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Publisher: Emerald   (Total: 312 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 312 Journals sorted alphabetically
A Life in the Day     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Accounting Auditing & Accountability J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Accounting Research J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.26, h-index: 7)
Accounting, Auditing and Accountability J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.88, h-index: 40)
Advances in Accounting Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.514, h-index: 5)
Advances in Appreciative Inquiry     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.124, h-index: 5)
Advances in Dual Diagnosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47, SJR: 0.228, h-index: 2)
Advances in Gender Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.229, h-index: 7)
Advances in Intl. Marketing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.123, h-index: 11)
Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50, SJR: 0.29, h-index: 5)
Advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
African J. of Economic and Management Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.125, h-index: 2)
Agricultural Finance Review     Hybrid Journal  
Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 119, SJR: 0.391, h-index: 18)
American J. of Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.215, h-index: 25)
Arts Marketing : An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Asia Pacific J. of Marketing and Logistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.244, h-index: 15)
Asia-Pacific J. of Business Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.182, h-index: 7)
Asian Education and Development Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Asian J. on Quality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Asian Review of Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.29, h-index: 7)
Aslib J. of Information Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.65, h-index: 29)
Aslib Proceedings     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 174)
Assembly Automation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.657, h-index: 26)
Baltic J. of Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.354, h-index: 14)
Benchmarking : An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.556, h-index: 38)
British Food J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.329, h-index: 35)
Built Environment Project and Asset Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.232, h-index: 4)
Business Process Management J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.614, h-index: 42)
Business Strategy Series     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.201, h-index: 6)
Campus-Wide Information Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Career Development Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.686, h-index: 32)
China Agricultural Economic Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.238, h-index: 10)
China Finance Review Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Chinese Management Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.216, h-index: 12)
Circuit World     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.346, h-index: 17)
Clinical Governance: An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.277, h-index: 15)
Collection Building     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.829, h-index: 10)
COMPEL: The Intl. J. for Computation and Mathematics in Electrical and Electronic Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.269, h-index: 22)
Competitiveness Review : An Intl. Business J. incorporating J. of Global Competitiveness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Construction Innovation: Information, Process, Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.508, h-index: 8)
Corporate Communications An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.703, h-index: 26)
Corporate Governance Intl. J. of Business in Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.309, h-index: 29)
Critical Perspectives on Intl. Business     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.32, h-index: 15)
Cross Cultural Management An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.356, h-index: 13)
Development and Learning in Organizations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.138, h-index: 8)
Direct Marketing An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Disaster Prevention and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.533, h-index: 32)
Drugs and Alcohol Today     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 93, SJR: 0.241, h-index: 4)
Education + Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.532, h-index: 30)
Education, Business and Society : Contemporary Middle Eastern Issues     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.141, h-index: 10)
Employee Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.435, h-index: 22)
Engineering Computations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.387, h-index: 39)
Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.541, h-index: 28)
Equal Opportunities Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Equality, Diversity and Inclusion : An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.239, h-index: 9)
Ethnicity and Inequalities in Health and Social Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.13, h-index: 2)
EuroMed J. of Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.145, h-index: 9)
European Business Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.481, h-index: 21)
European J. of Innovation Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.596, h-index: 30)
European J. of Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.933, h-index: 55)
European J. of Training and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.489, h-index: 23)
Evidence-based HRM     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Facilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.371, h-index: 18)
foresight     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.486, h-index: 20)
Gender in Management : An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.359, h-index: 22)
Grey Systems : Theory and Application     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Health Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.383, h-index: 17)
Higher Education, Skills and Work-based Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 0.172, h-index: 4)
History of Education Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.141, h-index: 2)
Housing, Care and Support     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.174, h-index: 4)
Human Resource Management Intl. Digest     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.121, h-index: 6)
Humanomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.14, h-index: 4)
Indian Growth and Development Review     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.163, h-index: 4)
Industrial and Commercial Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.217, h-index: 14)
Industrial Lubrication and Tribology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.322, h-index: 19)
Industrial Management & Data Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.63, h-index: 69)
Industrial Robot An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.375, h-index: 32)
Info     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.25, h-index: 21)
Information and Computer Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Information Technology & People     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45, SJR: 0.576, h-index: 28)
Interactive Technology and Smart Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.112, h-index: 1)
Interlending & Document Supply     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 59, SJR: 0.48, h-index: 13)
Internet Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41, SJR: 1.746, h-index: 57)
Intl. J. for Lesson and Learning Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. for Researcher Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Intl. J. of Accounting and Information Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.304, h-index: 7)
Intl. J. of Bank Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.515, h-index: 38)
Intl. J. of Climate Change Strategies and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.416, h-index: 7)
Intl. J. of Clothing Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.279, h-index: 25)
Intl. J. of Commerce and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Conflict Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.763, h-index: 38)
Intl. J. of Contemporary Hospitality Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.329, h-index: 35)
Intl. J. of Culture Tourism and Hospitality Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.399, h-index: 5)
Intl. J. of Development Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Intl. J. of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.225, h-index: 7)
Intl. J. of Educational Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.424, h-index: 32)
Intl. J. of Emergency Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.179, h-index: 1)
Intl. J. of Emerging Markets     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.199, h-index: 5)
Intl. J. of Energy Sector Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.25, h-index: 12)
Intl. J. of Entrepreneurial Behaviour & Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.694, h-index: 28)
Intl. J. of Event and Festival Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.32, h-index: 8)
Intl. J. of Gender and Entrepreneurship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.638, h-index: 6)
Intl. J. of Health Care Quality Assurance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.352, h-index: 32)
Intl. J. of Housing Markets and Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.201, h-index: 5)
Intl. J. of Intelligent Computing and Cybernetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.258, h-index: 10)
Intl. J. of Intelligent Unmanned Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.145, h-index: 2)
Intl. J. of Islamic and Middle Eastern Finance and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Intl. J. of Law and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.107, h-index: 2)
Intl. J. of Law in the Built Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.111, h-index: 2)
Intl. J. of Leadership in Public Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Intl. J. of Lean Six Sigma     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.562, h-index: 15)
Intl. J. of Logistics Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.998, h-index: 15)
Intl. J. of Managerial Finance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.212, h-index: 11)
Intl. J. of Managing Projects in Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Manpower     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.354, h-index: 37)
Intl. J. of Mentoring and Coaching in Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Intl. J. of Migration, Health and Social Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.261, h-index: 5)
Intl. J. of Numerical Methods for Heat & Fluid Flow     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.594, h-index: 32)
Intl. J. of Operations & Production Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 2.198, h-index: 94)
Intl. J. of Organizational Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.222, h-index: 11)
Intl. J. of Pervasive Computing and Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.165, h-index: 9)
Intl. J. of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.304, h-index: 12)
Intl. J. of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.694, h-index: 66)
Intl. J. of Prisoner Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.254, h-index: 10)
Intl. J. of Productivity and Performance Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.785, h-index: 31)
Intl. J. of Public Sector Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.272, h-index: 37)
Intl. J. of Quality & Reliability Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.544, h-index: 63)
Intl. J. of Quality and Service Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.133, h-index: 1)
Intl. J. of Retail & Distribution Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.543, h-index: 36)
Intl. J. of Service Industry Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Social Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.227, h-index: 25)
Intl. J. of Sociology and Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43, SJR: 0.361, h-index: 5)
Intl. J. of Structural Integrity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.325, h-index: 8)
Intl. J. of Sustainability in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.616, h-index: 29)
Intl. J. of Web Information Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.208, h-index: 13)
Intl. J. of Wine Business Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.196, h-index: 12)
Intl. J. of Workplace Health Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.358, h-index: 8)
Intl. Marketing Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 1.076, h-index: 57)
J. of Accounting & Organizational Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.346, h-index: 7)
J. of Accounting in Emerging Economies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
J. of Adult Protection, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.291, h-index: 7)
J. of Advances in Management Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
J. of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44, SJR: 0.177, h-index: 9)
J. of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
J. of Applied Accounting Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.22, h-index: 5)
J. of Applied Research in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
J. of Asia Business Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.115, h-index: 1)
J. of Assistive Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.215, h-index: 6)
J. of Business & Industrial Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.664, h-index: 48)
J. of Business Strategy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.381, h-index: 17)
J. of Children's Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.167, h-index: 9)
J. of Chinese Economic and Foreign Trade Studies     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.188, h-index: 4)
J. of Chinese Entrepreneurship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
J. of Chinese Human Resource Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.112, h-index: 3)
J. of Communication Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.735, h-index: 6)
J. of Consumer Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.613, h-index: 62)
J. of Corporate Real Estate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.633, h-index: 5)
J. of Criminal Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 93, SJR: 0.13, h-index: 1)
J. of Criminological Research, Policy and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
J. of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.109, h-index: 5)
J. of Documentation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 153, SJR: 0.936, h-index: 50)
J. of Economic and Administrative Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
J. of Economic Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.498, h-index: 26)
J. of Educational Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.848, h-index: 36)
J. of Engineering, Design and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.173, h-index: 10)
J. of Enterprise Information Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.433, h-index: 38)
J. of Enterprising Communities People and Places in the Global Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.212, h-index: 8)
J. of Entrepreneurship and Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
J. of European Industrial Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
J. of European Real Estate Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.52, h-index: 7)
J. of Facilities Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
J. of Family Business Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
J. of Fashion Marketing and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.529, h-index: 30)
J. of Financial Crime     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 335, SJR: 0.158, h-index: 5)
J. of Financial Economic Policy     Hybrid Journal  
J. of Financial Management of Property and Construction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.234, h-index: 1)
J. of Financial Regulation and Compliance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
J. of Financial Reporting and Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
J. of Forensic Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 0.225, h-index: 8)
J. of Global Mobility     Hybrid Journal  
J. of Global Responsibility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
J. of Health Organisation and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.67, h-index: 27)
J. of Historical Research in Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.376, h-index: 8)
J. of Hospitality and Tourism Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.672, h-index: 10)
J. of Human Resource Costing & Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
J. of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
J. of Indian Business Research     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.184, h-index: 2)
J. of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.209, h-index: 3)
J. of Integrated Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.286, h-index: 8)
J. of Intellectual Capital     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.726, h-index: 36)
J. of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.321, h-index: 3)
J. of Intl. Education in Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
J. of Intl. Trade Law and Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.158, h-index: 4)
J. of Investment Compliance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
J. of Islamic Accounting and Business Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
J. of Islamic Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.465, h-index: 15)
J. of Knowledge Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 93, SJR: 1.12, h-index: 49)
J. of Knowledge-based Innovation in China     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)

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Journal Cover International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
  [SJR: 0.352]   [H-I: 32]   [6 followers]  Follow
    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 0952-6862
   Published by Emerald Homepage  [312 journals]
  • Evaluation of patient wristbands and patient Identification process in a
           training hospital in Turkey
    • Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 29, Issue 8, October 2016.
      Purpose The aim of this study is to evaluate the utilisation of patient wristbands and the patient identification process in a training hospital in Ankara, Turkey. Design/methodology/approach This descriptive and cross-sectional study was conducted in a training hospital with 640 beds, accredited by Joint Commission International. The views of 348 patients and 419 hospital personnel on the implementation of patient wristbands and identification process were evaluated. Findings The results indicated that lack of information among patients about the importance of patient wristbands, and the misknowledge among staff participants on when, where and by whom patient wristbands should be put on and verified, were the weakest points in this hospital. Research limitations/implications Patient identification process must be strictly implemented according to the standard procedures of patient safety. Both patients and hospital personnel should be trained continuously and training sections must be held to increase their awareness about the importance of patient wristbands and identification. Practical implications Finding new ways and using new methods for increasing knowledge about patient identification and patient wristbands are necessary. Hospital management should prepare a written patient identification and patient wristband policy and procedure document by taking the views of patients and hospital personnel, and share it with them. Originality/value This study incorporates the views and attitudes of patients and healthcare personnel in improving health care quality by increasing awareness about patient identification and wristbands.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2016-08-25T11:18:59Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-04-2016-0052
       
  • Health providers’ perception of quality of care for neonates in health
           facilities in a municipality in southern Ghana
    • Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 29, Issue 8, October 2016.
      Purpose To assess available human resources for neonatal care and their skills, in order to explore health providers’ perceptions of quality of neonatal care in health facilities in Ghana. Design/methodology/approach Data were gathered using qualitative interviews with health providers working in the maternity and paediatric wards and midwives; direct observation; and documentary review at a regional hospital, a municipal hospital and four health centres in a municipality in a region in southern Ghana. Data was analysed using thematic framework through the process of coding in six phases to create and establish meaningful patterns. Findings The study revealed that health providers were concerned about the number of staff available, their competence and also equipment available for them to work more efficiently. Some essential equipment for neonatal care were either not available or were non-functional where they were available while aseptic procedures were not been adhered to. Moreover, personal protective equipment such as facemask, caps, aprons were not used except in the labour wards where staff had to change their footwear before entering. Research limitations/implications Limited number of health providers and facilities used, lack of exploration of parents of neonates’ perspective of quality of neonatal care in this study and other settings, including the teaching hospitals. We did not examine issues related to the ineffective use of IV cannulation for neonates by nurses as well as referral of neonates. Additionally, we did not explore the perspectives of management of the municipal and regional health directorates or policy makers of the Ministry of Health and Ghana Health Service regarding the shortage of staff, inadequate provision of medical equipment and infrastructure. Practical implications This paper suggests the need for policy makers to redirect their attention to the issues that would improve the quality of neonatal health care in health facilities in Ghana and in countries with similar challenges. Originality/value There seemed to be no defined policy framework for management of neonatal care in the country’s health care facilities. The study recommends the adoption of paediatric and neonatal care nursing as a specialty in the curricula of health training institutions. In-service trainings should encompass issues related to management of sick babies, care of preterm babies, neonatal resuscitation, and intravenous (IV) cannulation, among others.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2016-08-25T11:18:58Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-04-2016-0055
       
  • Stakeholders’ roles and responsibilities regarding quality of care
    • Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 29, Issue 8, October 2016.
      Purpose The aim of this research was to describe how different stakeholders (society, managers, employees and clients) can together ensure the quality of care. Design/methodology/approach Qualitative data were collected from four focus group interviews conducted in three countries. All interviewees were pursuing a master’s degree in social and/or health care management and had begun working in their field after completing their bachelor’s degree. The data were analysed using inductive content analysis. Findings The society and managers are responsible for the care system as a whole and must apply system-oriented, rather than sector-oriented, thinking. Employees are responsible for ensuring the continuity of client services in their work, and managers and employees share the responsibility of achieving the organisational goals and quality standards. The clients are responsible for acting as responsible service users and providing the required information to obtain care. Communication was strongly emphasised in the data, and it necessitates cross-professional and organisational boundaries, professional and political boundaries, as well as boundaries between the professional and the client. Research limitations/implications Since the interviewees were all pursuing a master’s degree in social and/or health care management, when reflecting on their work experience, they may have also been reflecting what they had learned in university. Practical implications This study emphasises the importance of collaboration and communication between stakeholders in ensuring the quality of care. Unpredictable economies, the ageing population and the ongoing integration and reorganization of health and social care services in Europe highlight systematic and strategic approach in quality of care. Originality/value This paper claims that communication between different care stakeholders gives a more systematic and coherent framework for the quality of care. Quality of care is a strategic choice and part of the strategic decision making at the societal, political, organisational and managerial levels.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2016-08-25T11:18:57Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-06-2015-0070
       
  • Healthcare and aging: do European Union countries differ?
    • Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 29, Issue 8, October 2016.
      Purpose The aim of our study was to evaluate socio-economic inequalities in the use, accessibility and satisfaction with health services amongst 60-84 year old people from seven European urban communities. Design/methodology/approach Data for this study was collected in 2009. The target population were people aged 60–84 years from Stuttgart (Germany), Athens (Greece), Ancona (Italy), Kaunas (Lithuania), Porto (Portugal), Granada (Spain), and Stockholm (Sweden). The total sample comprised 4,467 respondents with a mean response rate across these countries of 45.2%. Findings Our study demonstrated that the majority of respondents had contact with a health care provider within the last 12 months. The highest percentages were reported by respondents from Spain (97.8%) and Portugal (97.7%). The results suggest that 13.0% of respondents had refrained from seeking care services. The highest rates were amongst seniors from Lithuania (24.0%), Germany (16.2%) and Portugal (15.4%). Logistic regression suggests that seniors who refrained from seeking health care was statistically significant associated with those with higher levels of education (OR=1.21; 95% CI=1.01-1.25) and financial strain (OR=1.26; 95% CI=1.16-1.37). Furthermore, the majority of respondents were satisfied with health care services. Originality/value The findings from the ABUEL study indicate the existence of significant variations in use, accessibility and satisfaction with health services by country and for socio-economic factors related to organizing and financing of care systems.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2016-08-25T11:18:55Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-09-2015-0110
       
  • The impact of Lean bundles on hospital performance, does size matter?
    • Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 29, Issue 8, October 2016.
      Purpose The purpose of this research is to study the effect of the implementation of Lean bundles on hospital performance in private hospitals in Jordan and evaluate how much the size of organization can affect the relationship between lean bundles implementation and hospital performance. Design/methodology/approach The research is considered as quantitative method (descriptive and hypothesis testing). Three statistical techniques were adopted to analyse the data. Structural Equation Modelling (SEM) techniques and multi-group analysis were used to examine the research’s hypothesis, and to perform the required statistical analysis of the data from the survey. Reliability analysis and confirmatory factor analysis were used to test the construct validity, reliability, and measurement loadings that were performed. Findings Lean bundles have been identified as an effective approach that can dramatically improve the organizational performance of private hospitals in Jordan. Main Lean bundles- Just In Time, Human Resource Management, and Total Quality Management are applicable to large, small and medium hospitals without significant differences in advantages that depend on size. Originality/value According to the researchers' best knowledge, this is the first research that studies the impact of Lean bundles implementation in healthcare sector in Jordan. This research also makes a significant contribution for decision makers in health care to increase their awareness of Lean bundles.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2016-08-25T11:18:54Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-07-2015-0083
       
  • Dispensing medication refills without counselling - an evaluation on
           efficiency, safety and patient acceptance
    • Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 29, Issue 8, October 2016.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to assess the safety and efficiency of, and acceptance by, patients on an Express Refill Service (ERS). Design/methodology/approach A pilot uncontrolled, cross-sectional, single-centred study was conducted at the outpatient pharmacy of a tertiary hospital. Under ERS, prescriptions are dispensed without review and counselling, for patients refilling prescription medications. Efficiency was assessed by comparing processing times of ERS prescriptions with regular prescriptions. Safety was assessed by independent review of prescriptions by two pharmacists. Patient acceptance was assessed by a survey. Findings ERS reduces processing time of prescriptions by more than 30% compared to the regular fill process. ERS is generally safe for patients, with drug-related problems identified in only one prescription. It is accepted by patients who opt for the service, as 91.4% agreed or strongly agreed that they were satisfied with the service. Research limitations/implications The study was conducted on a small convenience sample of patients in a single centre, with no control group. Practical implications Results show that ERS is efficient, safe and well accepted for select patients refilling their prescriptions. This leads to shorter waiting times and greater patient satisfaction. Originality/value This is the first published study that has explored the feasibility of an express prescription refill service. Despite some limitations, this study shows that omitting prospective clinical review and patient counselling can reduce processing time and improve patient satisfaction.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2016-08-25T11:18:53Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-04-2016-0040
       
  • Barriers to accurately measuring patients’ dietary intake in hospitals
           using the visual estimation method: a qualitative study
    • Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 29, Issue 8, October 2016.
      Purpose Visual estimation, an easy-to-perform technique, is commonly used in hospitals to assess dietary intake in patients. We performed a qualitative study where we interviewed nurses and dietitians about their perceptions of barriers to accurately measuring patients’ dietary intake in hospitals using the visual estimation method. Design/methodology/approach Ten dietitians and 10 clinical nurses responded to 30-minute, individual interviews in Tokyo, Japan, in September 2014. Each interview was conducted using a common protocol of open-ended questions focusing on the challenges of the visual estimation method and barriers to accurately measuring patients’ dietary intake as part of their routine work. The tape-recorded interviews were transcribed and analyzed based on Grounded Theory. Findings Five main categories emerged: hospitals, meals, colleagues, raters, and patients. Various individual barriers such as skill, attitude, knowledge, and others that had not been considered in previous studies also emerged. External barriers that were out of the raters' control, such as shortage of time, human resources, financial ability, and others, emerged from the “hospitals” category. Research limitations/implications Research participants were all females and many of them had less than 10 years of experience. Practical implications In addition to standardizing the visual estimation process, medical staff need to overcome various other internal and external barriers to accurate measurements. Originality/value This is the first study to articulate some important barriers that influence reliability and validity when measuring patients’ dietary intake by visual estimation methods in typical clinical settings.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2016-08-25T11:18:51Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-04-2016-0042
       
  • Improving patient and staff outcomes using practice development
    • Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 29, Issue 8, October 2016.
      Purpose This study examines the impact of a practice development program, ‘Essentials of Care’ (EOC), on patient and staff outcomes, workplace culture and service delivery. Design/methodology/approach A descriptive study design was used to explore the impact of EOC in a district hospital rehabilitation ward. EOC focuses on embedding a person centred culture within clinical areas and is structured from practice development methodologies. EOC was implemented in a metropolitan district hospital rehabilitation older person 20-bed ward. Findings Two projects were implemented during EOC. These projects led to nine significant patient and staff outcomes for medication and continence care practices. Outcomes included a reduction in older person complaints by 80%; pressure injuries by 62%; ward multi resistant staphylococcus aureus infection rates by 50%; clinical incidents by 22%; older person falls by 14% (per 1000 bed days); and nursing sick leave by 10%. There was also a 13% improvement in the post nursing workplace satisfaction survey. Research limitations/implications This is a single site study and findings may not be suitable for generalising across ward settings and broader population groups. Originality/value The EOC program led to significant improvements for and in clinical practices, staff satisfaction and ward culture. Specifically, the EOC program also identified significant cost savings and brought together the healthcare team in a cohesive and integrated way not previously experienced by staff. Practice development strategies can champion service quality improvement, optimal patient outcomes and consistency within healthcare.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2016-08-25T11:18:50Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-02-2016-0020
       
  • Mind the Gap; discrepancies at local, national and international levels
    • Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 29, Issue 8, October 2016.

      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2016-08-25T11:18:49Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-06-2016-0092
       
  • Editorial
    • Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 29, Issue 7, August 2016.

      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2016-08-01T07:18:38Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-05-2016-0076
       
  • Quality of life in breast cancer sufferers
    • Pages: 721 - 732
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 29, Issue 7, Page 721-732, August 2016.
      Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to measure health-related quality of life (QOL) among patients with early stage cancer breast under curative treatment at department of oncology and nuclear medicine at Ain Shams University Hospitals. Identify factors affecting QOL among these patients. Design/methodology/approach – A cross-sectional study measured QOL among early stage female breast cancer (BC) patients and determined the main factors affecting their QOL. Three interviewer administered questionnaires were used. Findings – The physical domain mostly affected in BC patients and the functional domain least. Socio-demographic factors that significantly affected BC patients QOL scores were patient age, education, having children and family income. Specific patient characteristics include caregiver presence – a factor that affected different QOL scores. Age at diagnosis, affection in the side of the predominant hand, post-operative chemotherapy and difficulty in obtaining the medication were the disease-related factors that affected QOL scores. Originality/value – The final model predicting QOL for early stage female BC patients included age, education and difficulty in obtaining the medication as determinants for total QOL score. Carer presence was the specific patient characteristic that affected different QOL scores.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2016-08-01T07:18:03Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-05-2015-0057
       
  • Improving outpatient phlebotomy service efficiency and patient experience
           using discrete-event simulation
    • Pages: 733 - 743
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 29, Issue 7, Page 733-743, August 2016.
      Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to present a simulation modeling application to reconfigure the outpatient phlebotomy service of an acute regional and teaching hospital in Hong Kong, with an aim to improve service efficiency, shorten patient queuing time and enhance workforce utilization. Design/methodology/approach – The system was modeled as an inhomogeneous Poisson process and a discrete-event simulation model was developed to simulate the current setting, and to evaluate how various performance metrics would change if switched from a decentralized to a centralized model. Variations were then made to the model to test different workforce arrangements for the centralized service, so that managers could decide on the service’s final configuration via an evidence-based and data-driven approach. Findings – This paper provides empirical insights about the relationship between staffing arrangement and system performance via a detailed scenario analysis. One particular staffing scenario was chosen by manages as it was considered to strike the best balance between performance and workforce scheduled. The resulting centralized phlebotomy service was successfully commissioned. Practical implications – This paper demonstrates how analytics could be used for operational planning at the hospital level. The authors show that a transparent and evidence-based scenario analysis, made available through analytics and simulation, greatly facilitates management and clinical stakeholders to arrive at the ideal service configuration. Originality/value – The authors provide a robust method in evaluating the relationship between workforce investment, queuing reduction and workforce utilization, which is crucial for managers when deciding the delivery model for any outpatient-related service.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2016-08-01T07:18:55Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-08-2015-0093
       
  • Clinical Assessment of Risk Management: an INtegrated Approach (CARMINA)
    • Pages: 744 - 758
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 29, Issue 7, Page 744-758, August 2016.
      Purpose – The European Union recommendations for patient safety calls for shared clinical risk management (CRM) safety standards able to guide organizations in CRM implementation. The purpose of this paper is to develop a self-evaluation tool to measure healthcare organization performance on CRM and guide improvements over time. Design/methodology/approach – A multi-step approach was implemented including: a systematic literature review; consensus meetings with an expert panel from eight Italian leader organizations to get to an agreement on the first version; field testing to test instrument feasibility and flexibility; Delphi strategy with a second expert panel for content validation and balanced scoring system development. Findings – The self-assessment tool – Clinical Assessment of Risk Management: an INtegrated Approach includes seven areas (governance, communication, knowledge and skills, safe environment, care processes, adverse event management, learning from experience) and 52 standards. Each standard is evaluated according to four performance levels: minimum; monitoring; outcomes; and improvement actions, which resulted in a feasible, flexible and valid instrument to be used throughout different organizations. Practical implications – This tool allows practitioners to assess their CRM activities compared to minimum levels, monitor performance, benchmarking with other institutions and spreading results to different stakeholders. Originality/value – The multi-step approach allowed us to identify core minimum CRM levels in a field where no consensus has been reached. Most standards may be easily adopted in other countries.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2016-08-01T07:18:44Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-11-2015-0140
       
  • Outpatient clinic waiting time, provider communication styles and
           satisfaction with healthcare in India
    • Pages: 759 - 777
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 29, Issue 7, Page 759-777, August 2016.
      Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the impact of extended waiting time on patients’ perceptions of provider communication skills and in-clinic satisfaction, in three major cities in India. Design/methodology/approach – In total, 625 patients were interviewed. The multivariate general linear model was used to determine the causality and relationship between the independent and the dependent variable. A moderation analysis was also conducted to assess waiting time role as a potential moderator in doctor-patient communication. Findings – Results show that patients with higher waiting time were less satisfied with health care quality. Male patients and patients of male providers were more affected by extended waiting time than female patients and patients of female providers. The advanced regression analysis, however, suggests weak support for waiting time and its effect on overall satisfaction with clinic quality. Waiting time did not moderate the relationship between satisfaction with dominant communication style, and overall satisfaction at the outpatient clinic. Research limitations/implications – A cross-sectional study does not easily lend itself to explaining causality with certainty. Thus, sophisticated techniques, such as structural equation modelling may also be utilized to assess the influence of extended waiting time on satisfaction with healthcare at outpatient clinics. Practical implications – Findings are relevant for providers as the onus is on them to ensure patient satisfaction. They should initiate a workable waiting time assessment model at the operational level. Originality/value – There has been a relatively lesser focus on patient waiting time in patient-provider satisfaction studies. In India, this aspect is still vastly unexplored especially in the context of outpatient clinics. Gender wise pattern of patient satisfaction and waiting time is also missing in most studies.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2016-08-01T07:19:03Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-02-2016-0017
       
  • Survival probability in patients with liver trauma
    • Pages: 778 - 785
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 29, Issue 7, Page 778-785, August 2016.
      Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to assess the survival probability among patients with liver trauma injury using the anatomical and psychological scores of conditions, characteristics and treatment modes. Design/methodology/approach – A logistic model is used to estimate 173 patients’ survival probability. Data are taken from patient records. Only emergency room patients admitted to University Hospital of Trauma (former Military Hospital) in Tirana are included. Data are recorded anonymously, preserving the patients’ privacy. Findings – When correctly predicted, the logistic models show that survival probability varies from 70.5 percent up to 95.4 percent. The degree of trauma injury, trauma with liver and other organs, total days the patient was hospitalized, and treatment method (conservative vs intervention) are statistically important in explaining survival probability. Practical implications – The study gives patients, their relatives and physicians ample and sound information they can use to predict survival chances, the best treatment and resource management. Originality/value – This study, which has not been done previously, explores survival probability, success probability for conservative and non-conservative treatment, and success probability for single vs multiple injuries from liver trauma.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2016-08-01T07:18:28Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-04-2016-0045
       
  • Managing healthcare information: analyzing trust
    • Pages: 786 - 800
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 29, Issue 7, Page 786-800, August 2016.
      Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to analyze two case studies with a trust matrix tool, to identify trust issues related to electronic health records. Design/methodology/approach – A qualitative research approach is applied using two case studies. The data analysis of these studies generated a problem list, which was mapped to a trust matrix. Findings – Results demonstrate flaws in current practices and point to achieving balance between organizational, person and technology trust perspectives. The analysis revealed three challenge areas, to: achieve higher trust in patient-focussed healthcare; improve communication between patients and healthcare professionals; and establish clear terminology. By taking trust into account, a more holistic perspective on healthcare can be achieved, where trust can be obtained and optimized. Research limitations/implications – A trust matrix is tested and shown to identify trust problems on different levels and relating to trusting beliefs. Future research should elaborate and more fully address issues within three identified challenge areas. Practical implications – The trust matrix’s usefulness as a tool for organizations to analyze trust problems and issues is demonstrated. Originality/value – Healthcare trust issues are captured to a greater extent and from previously unchartered perspectives.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2016-08-01T07:18:12Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-11-2015-0136
       
  • Performance indicators: healthcare professionals’ views
    • Pages: 801 - 815
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 29, Issue 7, Page 801-815, August 2016.
      Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to capture factors behind professional views of indicator usefulness as a common structure for assessing healthcare performance and their important characteristics to design limited key performance indicators (PIs) for holistic hospital management. Design/methodology/approach – Two surveys were conducted using self-administered questionnaires, in which hospital manager/staff respondents were asked to rate the 52 PIs’ usefulness. In total, 228 manager and 894 staff responses were collected. Findings – Eight factors were elicited from manager and staff responses as performance measures with 72 percent cumulative variance accounted for. Hospital managers and staff showed similar performance measure perceptions: high-utility acknowledgment on safety, operational efficiency and patient/employee satisfaction but relatively low-employee development concerns. Manager indicator usefulness perceptions were rather homogeneous and significantly higher than staff for almost all performance measures. Practical implications – Homogeneous manager views mean that a single key PI set for hospital management may be established regardless of hospital attributes. The following aspects may be measures that should be managed in a healthcare organization based on their key PIs: patient/employee safety, operational efficiency, financial effectiveness and patient/employee satisfaction. Originality/value – This is a pilot study on hospital management PIs in Japan. The eight-dimensional factor structure and findings about healthcare provider perceptions may be useful for healthcare management.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2016-08-01T07:18:34Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-12-2015-0142
       
 
 
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