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Publisher: Emerald   (Total: 356 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 356 Journals sorted alphabetically
A Life in the Day     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Academia Revista Latinoamericana de Administraci√≥n     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.178, CiteScore: 1)
Accounting Auditing & Accountability J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32, SJR: 1.71, CiteScore: 3)
Accounting Research J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.144, CiteScore: 0)
Accounting, Auditing and Accountability J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 2.187, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Accounting Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.279, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Appreciative Inquiry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.451, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Autism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33, SJR: 0.222, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Dual Diagnosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46, SJR: 0.21, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Gender Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.16, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Intl. Marketing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 83, SJR: 0.296, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
African J. of Economic and Management Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.216, CiteScore: 1)
Agricultural Finance Review     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.406, CiteScore: 1)
Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 219, SJR: 0.354, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Annals in Social Responsibility     Full-text available via subscription  
Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.235, CiteScore: 1)
Arts and the Market     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Asia Pacific J. of Innovation and Entrepreneurship     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asia Pacific J. of Marketing and Logistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.425, CiteScore: 1)
Asia-Pacific J. of Business Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.234, CiteScore: 1)
Asian Association of Open Universities J.     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian Education and Development Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.233, CiteScore: 1)
Asian J. on Quality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Asian Review of Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.222, CiteScore: 1)
Aslib J. of Information Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31, SJR: 0.725, CiteScore: 2)
Aslib Proceedings     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 312)
Assembly Automation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.603, CiteScore: 2)
Baltic J. of Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.309, CiteScore: 1)
Benchmarking : An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.559, CiteScore: 2)
British Food J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.5, CiteScore: 2)
Built Environment Project and Asset Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.46, CiteScore: 1)
Business Process Re-engineering & Management J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Business Strategy Series     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Career Development Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.527, CiteScore: 2)
China Agricultural Economic Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.31, CiteScore: 1)
China Finance Review Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.245, CiteScore: 0)
Chinese Management Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.278, CiteScore: 1)
Circuit World     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.246, CiteScore: 1)
Collection and Curation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.296, CiteScore: 1)
COMPEL: The Intl. J. for Computation and Mathematics in Electrical and Electronic Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.22, CiteScore: 1)
Competitiveness Review : An Intl. Business J. incorporating J. of Global Competitiveness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.274, CiteScore: 1)
Construction Innovation: Information, Process, Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.731, CiteScore: 2)
Corporate Communications An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.453, CiteScore: 1)
Corporate Governance Intl. J. of Business in Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.336, CiteScore: 1)
Critical Perspectives on Intl. Business     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.378, CiteScore: 1)
Cross Cultural & Strategic Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.504, CiteScore: 2)
Data Technologies and Applications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 328, SJR: 0.355, CiteScore: 1)
Development and Learning in Organizations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.138, CiteScore: 0)
Digital Library Perspectives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32, SJR: 0.341, CiteScore: 1)
Direct Marketing An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Disaster Prevention and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.47, CiteScore: 1)
Drugs and Alcohol Today     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 148, SJR: 0.245, CiteScore: 1)
Education + Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Education, Business and Society : Contemporary Middle Eastern Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.707, CiteScore: 3)
Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Employee Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.551, CiteScore: 2)
Engineering Computations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.444, CiteScore: 1)
Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.653, CiteScore: 2)
English Teaching: Practice & Critique     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.417, CiteScore: 1)
Equal Opportunities Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Equality, Diversity and Inclusion : An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.5, CiteScore: 1)
EuroMed J. of Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.26, CiteScore: 1)
European Business Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.585, CiteScore: 3)
European J. of Innovation Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.454, CiteScore: 2)
European J. of Management and Business Economics     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.239, CiteScore: 1)
European J. of Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.971, CiteScore: 2)
European J. of Training and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.477, CiteScore: 1)
Evidence-based HRM     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.537, CiteScore: 1)
Facilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.503, CiteScore: 2)
Foresight     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.34, CiteScore: 1)
Gender in Management : An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.412, CiteScore: 1)
Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 992, SJR: 0.261, CiteScore: 1)
Grey Systems : Theory and Application     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Health Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.421, CiteScore: 1)
Higher Education Evaluation and Development     Open Access  
Higher Education, Skills and Work-based Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47, SJR: 0.426, CiteScore: 1)
History of Education Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.26, CiteScore: 0)
Housing, Care and Support     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.171, CiteScore: 0)
Human Resource Management Intl. Digest     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.129, CiteScore: 0)
IMP J.     Hybrid Journal  
Indian Growth and Development Review     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.174, CiteScore: 0)
Industrial and Commercial Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.301, CiteScore: 1)
Industrial Lubrication and Tribology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.334, CiteScore: 1)
Industrial Management & Data Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.904, CiteScore: 3)
Industrial Robot An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.318, CiteScore: 1)
Info     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Information and Computer Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.307, CiteScore: 1)
Information Technology & People     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45, SJR: 0.671, CiteScore: 2)
Innovation & Management Review     Open Access  
Interactive Technology and Smart Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.191, CiteScore: 1)
Interlending & Document Supply     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 61)
Internet Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37, SJR: 1.645, CiteScore: 5)
Intl. J. for Lesson and Learning Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.324, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. for Researcher Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Intl. J. of Accounting and Information Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.275, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Bank Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.654, CiteScore: 3)
Intl. J. of Climate Change Strategies and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.353, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Clothing Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.318, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Commerce and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Conflict Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.362, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Contemporary Hospitality Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.452, CiteScore: 4)
Intl. J. of Culture Tourism and Hospitality Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.339, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Development Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.139, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.387, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Educational Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.559, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Emergency Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.201, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Emerging Markets     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.474, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Energy Sector Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.349, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Entrepreneurial Behaviour & Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.629, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Ethics and Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.333, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Event and Festival Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.388, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Gender and Entrepreneurship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.445, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Health Care Quality Assurance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.358, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Health Governance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.247, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Housing Markets and Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.211, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Human Rights in Healthcare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.205, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Information and Learning Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.226, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Innovation Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.197, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Intelligent Computing and Cybernetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.214, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Intelligent Unmanned Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Islamic and Middle Eastern Finance and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.375, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Law and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.217, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Leadership in Public Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Intl. J. of Lean Six Sigma     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.802, CiteScore: 3)
Intl. J. of Logistics Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.71, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Managerial Finance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.203, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Managing Projects in Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.36, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Manpower     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.365, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Mentoring and Coaching in Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.426, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Migration, Health and Social Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.307, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Numerical Methods for Heat & Fluid Flow     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.697, CiteScore: 3)
Intl. J. of Operations & Production Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 2.052, CiteScore: 4)
Intl. J. of Organization Theory and Behavior     Hybrid Journal  
Intl. J. of Organizational Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.268, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Pervasive Computing and Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.138, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.25, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.821, CiteScore: 4)
Intl. J. of Prisoner Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.303, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Productivity and Performance Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.578, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Public Sector Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31, SJR: 0.438, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Quality & Reliability Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.492, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Quality and Service Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.309, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Retail & Distribution Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.742, CiteScore: 3)
Intl. J. of Service Industry Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Social Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.225, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Sociology and Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54, SJR: 0.3, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.269, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Structural Integrity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.228, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Sustainability in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.502, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Tourism Cities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.502, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Web Information Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.186, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Wine Business Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.562, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Workplace Health Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.303, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. Marketing Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.895, CiteScore: 3)
Irish J. of Occupational Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
ISRA Intl. J. of Islamic Finance     Open Access  
J. for Multicultural Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.237, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Accounting & Organizational Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.301, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Accounting in Emerging Economies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
J. of Adult Protection, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.314, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Advances in Management Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
J. of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45, SJR: 0.222, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.108, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Applied Accounting Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.227, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Applied Research in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49, SJR: 0.2, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Asia Business Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.245, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Assistive Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
J. of Business & Industrial Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.652, CiteScore: 2)
J. of Business Strategy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.333, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Capital Markets Studies     Open Access  
J. of Centrum Cathedra     Open Access  
J. of Children's Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.243, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Chinese Economic and Foreign Trade Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.2, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Chinese Entrepreneurship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
J. of Chinese Human Resource Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.173, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Communication Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.625, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Consumer Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.664, CiteScore: 2)
J. of Corporate Real Estate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.368, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Criminal Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 139, SJR: 0.268, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Criminological Research, Policy and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48, SJR: 0.254, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.257, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Defense Analytics and Logistics     Open Access  
J. of Documentation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 197, SJR: 0.613, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Economic and Administrative Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
J. of Economic Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.733, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Economics, Finance and Administrative Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.217, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Educational Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 1.252, CiteScore: 2)
J. of Enabling Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.369, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Engineering, Design and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.212, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Enterprise Information Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.827, CiteScore: 4)
J. of Enterprising Communities People and Places in the Global Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.281, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Entrepreneurship and Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.262, CiteScore: 1)
J. of European Industrial Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
J. of European Real Estate Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.268, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Facilities Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.33, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Family Business Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
J. of Fashion Marketing and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.608, CiteScore: 2)

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.358
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 12  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0952-6862
Published by Emerald Homepage  [356 journals]
  • Service quality and urolithiasis patient adherence
    • Pages: 2 - 10
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 32, Issue 1, Page 2-10, February 2019.
      Purpose Adherence to preventive recommendations improves clinical outcomes and is compulsory for long-term prevention in urolithiasis patients. Service quality can affect patients’ adherence to treatment and care. The purpose of this paper is to compare perceived service quality, using the SERVQUAL model, between urolithiasis patients who were nonadherent to their follow-up visits and those who were adherent, in a stone prevention clinic, Tehran, Iran. Design/methodology/approach This was a cross-sectional study on patients with urolithiasis referred to the Shahid-Labbafinejad Hospital stone prevention clinic between 2010 and 2014. All patients withdrawing from follow-up visits were selected as the nonadherent group. Patients with follow-up visits were randomly selected and appointed as the adherent group. Data included demographic, service quality (assessed using the SERVQUAL) and a questionnaire about the reason for withdrawal from follow-up visits. Man–Whitney U test, χ2 and binary logistic regression were used for data analyses. Findings In total, 531 nonadherent and 51 adherent patients entered the study. SERVQUAL results revealed that patients’ expectations were significantly higher than their perceptions in all five service quality dimensions in both groups. The adherent group had better-quality scores. Responsibility, assurance and empathy scores significantly increased patient adherence odds. Research limitations/implications Uni-center design; missing data, such as socioeconomic status and disease severity, which may influence treatment adherence; and missing data regarding adherence to medication and dietary advice were limitations. Practical implications Service quality needs to be improved in all dimensions. Originality/value Since responsiveness, assurance and empathy dimensions determined patients’ adherence, giving special attention to these dimensions could improve patient adherence.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2019-03-12T12:14:47Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-08-2017-0140
       
  • Does TeamSTEPPS affect psychological status'
    • Pages: 11 - 20
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 32, Issue 1, Page 11-20, February 2019.
      Purpose The Team Strategies and Tools to Enhance Performance and Patient Safety (TeamSTEPPS) program is known to improve team and clinical performance, but the relationship to psychological stress has not been clarified. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate team performance, clinical performance and psychological stress simultaneously in a simulation-based training combined with or without the TeamSTEPPS program. Design/methodology/approach This randomized, controlled, prospective pilot study was performed to reveal TeamSTEPPS impact on psychological stress. The course included an emergency care training course, the TeamSTEPPS program, and a scenario simulation. Ten medical student teams were randomly allocated two groups: a TeamSTEPPS group and a non-TeamSTEPPS group. Team performance, clinical performance and psychological stress were evaluated simultaneously in the course; i.e., questionnaire evaluation and an observational evaluation for team performance; an assessor’s evaluation and a simulator’s evaluation for clinical performance. Autonomic nervous activity, represented by salivary amylase levels and heart rate variability, were measured as psychological stress indicators. Findings Team performance and clinical performance were significantly better in the TeamSTEPPS group, while psychological stress did not differ between the groups. Originality/value This is the first study to examine the relationship between TeamSTEPPS and psychological stress. Although only preliminary conclusions can be drawn from this small-scale study, results suggest that the TeamSTEPPS program improved team and clinical performance without increasing psychological stress.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2019-03-12T12:15:43Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-08-2017-0156
       
  • Failure demand: a concept evaluation in UK primary care
    • Pages: 21 - 33
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 32, Issue 1, Page 21-33, February 2019.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to assess failure demand as a lean concept that assists in waste analysis during quality improvement activity. The authors assess whether the concept’s limited use is a missed opportunity to help us understand improvement priorities, given that a UK Government requirement for public service managers to report failure demand has been removed. Design/methodology/approach The authors look at the literature across the public sector and then apply the failure demand concept to the UK’s primary healthcare system. The UK National Health Service (NHS) demand data are analysed and the impact on patient care is elicited from patient interviews. Findings The study highlighted the concept’s value, showing how primary care systems often generate failure demand partly owing to existing demand and capacity management practices. This demand is deflected to other systems, such as the accident and emergency department, with a considerable detrimental impact on patient experience. Research limitations/implications More research is needed to fully understand how best to exploit the failure demand concept within wider healthcare as there are many potential barriers to its appropriate and successful application. Practical implications The authors highlight three practical barriers to using failure demand: first, demand within the healthcare system is poorly understood; second, systems improvement understanding is limited; and third, need to apply the concept for improvement and not just for reporting purposes. Originality/value The authors provide an objective and independent insight into failure demand that has not previously been seen in the academic literature, specifically in relation to primary healthcare.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2019-03-12T12:16:15Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-08-2017-0159
       
  • Establishing mercury-free medical facilities: a Malaysian case study
    • Pages: 34 - 44
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 32, Issue 1, Page 34-44, February 2019.
      Purpose Mercury is widely used in medical and healthcare facilities as dental amalgam, mercury-added medical devices, thiomersal-containing vaccines, laboratory analysis and for other general applications despite the hazards. Various agencies consistently promote mercury-free medical facilities through mercury-free alternatives and better management practices, which are in line with the Minamata Convention on Mercury that aims to protect human health and environment from anthropogenic mercury release. The paper aims to discuss these issues. Design/methodology/approach The authors conducted a gap analysis on recommended practices gathered from the literature and current practices gathered through semi-structured interviews with Malaysian medical personnel. A life cycle approach was adopted covering mercury use: input, storage, handling, accident, waste disposal and governance phases. Findings The authors found that there are significant gaps between recommended and current mercury management practices. Analysis indicates improper mercury management as the main contributor to these gaps. The authors found from recommended practices that core components needing improvement include: mercury management action plan, mercury use identification team, purchasing policy, proper guidelines and monitoring systems. Practical implications This study helps us to understand mercury management practices and suggests essential steps to establish a mercury-free medical facility. Originality/value This study explored the gaps between recommended and current mercury management practices in a medical facility and contributes to the Minamata Convention on Mercury aspirations.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2019-03-12T12:14:51Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-08-2017-0161
       
  • Oral care – identifying quality improvement areas
    • Pages: 45 - 58
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 32, Issue 1, Page 45-58, February 2019.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to describe and compare nurses’ and healthcare assistants’ oral care quality perceptions, including perceived reality (PR) and subjective importance (SI), to identify improvement areas in intensive care and short-term care, and to explore potential nursing satisfaction predictors regarding oral care. Design/methodology/approach Swedish staff, 154 within intensive care and 278 within short-term care responded to a modified quality of care from a patient perspective questionnaire. Descriptive and analytical statistics were used. Findings Staff scored oral care quality both high and low in relation to PR and SI. Improvement areas were identified, despite high satisfaction values regarding oral care. Setting, SI and PR explained 51.5 percent of the variance in staff satisfaction regarding oral care quality. Practical implications Quality improvements could guide oral care development. Originality/value This study describes oral care by comparing nurse perceptions of how important they perceive different oral care aspects and to what extent these oral care aspects are performed.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2019-03-12T12:14:39Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-09-2017-0176
       
  • Chemotherapy scheduling template development using an optimization
           approach
    • Pages: 59 - 70
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 32, Issue 1, Page 59-70, February 2019.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to develop a chemotherapy scheduling template that accounts for nurse resource availability and patient treatment needs to alleviate the mid-day patient load and provide quality services for patients. Design/methodology/approach Owing to treatment complexity in chemotherapy administration, nurses are required at the beginning, end and during treatment. When nurses are not available to continue treatment, the service is compromised, and the resource constraint is violated, which leads to inevitable delay that risks service quality. Consequently, an optimization method is used to create a scheduling template that minimizes the violation between resource assignment and treatment requirements, while leveling patient load throughout a day. A case study from a typical clinic day is presented to understand current scheduling issues, describe nursing resource constraints, and develop a constraint-based optimization model and leveling algorithm for the final template. Findings The approach is expected to reduce the variation in the system by 24 percent and result in five fewer chemo chairs used during peak hours. Adjusting staffing levels could further reduce resource constraint violations and more savings on chair occupancy. The actual implementation results indicate a 33 percent reduction on resource constraint violations and positive feedback from nursing staff for workload. Research limitations/implications Other delays, including laboratory test, physician visit and treatment assignment, are potential research areas. Originality/value The study demonstrates significant improvement in mid-day patient load and meeting treatment needs using optimization with a unique objective.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2019-03-12T12:16:56Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-10-2017-0187
       
  • Obtaining laboratory accreditation – required activities
    • Pages: 71 - 83
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 32, Issue 1, Page 71-83, February 2019.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to describe the activities needed to meet specified requirements to assist laboratory staff running tests and calibrations and to obtain ISO/IEC 17025 accreditation. Design/methodology/approach The relevant literature that contributes to establishing activities that help laboratory staff to obtain ISO/IEC 17025 accreditation was studied. Laboratory researchers specializing in electro-medical equipment quality control were questioned about the criteria to be observed when selecting, developing and validating analytical steps. Findings Results revealed the analytical method criteria to be observed, which demonstrated their essentially quantitative nature. Originality/value This study presents a model that improves selecting, developing and validating analytical steps and contributes to producing reliable test and calibration results. These improvements can help laboratory testing and calibration to meet clients’ needs, satisfy specified requirements and provide reliable results.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2019-03-12T12:15:55Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-10-2017-0191
       
  • Better get moving on laboratory quality assurance
    • Pages: 84 - 86
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 32, Issue 1, Page 84-86, February 2019.
      Purpose With recent advances in laboratory hematology automation, emphasis is now on quality assurance processes as they are indispensable for generating reliable and accurate test results. It is therefore imperative to acquire efficient measures for recognizing laboratory malfunctions and errors to improve patient safety. The paper aims to discuss these issues. Design/methodology/approach Moving algorithm is a quality control process that monitors analyzer performance from historical records through a continuous process, which does not require additional expenditure, and can serve as an additional support to the laboratory quality control program. Findings The authors describe an important quality assurance tool, which can be easily applied in any laboratory setting, especially in cost-constrained areas where running commercial controls throughout every shift may not be a feasible option. Originality/value The authors focus on clinical laboratory quality control measures for providing reliable test results. The moving average appears to be a reasonable and applicable choice for vigilantly monitoring each result.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2019-03-12T12:17:02Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-10-2017-0204
       
  • Assessing hospital quality management systems: evidence from Iran
    • Pages: 87 - 96
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 32, Issue 1, Page 87-96, February 2019.
      Purpose A quality management system (QMS) is defined as interacting activities, methods and procedures used to monitor, control and improve service quality. The purpose of this paper is to describe the QMS status using the Quality Management System Index (QMSI) in hospitals affiliated to Shahid Beheshti Medical Sciences University in Tehran, Iran. Design/methodology/approach In this cross-sectional study, 28 hospitals were investigated. A validated 46-item questionnaire was used for data collection. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, Pearson correlation, independent student’s t-test and regression analysis. Findings The mean QMSI score was 18.4: 15.3 for public and 20.9 for non-public hospitals (p=0.001). The lowest (1.96) and the highest (2.14) scores related to “Quality policy documents” and “Quality monitoring by the board,” respectively. The difference between public and non-public hospitals was significant in all nine QMSI dimensions (p=0.001). The QMSI score was higher in non-public and small hospitals than in public and large ones (p=0.05). Originality/value Most QMS studies come from developed countries, and there is no systematic information about the mechanisms and processes involved in implementing QMS in developing countries like Iran. This is the first study on Iranian hospital QMS using a newly developed tool (QMSI), and results showed that QMS maturity in these hospitals was relatively good, but the non-public hospitals status (private and charity) was far better than public hospitals.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2019-03-12T12:15:08Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-11-2017-0208
       
  • The privatisation of healthcare system in Bangladesh
    • Pages: 97 - 107
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 32, Issue 1, Page 97-107, February 2019.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to examine the factors that triggered the privatisation of Bangladesh’s health sector. Design/methodology/approach This study follows systematic reviews in its undertaking and is based on an extensive review of both published and unpublished documents. Different search engines and databases were used to collect the materials. The study takes into account of various research publications, journal articles, government reports, policy and planning documents, relevant press reports/articles, and reports and discussion papers from the World Health Organization, the World Bank and the Asian Development Bank. Findings While Bangladesh’s healthcare sector has undergone an increasing trend towards privatisation, this move has limited benefits on the overall improvement in the health of the people of Bangladesh. The public sector should remain vital, and the government must remobilise it to provide better provision of healthcare. Research limitations/implications The paper focusses only on the public policy aspect of privatisation in healthcare of a country. Practical implications The paper examines the issue of privatisation of healthcare and concludes that privatisation not only makes services more expensive, but also diminishes equity and accountability in the provision of services. The study, first, makes a spate of observations on improving public healthcare resources, which can be of value to key decision makers and stakeholders in the healthcare sector. It also discourages the move towards private sector interventions. Originality/value This study is an independent explanation of a country’s healthcare system. Lesson learned from this study could also be used for developing public policy in similar socio-economic contexts.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2019-03-12T12:17:21Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-11-2017-0217
       
  • Quality of patient information in emergency department
    • Pages: 108 - 119
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 32, Issue 1, Page 108-119, February 2019.
      Purpose Data comprise one of the key resources currently used in organizations. High-quality data are those that are appropriate for use by the customer. The quality of data is a key factor in determining the level of healthcare in hospitals, and its improvement leads to an improved quality of health and treatment and ultimately increases patient satisfaction. The purpose of this paper is to assess the quality of emergency patients’ information in a hospital information system. Design/methodology/approach This cross-sectional study was conducted on 385 randomly selected records of patients admitted to the emergency department of Shahid Beheshti Hospital in Kashan, Iran, in 2016. Data on five dimensions of quality, including accuracy, accessibility, timeliness, completeness and definition, were collected using a researcher-made checklist and were then analyzed in SPSS. The results are presented using descriptive statistics, such as frequency distribution and percentage. Findings The overall quality of emergency patients’ information in the hospital information system was 86 percent, and the dimensions of quality scored 87.7 percent for accuracy, 86.8 percent for completeness, 83.9 percent for timeliness, 79 percent for definition and 62.1 percent for accessibility. Originality/value Increasing the quality of patient information at emergency departments can lead to improvements in the timely diagnosis and management of diseases and patient and personnel satisfaction, and reduce hospital costs.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2019-03-12T12:14:34Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-09-2017-0177
       
  • Role of a hospital accreditation program in developing a process
           management system
    • Pages: 120 - 136
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 32, Issue 1, Page 120-136, February 2019.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to clarify the effects of the Iranian Hospital Accreditation Program (IHAP) on hospital processes from the viewpoint of the staff charged with establishing the program. Design/methodology/approach This qualitative study is based on the data collected in semi-structured interviews conducted in 2016, which involved eight questions. Interviews were held with 70 staff members at 14 hospitals. Managerial staff were purposively interviewed based on their familiarity and involvement with the program. The hospitals were divided into five groups, comprising public, private, charity, military and social service hospitals. A thematic analysis was carried out using the collected data. Findings Three themes emerged from the data, which together comprise a process management cycle: the establishment, implementation, and control phases of the program. For each phase, various positive trends, as well as hurdles for establishing the program, declared which were framed two sub-themes as positive effects and challenges. Originality/value The findings contribute to the body of evidence used by policy-makers and hospital managers to improve the change management processes related to the Iranian IHAP. Although positive changes in the process management cycles at Iranian hospitals were noted, successful implementation of the program demands a thorough assessment of the hospitals’ technical and financial needs (taking into account disparities between hospitals), and there is an urgent requirement for a plan to meet these needs.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2019-03-12T12:15:25Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-01-2018-0002
       
  • Evaluating factors affecting patient satisfaction using the Kano model
    • Pages: 137 - 151
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 32, Issue 1, Page 137-151, February 2019.
      Purpose Healthcare providers are increasing their focus on patient satisfaction and patient-oriented services as they play a significant role in managing rising costs, elevating service quality and establishing sustainable quality improvement strategies. In recent years, the Kano model has gained popularity in the healthcare industry and has been employed to improve patient satisfaction. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate how the Kano model can be deployed to identify a wide range of complex patient needs and convey its potential usefulness in the continuous improvement of the healthcare sector. Design/methodology/approach This paper provides a case study of implementing the Kano model to identify diverse patient needs and aims to eliminate the gaps identified in prior research, which include generically applying the Kano model to all service units of the healthcare system and using a predetermined service quality scale. This study emphasizes the importance of scale development and individual attention to each healthcare service unit in determining intricate patient needs. A cross-sectional study was conducted at the Student Health Services (SHS) of Missouri University of Science and Technology where the data were collected using the Kano survey. The respondents included undergraduate and graduate students that have utilized the healthcare services offered. A total of 138 patients were surveyed using a Kano model-based questionnaire that included demographics and treatment as well as service expectations. Findings Of the 21 quality attributes evaluated by the patients, 16 were categorized as one-dimensional, 3 as indifferent, and 2 as attractive attributes using the Kano model. None of the quality attributes showed a dominant must-be feature. The students considered the availability of appropriately qualified medical staff within 10 minutes of the check-in process and provision of after-hours care as attractive attributes that create greater satisfaction. Research limitations/implications The research was conducted at a university SHS center. Therefore, respondents in the survey are in a younger age group, which may affect patient expectations. In addition, expectations of an SHS center may be different than expectations of visiting a primary care physician and other healthcare units. Originality/value This study contributes to a better understanding of the identification of healthcare needs using the Kano model and advocates focusing on shifts in the categories over time and changes in the demographic environment.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2019-03-12T12:15:15Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-02-2018-0056
       
  • Emergency department utilization among individuals with idiopathic
           intracranial hypertension
    • Pages: 152 - 163
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 32, Issue 1, Page 152-163, February 2019.
      Purpose Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) can be a debilitating disorder that is difficult to identify and treat. Failure to adequately manage IIH symptoms may force patients to present at emergency departments (EDs) seeking symptom relief. The purpose of this paper is to empirically characterize ED use by previously diagnosed IIH patients. Design/methodology/approach Patients diagnosed with IIH, and who registered with the Intracranial Hypertension Registry by 2014, were solicited for study inclusion. A survey was designed to elicit ED use during the period 2010–2012. Information on demographic and socioeconomic characteristics, IIH signs and symptoms, time since diagnosis, perspectives of ED use and quality of life was collected. Quality of life was assessed using an adaptation of the Migraine-Specific Quality of Life Questionnaire. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and nonparametric hypothesis tests. Findings In total, 39 percent of IIH patients used emergency services over the study period; those that did used the services intensely. These patients were more likely to be non-white, live in households making less than $25,000 annually, have public insurance and have received a diversional shunt procedure. Patients who used the ED were less likely to live in households making $100,000, or more, annually and have private insurance. Participants who used the ED had significantly lower quality-of-life scores, were younger and had been diagnosed with IIH for less time. Originality/value ED staff and outside physicians can utilize the information contained in this study to more effectively recognize the unique circumstances of IIH patients who present at EDs.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2019-03-12T12:16:02Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-04-2017-0060
       
  • Greek gynecology healthcare professionals towards quality management
           systems
    • Pages: 164 - 175
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 32, Issue 1, Page 164-175, February 2019.
      Purpose Today, quality management systems (QMS) are a promising candidate for the improvement of healthcare services. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the opinions/attitudes of gynecology healthcare professionals toward quality and quality management in healthcare facilities (HFs) in Greece. Design/methodology/approach An anonymous self-administered questionnaire was distributed to healthcare professionals, asking for opinions on quality objectives associated with the everyday workflow in HFs (e.g. management of patients, resources, etc.) and on QMS. The study was conducted in Hippokration Hospital of Thessaloniki, including 187 participants. Statistical assessment and analysis of the questionnaires were carried out. Findings Although 87.5 percent recognized the importance of potential QMS implementation and accreditation, over 50 percent believed that it would lead rather to increased workload and bureaucracy than to any considerable quality improvement. More than 60 percent were completely unaware of the implementation of quality objectives such as quality handbook, quality policy, audit meetings and accreditation status in their HFs. This unawareness was also reported in terms of patient, data, human and general resources management. Finally, awareness over medical malpractice and positive attitude toward official reporting were detected. Originality/value Most respondents acknowledged the significance of quality, QMS implementation and accreditation in Greek hospitals. However, there was a critical gap in knowledge about quality management objectives/processes that could be possibly resolved by expert teams and well-organized educational programs aiming to educate personnel regarding the various quality objectives in Greek HFs.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2019-03-12T12:15:36Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-05-2017-0083
       
  • Patients’ perceptions of healthcare quality in Ghana
    • Pages: 176 - 190
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 32, Issue 1, Page 176-190, February 2019.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role of service quality (SQ), customer satisfaction (CS) and customer loyalty (CL) in Ghana’s health sector and a comparative analysis of private and public hospital SQ. Design/methodology/approach A convenient sample of 1,236 respondents was generated from both private and public hospitals. The study utilises an asymptotic distribution free estimation technique in CB-SEM using LISREL to test the relationships, while Wilcoxon–Mann–Whitney test was used to determine the differences in SQ performances between private and public hospitals. Findings The study found a significant positive relationship between SQ and CS. Also, the study found a significant positive relationship between CS and CL. Finally, SQ was found to be better in private hospitals, resulting higher CS and CL. Practical implications The study highlights the significant role SQ plays in generating CS and CL to guide healthcare provider policy decision making to improve healthcare delivery. It also serves as a guide to patients to make informed decisions regarding the choice of alternative hospitals. Originality/value The study provides a useful guide to strategy and policy formulation in the healthcare sector by exploring the potential viability of SERVQUAL-related model as a relevant tool for assessing SQ in Ghana’s health sector. The results also identified SQ gap between private and public hospitals and thus have implications on how hospitals should strategise to improve their SQ.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2019-03-12T12:16:19Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-10-2017-0200
       
  • Evaluating inputs of failure modes and effects analysis in identifying
           patient safety risks
    • Pages: 191 - 207
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 32, Issue 1, Page 191-207, February 2019.
      Purpose There is a growing awareness on the use of systems approaches to improve patient safety and quality. While earlier studies evaluated the validity of such approaches to identify and mitigate patient safety risks, so far only little attention has been given to their inputs, such as structured brainstorming and use of system mapping approaches (SMAs), to understand their impact in the risk identification process. To address this gap, the purpose of this paper is to evaluate the inputs of a well-known systems approach, failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA), in identifying patient safety risks in a real healthcare setting. Design/methodology/approach This study was conducted in a newly established adult attention deficit hyperactivity disorder service at Cambridge and Peterborough Foundation Trust in the UK. Three stakeholders of the chosen service together with the facilitators conducted an FMEA exercise along with a particular system diagram that was initially found as the most useful SMA by eight stakeholders of the service. Findings In this study, it was found that the formal structure of FMEA adds value to the risk identification process through comprehensive system coverage with the help of the system diagram. However, results also indicates that the structured brainstorming refrains FMEA participants from identifying and imagining new risks since they follow the process predefined in the given system diagram. Originality/value While this study shows the potential contribution of FMEA inputs, it also suggests that healthcare organisations should not depend solely on FMEA results when identifying patient safety risks; and therefore prioritising their safety concerns.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2019-03-12T12:14:53Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-12-2017-0233
       
  • Understanding and improving the care pathway for children with autism
    • Pages: 208 - 223
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 32, Issue 1, Page 208-223, February 2019.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to describe current care pathways for children with autism including enablers and barriers, as experienced by health professionals, education professionals and families in South Wales, UK. Design/methodology/approach This study is based on a mixed-methods approach using focus group discussions, creative writing workshops and visualisation using rich pictures. Findings The experiences of the care pathways differed significantly across the three groups. Health professionals described the most rigidly structured pathways, with clear entry points and outcomes. Education professionals and parents described more complex and confusing pathways, with parents assuming the responsibility of coordinating the health and education activity in a bid to link the two independent pathways. All three groups identified enablers, although these differed across the groups. The barriers were more consistent across the groups (e.g. poor communication, missing information, lack of transparency, limited post-diagnosis services and access to services based on diagnosis rather than need). Practical implications This research could inform the design of new services which are premised on multi-agency and multi-disciplinary working to ensure children with Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) receive joined up services and support. Originality/value Although this study did not represent all professional groups or all experiences of autism, the authors examined three different perspectives of the ASD pathway. In addition, the authors triangulated high-level process maps with rich pictures and creative writing exercises, which allowed the authors to identify specific recommendations to improve integration and reduce duplication and gaps in provision.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2019-03-12T12:15:46Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-08-2017-0153
       
  • Non-performance of urinalysis among pregnant women in Brazil
    • Pages: 224 - 232
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 32, Issue 1, Page 224-232, February 2019.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to measure the prevalence, evaluate the trend and identify the factors associated with the non-performance of qualitative urine test (QUT) among pregnant women living in the extreme south of Brazil between 2007 and 2016. Design/methodology/approach All births occurred in the local maternity wards from January 1 to December 31 of 2007, 2010, 2013 and 2016. Mothers were interviewed within 48h after delivery. The outcome was the non-performance of QUT during pregnancy. χ2 test was used to compare proportions and Poisson regression with robust variance adjustment for the multivariate analysis. The effect measure used was the prevalence ratio. Findings Of the 10,331 new mothers identified, 10,004 (96.8 percent) performed at least one prenatal visit. The prevalence of non-performance of QUT was 3.3 percent (95% CI 2.9–3.7 percent), ranging from 1.5 percent in 2007 to 5.3 percent in 2016 (p
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2019-03-12T12:16:06Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-11-2017-0210
       
  • Tactical capacity planning in hospital departments
    • Pages: 233 - 245
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 32, Issue 1, Page 233-245, February 2019.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to explore tactical planning potential within hospital departments. The study had two objectives: first, to develop a framework for tactical capacity planning in healthcare departments by identifying and structuring essential components for healthcare capacity management; and, second, to identify context-specific requirements and functionality demands on tactical planning processes within healthcare. Design/methodology/approach A framework for tactical capacity planning was developed through a literature review. Additionally, an exploratory multiple-case study was performed, with cases from three Swedish hospital departments, which provide the opportunity to study framework applicability in its natural context. Findings Findings illustrate how an active tactical planning process can facilitate adjustments to capacity. However, the multiple-case study shows that there are contextual differences between departments, depending on available treatments and resources that affect capacity adjustments, and how the planning process activities should be structured. Originality/value This project develops a framework for a tactical capacity-planning process adapted to healthcare provider contexts. By developing the framework, based on the literature and tactical level planning processes within three Swedish hospital case studies, the authors bridge gaps between theory and application regarding healthcare capacity planning.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2019-03-12T12:17:12Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-11-2017-0218
       
  • Relationship between patient costs and patient pathways
    • Pages: 246 - 261
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 32, Issue 1, Page 246-261, February 2019.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to identify actual (as-is) patient pathway variation among breast cancer patients and to investigate the relationship between pathways and the cost incurred by patients. Design/methodology/approach Both quantitative and qualitative methods were employed to analyze data from four Swedish hospital groups. Quantitative methods include event-log data mining and statistical analyses on the related patient cost from the Swedish breast cancer quality registry and case-costing system. Qualitative methods included collaboration with and interviewing domain experts. Findings Unique pathways, followed by only one patient, were generally costlier than the most and less frequent pathways. Earlier study findings are confirmed for mastectomy patients, with more frequent pathways having a lower cost, whereas contradicting and inconclusive results emerged for the partial mastectomy patient groups. Highest variation in pathways was identified for patients receiving chemotherapy. Practical implications The common belief – if one follows a standardized patient pathway, then the cost will be lower – should be re-examined based on the actual pathways that occur in reality. Originality/value The relationships between patient pathways and patient cost allow more complex insights, beyond the general causal relationship between successfully implementing a “to-be” care pathway and lower cost. This highlights data-driven research’s importance, where actual pathways (as-is) provide more useful information than to-be care pathways.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2019-03-12T12:15:03Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-10-2017-0199
       
  • Bedside vital parameters that indicate early deterioration
    • Pages: 262 - 272
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 32, Issue 1, Page 262-272, February 2019.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to determine associations between initially recorded deviations in individual bedside vital parameters that contribute to total Modified Early Warning Score (MEWS) levels 2 or 3 and further clinical deterioration (MEWS level=4). Design/methodology/approach This was a prospective study in which 27,504 vital parameter values, corresponding to a total MEWS level⩾2, belonging to 1,315 adult medical and surgical inpatient patients admitted to a 90-bed study setting at a university hospital, were subjected to binary logistic and COX regression analyses to determine associations between vital parameter values initially corresponding to total MEWS levels 2 or 3 and later deterioration to total MEWS level ⩾4, and to evaluate corresponding time intervals. Findings Respiratory rate, heart rate and patient age were significantly (p=0.012, p
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2019-03-12T12:17:25Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-10-2017-0206
       
  • Organisational culture: the hidden operand in clinical laboratories
    • Pages: 273 - 280
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 32, Issue 1, Page 273-280, February 2019.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to present organisational cultural determinants that can influence total quality management (TQM) in clinical laboratories. Design/methodology/approach This is a viewpoint paper using evidence provided by a literature research about cultural patterns using Competing Values Framework to explain the relationship between organisational culture and TQM. Findings Cultural aspects likely to enhance creativity and innovation are considered as incentives in promoting cultural transformation. TQM in the average modern clinical laboratory requires a long overdue transformational change in values, culture and attitude. Social implications Valuing people, making up an organisation, is expected to enhance TQM. Originality/value This paper provokes a shift in thinking among traditional clinical laboratory managers and results in a win-win for both staff and total quality outcomes.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2019-03-12T12:17:05Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-11-2017-0219
       
  • Competencies required for healthcare improvement positions
    • Pages: 281 - 295
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 32, Issue 1, Page 281-295, February 2019.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to examine the competencies that US healthcare organizations require for quality and performance improvement positions. Design/methodology/approach A US healthcare improvement job posting content analysis was conducted using the HQ Essentials competency framework. Findings The HQ essentials competencies most desired for improvement positions include project management, training, data analysis and applied performance improvement methods. Competency requirements varied somewhat by job focus area: performance, quality, or process improvement, and Lean and Six Sigma. Practical implications Healthcare leaders may use the author’s results to understand what competencies may be required for various improvement roles and to identify any gaps in required skills and knowledge areas that may need to be addressed. Educators and policy-makers should consider how these competencies align with employers’ needs and what resources or professional development may be needed to address gaps. Originality/value This is the first healthcare improvement competencies analysis based on job postings.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2019-03-12T12:14:57Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-12-2017-0236
       
  • Improving patient satisfaction: the virtual breakthrough series
           collaborative
    • Pages: 296 - 306
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 32, Issue 1, Page 296-306, February 2019.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to improve the Siloam Hospitals’ (SHs) patient satisfaction index (PSI) and overcome Indonesia’s geographical barriers. Design/methodology/approach The topic was selected for reasons guided by the Institute of Healthcare Improvement virtual breakthrough series collaborative (VBSC). Subject matter experts came from existing global quality development in collaboration with sales and marketing, and talent management agencies/departments. Patient satisfaction (PS) was measured using the SH Customer Feedback Form. Data were analysed using Friedman’s test. Findings The in-patient (IP) department PSI repeated measures comparison during VBSC, performed using Friedman’s test, showed a statistically significant increase in the PSI, χ2 = 44.00, p
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2019-03-12T12:16:09Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-01-2018-0014
       
 
 
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