. Univariate forecasting models using the number of new and current dialysis patients, by the Malaysian Dialysis and Transplant Registry from 1993 to 2013 were used. Four forecasting models were evaluated, and the model with the smallest error was selected for the prediction. Result. ARIMA (0, 2, 1) modeling with the lowest error was selected to predict both the incidence (RMSE = 135.50, MAPE = 2.85, and MAE = 87.71) and the prevalence (RMSE = 158.79, MAPE = 1.29, and MAE = 117.21) of dialysis patients. The estimated incidences of new dialysis patients in 2020 and 2040 are 10,208 and 19,418 cases, respectively, while the estimated prevalence is 51,269 and 106,249 cases. Conclusion. The growth of ESRD patients on dialysis in Malaysia can be expected to continue at an alarming rate. Effective steps to address and curb further increase in new patients requiring dialysis are urgently needed, in order to mitigate the expected financial and health catastrophes associated with the projected increase of such patients.
      PubDate: Tue, 28 Feb 2017 07:12:21 +000
       
  • Childhood Nephrotic Syndrome Management and Outcome: A Single Center
           Retrospective Analysis

    • Abstract: There is a paucity of information on outpatient management and risk factors for hospitalization and complications in childhood nephrotic syndrome (NS). We described the management, patient adherence, and inpatient and outpatient usage of 87 pediatric NS patients diagnosed between 2006 and 2012 in the Atlanta Metropolitan Statistical Area. Multivariable analyses were performed to examine the associations between patient characteristics and disease outcome. We found that 51% of the patients were treated with two or more immunosuppressants. Approximately half of the patients were noted to be nonadherent to medications and urine protein monitoring. The majority (71%) of patients were hospitalized at least once, with a median rate of 0.5 hospitalizations per patient year. Mean hospital length of stay was 4.0 (3.8) days. Fourteen percent of patients experienced at least one serious disease complication. Black race, frequently relapsing/steroid-dependent and steroid-resistant disease, and the first year following diagnosis were associated with higher hospitalization rates. The presence of comorbidities was associated with longer hospital length of stay and increased risk of serious disease complications. Our results highlight the high morbidity and burden of NS and point to particular patient subgroups that may be at increased risk for poor outcome.
      PubDate: Thu, 23 Feb 2017 07:13:15 +000
       
  • Focused Real-Time Ultrasonography for Nephrologists

    • Abstract: We propose that renal consults are enhanced by incorporating a nephrology-focused ultrasound protocol including ultrasound evaluation of cardiac contractility, the presence or absence of pericardial effusion, inferior vena cava size and collapsibility to guide volume management, bladder volume to assess for obstruction or retention, and kidney size and structure to potentially gauge chronicity of renal disease or identify other structural abnormalities. The benefits of immediate and ongoing assessment of cardiac function and intravascular volume status (prerenal), possible urinary obstruction or retention (postrenal), and potential etiologies of acute kidney injury or chronic kidney disease far outweigh the limitations of bedside ultrasonography performed by nephrologists. The alternative is reliance on formal ultrasonography, which creates a disconnect between those who order, perform, and interpret studies, creates delays between when clinical questions are asked and answered, and may increase expense. Ultrasound-enhanced physical examination provides immediate information about our patients, which frequently alters our assessments and management plans.
      PubDate: Thu, 02 Feb 2017 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Apolipoprotein C-I Levels Are Associated with the Urinary Protein/Urinary
           Creatinine Ratio in Pediatric Idiopathic Steroid-Sensitive Nephrotic
           Syndrome: A Case Control Study

    • Abstract: Humoral factors may cause idiopathic steroid-sensitive nephrotic syndrome (ISSNS). In the present study, we analyzed serum proteins using mass spectrometry (MS) to identify proteins associated with the pathophysiology of pediatric ISSNS. We collected serial serum samples from 33 children during each ISSNS phase; Phase A1 is the acute phase prior to steroid treatment (STx), Phase A2 represents the remission period with STx, and Phase A3 represents the remission period after completion of STx. Children with normal urinalyses (Group B) and children with a nephrotic syndrome other than ISSNS (Group C) served as controls. No significant differences in urinary protein/urinary creatinine (UP/UCr) ratios were observed between the children with phase A1 ISSNS and Group C. We used surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization time of flight MS for sample analysis. Four ion peaks with a mass-to-charge ratio (m/z) of 6,444, 6,626, 8,695, and 8,915 were significantly elevated during ISSNS Phase A1 compared to Phase A2, Phase A3, and Group C. The intensity of an m/z of 6,626 significantly correlated with the UP/UCr ratio and an m/z of 6,626 was identified as apolipoprotein C-I (Apo C-I). Apo C-I levels correlate with the UP/UCr ratio in pediatric ISSNS. Our findings provide new insights into the pathophysiology of ISSNS.
      PubDate: Mon, 30 Jan 2017 11:01:49 +000
       
  • Clinical Utility of Urinary β2-Microglobulin in Detection of Early
           Nephropathy in African Diabetes Mellitus Patients

    • Abstract: Background. Studies have indicated that diabetic tubulopathy may occur earlier than glomerulopathy, therefore providing a potential avenue for earlier diagnosis of diabetic nephropathy. Urinary beta-2-microglobulin (β2m) was investigated in this study as a potential biomarker in the detection of early nephropathy in type 2 diabetics. Methods. One hundred and two diabetic subjects and 103 controls that met the inclusion criteria had data (sociodemographic, medical history, physical examination, and laboratory) collected. Urinary β2m levels and urinary albumin concentration (UAC) were determined. Results. Elevated urinary β2m was more frequent among the diabetics (52%, 95% CI: 42.1–61.8%) than among the controls (32%, 95% CI: 22.9–41.2%). The frequency of microalbuminuria was higher in the diabetics (35.3%, 95% CI: 25.9–44.7%) than in the controls (15.5%, 95% CI: 8.4–22.6%). There was a positive correlation between urinary β2m and UAC (rho = 0.38, ). Multivariate analysis showed BMI (OR: 1.23, 95% CI: 1.05–1.45), eGFR (OR: 0.97, 95% CI: 0.94–0.99), and presence of microalbuminuria (OR: 3.94, 95% CI: 1.32–11.77) as independent predictors of elevated urinary beta-2-microglobulin among the diabetics. Conclusion. Urinary β2m may be useful, either as a single test or as a component of a panel of tests, in the early detection of diabetic nephropathy.
      PubDate: Mon, 30 Jan 2017 07:35:19 +000
       
  • Assessing the Association between Serum Ferritin, Transferrin Saturation,
           and C-Reactive Protein in Northern Territory Indigenous Australian
           Patients with High Serum Ferritin on Maintenance Haemodialysis

    • Abstract: Objective. To determine the significance of high serum ferritin observed in Indigenous Australian patients on maintenance haemodialysis in the Northern Territory, we assessed the relationship between ferritin and transferrin saturation (TSAT) as measures of iron status and ferritin and C-reactive protein (CRP) as markers of inflammation. Methods. We performed a retrospective cohort analysis of data from adult patients (≥18 years) on maintenance haemodialysis (>3 months) from 2004 to 2011. Results. There were 1568 patients. The mean age was 53.9 (11.9) years. 1244 (79.3%) were Indigenous. 44.2% () were male. Indigenous patients were younger (mean age [52.3 (11.1) versus 57.4 (15.2), ]) and had higher CRP [14.7 mg/l (7–35) versus 5.9 mg/l (1.9–17.5), ], higher median serum ferritin [1069 µg/l (668–1522) versus 794.9 µg/l (558.5–1252.0), ], but similar transferrin saturation [26% (19–37) versus 28% (20–38), ]. We observed a small positive correlation between ferritin and TSAT (, ), no correlation between ferritin and CRP ( = 0.001, ), and positive association between high serum ferritin and TSAT (), Indigenous ethnicity (), urea reduction ratio (), and gender () after adjustment in mixed regression analysis. Conclusion. Serum ferritin and TSAT may inadequately reflect iron status in this population. The high ferritin was poorly explained by inflammation.
      PubDate: Tue, 24 Jan 2017 00:00:00 +000
       
  • High Serum Alkaline Phosphatase, Hypercalcaemia, Race, and Mortality in
           South African Maintenance Haemodialysis Patients

    • Abstract: Objective. To determine the association between serum total alkaline phosphatase (TAP) and mortality in African maintenance haemodialysis patients (MHD). Patients and Methods. The study enrolled a total of 213 patients on MHD from two dialysis centers in Johannesburg between January 2009 and March 2016. Patients were categorized into a low TAP group (≤112 U/L) versus a high TAP group (>112 U/L) based on a median TAP of 112 U/L. Results. During the follow-up period of 7 years, there were 55 (25.8%) deaths. After adjusting for cofounders such as age, other markers of bone disorder, and comorbidity (diabetes mellitus), patients in the high TAP group had significantly higher risk of death compared to patients in the low TAP group (hazard ratio, 2.50; 95% CI 1.24–5.01, P = 0.01). Similarly, serum calcium >2.75 mmol/L was associated with increased risk of death compared to patients within levels of 2.10–2.37 mmol/L (HR 6.34, 95% CI 1.40–28.76; P = 0.02). The HR for death in white patients compared to black patients was 6.88; 95% CI 1.82–25.88; P = 0.004. Conclusion. High levels of serum alkaline phosphatase, hypercalcaemia, and white race are associated with increased risk of death in MHD patients.
      PubDate: Thu, 12 Jan 2017 09:24:31 +000
       
  • Serum Endocan Levels Associated with Hypertension and Loss of Renal
           Function in Pediatric Patients after Two Years from Renal Transplant

    • Abstract: Endocan is an important biomarker of inflammation and endothelial dysfunction that increases in association with several chronic diseases. Few published data have described the role of endocan in pediatric renal transplant (RT) patients. We evaluated the endocan concentrations in 62 children who underwent renal transplantation and assessed their relationships with the patients’ blood pressure and loss of renal function. The endocan levels were significantly elevated in the pediatric RT patients who had hypertension and a loss of renal function. We determined positive correlations between the endocan concentrations and the hemodynamic variables (systolic blood pressure: ; ; pulse pressure: ; ). The endocan levels were inversely correlated with the estimated glomerular filtration rate (; ). An endocan cutoff concentration of 7.0 ng/mL identified pediatric RT patients who had hypertension and a loss of renal function with 100% sensitivity and 75% specificity. In conclusion, the endocan concentrations were significantly elevated in pediatric RT patients who had both hypertension and a loss of renal function. The correlations between the endocan levels and the hemodynamic variables and the markers of renal function strengthen the hypothesis that it is an important marker of cardiorenal risk.
      PubDate: Mon, 19 Dec 2016 11:34:16 +000
       
  • The Role of Renal Replacement Therapy in the Management of Pharmacologic
           Poisonings

    • Abstract: Pharmacologic toxicities are common and range from mild to life-threatening. The aim of this study is to review and update the data on the role of renal replacement therapy (RRT) in the management of various pharmacologic poisonings. We aim to provide a focused review on the role of RRT in the management of pharmacological toxicities. Relevant publications were searched in MEDLINE with the following search terms alone or in combination: pharmacologic toxicity, hemodialysis, hemofiltration, renal replacement therapy, toxicology, poisonings, critical illness, and intensive care. The studies showed that a pharmacologic substance should meet several prerequisites to be deemed dialyzable. These variables include having a low molecular weight (
      PubDate: Wed, 30 Nov 2016 12:21:14 +000
       
  • Overview of Pregnancy in Renal Transplant Patients

    • Abstract: Kidney transplantation offers best hope to women with end-stage renal disease who wish to become pregnant. Pregnancy in a kidney transplant recipient continues to remain challenging due to side effects of immunosuppressive medication, risk of deterioration of allograft function, risk of adverse maternal complications of preeclampsia and hypertension, and risk of adverse fetal outcomes of premature birth, low birth weight, and small for gestational age infants. The factors associated with poor pregnancy outcomes include presence of hypertension, serum creatinine greater than 1.4 mg/dL, and proteinuria. The recommended maintenance immunosuppression in pregnant women is calcineurin inhibitors (tacrolimus/cyclosporine), azathioprine, and low dose prednisone; and it is considered safe. Sirolimus and mycophenolate mofetil should be stopped 6 weeks prior to conception. The optimal time to conception continues to remain an area of contention. It is important that counseling for childbearing should start as early as prior to getting a kidney transplant and should be done at every clinic visit after transplant. Breast-feeding is not contraindicated and should not be discouraged. This review will help the physicians in medical optimization and counseling of renal transplant recipients of childbearing age.
      PubDate: Wed, 30 Nov 2016 12:16:39 +000
       
  • Decreased Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D Level Causes Interventricular Septal
           Hypertrophy in Patients on Peritoneal Dialysis: Cardiovascular Aspects of
           Endogenous Vitamin D Deficiency

    • Abstract: Introduction. In the present study, we aimed to analyze the relation of vitamin D with echocardiographic indexes in patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD) receiving renal replacement therapy (RRT). Methods. A total of 98 patients, 64 patients on hemodialysis (HD) (29F/35M, mean age 56.75 ± 18.63 years) and 34 age matched patients on peritoneal dialysis (PD) (21F/13M, mean age 58.11 ± 10.63 years), with similar duration of ESRD and RRT were enrolled into this cross-sectional study. Echocardiographic examination was performed after dialysis session at normovolemic status. Fasting blood samples were obtained before dialysis session. Results. Patients on PD and female patients in both groups had significantly lower level of 25-OH-D3 level when compared to patients on HD or male patients (p: 0.0001 and p: 0.0001). When all participants were considered, there was no significant association between 25-OH-D3 and echocardiographic parameters; however, in patients on PD, a significant negative correlation was determined between 25-OH-D3 and diastolic blood pressure, interventricular septal hypertrophy (ISH), and left ventricular mass index (LVMI) (r: −0.424, p: 0.012; r: −0.508, p: 0.004; r: 0.489, p: 0.04, resp.). Conclusion. Low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels is associated with ISH and LVMI in PD patients.
      PubDate: Sun, 27 Nov 2016 09:12:57 +000
       
  • Automated Fluid Management for Treatment of Rhabdomyolysis

    • Abstract: Purpose. Fluid therapy aimed at increasing urine output is a commonly employed strategy to prevent acute kidney injury (AKI) in critically ill patients with rhabdomyolysis. Automated fluid management has the potential to optimise urine output while avoiding fluid accumulation in rhabdomyolysis patients. Methods. In a single centre clinical service evaluation we compared a convenience sample of critically ill adults with rhabdomyolysis treated with automated fluid management using the RenalGuard® device to patients managed with manual fluid adjustment following our standard rhabdomyolysis protocol. Primary outcome was number of hours with urine output >2 mL/kg during first 48 h of therapy. Results. Eight patients treated with RenalGuard were compared to 28 patients treated with manual fluid management. Number of hours of target urine output was greater in the RenalGuard versus the Standard group (176/312 (56.4%) versus 534/1305 (40.9%); ). Urine output was significantly higher in the first 24 h in the RenalGuard group (median (IQR) 4033 mL (3682–7363) versus 2913 mL (2263–4188 mL); ). Fluid balance, electrolyte, diuretics, and bicarbonate use were comparable between groups. Conclusions. Automated fluid management resulted in a higher urine output more quickly in the treatment of rhabdomyolysis. Further research is needed to analyse the effect of diuresis-matched hydration for the prevention of AKI in rhabdomyolysis.
      PubDate: Thu, 24 Nov 2016 07:43:10 +000
       
  • Acute Kidney Injury in Diabetes Mellitus

    • Abstract: Diabetes mellitus (DM) significantly increases the overall morbidity and mortality, particularly by elevating the cardiovascular risk. The kidneys are severely affected as well, partly as a result of intrarenal athero- and arteriosclerosis but also due to noninflammatory glomerular damage (diabetic nephropathy). DM is the most frequent cause of end-stage renal disease in our society. Acute kidney injury (AKI) remains a clinical and prognostic problem of fundamental importance since incidences have been increased in recent years while mortality has not substantially been improved. As a matter of fact, not many studies particularly addressed the topic “AKI in diabetes mellitus.” Aim of this article is to summarize AKI epidemiology and outcomes in DM and current recommendations on blood glucose control in the intensive care unit with regard to the risk for acquiring AKI, and finally several aspects related to postischemic microvasculopathy in AKI of diabetic patients shall be discussed. We intend to deal with this relevant topic, last but not least with regard to increasing incidences and prevalences of both disorders, AKI and DM.
      PubDate: Tue, 15 Nov 2016 07:10:24 +000
       
  • Characteristics of the Relationship of Kidney Dysfunction with
           Cardiovascular Disease in High Risk Patients with Diabetes

    • Abstract: We aimed at comparing the relationship of reduced estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) with cardiovascular disease (CVD) and mortality between high risk patients with and without type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The cross-sectional study evaluated 16,298 participants (1,627 T2DM) acutely admitted to hospital. The longitudinal study comprised 7,508 patients (673 with diabetes and 6,835 without). eGFR was categorized into 6 stages from >90 to
      PubDate: Thu, 03 Nov 2016 13:30:47 +000
       
  • Acute Kidney Injury in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: A Review

    • Abstract: Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a highly effective treatment strategy for lymphoproliferative disorders and bone marrow failure states including aplastic anemia and thalassemia. However, its use has been limited by the increased treatment related complications, including acute kidney injury (AKI) with an incidence ranging from 20% to 73%. AKI after HSCT has been associated with an increased risk of mortality. The incidence of AKI reported in recipients of myeloablative allogeneic transplant is considerably higher in comparison to other subclasses mainly due to use of cyclosporine and development of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) in allogeneic groups. Acute GVHD is by itself a major independent risk factor for the development of AKI in HSCT recipients. The other major risk factors are sepsis, nephrotoxic medications (amphotericin B, acyclovir, aminoglycosides, and cyclosporine), hepatic sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (SOS), thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA), marrow infusion toxicity, and tumor lysis syndrome. The mainstay of management of AKI in these patients is avoidance of risk factors contributing to AKI, including use of reduced intensity-conditioning regimen, close monitoring of nephrotoxic medications, and use of alternative antifungals for prophylaxis against infection. Also, early identification and effective management of sepsis, tumor lysis syndrome, marrow infusion toxicity, and hepatic SOS help in reducing the incidence of AKI in HSCT recipients.
      PubDate: Thu, 03 Nov 2016 09:24:50 +000
       
  • Proteasome Activators, PA28α and PA28β, Govern Development of
           Microvascular Injury in Diabetic Nephropathy and Retinopathy

    • Abstract: Diabetic nephropathy (DN) and diabetic retinopathy (DR) are major complications of type 1 and type 2 diabetes. DN and DR are mainly caused by injury to the perivascular supporting cells, the mesangial cells within the glomerulus, and the pericytes in the retina. The genes and molecular mechanisms predisposing retinal and glomerular pericytes to diabetic injury are poorly characterized. In this study, the genetic deletion of proteasome activator genes, PA28α and PA28β genes, protected the diabetic mice in the experimental STZ-induced diabetes model against renal injury and retinal microvascular injury and prolonged their survival compared with wild type STZ diabetic mice. The improved wellbeing and reduced renal damage was associated with diminished expression of Osteopontin (OPN) and Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1 (MCP-1) in the glomeruli of STZ-injected PA28α/PA28β double knockout (Pa28αβDKO) mice and also in cultured mesangial cells and retinal pericytes isolated from Pa28αβDKO mice that were grown in high glucose. The mesangial PA28-mediated expression of OPN under high glucose conditions was suppressed by peptides capable of inhibiting the binding of PA28 to the 20S proteasome. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that diabetic hyperglycemia promotes PA28-mediated alteration of proteasome activity in vulnerable perivascular cells resulting in microvascular injury and development of DN and DR.
      PubDate: Tue, 18 Oct 2016 14:55:23 +000
       
  • Psychosocial Factors in End-Stage Kidney Disease Patients at a Tertiary
           Hospital in Australia

    • Abstract: Aim. This study seeks to review the psychosocial factors affecting patients with end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) from a tertiary hospital in Australia. Methods. We audited patients with ESKD, referred to social work services from January 2012 to December 2014. All patients underwent psychosocial assessments by one, full-time renal social worker. Patient demographics, cumulative social issues, and subsequent interventions were recorded directly into a database. Results. Of the 244 patients referred, the majority were >60 years (58.6%), male (60.7%), born in Australia (62.3%), on haemodialysis (51.6%), and reliant on government financial assistance (88%). Adjustment issues (41%), financial concerns (38.5%), domestic assistance (35.2%), and treatment nonadherence (21.3%) were the predominant reasons for social work consultation. Younger age, referral prior to start of dialysis, and unemployment were significant independent predictors of increased risk of adjustment issues (,
      PubDate: Tue, 11 Oct 2016 08:59:17 +000
       
  • Is Anticoagulation Discontinuation Achievable with Citrate Dialysate
           during HDF Sessions?

    • Abstract: Citrate dialysate has been developed for few years to replace acetate and HCl concentrates. In Online Postdilution Hemodiafiltration (OL-POST-HDF), several issues are remaining concerning the possibility of stopping anticoagulation during sessions and the side effects of citrate solutions on calcium metabolism. This 1-year monocentric retrospective study included all patients exposed to citrate in OL-POST-HDF with nadroparin decrease for more than one month. Clotting events, serum calcium, PTH, hemoglobin, CRP, depuration parameters, and treatments administrated were recorded for analysis. 27 patients experienced nadroparin decrease and 5 did not receive nadroparin at the end of the study. Nadroparin decrease and withdrawal were both associated with more clotting events whereas the use of vitamin K antagonists was protective. No significant metabolic side effects were observed. Citrate dialysate does not allow anticoagulation discontinuation or decrease but has no significant side effects on mineral bone metabolism or erythropoiesis.
      PubDate: Mon, 10 Oct 2016 10:49:10 +000
       
  • Dialysate White Blood Cell Change after Initial Antibiotic Treatment
           Represented the Patterns of Response in Peritoneal Dialysis-Related
           Peritonitis

    • Abstract: Background. Patients with peritoneal dialysis-related peritonitis usually have different responses to initial antibiotic treatment. This study aimed to explore the patterns of response by using the changes of dialysate white blood cell count on the first five days of the initial antibiotic treatment. Materials and Methods. A retrospective cohort study was conducted. All peritoneal dialysis-related peritonitis episodes from January 2014 to December 2015 were reviewed. We categorized the patterns of antibiotic response into 3 groups: early response, delayed response, and failure group. The changes of dialysate white blood cell count for each pattern were determined by multilevel regression analysis. Results. There were 644 episodes in 455 patients: 378 (58.7%) of early response, 122 (18.9%) of delayed response, and 144 (22.3%) of failure episodes. The patterns of early, delayed, and failure groups were represented by the average rate reduction per day of dialysate WBC of 68.4%, 34.0%, and 14.2%, respectively ( value < 0.001 for all comparisons). Conclusion. Three patterns, which were categorized by types of responses, have variable rates of WBC declining. Clinicians should focus on the delayed response and failure patterns in order to make a decision whether to continue medical therapies or to aggressively remove the peritoneal catheter.
      PubDate: Tue, 30 Aug 2016 11:32:52 +000
       
  • Acute Kidney Injury and Atypical Features during Pediatric
           Poststreptococcal Glomerulonephritis

    • Abstract: The most common acute glomerulonephritis in children is poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis (PSGN) usually occurring between 3 and 12 years old. Hypertension and gross hematuria are common presenting symptoms. Most PSGN patients do not experience complications, but rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis and hypertensive encephalopathy have been reported. This paper reports 17 patients seen in 1 year for PSGN including 4 with atypical PSGN, at a pediatric tertiary care center. Seventeen children (11 males), mean age of 8 years, were analyzed. Ninety-four percent had elevated serum BUN levels and decreased GFR. Four of the hospitalized patients had complex presentations that included AKI along with positive ANA or ANCAs. Three patients required renal replacement therapy and two were thrombocytopenic. PSGN usually does not occur as a severe nephritis. Over the 12-month study period, 17 cases associated with low serum albumin in 53%, acute kidney injury in 94%, and thrombocytopenia in 18% were treated. The presentation of PSGN may be severe and in a small subset have associations similar to SLE nephritis findings including AKI, positive ANA, and hematological anomalies.
      PubDate: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 14:22:36 +000
       
  • Impact of Pediatric Chronic Dialysis on Long-Term Patient Outcome: Single
           Center Study

    • Abstract: Objective. Owing to a shortage of kidney donors in Israel, children with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) may stay on maintenance dialysis for a considerable time, placing them at a significant risk. The aim of this study was to understand the causes of mortality. Study Design. Clinical data were collected retrospectively from the files of children on chronic dialysis (>3 months) during the years 1995–2013 at a single pediatric medical center. Results. 110 patients were enrolled in the study. Mean age was  yrs. (range: 1 month–24 yrs). Forty-five children (42) had dysplastic kidneys and 19 (17.5) had focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. Twenty-five (22.7) received peritoneal dialysis, 59 (53.6) hemodialysis, and 6 (23.6) both modalities sequentially. Median dialysis duration was 1.46 years (range: 0.25–17.54 years). Mean follow-up was  yrs. Seventy-nine patients (71.8) underwent successful transplantation, 10 (11.2) had graft failure, and 8 (7.3) continued dialysis without transplantation. Twelve patients (10.9) died: 8 of dialysis-associated complications and 4 of their primary illness. The 5-year survival rate was 84: 90 for patients older than 5 years and 61 for younger patients. Conclusions. Chronic dialysis is a suitable temporary option for children awaiting renal transplantation. Although overall long-term survival rate is high, very young children are at high risk for life-threatening dialysis-associated complications.
      PubDate: Mon, 15 Aug 2016 12:08:11 +000
       
  • Prevalence and Risk Factors of Lower Limb Amputation in Patients with
           End-Stage Renal Failure on Dialysis: A Systematic Review

    • Abstract: Background. Renal dialysis has recently been recognised as a risk factor for lower limb amputation (LLA). However, exact rates and associated risk factors for the LLA are incompletely understood. Aim. Prevalence and risk factors of LLA in end-stage renal failure (ESRF) subjects on renal dialysis were investigated from the existing literature. Methods. Published data on the subject were derived from MEDLINE, PubMed, and Google Scholar search of English language literature from January 1, 1980, to July 31, 2015, using designated key words. Results. Seventy studies were identified out of which 6 full-text published studies were included in this systematic review of which 5 included patients on haemodialysis alone and one included patients on both haemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis. The reported findings on prevalence of amputation in the renal failure on dialysis cohort ranged from 1.7% to 13.4%. Five out of the six studies identified diabetes as the leading risk factor for amputation in subjects with ESRF on renal dialysis. Other risk factors identified were high haemoglobin A1c, elevated c-reactive protein, and low serum albumin. Conclusions. This review demonstrates high rate of LLA in ESRF patients receiving dialysis therapy. It has also identified diabetes and markers of inflammation as risk factors of amputation in ESRF subjects on dialysis.
      PubDate: Wed, 27 Jul 2016 12:56:39 +000
       
  • Effects of Therapy on Urine Neutrophil Gelatinase-Associated Lipocalin in
           Nondiabetic Glomerular Diseases with Proteinuria

    • Abstract: Urine neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) is widely used as a biomarker for acute kidney injury. Cross-sectional studies have shown that NGAL may be elevated in glomerular diseases, but there is limited information on the value of NGAL in predicting treatment response or on the changes of NGAL levels after therapy. We prospectively evaluated the effects of therapy on NGAL in nondiabetic glomerular diseases. Urine NGAL was collected at biopsy and follow-up at 12 months. At baseline, NGAL in glomerular disease patients () correlated with proteinuria, but not with glomerular filtration rate (GFR). After therapy with renin-angiotensin blockers and/or immune modulating agents, change of NGAL correlated with change of proteinuria, but not with change of GFR. NGAL at baseline was not different between patients in complete remission (CR) at follow-up compared to those not in remission (NR). Compared to baseline, NGAL at follow-up decreased in CR (), but not in NR. Change of NGAL was greater in CR than NR. In conclusion, the change of urine NGAL correlated with the change of proteinuria. Baseline NGAL was not a predictor of complete remission. Future studies will be necessary to determine the role of NGAL as a predictor of long term outcome in proteinuric glomerular diseases.
      PubDate: Mon, 25 Jul 2016 10:17:17 +000
       
  • Prevalence of Hypercalcaemia in a Renal Transplant Population: A Single
           Centre Study

    • Abstract: Introduction. Postrenal transplant bone disease is a significant problem. Factors influencing postrenal transplant bone status include high dose acute and low dose long-term steroid use, persistent hypercalcaemia, and graft failure. In this study, we aimed to determine the prevalence of hypercalcaemia and to evaluate the risk factors for postrenal transplant hypercalcaemia in long-term renal transplant patients at our centre. Methods. This is a biochemical audit in which we studied renal transplant recipients from the Central Northern Adelaide Renal Transplant Services, South Australia. Inclusion criteria include kidney transplant patients with functioning graft since 1971 and at least 3 months after transplantation at the time of analysis. Hypercalcaemia was defined as persistently elevated serum corrected calcium greater than or equal to 2.56 mmol/L for three consecutive months. Results. 679 renal transplant recipients with a functioning graft were studied and 101 were hypercalcaemic between March 2011 and June 2011 (15%). 60% of the hypercalcaemic patients were male and 40% were female, with chronic glomerulonephritis (39%) being the commonest cause of their end stage kidney disease (ESKD). Prevalence was similar in those that had haemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis pretransplantation. Hypercalcaemia in the renal transplant population was not secondary to suboptimal allograft function but secondary to pretransplantation hyperparathyroidism with persistent high parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels after transplantation. Conclusion. There is a high prevalence of hypercalcaemia (15%) in renal transplant recipients. The predominant cause for hypercalcaemia is pretransplantation hyperparathyroidism. The magnitude of pretransplantation hyperparathyroidism is the major determinant for long-term parathyroid function rather than graft function or pretransplantation duration on dialysis or mode of dialysis.
      PubDate: Thu, 14 Jul 2016 14:13:08 +000
       
  • Hypoxia Associated Proteolytic Processing of OS-9 by the Metalloproteinase
           Meprin β

    • Abstract: Meprin metalloproteases play a role in the pathology of ischemia/reperfusion- (IR-) induced renal injury. The endoplasmic reticulum-associated protein, osteosarcoma-9 (OS-9), has been shown to interact with the carboxyl-terminal tail of meprin β. More importantly, OS-9 interacts with the hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and the prolyl-hydroxylase, proteins which mediate the cell’s response to hypoxia. To determine if OS-9 is a meprin substrate, kidney proteins from meprin αβ knockout mice (αβKO) (which lack endogenous meprins) and purified human OS-9 were incubated with activated forms of meprin A and meprin B, and Western blot analysis was used to evaluate proteolytic processing of OS-9. Fragmentation of OS-9 was observed in reactions with meprin B, but not meprin A. To determine whether meprin B cleaves OS-9 in vivo, wild-type (WT) and meprin αβKO mice were subjected to IR-induced renal injury. Fragmentation of OS-9 was observed in kidney proteins from WT mice subjected to IR, but not in meprin αβKO counterparts. Transfection of kidney cells (MDCK and HEK293) with meprin β cDNA prevented accumulation of OS-9 following exposure to the hypoxia mimic, CoCl2. These data suggest that meprin β interaction with OS-9 plays a role in the hypoxia response associated with IR-induced renal injury.
      PubDate: Wed, 13 Jul 2016 13:18:48 +000
       
 
 
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