for Journals by Title or ISSN
for Articles by Keywords
help

Publisher: Emerald   (Total: 335 journals)

 A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

        1 2 | Last   [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

Showing 1 - 200 of 335 Journals sorted alphabetically
A Life in the Day     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Academia Revista Latinoamericana de Administraci√≥n     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.144, h-index: 4)
Accounting Auditing & Accountability J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Accounting Research J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.26, h-index: 7)
Accounting, Auditing and Accountability J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.88, h-index: 40)
Advances in Accounting Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.514, h-index: 5)
Advances in Appreciative Inquiry     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.124, h-index: 5)
Advances in Autism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Dual Diagnosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48, SJR: 0.228, h-index: 2)
Advances in Gender Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.229, h-index: 7)
Advances in Intl. Marketing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.123, h-index: 11)
Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60, SJR: 0.29, h-index: 5)
Advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
African J. of Economic and Management Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.125, h-index: 2)
Agricultural Finance Review     Hybrid Journal  
Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 182, SJR: 0.391, h-index: 18)
American J. of Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Annals in Social Responsibility     Full-text available via subscription  
Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.215, h-index: 25)
Arts and the Market     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Asia Pacific J. of Marketing and Logistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.244, h-index: 15)
Asia-Pacific J. of Business Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.182, h-index: 7)
Asian Association of Open Universities J.     Open Access  
Asian Education and Development Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Asian J. on Quality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Asian Review of Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.29, h-index: 7)
Aslib J. of Information Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.65, h-index: 29)
Aslib Proceedings     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 262)
Assembly Automation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.657, h-index: 26)
Baltic J. of Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.354, h-index: 14)
Benchmarking : An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.556, h-index: 38)
British Food J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.329, h-index: 35)
Built Environment Project and Asset Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.232, h-index: 4)
Business Process Re-engineering & Management J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.614, h-index: 42)
Business Strategy Series     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.201, h-index: 6)
Career Development Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.686, h-index: 32)
China Agricultural Economic Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.238, h-index: 10)
China Finance Review Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Chinese Management Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.216, h-index: 12)
Circuit World     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.346, h-index: 17)
Collection Building     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.829, h-index: 10)
COMPEL: The Intl. J. for Computation and Mathematics in Electrical and Electronic Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.269, h-index: 22)
Competitiveness Review : An Intl. Business J. incorporating J. of Global Competitiveness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Construction Innovation: Information, Process, Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.508, h-index: 8)
Corporate Communications An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.703, h-index: 26)
Corporate Governance Intl. J. of Business in Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.309, h-index: 29)
Critical Perspectives on Intl. Business     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.32, h-index: 15)
Cross Cultural & Strategic Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.356, h-index: 13)
Development and Learning in Organizations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.138, h-index: 8)
Digital Library Perspectives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Direct Marketing An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Disaster Prevention and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.533, h-index: 32)
Drugs and Alcohol Today     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 134, SJR: 0.241, h-index: 4)
Education + Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.532, h-index: 30)
Education, Business and Society : Contemporary Middle Eastern Issues     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.141, h-index: 10)
Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Employee Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.435, h-index: 22)
Engineering Computations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.387, h-index: 39)
Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.541, h-index: 28)
Equal Opportunities Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Equality, Diversity and Inclusion : An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.239, h-index: 9)
EuroMed J. of Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.145, h-index: 9)
European Business Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.481, h-index: 21)
European J. of Innovation Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.596, h-index: 30)
European J. of Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.933, h-index: 55)
European J. of Training and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.489, h-index: 23)
Evidence-based HRM     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Facilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.371, h-index: 18)
Foresight     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.486, h-index: 20)
Gender in Management : An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.359, h-index: 22)
Grey Systems : Theory and Application     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Health Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.383, h-index: 17)
Higher Education, Skills and Work-based Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45, SJR: 0.172, h-index: 4)
History of Education Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.141, h-index: 2)
Housing, Care and Support     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.174, h-index: 4)
Human Resource Management Intl. Digest     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.121, h-index: 6)
Humanomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.14, h-index: 4)
IMP J.     Hybrid Journal  
Indian Growth and Development Review     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.163, h-index: 4)
Industrial and Commercial Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.217, h-index: 14)
Industrial Lubrication and Tribology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.322, h-index: 19)
Industrial Management & Data Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.63, h-index: 69)
Industrial Robot An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.375, h-index: 32)
Info     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.25, h-index: 21)
Information and Computer Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Information Technology & People     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45, SJR: 0.576, h-index: 28)
Interactive Technology and Smart Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.112, h-index: 1)
Interlending & Document Supply     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 61, SJR: 0.48, h-index: 13)
Internet Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42, SJR: 1.746, h-index: 57)
Intl. J. for Lesson and Learning Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. for Researcher Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Intl. J. of Accounting and Information Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.304, h-index: 7)
Intl. J. of Bank Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.515, h-index: 38)
Intl. J. of Climate Change Strategies and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.416, h-index: 7)
Intl. J. of Clothing Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.279, h-index: 25)
Intl. J. of Commerce and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Conflict Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.763, h-index: 38)
Intl. J. of Contemporary Hospitality Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.329, h-index: 35)
Intl. J. of Culture Tourism and Hospitality Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.399, h-index: 5)
Intl. J. of Development Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Intl. J. of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.225, h-index: 7)
Intl. J. of Educational Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.424, h-index: 32)
Intl. J. of Emergency Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.179, h-index: 1)
Intl. J. of Emerging Markets     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.199, h-index: 5)
Intl. J. of Energy Sector Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.25, h-index: 12)
Intl. J. of Entrepreneurial Behaviour & Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.694, h-index: 28)
Intl. J. of Event and Festival Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.32, h-index: 8)
Intl. J. of Gender and Entrepreneurship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.638, h-index: 6)
Intl. J. of Health Care Quality Assurance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.352, h-index: 32)
Intl. J. of Health Governance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.277, h-index: 15)
Intl. J. of Housing Markets and Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.201, h-index: 5)
Intl. J. of Human Rights in Healthcare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.13, h-index: 2)
Intl. J. of Information and Learning Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Intl. J. of Innovation Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.173, h-index: 5)
Intl. J. of Intelligent Computing and Cybernetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.258, h-index: 10)
Intl. J. of Intelligent Unmanned Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.145, h-index: 2)
Intl. J. of Islamic and Middle Eastern Finance and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Intl. J. of Law and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.107, h-index: 2)
Intl. J. of Law in the Built Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.111, h-index: 2)
Intl. J. of Leadership in Public Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Intl. J. of Lean Six Sigma     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.562, h-index: 15)
Intl. J. of Logistics Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.998, h-index: 15)
Intl. J. of Managerial Finance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.212, h-index: 11)
Intl. J. of Managing Projects in Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Manpower     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.354, h-index: 37)
Intl. J. of Mentoring and Coaching in Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Intl. J. of Migration, Health and Social Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.261, h-index: 5)
Intl. J. of Numerical Methods for Heat & Fluid Flow     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.594, h-index: 32)
Intl. J. of Operations & Production Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 2.198, h-index: 94)
Intl. J. of Organizational Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.222, h-index: 11)
Intl. J. of Pervasive Computing and Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.165, h-index: 9)
Intl. J. of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.304, h-index: 12)
Intl. J. of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.694, h-index: 66)
Intl. J. of Prisoner Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.254, h-index: 10)
Intl. J. of Productivity and Performance Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.785, h-index: 31)
Intl. J. of Public Sector Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.272, h-index: 37)
Intl. J. of Quality & Reliability Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.544, h-index: 63)
Intl. J. of Quality and Service Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.133, h-index: 1)
Intl. J. of Retail & Distribution Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.543, h-index: 36)
Intl. J. of Service Industry Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Social Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.227, h-index: 25)
Intl. J. of Sociology and Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48, SJR: 0.361, h-index: 5)
Intl. J. of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Structural Integrity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.325, h-index: 8)
Intl. J. of Sustainability in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.616, h-index: 29)
Intl. J. of Tourism Cities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Web Information Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.208, h-index: 13)
Intl. J. of Wine Business Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.196, h-index: 12)
Intl. J. of Workplace Health Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.358, h-index: 8)
Intl. Marketing Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.076, h-index: 57)
J. for Multicultural Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.124, h-index: 11)
J. of Accounting & Organizational Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.346, h-index: 7)
J. of Accounting in Emerging Economies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
J. of Adult Protection, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.291, h-index: 7)
J. of Advances in Management Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
J. of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49, SJR: 0.177, h-index: 9)
J. of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
J. of Applied Accounting Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.22, h-index: 5)
J. of Applied Research in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
J. of Asia Business Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.115, h-index: 1)
J. of Assistive Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.215, h-index: 6)
J. of Business & Industrial Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.664, h-index: 48)
J. of Business Strategy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.381, h-index: 17)
J. of Centrum Cathedra     Open Access  
J. of Children's Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.167, h-index: 9)
J. of Chinese Economic and Foreign Trade Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.188, h-index: 4)
J. of Chinese Entrepreneurship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
J. of Chinese Human Resource Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.112, h-index: 3)
J. of Communication Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.735, h-index: 6)
J. of Consumer Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.613, h-index: 62)
J. of Corporate Real Estate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.633, h-index: 5)
J. of Criminal Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 127, SJR: 0.13, h-index: 1)
J. of Criminological Research, Policy and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54)
J. of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.109, h-index: 5)
J. of Documentation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 189, SJR: 0.936, h-index: 50)
J. of Economic and Administrative Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
J. of Economic Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.498, h-index: 26)
J. of Educational Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.848, h-index: 36)
J. of Engineering, Design and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.173, h-index: 10)
J. of Enterprise Information Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.433, h-index: 38)
J. of Enterprising Communities People and Places in the Global Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.212, h-index: 8)
J. of Entrepreneurship and Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
J. of European Industrial Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
J. of European Real Estate Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.52, h-index: 7)
J. of Facilities Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
J. of Family Business Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
J. of Fashion Marketing and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.529, h-index: 30)
J. of Financial Crime     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 345, SJR: 0.158, h-index: 5)
J. of Financial Economic Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
J. of Financial Management of Property and Construction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.234, h-index: 1)
J. of Financial Regulation and Compliance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
J. of Financial Reporting and Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
J. of Forensic Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50, SJR: 0.225, h-index: 8)
J. of Global Mobility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
J. of Global Responsibility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
J. of Health Organisation and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.67, h-index: 27)
J. of Historical Research in Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.376, h-index: 8)
J. of Hospitality and Tourism Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.672, h-index: 10)
J. of Human Resource Costing & Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
J. of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)

        1 2 | Last   [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

Journal Cover International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education
  [SJR: 0.616]   [H-I: 29]   [12 followers]  Follow
    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 1467-6370
   Published by Emerald Homepage  [335 journals]
  • Ecological regional analysis applied to campus sustainability performance
    • Pages: 974 - 994
      Abstract: International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, Volume 18, Issue 7, Page 974-994, November 2017.
      Purpose Sustainability performance in higher education is often evaluated at a generalized large scale. It remains unknown to what extent campus efforts address regional sustainability needs. This study begins to address this gap by evaluating trends in performance through the lens of regional environmental characteristics. Design/methodology/approach Four sustainability metrics across 300 North American institutions are analyzed between 2005 and 2014. The study applies two established regional frameworks to group and assess the institutions: Commission on Environmental Cooperation Ecoregions and WaterStat (water scarcity status). Standard t-tests were used to assess significant differences between the groupings of institutions as compared to the North American study population as a whole. Findings Results indicate that all institutions perform statistically uniformly for most variables when grouped at the broadest (Level I) ecoregional scale. One exception is the Marine West Coast Forest ecoregion where institutions outperformed the North American average for several variables. Only when institutions are grouped at a smaller scale of (Level III) ecoregions do the majority of significant performance patterns emerge. Research limitations/implications This paper demonstrates an ecoregions-based analytical approach to evaluating sustainability performance that contrasts with common evaluation methods in the implementation field. This research also identifies a gap in the literature explicitly linking ecological sub-regions with their associated environmental challenges and identifies next research steps in developing defensible regional targets for applied sustainability efforts. Practical implications The practical implications of this research include the following: substantive changes to methodologies for rating sustainability leadership and performance, a framework that incentivizes institutions to frame sustainability efforts in terms of collaborative or collective impact, a framework within which institutions can meaningfully prioritize efforts, and a potential shift toward regional impact metrics rather than those focused solely on campus-based or generalized targets. Originality/value The authors believe this to be the first effort to analyze North American higher education sustainability performance using regional frameworks.
      Citation: International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education
      PubDate: 2017-11-06T03:41:25Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSHE-02-2016-0023
       
  • Higher education institutions: a strategy towards sustainability
    • Pages: 995 - 1017
      Abstract: International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, Volume 18, Issue 7, Page 995-1017, November 2017.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to guide higher education institutions (HEIs) in accomplishing sustainability goals while strengthening their associated systems and processes. Pursuing this goal, this study proposes a conceptual framework for modeling the HEI organizational environment; a set of strategic sustainability actions to drive movements toward sustainability; and an assessment scheme incorporating four indices to measure the degree of commitment, parity, difficulty and institutional performance throughout the implementation process of the actions proposed. Design/methodology/approach Development of the work included a literature review focused on internationally established concepts, recommendations and guidelines aimed at driving HEIs to fully acknowledge the principles of sustainable development, a study of the state-of-the-art evaluation frameworks for sustainability and an analysis of scientific studies on sustainability in HEIs and society. Findings The overall approach proposed proved to be robust, as it synthesizes global concepts, recommendations and guidelines endorsed by key international organizations and researchers thoroughly discussed in worldwide publications related to sustainability. Moreover, the conceptual framework for modeling the HEI organizational environment, the strategic sustainability actions formulated and the assessment scheme are confirmed to be a practical and realistic strategy for assisting HEIs to effectively achieve their sustainability targets and goals. Practical implications Facilitation of institutional performance assessment using the hands-on tool proposed to drive HEIs toward sustainability. Originality/value Few studies have proposed multidimensional approaches and indices to assess the institutional performance of HEIs in implementing sustainability actions.
      Citation: International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education
      PubDate: 2017-11-06T03:40:31Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSHE-08-2016-0159
       
  • Strategies to promote sustainability in higher education institutions
    • Pages: 1018 - 1038
      Abstract: International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, Volume 18, Issue 7, Page 1018-1038, November 2017.
      Purpose This paper aims to analyze strategies that promote sustainability in higher education institutions (HEIs), focusing on the case study of a federal institute of higher education in Brazil. Design/methodology/approach The research was based on a scientific literature review on sustainability in HEIs, to identify the recurrent actions for sustainability in these institutions; and a case study of a federal institute of higher education in Brazil, to illustrate how these actions are being implemented by HEIs. Findings Concerns about sustainability, prompted by the Brazilian federal legislature, led federal HEI to change its internal processes, infrastructure and organizational culture toward sustainability. Practical implications The findings presented in this study, more specifically the sustainability plan of the Federal Institute for Education, Science and Technology of Santa Catarina, aligned with the recommendations proposed, can be used and replicated in other HEIs. Originality/value Scientific literature about organizational changes led by sustainability concerns, in HEIs specifically, still needs more attention in the academia. By addressing the case of a Brazilian public institution of higher education, this paper contributes to the literature on sustainability in higher education by reporting the process of implementation of a sustainability plan.
      Citation: International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education
      PubDate: 2017-11-06T03:41:08Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSHE-06-2016-0102
       
  • Comparing pedagogies for plastic waste management at university level
    • Pages: 1039 - 1059
      Abstract: International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, Volume 18, Issue 7, Page 1039-1059, November 2017.
      Purpose This paper aims to compare the learning outcomes of gaming simulation and guided inquiry in sustainability education on plastic waste management. The current study targets the identification of success factors in these teaching approaches. Design/methodology/approach This study used a quasi-experimental design with undergraduate participants who were randomly assigned to an eight-hour sustainability education class using either gaming simulation or guided inquiry. Pre- and post-tests on students’ knowledge, attitudes and intended behavior were conducted, followed by individual interviews to provide more detailed reflections on the teaching approach to which they were assigned. Findings In terms of knowledge acquisition and behavioral changes, the quantitative results suggested that the pre-/post-test in-group differences were significant in both groups. More importantly, a significant positive attitudinal change was observed in the gaming simulation group only. In the interviews, participants attributed effective knowledge acquisition to active learning element in class, while the characterization of cognitive dissonance triggered in the gaming simulation induced subsequent affective changes. Practical implications Activities in this program can be applied or modified to accommodate differences in other similar programs. The findings can also provide indicators to designs of similar programs in the future. Originality/value This paper explores plausible factors (ideology and implementation) that contribute to successful sustainability education programs. Through comparison between gaming simulation and guided inquiry, elements for effective education for sustainable development learning in the pedagogical designs are discussed.
      Citation: International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education
      PubDate: 2017-11-06T03:40:24Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSHE-04-2016-0073
       
  • Assessing the role of college as a sustainability communication channel
    • Pages: 1060 - 1075
      Abstract: International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, Volume 18, Issue 7, Page 1060-1075, November 2017.
      Purpose The purpose of this study is to assess the effectiveness of higher education institution as a sustainability communication channel. The theory of planned behavior was used to examine the degree to which a student’s tenure at a large university with active and visible sustainability initiatives is associated with changes in views about sustainability and changes in reported sustainability behaviors. Design/methodology/approach This study involved a campus-wide online survey on undergraduate students at a large mid-western university. A direct measurement approach to the theory of planned behavior was used to measure changes in attitudes, normative beliefs, perceived behavioral controls and self-reported behaviors on five different environmental sustainability behaviors. Findings Overall findings support the notion that higher education institutions can be effective communication channels for sustainability issues, as students who have been in college for a longer period of time reported somewhat more positive attitudes, normative and efficacy beliefs and more sustainable behaviors. Practical implications By measuring specific components of the theory of planned behavior, this study provides insights on specific areas in which campaigns targeting college students in different college years could become more effective. Originality/value Few studies have assessed college as an effective sustainability communication channel despite the fact that it is potentially a powerful channel to reach a large population at their critical age. This study also measures specific components to sustainability behaviors by using the theory of planned behavior as a guiding framework.
      Citation: International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education
      PubDate: 2017-11-06T03:40:35Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSHE-09-2016-0172
       
  • Defining sustainability in higher education: a rhetorical analysis
    • Pages: 1076 - 1089
      Abstract: International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, Volume 18, Issue 7, Page 1076-1089, November 2017.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to examine the diverse definitions of sustainability in higher education, focusing on the rhetorical uses of the term among various institutions within the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education (AASHE). Design/methodology/approach The paper begins with an overview of the term sustainability in political and public discourse, using that as a gateway to understanding the rhetorical uses of the term. Through this framework, the paper begins a vital discussion about university texts and what they reveal about sustainability in US higher education. Findings The author finds that university definitions of sustainability reveal a similar malleability and fluidity as definitions in political and public discourse, while at the same time revealing particular trends in the ways in which concepts of interconnection, technological problem-solving and temporality persist in definitions of the term in higher education. Research limitations/implications This analysis is limited to definitions of sustainability used by several representative institutions within AASHE. Further studies should provide a more comprehensive analysis of a larger sampling of AASHE institutions as well as universities not affiliated with AASHE. Practical implications Administrators and educators at institutes of higher education must account for the ways in which definitions of sustainability are tied to an institution’s goals, agendas and material circumstances. Developing a better understanding of how such definitions emerge can provide greater clarity in enacting change. Originality/value This paper melds together rhetorical theories on sustainability with broader research on the use of the term in higher education. As such, it offers a unique interdisciplinary perspective on rhetoric, sustainability and higher education.
      Citation: International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education
      PubDate: 2017-11-06T03:41:05Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSHE-12-2015-0215
       
  • Sustainability consciousness of pre-service teachers in Pakistan
    • Pages: 1090 - 1107
      Abstract: International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, Volume 18, Issue 7, Page 1090-1107, November 2017.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to draw attention towards sustainability consciousness (SC) of pre-service teachers (student teachers) as their role is central in teaching for sustainable development. This paper investigated SC of the pre-service teachers in Pakistan and compared it with other undergraduate students in the country and with that of Swedish upper secondary students. Design/methodology/approach The paper used survey method using a tool developed by a group of Canadian researchers to measure knowledge, attitudes and behaviours towards sustainable development. The instrument was later adapted by a group of Swedish researchers to measure SC. Study data came from 207 pre-service teachers and 154 undergraduate students studying humanities. Findings The paper reports that SC of the pre-service teachers in Pakistan is much lower than that of Swedish upper secondary students. Moreover, the paper indicates that the SC of pre-service teachers is not different from other undergraduate students in the country. Practical implications This paper establishes a baseline of SC of the final-year pre-service teachers enrolled in BEd (Honours) programme in Pakistan. Such a study is critical in the context when ESD is a missing element in teacher education in Pakistan. In the presence of such a baseline study, teacher education institutes and departments might review their curricula in terms of their focus on ESD and plan for initiatives to educate pre-service teachers for sustainability. Originality/value The paper contributes to a broader debate on measuring SC of university students.
      Citation: International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education
      PubDate: 2017-11-06T03:41:10Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSHE-11-2016-0218
       
  • Experiential learning for engaging nutrition undergraduates with
           sustainability
    • Pages: 1108 - 1122
      Abstract: International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, Volume 18, Issue 7, Page 1108-1122, November 2017.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to describe students’ self-reported learning from engaging in an experiential learning task designed to develop their understanding of sustainable food systems and dietary practices. Design/methodology/approach In all, 143 first-year students enrolled in an entry level food and nutrition subject undertook a three-week eco-friendly food challenge (1. Reduce food (and food-related) waste; 2. localise food purchases; 3. eat seasonally and sustainably; or 4. reduce meat consumption). They blogged about their experience and respond to an action-orientated reflective question each week. Content analysis of the blogs was undertaken using NVivo 10. Content was systematically coded and categorised according to action/activity, learning and response to reflective question. Findings Students reported undertaking a range of self-selected practical activities throughout the challenge. Self-reported learning suggested students gained self-awareness and knowledge and demonstrated problem-solving abilities. The importance of planning and preparation was the most common theme in students’ blogs when responding to the action-orientated reflective question in Week 1. In Week 2, students identified socially mediated barriers and the time and energy required to undertake their challenge as the most likely barriers preventing others engaging in the challenge. They provided advice and solutions to overcome these barriers. In Week 3, a range of community, government and multi-sector initiatives to support consumer food-related behaviour change were identified. Originality/value This approach presents a possible means for engaging nutrition undergraduates with environmental sustainability.
      Citation: International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education
      PubDate: 2017-11-06T03:41:22Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSHE-01-2016-0010
       
  • Effective strategies for enhancing waste management at university campuses
    • Pages: 1123 - 1141
      Abstract: International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, Volume 18, Issue 7, Page 1123-1141, November 2017.
      Purpose The purpose of this study is to identify and assess the waste management strategies that should be priorities for higher education institutions. The role of policy instruments (i.e. purchasing policies and recycling initiatives) in implementing sustainable zero-waste management programs at higher education institutions was investigated through comparison of American top-level and Western Kentucky University (WKU) benchmark universities. Design/methodology/approach Waste minimization-oriented policy instruments implemented at American top-level and WKU benchmark universities were analyzed through policy evaluation techniques. Digital surveys were distributed to sustainability coordinators at WKU benchmark and top-level universities. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with survey participants. Findings It is important to identify well-defined temporal periods with goals and allocated tasks for direct and indirect stakeholders. Time periods should include planning for readiness programs and infrastructural needs, along with performing comprehensive waste characterization studies. As the waste program matures, the creation of integrated waste management policies with specific responsibilities for all stakeholders and departments will be required. Research limitations/implications The sampling of universities evaluated in this research is not representative of all universities in the USA or internationally, as they can vary widely. Yet, general waste management trends applicable to most universities can be gleaned from this research. Practical implications Widely varying zero-waste strategies are readily implemented at universities. A holistic review of successful waste management plans highlights key management approaches that should be included in all plans to ensure their success. Originality/value This study is one of the first of its kind to holistically evaluate policy factors influencing effective zero-waste management at higher education institutions.
      Citation: International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education
      PubDate: 2017-11-06T03:41:47Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSHE-01-2016-0017
       
  • How low can you go'
    • Pages: 1142 - 1156
      Abstract: International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, Volume 18, Issue 7, Page 1142-1156, November 2017.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to describe the impacts of an ecological footprint (EF) reduction campaign on the pro-environmental behavior of university students, faculty and staff. The campaign emphasized educating participants on specific actions that reduce resource use and the relative environmental benefit of each action. Design/methodology/approach This investigation used a pre-test–post-test design. At the beginning of an academic year, participants were invited to measure their baseline EF and take part in a footprint reduction campaign. At the end of the campaign, participants measured their EF again to see if they were able to reduce it by 10 per cent. Findings Participants in the footprint reduction campaign decreased their EF by 10 per cent. Students changed behaviors related to goods and services the most, resulting in a 16 per cent decrease in footprint for this behavior category. The most significant behavior change for faculty and staff was in the housing category with footprint reductions of 12 and 11 per cent, respectively. The most common behavioral changes in students were low- and no-cost options. Research limitations/implications Because of the general nature of the EF tool, estimates of resource use reduction are approximate. Data describing pro-environmental behaviors were self-reported by participants, making accuracy dependent on participant recollections. Originality/value This paper illustrates how providing quantitative, personalized and university-specific knowledge on the impact of personal lifestyles on natural resources can facilitate significant, measurable pro-environmental behavioral change for the entire campus community. It also provides direction on how to develop targeted sustainability campaigns for different audiences.
      Citation: International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education
      PubDate: 2017-11-06T03:41:16Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSHE-08-2015-0145
       
  • Low factual understanding and high anxiety about climate warming impedes
           university students to become sustainability stewards
    • Pages: 1157 - 1175
      Abstract: International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, Volume 18, Issue 7, Page 1157-1175, November 2017.
      Purpose This study, from Western Sydney University, aims to assess the disposition of students towards climate warming (CW) – a key component of sustainability. CW is a global reality. Any human born after February 1985 has never lived in a world that was not constantly warming, yet little is known about how higher education students perceive their future in a warming world. Design/methodology/approach An online survey, split into three parts, was used to deliver benchmark data on (I) personal information, (II) factual knowledge and (III) sentiments related to CW. Findings Gender and age of students significantly influenced their perception of CW. While self-rated understanding of CW was generally high, factual knowledge about CW was low. Few students recognized that CW was already under way, and that it was mainly caused by human activity. The most prominent emotions were fear, sadness and anger, foretelling widespread disempowerment and fear for the future. Research limitations/implications The study was based on a single dataset and survey response was relatively low. However, respondents mirrored the composition of the student community very well. Originality/value This is the first study revealing large psychological distance to the effects of CW in university students from Australia. Combined with the impression of despondence, the present study suggests that higher education in Australia, and possibly elsewhere, is not providing the prerequisite tools tomorrow’s leaders require for meeting societal, environmental and economic challenges caused by CW. Practical ways to erase these blind spots in sustainability literacy are provided, drawing upon established and novel concepts in higher education.
      Citation: International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education
      PubDate: 2017-11-06T03:40:49Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSHE-09-2016-0179
       
  • Promoting sustainable development implementation in higher education
    • Pages: 1176 - 1190
      Abstract: International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, Volume 18, Issue 7, Page 1176-1190, November 2017.
      Purpose This study aims to review the zeal exhibited by universities in South Africa towards aligning institutional mandates of teaching, learning, research and community engagement to the sustainable development (SD) agenda. The implementation of the SD agenda across higher education institutions (HEIs) continues to draw attention from the wider society. This is because HEIs are increasingly being looked up to for leadership in this regard. However, although several studies are quick to identify various factors which have driven the adoption of sustainable practices in HEIs, the paucity of studies seeking to identify the drivers for SD implementation remains glaring. This is particularly so in developing countries like South Africa. Design/methodology/approach To confirm the exploratory data from desktop study on public university engagement with sustainability in South Africa, a single case study was conducted in the Central University of Technology (CUT). The single case study design adopted semi-structured interviews and document reviews as data collection techniques. Purposive snowballing sampling technique was strictly adhered to in the selection of interviewees. Interviewees were selected on the basis of their roles in the implementation of the CUT’s sustainability agenda. Findings Data emanating from these interviews were analysed thematically using qualitative content analysis. Although a plethora of drivers were identified, there appeared to be a consensus between most of the interviewees that the quest for cost reduction remained the most significant driver for the viable implementation of the sustainability agenda at CUT. Research limitations/implications It is expected that findings from this study would provide a platform for the development of effective implementation strategies in South African HEIs. Also, the findings contribute to filing the extant gap observed concerning implementation and drivers for engendering SD implementation in HEIs in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) region. Practical implications By highlighting the drivers for SD implementation, this study contributes to the development of a more receptive social ontology among various stakeholders in an HEI towards the agenda, particularly within the SSA context where there is low level of awareness and buy-in by these stakeholders. Originality/value This study makes an original contribution to the research base of SD in HEIs and implementation.
      Citation: International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education
      PubDate: 2017-11-06T03:41:42Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSHE-09-2016-0167
       
  • Comparing faculty perceptions of sustainability teaching at two US
           universities
    • Pages: 1191 - 1211
      Abstract: International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, Volume 18, Issue 7, Page 1191-1211, November 2017.
      Purpose This study aims to examine and compare faculty perceptions of the process of institutionalizing sustainability, developing sustainability pedagogy and activating key sustainability competencies between the University of Oklahoma (OU) and Arizona State University (ASU). Design/methodology/approach Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 17 professors in the Department of Geography and Environmental Sustainability at OU and 10 professors in the School of Sustainability at ASU. Findings The results highlight the complexity of teaching sustainability in an interdisciplinary manner in both programs. Professors are incorporating many of the key competencies of sustainability teaching, but in a patchwork manner that does not necessary follow the comprehensive frameworks from the literature. Practical implications The comparative analysis leads to recommendations for teaching sustainability in higher education. Originality/value This study contributes to theories of sustainability teaching by identifying gaps between what professors are actually doing and experiencing and a set of best practices from the literature.
      Citation: International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education
      PubDate: 2017-11-06T03:40:57Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSHE-01-2016-0006
       
  • Developing pro-environmental behaviour: ecotourism fieldtrip and
           experiences
    • Pages: 1212 - 1229
      Abstract: International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, Volume 18, Issue 7, Page 1212-1229, November 2017.
      Purpose This study aims to assess the effectiveness of a student participatory approach and assessment to achieve an environmentally friendly behaviour and change strategy. Design/methodology/approach Three time-phase studies employed a participatory and experiential case in the form of ecotourism experiential learning and assessment using a sample of 100 higher education students. Findings The findings suggest that students’ participations through the development, implementation and maintenance of nature-based experiences, combined with professional guides in educating students about sustainable practices has significant and positive effects on pro-environmental behaviour (PEB). The study reveals that social-psychological constructs (except environmental awareness) and socio-demographic variables account for variances in PEB intentions and provides managerial implications for marketers on the use of student participation to enhance behaviour. Practical implications Experiential and guided learning adds value to PEB through performance accomplishments and instrumental support. Social implications The guiding principles of moral norms and acting in favour of the community (general social pressure and the underlying normative beliefs) lead to a higher tendency to perform according to the ideal behaviour. Originality/value This study is the first to use student participation, guided learning, tour guides and experiences to transfer the knowledge of PEB to individuals.
      Citation: International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education
      PubDate: 2017-11-06T03:41:53Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSHE-03-2016-0052
       
  • Mapping sustainability efforts at the Claremont colleges
    • Pages: 1230 - 1243
      Abstract: International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, Volume 18, Issue 7, Page 1230-1243, November 2017.
      Purpose The purpose of this study is to map and analyze sustainability activities and relationships at the seven Claremont Colleges and graduate institutions using social network analysis (SNA) to inform sustainability planning and programming. Design/methodology/approach Online surveys and interviews were conducted among faculty, staff and students, and a network map was created and analyzed using network statistics to identify network characteristics. Findings The mapped sustainability network has 291 one- and bi-directional connections but with substantial differences among institutions. Pomona and Pitzer colleges have the highest number of sustainability-related courses because of their popular Environmental Analysis programs. The two graduate schools and Scripps College are comparatively isolated. Scripps’ network is small but highly interconnected and resilient. Pomona’s network is extensive but concentrated on a single node. Several other key actors were identified based on the number of nodes extending from or connecting to them. Several new sustainability initiatives were recently launched in response to the study. Practical implications SNA and mapping for campus sustainability can highlight network gaps and network vulnerabilities. To increase completeness, a representative and sufficiently large data sample is needed, requiring multiple, coordinated forms of contact. Interviews yield more detailed and comprehensive information than online surveys but are more time-consuming. Thus, the combination of electronic surveys and in-person interviews can be a successful strategy for maximizing information collection. Originality/value The case study was the first of its kind conducted at the Claremont Colleges and one of the first in higher education. It informs sustainability planning, coordination and integration efforts.
      Citation: International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education
      PubDate: 2017-11-06T03:41:50Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSHE-12-2015-0206
       
  • Students’ attitudes to solid waste management in a Nigerian
           university
    • Pages: 1244 - 1262
      Abstract: International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, Volume 18, Issue 7, Page 1244-1262, November 2017.
      Purpose Waste management is a critical element of the campus sustainability movement in which Nigerian universities are yet to actively participate. The purpose of this study was to investigate prevalent waste management practices and the disposition of undergraduate students in a Nigerian University. Design/methodology/approach Data collection involved the use of a questionnaire, focus group discussion and participative observation. Respondents consisted of 840 students drawn from four academic faculties of the university. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to address the research questions raised to guide the investigation. Findings Indiscriminate littering, open dumping of waste, weedy and overgrown lawns, proliferation of power generating sets, uncollected refuse sites and defaced walls with postings were the major observed environmental challenges. Open burning of refuse was found to be the single most prevalent way of managing large volumes of waste generated on the university campus. Although the problems were widespread, only 40.5 per cent of the students expressed serious concern for the solid waste practices. Also, while the students were positively disposed to innovative ways of addressing the challenge of waste management in the university, there were significant differences in students’ awareness and disposition according to sex, age, academic level and faculties. Research limitations/implications The implications of the findings for campus-based sustainability education are discussed. Originality/value This study is an original research article which interrogated the students’ attitudes to solid waste management in a Nigerian University. It used a combination of both qualitative and quantitative techniques, such as questionnaire, focus group discussion and participative observation.
      Citation: International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education
      PubDate: 2017-11-06T03:41:40Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSHE-03-2016-0057
       
  • Assessing sustainability curriculum: from transmissive to transformative
           approaches
    • Pages: 1263 - 1278
      Abstract: International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, Volume 18, Issue 7, Page 1263-1278, November 2017.
      Purpose This paper aims to describe a two-stage sustainability curriculum assessment, providing tools and strategies for other faculty to use in implementing their own sustainability assessments. Design/methodology/approach In the first stage of the five-year curriculum assessment, the authors used an anonymous survey of sustainability faculty and requested data that would verify the survey’s self-reporting: updated sustainability syllabi, and answers to the question, “where have you integrated the three aspects of sustainability – biological systems, social systems, economic systems – into this course'” Finding that the self-reporting results did not match the evidence on the syllabi, the authors interrogated their methods from the faculty workshop trainings for sustainability curriculum transformation. Findings The authors’ workshops had not provided clear definitions for “sustainability” and the learning outcomes expected in sustainability courses. They had also not addressed the role of transformative pedagogy in teaching a holistic approach to sustainability. The research identified and transcended five key barriers to implementing sustainability curriculum: an over-reliance on faculty volunteers, unclear and unenforced expectations about sustainability implementations, a failure to recognize and circumvent institutional and philosophical barriers to teaching sustainability’s interdisciplinary approach through disciplinary-based curriculum, conceiving of sustainability pedagogy as transmission rather than transformation, and overlooking the ecology of educational systems as nested within the larger sociopolitical environment. Research limitations/implications This study confirms the limitations of faculty self-reporting unless augmented with verifiable data. Practical implications Sustainability educators can use this research to devise curriculum or program assessment on their campuses: the mixed-methods approach to data collection, the inquiry into sustainability workshop trainings, the elements required on sustainability syllabi for building a coherent sustainability studies program, the resources for practicing a transformative sustainability pedagogy, and the barriers to sustainability implementation along with strategies for surmounting these barriers will all be of use. Originality/value This paper explores and combats root causes for an all-too-common disconnection between positive faculty self-assessment and syllabi that do not fully integrate sustainability across the disciplines.
      Citation: International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education
      PubDate: 2017-11-06T03:41:15Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSHE-11-2015-0186
       
  • Promoting sustainability in a college café by opposite-sex cashiers
    • Pages: 1279 - 1290
      Abstract: International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, Volume 18, Issue 7, Page 1279-1290, November 2017.
      Purpose People engage in green consumption for many reasons, both conscious and unconscious. This paper aims to draw on evolutionary psychology to propose that hard-wired mating strategies encourage both men and women to increase their green consumption in the presence of members of the opposite sex. Design/methodology/approach Observations were conducted on 324 students who purchased cold drinks in disposable cups from a college café. The students were offered the choice of adding 20 cents to their purchase for a bio-degradable cup. Findings Overall, 160 students agreed to pay the premium for a bio-degradable cup, with green purchases 46 per cent higher among women and 61 per cent higher among men when facing a cashier of the opposite sex. Originality/value The findings suggest that the activation of mating cues prompts students to display prosocial, altruistic behavior and/or to engage in conspicuous consumption (i.e. agreeing to pay more for the sustainable product). The study was conducted in the field using naïve participants and demonstrates the application of evolutionary psychology to green marketing. It also adds to what is a surprisingly small literature on the effect of employee–customer gender mismatch.
      Citation: International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education
      PubDate: 2017-11-06T03:41:29Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSHE-01-2016-0013
       
  • A study of goal frames shaping pro-environmental behaviour in university
           students
    • Pages: 1291 - 1310
      Abstract: International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, Volume 18, Issue 7, Page 1291-1310, November 2017.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of university in shaping pro-environmental behaviour in students. Design/methodology/approach The paper used goal-framing theory to investigate the relationship between goals and pro-environmental behaviour by comparing the responses of entry- and exit-level students. Structural equation modeling, one-way analysis of variance and other standard statistical analysis have been used to analyse the data collected through questionnaire survey in a central university offering technical education in India. Findings Pro-environmental intention in students increases with a strong normative goal. The direct and indirect effects indicate hedonic goal and gain goal via normative goal leads to better pro-environmental behaviour. Higher values for normative goal in exit-level students substantiates the role of university. Practical implications The paper provides scope to improvise and incorporate environmental practices into the habits of the students by aligning their goals and university dimensions including curriculum, campus operations, research and outreach activities. Originality/value The results make an important contribution in establishing a sustained green culture by offering a new university paradigm.
      Citation: International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education
      PubDate: 2017-11-06T03:41:58Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSHE-10-2016-0185
       
  • An empirical assessment of administration and planning activity and their
           impact on the realization of sustainability-related initiatives and
           programs in higher education
    • Pages: 1311 - 1330
      Abstract: International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, Volume 18, Issue 7, Page 1311-1330, November 2017.
      Purpose Administrators in higher-education settings routinely create planning documents that help steer the organization in mission-centric ways. In the area of sustainability planning, strategic plans, sustainability plans and climate action plans are the most common methods used. The purpose of this study is to evaluate if specific forms of planning predict sustainability outcomes. Design/methodology/approach This question was evaluated via an empirical archival study of the AASHE STARS database in relation to planning, administration and governance credits and criteria to determine if specific forms of planning were predictive of sustainability implementation outcomes in the categories of Education and Research, Operations, Diversity and Affordability, Human Resources, Investment, Public Engagement and Innovation. Findings Findings support the notion that climate action plans were most predictive of achieving sustainability outcomes, and strategic plans were best able to predict educational outcomes. Practical implications These findings have important implications for the design and execution of sustainability planning processes in higher-education institutions. Originality/value The academic literature contains relatively few empirical studies that demonstrate the capacity of planning on the realization of sustainability outcomes.
      Citation: International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education
      PubDate: 2017-11-06T03:40:39Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSHE-03-2016-0047
       
 
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
Fax: +00 44 (0)131 4513327
 
Home (Search)
Subjects A-Z
Publishers A-Z
Customise
APIs
Your IP address: 107.20.120.65
 
About JournalTOCs
API
Help
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-2016