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Publisher: Hindawi   (Total: 269 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 269 Journals sorted alphabetically
Abstract and Applied Analysis     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.512, h-index: 32)
Active and Passive Electronic Components     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.157, h-index: 15)
Advances in Acoustics and Vibration     Open Access   (Followers: 29, SJR: 0.259, h-index: 6)
Advances in Agriculture     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Artificial Intelligence     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Advances in Astronomy     Open Access   (Followers: 37, SJR: 0.351, h-index: 17)
Advances in Bioinformatics     Open Access   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.421, h-index: 8)
Advances in Chemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Advances in Civil Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 35, SJR: 0.338, h-index: 8)
Advances in Condensed Matter Physics     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.248, h-index: 10)
Advances in Decision Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.231, h-index: 6)
Advances in Fuzzy Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.258, h-index: 7)
Advances in Hematology     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.892, h-index: 18)
Advances in High Energy Physics     Open Access   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.892, h-index: 19)
Advances in Human-Computer Interaction     Open Access   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.439, h-index: 9)
Advances in Materials Science and Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 32, SJR: 0.263, h-index: 11)
Advances in Mathematical Physics     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.332, h-index: 10)
Advances in Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.498, h-index: 10)
Advances in Multimedia     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.191, h-index: 10)
Advances in Nonlinear Optics     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Numerical Analysis     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Operations Research     Open Access   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.343, h-index: 7)
Advances in Optical Technologies     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.283, h-index: 16)
Advances in OptoElectronics     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.973, h-index: 16)
Advances in Orthopedics     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Pharmacological Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.695, h-index: 13)
Advances in Physical Chemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.297, h-index: 7)
Advances in Power Electronics     Open Access   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.26, h-index: 6)
Advances in Preventive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 23)
Advances in Tribology     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.267, h-index: 6)
Advances in Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.629, h-index: 16)
Advances in Virology     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 1.04, h-index: 12)
AIDS Research and Treatment     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.125, h-index: 14)
Analytical Cellular Pathology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.334, h-index: 12)
Anatomy Research Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Anemia     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.991, h-index: 11)
Anesthesiology Research and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.513, h-index: 12)
Applied and Environmental Soil Science     Open Access   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.53, h-index: 9)
Applied Bionics and Biomechanics     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.23, h-index: 13)
Applied Computational Intelligence and Soft Computing     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Archaea     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.248, h-index: 27)
Arthritis     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Autism Research and Treatment     Open Access   (Followers: 28)
Autoimmune Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.909, h-index: 17)
Behavioural Neurology     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.696, h-index: 34)
Biochemistry Research Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.085, h-index: 17)
Bioinorganic Chemistry and Applications     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.286, h-index: 19)
BioMed Research Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.725, h-index: 59)
Biotechnology Research Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Bone Marrow Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Canadian J. of Gastroenterology & Hepatology     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.856, h-index: 53)
Canadian J. of Infectious Diseases and Medical Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.409, h-index: 25)
Canadian Respiratory J.     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.503, h-index: 42)
Cardiology Research and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.941, h-index: 17)
Case Reports in Anesthesiology     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Case Reports in Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Case Reports in Critical Care     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Case Reports in Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Case Reports in Dermatological Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Case Reports in Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Case Reports in Endocrinology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.326, h-index: 1)
Case Reports in Gastrointestinal Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Case Reports in Genetics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Case Reports in Hematology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Case Reports in Hepatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Case Reports in Immunology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Case Reports in Infectious Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Case Reports in Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Case Reports in Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Case Reports in Neurological Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Case Reports in Obstetrics and Gynecology     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Case Reports in Oncological Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Case Reports in Ophthalmological Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Case Reports in Orthopedics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Case Reports in Otolaryngology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Case Reports in Pathology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Case Reports in Pediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Case Reports in Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Case Reports in Pulmonology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Case Reports in Radiology     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Case Reports in Rheumatology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Case Reports in Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Case Reports in Transplantation     Open Access  
Case Reports in Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Case Reports in Vascular Medicine     Open Access  
Case Reports in Veterinary Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Child Development Research     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Chinese J. of Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Chinese J. of Mathematics     Open Access  
Cholesterol     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.906, h-index: 12)
Complexity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.526, h-index: 27)
Computational and Mathematical Methods in Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.415, h-index: 22)
Computational Intelligence and Neuroscience     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.232, h-index: 30)
Contrast Media & Molecular Imaging     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.932, h-index: 34)
Critical Care Research and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.916, h-index: 14)
Current Gerontology and Geriatrics Research     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.8, h-index: 12)
Depression Research and Treatment     Open Access   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.77, h-index: 11)
Dermatology Research and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.576, h-index: 15)
Diagnostic and Therapeutic Endoscopy     Open Access   (SJR: 0.651, h-index: 18)
Discrete Dynamics in Nature and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.323, h-index: 24)
Disease Markers     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.774, h-index: 49)
Education Research Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Emergency Medicine Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Enzyme Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.457, h-index: 18)
Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.615, h-index: 50)
Experimental Diabetes Research     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.591, h-index: 30)
Gastroenterology Research and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.664, h-index: 21)
Genetics Research Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Geofluids     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.693, h-index: 38)
HPB Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.798, h-index: 22)
Infectious Diseases in Obstetrics and Gynecology     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.976, h-index: 34)
Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Infectious Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.763, h-index: 15)
Intl. J. of Aerospace Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 68, SJR: 0.241, h-index: 6)
Intl. J. of Agronomy     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.223, h-index: 2)
Intl. J. of Alzheimer's Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.193, h-index: 25)
Intl. J. of Analysis     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Analytical Chemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.157, h-index: 2)
Intl. J. of Antennas and Propagation     Open Access   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.385, h-index: 15)
Intl. J. of Biodiversity     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Biomaterials     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.485, h-index: 10)
Intl. J. of Biomedical Imaging     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.581, h-index: 23)
Intl. J. of Breast Cancer     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Intl. J. of Cell Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 2.658, h-index: 25)
Intl. J. of Chemical Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.361, h-index: 10)
Intl. J. of Chronic Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Computer Games Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.213, h-index: 12)
Intl. J. of Corrosion     Open Access   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.19, h-index: 7)
Intl. J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.558, h-index: 11)
Intl. J. of Differential Equations     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.363, h-index: 11)
Intl. J. of Digital Multimedia Broadcasting     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.144, h-index: 10)
Intl. J. of Electrochemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Intl. J. of Endocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.961, h-index: 24)
Intl. J. of Engineering Mathematics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Food Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Forestry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Genomics     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.721, h-index: 7)
Intl. J. of Hepatology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Hypertension     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.823, h-index: 20)
Intl. J. of Inflammation     Open Access   (SJR: 0.876, h-index: 14)
Intl. J. of Mathematics and Mathematical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.346, h-index: 27)
Intl. J. of Medicinal Chemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Intl. J. of Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.006, h-index: 18)
Intl. J. of Navigation and Observation     Open Access   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.411, h-index: 7)
Intl. J. of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.926, h-index: 14)
Intl. J. of Optics     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.262, h-index: 7)
Intl. J. of Otolaryngology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Pediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Intl. J. of Peptides     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.73, h-index: 16)
Intl. J. of Photoenergy     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.348, h-index: 28)
Intl. J. of Plant Genomics     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.578, h-index: 20)
Intl. J. of Polymer Science     Open Access   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.265, h-index: 11)
Intl. J. of Population Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Reconfigurable Computing     Open Access   (SJR: 0.182, h-index: 8)
Intl. J. of Reproductive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Intl. J. of Rheumatology     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.015, h-index: 18)
Intl. J. of Rotating Machinery     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.402, h-index: 19)
Intl. J. of Spectroscopy     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Intl. J. of Stochastic Analysis     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.234, h-index: 19)
Intl. J. of Surgical Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.753, h-index: 11)
Intl. J. of Telemedicine and Applications     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.757, h-index: 14)
Intl. J. of Vascular Medicine     Open Access   (SJR: 0.865, h-index: 16)
Intl. J. of Zoology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.389, h-index: 8)
Intl. Scholarly Research Notices     Open Access   (Followers: 204)
ISRN Astronomy and Astrophysics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
J. of Addiction     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
J. of Advanced Transportation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.911, h-index: 24)
J. of Aging Research     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 1.259, h-index: 23)
J. of Analytical Methods in Chemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.296, h-index: 13)
J. of Applied Chemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
J. of Applied Mathematics     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.341, h-index: 22)
J. of Biomedical Education     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Blood Transfusion     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Botany     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.101, h-index: 2)
J. of Cancer Epidemiology     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 1.427, h-index: 12)
J. of Chemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.225, h-index: 11)
J. of Combustion     Open Access   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.27, h-index: 8)
J. of Complex Analysis     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
J. of Computer Networks and Communications     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.257, h-index: 8)
J. of Construction Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
J. of Control Science and Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.299, h-index: 9)
J. of Diabetes Research     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.024, h-index: 13)
J. of Drug Delivery     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 4.523, h-index: 2)
J. of Electrical and Computer Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.225, h-index: 10)
J. of Energy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Engineering     Open Access  
J. of Environmental and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 17, SJR: 1.136, h-index: 16)
J. of Food Quality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.497, h-index: 30)
J. of Function Spaces     Open Access   (SJR: 0.414, h-index: 10)
J. of Geological Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Healthcare Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.345, h-index: 10)
J. of Immunology Research     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.346, h-index: 41)
J. of Lipids     Open Access  
J. of Marine Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
J. of Materials     Open Access  
J. of Mathematics     Open Access  
J. of Nanomaterials     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.383, h-index: 24)
J. of Nanoscience     Open Access  
J. of Nanotechnology     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.283, h-index: 9)

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Journal Cover International Journal of Rheumatology
  [SJR: 1.015]   [H-I: 18]   [4 followers]  Follow
    
  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
   ISSN (Print) 1687-9260 - ISSN (Online) 1687-9279
   Published by Hindawi Homepage  [269 journals]
  • The Impact of Different Classification Criteria Sets on the Estimated
           Prevalence and Associated Risk Factors of Diastolic Dysfunction in
           Rheumatoid Arthritis

    • Abstract: This study compared the estimated prevalence and potential determinants of left ventricular (LV) diastolic dysfunction upon applying different classification criteria in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). LV diastolic function was assessed echocardiographically by pulsed Doppler (), tissue Doppler (, lateral and septal ), and left atrial volume index in 176 RA patients. Relationships of traditional cardiovascular risk factors and RA characteristics with LV diastolic function and dysfunction according to previous and current criteria were determined in multivariate regression models. Waist-hip ratio was associated with (standardised (SE) = , ) and lateral (standardised (SE) = , ); low diastolic blood pressure was related to (standardised (SE) = , ). Diastolic dysfunction prevalence differed upon applying previous (59%) compared to current (22%) criteria (). One SD increase in waist-hip ratio was associated with diastolic dysfunction when applying current criteria (OR = 2.61 (95% CI = 1.51–4.52), ), whereas one SD increase in diastolic blood pressure was inversely related to diastolic dysfunction upon using previous criteria (OR = 0.57 (95% CI = 0.40–0.81), ). In conclusion, application of current and previous diastolic dysfunction criteria markedly alters the prevalence and risk factors associated with diastolic dysfunction in RA.
      PubDate: Mon, 04 Dec 2017 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Review of Routine Laboratory Monitoring for Patients with Rheumatoid
           Arthritis Receiving Biologic or Nonbiologic DMARDs

    • Abstract: Safety concerns associated with many drugs indicated for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) can be attenuated by the early identification of toxicity through routine laboratory monitoring; however, a comprehensive review of the recommended monitoring guidelines for the different available RA therapies is currently unavailable. The aim of this review is to summarize the current guidelines for laboratory monitoring in patients with RA and to provide an overview of the laboratory abnormality profiles associated with each drug indicated for RA. Recommendations for the frequency of laboratory monitoring of serum lipids, liver transaminases, serum creatinine, neutrophil counts, and platelet counts in patients with RA were compiled from a literature search for published recommendations and guidelines as well as the prescribing information for each drug. Laboratory abnormality profiles for each drug were compiled from the prescribing information for each drug and a literature search including meta-analyses and primary clinical trials data.
      PubDate: Tue, 31 Oct 2017 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Gastrointestinal Symptoms and Elevated Levels of Anti-Saccharomyces
           cerevisiae Antibodies Are Associated with Higher Disease Activity in
           Colombian Patients with Spondyloarthritis

    • Abstract: Background. Spondyloarthritis (SpA) is a group of articular inflammatory rheumatic diseases that their gastrointestinal manifestations are around 10% of their extra-articular symptoms, supporting that the inflammatory response of the intestinal mucosa could be associated with the clinical status. Objectives. To investigate the association between gastrointestinal symptoms and autoantibodies and disease activity between SpA patients, healthy subjects (HS), and patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Methods. 102 SpA patients, 29 IBD patients, and 117 HS were included. Autoantibodies as ASCA, ANCA, anti-tTG, anti-DGP, ANA, and IgA were measured. The patients were assessed to evaluate clinical and gastrointestinal symptoms. An association analysis was performed using Chi square test and a logistic regression. Results. Significant differences were found for ASCA levels in SpA (28.2%) compared to IBD (14.2%) and HS (6.0%) (), as well as for ANAS in SpA (49.5%) and IBD (37.9%) () and abdominal pain () between SpA (54.3%) and IBD (27.5%). Significant associations were found between BASDAI > 4 and gastrointestinal symptoms () and IgA (). The association for abdominal bloating was maintained (OR: 3.93, CI-95%, 1.14–13.56; ). Conclusions. Gastrointestinal symptoms, ASCA, ANAS, and IgA levels were associated with high disease activity in SpA compared with IBD and HS.
      PubDate: Sun, 29 Oct 2017 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Cross-Cultural Validation of Urdu Version KOOS in Indian Population with
           Primary Knee Osteoarthritis

    • Abstract: Purpose. The primary aim of this study was to translate a self-reported questionnaire (KOOS) from English to Urdu and then to see its internal consistency, agreement, test-retest reliability, and validity among primary OA knee patients. Methodology. First, KOOS questionnaire was translated from English language to Urdu through standardized cross-cultural protocol. This translated version of KOOS was administered to 111 radiographically diagnosed primary OA knee patients at two times with 48-hour interval in-between. Cronbach’s alpha, floor and ceiling effect, intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), absolute agreement %, and Spearman correlation were used to fulfill our objectives. Results. Average time to administer this questionnaire was 20 minutes. There was good internal consistency with Cronbach’s alpha ranging from 0.7246 to 0.9139. The absolute agreement of each item between two tests ranged from 81.08% to 98.20%. Test-retest reliability was excellent (“” ranged from 0.9673 to 0.9782). There was no ceiling effect; however less than 4% floor effect was seen in two subscales. There was significant difference that existed between different X-ray grades in all subscales meaning good content validity for disease prognosis. Conclusion. The present results show that KOOS Urdu version is a reliable and valid measure for primary OA knee patients.
      PubDate: Wed, 25 Oct 2017 07:12:30 +000
       
  • Incidence and Risk Factors for Infections Requiring Hospitalization,
           Including Pneumocystis Pneumonia, in Japanese Patients with Rheumatoid
           Arthritis

    • Abstract: Objective. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) may be complicated by different infections, but risk factors for these are not fully elucidated. Here, we assessed the incidence of and risk factors for infections requiring hospitalization (IRH) including pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) in patients with RA. Methods. We retrospectively surveyed all RA patients treated at our hospital from 2009 to 2013, for whom data were available on demographic features, medications, comorbidities, and severity of RA. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was applied to calculate adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for factors associated with the occurrence of IRH. Results. In a total of 9210 patient-years (2688 patients), there were 373 IRH (3.7/100 patient-years). Respiratory tract infections were most frequent (, and additionally 16 PCP), followed by urinary tract infections (). Significant factors for PCP included higher age (≥70 years; OR 3.5), male sex (6.6), underlying lung disease (3.0), use of corticosteroids (4.8), and use of biologics (5.4). Use of methotrexate (5.7) was positively associated with PCP but negatively with total infections (0.7). Additionally, functional disorders and higher RA disease activity were also related to total infections. Conclusions. Risk factors for infection should be taken into account when deciding treatment for the individual RA patient.
      PubDate: Wed, 18 Oct 2017 08:03:07 +000
       
  • Knitting the Threads of Silk through Time: Behçet’s Disease—Past,
           Present, and Future

    • Abstract: Behçet’s disease (BD) is a chronic relapsing vasculitis that affects vessels of all types and sizes with a broad spectrum of phenotypic heterogeneity and complex immunopathogenesis. Efforts by the scientific community to resolve the unmet needs of BD and gaps in our knowledge have been hampered by considerable challenges that primarily relate to the rare nature of the disease in many parts of the world and its heterogeneity. Controversies remain in many aspects of the disease including the diagnostic criteria, immunopathogenesis and biomarker discovery, geographical variation, and therapeutic considerations. In this review, we highlight recent advances in our scientific understanding of BD, shed new insights into diagnostic and treatment strategies, and discuss residual gaps in our knowledge that will serve as the basis for current and future research.
      PubDate: Sun, 10 Sep 2017 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Review of Current Immunologic Therapies for Hidradenitis Suppurativa

    • Abstract: Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) is a chronic, recurrent, inflammatory disease of apocrine gland-bearing skin which affects approximately 1–4% of the population. The disease is more common in women and patients of African American descent and approximately one-third of patients report a family history. Obesity and smoking are known risk factors, but associations with other immune disorders, especially inflammatory bowel disease, are also recognized. The pathogenesis of HS is poorly understood and host innate or adaptive immune response, defective keratinocyte function, and the microbial environment in the hair follicle and apocrine gland have all been postulated to play a role in disease activity. While surgical interventions can be helpful to reduce disease burden, there is a high recurrence rate. Increasingly, data supports targeted immune therapy for HS, and longitudinal studies suggest benefit from these agents, both when used alone and as an adjunct to surgical treatments. The purpose of this review is to outline the current data supporting use of targeted immune therapy in HS management.
      PubDate: Sun, 20 Aug 2017 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Clinically Apparent Arterial Thrombosis in Persons with Systemic
           Vasculitis

    • Abstract: Objective. To estimate the incidence rate of clinically apparent arterial thrombotic events and associated comorbidities in patients with primary systemic vasculitis. Methods. Using large cohort administrative data from Quebec, Canada, we identified patients with vasculitis, including polyarteritis nodosa (PAN) and granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA). Incident acute myocardial infarctions (AMIs) and cerebrovascular accidents (CVAs) after the diagnosis of vasculitis were ascertained in the PAN and GPA group via billing and hospitalization data. These were compared to rates of a general population comparator group. The incidences of comorbidities (type 2 diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, and hypertension) were also collected. Results. Among the 626 patients identified with vasculitis, 19.7% had PAN, 2.9% had Kawasaki disease, 23.8% had GPA, 52.4% had GCA, and 1.3% had Takayasu arteritis. The AMI rate was substantially higher in males aged 18–44 with PAN, with rates up to 268.1 events per 10,000 patient years [95% CI 67.1–1070.2], approximately 30 times that in the age- and sex-matched control group. The CVA rate was also substantially higher, particularly in adults aged 45–65. Patients with vasculitis had elevated incidences of diabetes, dyslipidemia, and hypertension versus the general population. Conclusion. Atherothrombotic rates were elevated in patients identified as having primary systemic vasculitis. While incident rates of cardiovascular comorbidities were also increased, the substantial elevation in AMIs seen in young adults suggests a disease-specific component which requires further investigation.
      PubDate: Wed, 21 Jun 2017 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Evaluation of Vitamin D Status in Rheumatoid Arthritis and Its Association
           with Disease Activity across 15 Countries: “The COMORA Study”

    • Abstract: The aims of this study are to evaluate vitamin D status in 1413 RA patients of COMORA study from 15 countries and to analyze relationship between patients’ RA characteristics and low levels of vitamin D. All demographic, clinical, and biological data and RA comorbidities were completed. The results showed that the average of vitamin D serum dosage was 27.3 ng/mL ± 15.1 0.1–151. Status of vitamin D was insufficient in 54.6% and deficient in 8.5% of patients. 43% of RA patients were supplemented with vitamin D and absence of supplementation on vitamin D was related to higher prevalence of vitamin D deficiency (). Finally, our study shows that the status of low levels of vitamin D is common in RA in different countries and under different latitudes. Absence of supplementation on vitamin D was related to higher prevalence of vitamin D deficiency. Low levels of vitamin D were associated with patients characteristics (age, BMI, and educational level), RA (disease activity and corticosteroid dosage), and comorbidities (lung disease and osteoporosis therapy). This suggests the need for a particular therapeutic strategy to improve vitamin D status in RA patients.
      PubDate: Thu, 01 Jun 2017 06:26:34 +000
       
  • The CEDAR Study: A Longitudinal Study of the Clinical Effects of
           Conventional DMARDs and Biologic DMARDs in Australian Rheumatology
           Practice

    • Abstract: Objectives. To observe the choices of conventional disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (cDMARDs) and biologic DMARDs (bDMARDs) in the management of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in Australian routine clinical practice, to assess treatment survival and determine the effect of cDMARDs/bDMARDs on disease activity. Methods. Routinely collected, deidentified clinical data was sourced from 20 Australian rheumatology practices. RA patients aged ≥18 years, who had received cDMARDs/bDMARDs and a recorded subsequent visit, were included. A linear mixed model was used to determine the change over time and the percentage reduction in disease activity was summarized. Results. 12,526 RA patients were included: 72% females, mean age 62 years. cDMARDs and bDMARDs were used in 92% and 30% of patients, respectively. The most commonly prescribed cDMARD was methotrexate (76% patients); median time to stopping treatment was 337 months [95% CI: 279–ND]. Etanercept was the most commonly prescribed bDMARD (12% patients); median time to stopping treatment was 79 months [95% CI: 57–93]. Of 5,341 patients with a first change in medication (cDMARD or bDMARD), 87% had therapy escalation and 13% deescalation. Reduction in DAS28-ESR, 6-month post-DMARDs initiation ranged from 3%, adalimumab, to 14%, leflunomide and tocilizumab. Conclusions. In this large Australian cohort of unselected community RA patients, the choices of cDMARDs/bDMARDs are aligned with current international guidelines.
      PubDate: Tue, 23 May 2017 06:22:07 +000
       
  • The Nonradiographic Axial Spondyloarthritis, the Radiographic Axial
           Spondyloarthritis, and Ankylosing Spondylitis: The Tangled Skein of
           Rheumatology

    • Abstract: Since 1984 the diagnosis of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) has been based upon the modified New York (mNY) criteria with mandatory presence of radiographic sacroiliitis, without which the diagnosis is not tenable. However, it may take years or decades for radiographic sacroiliitis to develop delaying the diagnosis for long periods. It did not matter in the past because no effective treatment was available. However, with the availability of a highly effective treatment, namely, tumour necrosis factor-α inhibitors (TNFi), the issue of early diagnosis of AS acquired an urgency. The Assessment of SpondyloArthritis International Society (ASAS) classification criteria published in 2009 was a significant step towards this goal. These criteria described an early stage of the disease where sacroiliitis was demonstrable only on MRI but not on standard radiograph. Therefore, this stage of the disease was labelled “nonradiographic axial SpA” (nr-axSpA). But questions have been raised if, in search of early diagnosis, specificity was compromised. The Federal Drug Administration (FDA, USA) withheld approval for the use of TNFi in patients with nr-axSpA because of issues related to the specificity of these criteria. This review attempts to clarify some of these aspects of the nr-axSpA-AS relationship and also tries to answer the question whether ASAS classifiable radiographic axial spondyloarthritis (r-axSpA) term can be interchangeably used with the term AS.
      PubDate: Sun, 07 May 2017 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Tofacitinib versus Biologic Treatments in Moderate-to-Severe Rheumatoid
           Arthritis Patients Who Have Had an Inadequate Response to Nonbiologic
           DMARDs: Systematic Literature Review and Network Meta-Analysis

    • Abstract: Objective. To compare the efficacy and tolerability of tofacitinib, an oral Janus kinase inhibitor for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), as monotherapy and combined with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) versus biological DMARDs (bDMARDs) and other novel DMARDs for second-line moderate-to-severe rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients by means of a systematic literature review (SLR) and network meta-analysis (NMA). Methods. MEDLINE®, EMBASE®, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched to identify randomized clinical trials (RCTs) published between 1990 and March 2015. Efficacy data based on American College of Rheumatology (ACR) response criteria, improvements in the Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Index (HAQ-DI) at 6 months, and discontinuation rates due to adverse events were analyzed by means of Bayesian NMAs. Results. 45 RCTs were identified, the majority of which demonstrated a low risk of bias. Tofacitinib 5 mg twice daily (BID) and 10 mg BID monotherapy exhibited comparable efficacy and discontinuation rates due to adverse events versus other monotherapies. Tofacitinib 5 mg BID and 10 mg BID + DMARDs or methotrexate (MTX) were mostly comparable to other combination therapies in terms of efficacy and discontinuation due to adverse events. Conclusion. In most cases, tofacitinib had similar efficacy and discontinuation rates due to adverse events compared to biologic DMARDs.
      PubDate: Thu, 09 Mar 2017 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Interobserver Agreement in Magnetic Resonance of the Sacroiliac Joints in
           Patients with Spondyloarthritis

    • Abstract: Background. Clinical, laboratory, and radiologic parameters are used for diagnosis and classification of spondyloarthritis (SpA). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of sacroiliac (SI) joints is being increasingly used to detect early sacroiliitis. We decided to evaluate the interobserver agreement in MRI findings of SI joints of SpA patients between a local radiologist, a rheumatologist, and an expert radiologist in musculoskeletal diseases. Methods. 66 MRI images of the SI joints of patients with established diagnosis of SpA were evaluated. Agreement was expressed in Cohen’s kappa. Results. Interobserver agreement between a local radiologist and an expert radiologist was fair (). Only acute findings showed a moderate agreement (), while chronic findings revealed 76.5% of disagreement (). A fair agreement was observed in acute findings () as well as chronic findings () between a local radiologist and a rheumatologist. There was a substantial agreement between an expert radiologist and a rheumatologist (). In acute findings, a 100% agreement was achieved. Also chronic and acute plus chronic findings showed high levels of agreement and 0.62, resp.). Conclusions. Our study shows that rheumatologists may have similar MRI interpretations of SI joints in SpA patients as an expert radiologist.
      PubDate: Mon, 13 Feb 2017 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Hard Physical Work Intensifies the Occupational Consequence of
           Physician-Diagnosed Back Disorder: Prospective Cohort Study with Register
           Follow-Up among 10,000 Workers

    • Abstract: While musculoskeletal pain is common in the population, less is known about its labor market consequences in relation to physical activity at work. This study investigates whether hard physical work aggravates the consequences of back disorder. Using Cox regression analyses, we estimated the joint association of physical activity at work and physician-diagnosed back disorder in 2010 with the risk of register-based long-term sickness absence (LTSA) of at least 6 consecutive weeks during 2011-2012 among 9,544 employees from the general working population (Danish Work Environment Cohort Study). Control variables were age, gender, psychosocial work environment, smoking, leisure physical activity, BMI, depression, and mental health. At baseline, 19.4% experienced high low-back pain intensity (≥5, 0–9 scale) and 15.2% had diagnosed back disorder. While high pain intensity was a general predictor for LTSA, physician-diagnosed back disorder was a stronger predictor among those with hard physical work (HR 2.23; 95% CI 1.68–2.96) compared with light work (HR 1.40; 95% CI 1.09–1.80). Similarly, physician-diagnosed back disorder with simultaneous high pain intensity predicted LTSA to a greater extent among those with hard physical work. In conclusion, the occupational consequence of physician-diagnosed back disorder on LTSA is greater among employees with hard physical work.
      PubDate: Tue, 31 Jan 2017 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Isolated Ro52 Antibodies as Immunological Marker of a Mild Phenotype of
           Undifferentiated Connective Tissue Diseases

    • Abstract: The term undifferentiated connective tissue disease (UCTD) is used to describe undiagnosed patients that do not fulfill classification criteria for definite connective tissue disease (Systemic Lupus, Systemic Sclerosis, Sjögren Syndrome, and Dermatomyositis/Polymyositis). It is important to find serological markers as predictors of the evolution or severity of these diseases. The objective of this retrospective study was to investigate if there was a milder subgroup of UCTD with a special clinical profile consisting only in the presence of anti-Ro52 autoantibodies. Immunological and clinical records of 62 patients attending the hospital during 30 months were studied. Results showed a target population formed by mostly women, aged between 40 and 80 years at the moment of the study, with a registered age of onset between 40 and 60 years. Speckled pattern was the most frequent pattern found by indirect immunofluorescence. Given the obtained results and keeping in mind possible limitations because of sample size, isolated positive anti-Ro52 autoantibodies seem to lead to a benign effect in terms of evolution of the disease. As a future objective, the follow-up of these patients should be necessary to investigate new clinical symptoms, serological markers, or development of a definite connective tissue disease over time.
      PubDate: Sun, 22 Jan 2017 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Physicians’ Perspectives on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Chronic
           Nonbacterial Osteomyelitis

    • Abstract: Background/Purpose. Understanding the practices of pediatric rheumatologists in diagnosing and treating chronic nonbacterial osteomyelitis (CNO) can provide important information to guide the development of consensus treatment plans. The objectives of this study were to determine physicians’ approaches to (1) diagnosing and monitoring CNO, (2) ordering a bone biopsy, and (3) making treatment decisions. Methods. A survey was distributed among members of the Childhood Arthritis and Rheumatology Research Alliance using a web-based questionnaire. Results. 121 of 277 (41%) attending physician members completed the survey. Plain radiographs (89%) were most commonly used followed by regional MRI (78%), bone scintigraphy (43%), and whole-body MRI (36%). The top three reasons for performing a biopsy were constitutional findings (66%), unifocal bone lesions (64%), and nocturnal bone pain (45%). Nearly all responders (95%) prescribed nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) as initial therapy. For patients who failed NSAID treatment, methotrexate (67%), tumor necrosis factor inhibitors (65%), and bisphosphonates (46%) were the next most commonly used treatments. The presence of a spinal lesion increased the use of bisphosphonate treatment. Conclusion. The diagnostic approach and disease activity monitoring for CNO varied among surveyed physicians. Our survey findings provided important background for the development of consensus treatment plans for CNO.
      PubDate: Tue, 10 Jan 2017 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Validation of Administrative Osteoarthritis Diagnosis Using a Clinical and
           Radiological Population-Based Cohort

    • Abstract: Objectives. The validity of administrative osteoarthritis (OA) diagnosis in British Columbia, Canada, was examined against X-rays, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), self-report, and the American College of Rheumatology criteria. Methods. During 2002–2005, 171 randomly selected subjects with knee pain aged 40–79 years underwent clinical assessment for OA in the knee, hip, and hands. Their administrative health records were linked during 1991–2004, in which OA was defined in two ways: (AOA1) at least one physician’s diagnosis or hospital admission and (AOA2) at least two physician’s diagnoses in two years or one hospital admission. Sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values were compared using four reference standards. Results. The mean age was 59 years and 51% were men. The proportion of OA varied from 56.3 to 89.7% among men and 77.4 to 96.4% among women according to reference standards. Sensitivity and specificity varied from 21 to 57% and 75 to 100%, respectively, and PPVs varied from 82 to 100%. For MRI assessment, the PPV of AOA2 was 100%. Higher sensitivity was observed in AOA1 than AOA2 and the reverse was true for specificity and PPV. Conclusions. The validity of administrative OA in British Columbia varied due to case definitions and reference standards. AOA2 is more suitable for identifying OA cases for research using this Canadian database.
      PubDate: Thu, 29 Dec 2016 14:46:32 +000
       
  • Corrigendum to “An Insight into Methods and Practices in Hip
           Arthroplasty in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis”

    • PubDate: Tue, 27 Dec 2016 12:05:45 +000
       
  • Immune Mediators in Osteoarthritis: Infrapatellar Fat Pad-Infiltrating
           CD8+ T Cells Are Increased in Osteoarthritic Patients with Higher Clinical
           Radiographic Grading

    • Abstract: Osteoarthritis is a condition of joint failure characterized by many pathologic changes of joint-surrounding tissues. Many evidences suggest the role of both innate and adaptive immunity that interplay, resulting either in initiation or in progression of osteoarthritis. Adaptive immune cells, in particular T cells, have been demonstrated to play a role in the development of OA in animal models. However, the underlying mechanism is yet unclear. Our aim was to correlate the frequency and phenotype of tissue-infiltrating T cells in the synovial tissue and infrapatellar fat pad with radiographic grading. Our results show that CD8+ T cells are increased in osteoarthritic patients with higher radiographic grading. When peripheral blood CD8+ T cells were examined, we show that CD8+ T cells possess a significantly higher level of activation than its CD4+ T cell counterpart (). Our results suggest a role for CD8+ T cells and recruitment of these activated circulating peripheral blood CD8+ T cells to the knee triggering local inflammation within the knee joint.
      PubDate: Wed, 14 Dec 2016 14:31:51 +000
       
  • Serum Amyloid A Level in Egyptian Children with Familial Mediterranean
           Fever

    • Abstract: Background and Objectives. SAA is an acute-phase reactant detected during an FMF attack or other inflammatory conditions. High SAA levels may increase the risk of amyloidosis. The aim of the study is to measure the serum amyloid A (SAA) level in a group of Egyptian children with familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) and study its various correlates, if any. Methods. The study enrolled seventy-one children with FMF. Results. SAA level was high in 78.9% of the studied patients with a mean of  mg/L, and CRP was positive in 31% of patients. There was no significant releation between SAA level and any demographic or clinical manifestation. High SAA was more frequent in V726A allele (16.9%) followed by M694V allele (12.3%). Elevated SAA levels were more frequent in patients on low colchicine doses. Forty-five percent (45%) of patients have low adherence to colchicine therapy. Interpretation and Conclusion. High SAA levels were detected two weeks after last FMF attack in a large percentage of Egyptian FMF children. This indicates that subclinical inflammation continues during attack-free periods, and SAA could be used as a marker of it.
      PubDate: Tue, 13 Dec 2016 08:52:14 +000
       
  • Deferoxamine Suppresses Collagen Cleavage and Protease, Cytokine, and
           COL10A1 Expression and Upregulates AMPK and Krebs Cycle Genes in Human
           Osteoarthritic Cartilage

    • Abstract: This study reports the effects of the iron chelator deferoxamine (DFO) on collagen cleavage, inflammation, and chondrocyte hypertrophy in relation to energy metabolism-related gene expression in osteoarthritic (OA) articular cartilage. Full-depth explants of human OA knee articular cartilage from arthroplasty were cultured with exogenous DFO (1–50 μM). Type II collagen cleavage and phospho-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (pAMPK) concentrations were measured using ELISAs. Gene expression studies employed real-time PCR and included AMPK analyses in PBMCs. In OA explants collagen cleavage was frequently downregulated by 10–50 μM DFO. PCR analysis of 7 OA patient cartilages revealed that 10 μM DFO suppressed expression of MMP-1, MMP-13, IL-1β, and TNFα and a marker of chondrocyte hypertrophy, COL10A1. No changes were observed in the expression of glycolysis-related genes. In contrast, expressions of genes associated with the mitochondrial Krebs cycle (TCA), AMPK, HIF1α, and COL2A1 were upregulated. AMPK gene expression was reduced in OA cartilage and increased in PBMCs from the same patients compared to healthy controls. Our studies demonstrate that DFO is capable of suppressing excessive collagenase-mediated type II collagen cleavage in OA cartilage and reversing phenotypic changes. The concomitant upregulation of proanabolic TCA-related gene expressions points to a potential for availability of energy generating substrates required for matrix repair by end-stage OA chondrocytes. This might normally be prevented by high whole-body energy requirements indicated by elevated AMPK expression in PBMCs of OA patients.
      PubDate: Wed, 30 Nov 2016 06:11:35 +000
       
  • Association between Air Pollution and the Development of Rheumatic
           Disease: A Systematic Review

    • Abstract: Objective. Environmental risk factors, such as air pollution, have been studied in relation to the risk of development of rheumatic diseases. We performed a systematic literature review to summarize the existing knowledge. Methods. MEDLINE (1946 to September 2016) and EMBASE (1980 to 2016, week 37) databases were searched using MeSH terms and keywords to identify cohort, case-control, and case cross-over studies reporting risk estimates for the development of select rheumatic diseases in relation to exposure of measured air pollutants (). We extracted information on the population sample and study period, method of case and exposure determination, and the estimate of association. Results. There was no consistent evidence of an increased risk for the development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with exposure to NO2, SO2, PM2.5, or PM10. Case-control studies in systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases (SARDs) indicated higher odds of diagnosis with increasing PM2.5 exposure, as well as an increased relative risk for juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) in American children
      PubDate: Tue, 25 Oct 2016 12:31:23 +000
       
  • Impact of Anti-Inflammatory Drugs on Pyogenic Vertebral Osteomyelitis: A
           Prospective Cohort Study

    • Abstract: Objective. Pyogenic vertebral osteomyelitis (PVO) are frequently misdiagnosed and patients often receive anti-inflammatory drugs for their back pain. We studied the impact of these medications. Methods. We performed a prospective study enrolling patients with PVO and categorized them depending on their drugs intake. Then, we compared diagnosis delay, clinical presentation at hospitalization, incidence of complications, and cure rate. Results. In total, 79 patients were included. Multivariate analysis found no correlation between anti-inflammatory drug intake and diagnosis delay, clinical presentation, complications, or outcome. Conclusion. Anti-inflammatory drugs intake does not affect diagnostic delay, severity at diagnosis, or complications of PVO.
      PubDate: Wed, 19 Oct 2016 14:06:06 +000
       
  • Risk of Malignant Neoplasm in Patients with Incident Rheumatoid Arthritis
           1980–2007 in relation to a Comparator Cohort: A Population-Based Study

    • Abstract: Objective. To determine whether the incidence of malignancy is increased in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) compared to a matched comparison cohort and to identify risk for any individual malignancy in RA. Methods. A cohort of 813 Olmsted County, Minnesota, residents who first fulfilled 1987 ACR criteria for RA in 1980–2007 was previously identified by medical record review. Medical records of 813 RA cases and a comparison cohort of age and sex matched Olmsted County residents without RA were evaluated retrospectively for cancer occurrence. Patients in both cohorts were followed until death, migration from Olmsted County, or 12/31/2014. Results. The RA and non-RA cohorts (mean age at incidence/index date: 55.9 [SD: 15.7] years; 68.4% females in both cohorts) were followed on average of 14.1 (SD: 7.7) and 14.9 (SD: 8.1) years, respectively. Prior to RA incidence/index date, 52 RA patients and 66 non-RA subjects had malignancies excluding NMSC (). During follow-up, significantly more malignancies occurred in patients with RA () than in comparator subjects (; hazard ratio: 1.32; ). Inclusion of NMSC obviated this difference. Conclusion. After excluding NMSC, there was a small to moderately increased risk of malignancies in patients with RA. Cancer surveillance is imperative in all patients with RA.
      PubDate: Wed, 17 Aug 2016 14:25:20 +000
       
  • Severity of Osteoarthritis Is Associated with Increased Arterial Stiffness

    • Abstract: Objective. Osteoarthritis (OA) is associated with increased cardiovascular comorbidity and mortality. Evidence is lacking about whether arterial stiffness is involved in OA. The objective of our study was to find out associations between OA, arterial stiffness, and adipokines. Design. Seventy end-stage knee and hip OA patients (age years) and 70 asymptomatic controls (age years) were investigated using the applanation tonometry to determine their parameters of arterial stiffness. Serum adiponectin, leptin, and matrix metalloproteinase 3 (MMP-3) levels were determined using the ELISA method. Correlation between variables was determined using Spearman’s rho. Multiple regression analysis with a stepwise selection procedure was employed. Results. Radiographic OA grade was positively associated with increased carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cf-PWV) (, ). We found that OA grade was also associated with leptin and MMP-3 levels (, and , , resp.). In addition, serum adiponectin level was positively associated with augmentation index and inversely with large artery elasticity index (, and , , resp.). Conclusions. Our results suggest that OA severity is independently associated with increased arterial stiffness and is correlated with expression of adipokines. Thus, increased arterial stiffness and adipokines might play an important role in elevated cardiovascular risk in end-stage OA.
      PubDate: Sun, 17 Jul 2016 07:55:36 +000
       
  • Erratum to “The Characteristics and Significance of Locally Infiltrating
           B Cells in Lupus Nephritis and Their Association with Local BAFF
           Expression”

    • PubDate: Thu, 16 Jun 2016 07:05:11 +000
       
  • Cardiac Function and Diastolic Dysfunction in Behcet’s Disease: A
           Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    • Abstract: Background. Cardiovascular involvement in Behcet’s disease (BD) is reported and has variable manifestations. It is not clear if diastolic dysfunction (DD) is increased in BD. Our objective was to evaluate the existing literature to determine if cardiac dysfunction, particularly DD, was more prevalent in these patients. Methods. A systematic review and meta-analysis of the available studies analyzing the echocardiographic findings in BD was conducted using a random-effects model. Mean differences were used to calculate the effect sizes of the echocardiographic parameters of interest. Results. A total of 22 studies with 1624 subjects were included in the analysis. Patients with BD had statistically significantly larger mean left atrial dimension (0.08, ), greater aortic diameter (0.16, ), significantly reduced ejection fraction (−1.08, ), significantly prolonged mitral deceleration time (14.20, ), lower ratio (−0.24, ), and increased isovolumetric relaxation time (7.29, ). Conclusion. DD is increased in patients with BD by the presence of several echocardiographic parameters favoring DD as compared to controls. The meta-analysis also identified that LA dimension is increased in BD patients. EF has also been found to be lower in BD patients. Aortic diameter was also increased in BD patients as compared to controls.
      PubDate: Tue, 10 May 2016 11:58:24 +000
       
  • The Reliability of a Novel Automated System for ANA Immunofluorescence
           Analysis in Daily Clinical Practice

    • Abstract: Automated interpretation (AI) systems for antinuclear antibody (ANA) analysis have been introduced based on assessment of indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) patterns. The diagnostic performance of a novel automated IIF reading system was compared with visual interpretation (VI) of IIF in daily clinical practice to evaluate the reduction of workload. ANA-IIF tests of consecutive serum samples from patients with suspected connective tissue disease were carried out using HEp-2 cells according to routine clinical care. AI was performed using a visual analyser (Zenit G-Sight, Menarini, Germany). Agreement rates between ANA results by AI and VI were calculated. Of the 336 samples investigated, VI yielded 205 (61%) negative, 42 (13%) ambiguous, and 89 (26%) positive results, whereas 82 (24%) were determined to be negative, 176 (52%) ambiguous, and 78 (24%) positive by AI. AI displayed a diagnostic accuracy of 175/336 samples (52%) with a kappa coefficient of 0.34 compared to VI being the gold standard. Solely relying on AI, with VI only performed for all ambiguous samples by AI, would have missed 1 of 89 (1%) positive results by VI and misclassified 2 of 205 (1%) negative results by VI as positive. The use of AI in daily clinical practice resulted only in a moderate reduction of the VI workload (82 of 336 samples: 24%).
      PubDate: Mon, 09 May 2016 07:12:11 +000
       
  • SAPHIRE: Stress and Pulmonary Hypertension in Rheumatoid
           Evaluation—A Prevalence Study

    • Abstract: Pulmonary artery hypertension (PAH) is a disorder of elevated resistance in the pulmonary arterial vessels, reflected by elevation of measured pulmonary artery pressure (PAP), and presenting with breathlessness and, if untreated, progressing to right heart failure and death. The heightened prevalence of PAH in populations with underlying systemic autoimmune conditions, particularly scleroderma and its variants, is well recognised, consistent with the proposed autoimmune contribution to PAH pathogenesis, along with disordered thrombotic, inflammatory, and mitogenic factors. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is one of a group of systemic autoimmune conditions featuring inflammatory symmetrical erosive polyarthropathy as its hallmark. This study explored the prevalence of PAH in a population of unselected individuals with RA, using exercise echocardiography (EchoCG). The high prevalence of EchoCG-derived elevation of PAP (EDEPP) in this population (14%) suggests that, like other autoimmune conditions, RA may be a risk factor for PAH. Patients with RA may therefore represent another population for whom PAH screening with noninvasive tools such as EchoCG may be justified.
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Apr 2016 12:19:00 +000
       
  • The Diagnostic Value of Alpha-1-Antitrypsin Phenotype in Patients with
           Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis

    • Abstract: The deficiency of alpha-1 protease inhibitor, or alpha-1-antitrypsin (A1AT), predisposes to chronic lung diseases and extrapulmonary pathology. Besides classical manifestations, such as pulmonary emphysema and liver disease, alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency (A1ATD) is also known to be associated with granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA or Wegener’s granulomatosis). The aim of our study was to evaluate the frequency of allelic isoforms of A1AT and their clinical significance among GPA patients. Detailed clinical information, including Birmingham Vasculitis Activity Score (BVAS), incidence of lung involvement, anti-proteinase 3 (PR3) antibodies concentrations, and other laboratory data were collected in 38 GPA patients. We also studied serum samples obtained from 46 healthy donors. In all collected samples A1AT phenotyping by isoelectrofocusing (IEF) and turbidimetric A1AT measurement were performed. Abnormal A1AT variants were found in 18.4% (7/38) of cases: 1 ZZ, 4 MZ, 2 MF, and only 1 MZ in control group (2%). The mean A1AT concentration in samples with atypical A1AT phenotypes was significantly lower () than in normal A1AT phenotype. We found that patients with abnormal A1AT phenotypes had significantly higher vasculitis activity (BVAS) as well as anti-PR3 antibodies concentration. We conclude that A1AT deficiency should be considered in all patients with GPA.
      PubDate: Tue, 05 Apr 2016 14:15:31 +000
       
 
 
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