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Publisher: Emerald   (Total: 356 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 356 Journals sorted alphabetically
A Life in the Day     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Academia Revista Latinoamericana de Administración     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.178, CiteScore: 1)
Accounting Auditing & Accountability J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32, SJR: 1.71, CiteScore: 3)
Accounting Research J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.144, CiteScore: 0)
Accounting, Auditing and Accountability J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 2.187, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Accounting Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.279, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Appreciative Inquiry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.451, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Autism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32, SJR: 0.222, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Dual Diagnosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47, SJR: 0.21, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Gender Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.16, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Intl. Marketing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 83, SJR: 0.296, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
African J. of Economic and Management Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.216, CiteScore: 1)
Agricultural Finance Review     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.406, CiteScore: 1)
Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 211, SJR: 0.354, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Annals in Social Responsibility     Full-text available via subscription  
Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.235, CiteScore: 1)
Arts and the Market     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Asia Pacific J. of Innovation and Entrepreneurship     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asia Pacific J. of Marketing and Logistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.425, CiteScore: 1)
Asia-Pacific J. of Business Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.234, CiteScore: 1)
Asian Association of Open Universities J.     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian Education and Development Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.233, CiteScore: 1)
Asian J. on Quality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Asian Review of Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.222, CiteScore: 1)
Aslib J. of Information Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 0.725, CiteScore: 2)
Aslib Proceedings     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 308)
Assembly Automation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.603, CiteScore: 2)
Baltic J. of Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.309, CiteScore: 1)
Benchmarking : An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.559, CiteScore: 2)
British Food J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.5, CiteScore: 2)
Built Environment Project and Asset Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.46, CiteScore: 1)
Business Process Re-engineering & Management J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Business Strategy Series     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Career Development Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.527, CiteScore: 2)
China Agricultural Economic Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.31, CiteScore: 1)
China Finance Review Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.245, CiteScore: 0)
Chinese Management Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.278, CiteScore: 1)
Circuit World     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.246, CiteScore: 1)
Collection and Curation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.296, CiteScore: 1)
COMPEL: The Intl. J. for Computation and Mathematics in Electrical and Electronic Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.22, CiteScore: 1)
Competitiveness Review : An Intl. Business J. incorporating J. of Global Competitiveness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.274, CiteScore: 1)
Construction Innovation: Information, Process, Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.731, CiteScore: 2)
Corporate Communications An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.453, CiteScore: 1)
Corporate Governance Intl. J. of Business in Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.336, CiteScore: 1)
Critical Perspectives on Intl. Business     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.378, CiteScore: 1)
Cross Cultural & Strategic Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.504, CiteScore: 2)
Data Technologies and Applications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 323, SJR: 0.355, CiteScore: 1)
Development and Learning in Organizations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.138, CiteScore: 0)
Digital Library Perspectives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.341, CiteScore: 1)
Direct Marketing An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Disaster Prevention and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.47, CiteScore: 1)
Drugs and Alcohol Today     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 143, SJR: 0.245, CiteScore: 1)
Education + Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Education, Business and Society : Contemporary Middle Eastern Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.707, CiteScore: 3)
Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Employee Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.551, CiteScore: 2)
Engineering Computations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.444, CiteScore: 1)
Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.653, CiteScore: 2)
English Teaching: Practice & Critique     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.417, CiteScore: 1)
Equal Opportunities Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Equality, Diversity and Inclusion : An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.5, CiteScore: 1)
EuroMed J. of Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.26, CiteScore: 1)
European Business Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.585, CiteScore: 3)
European J. of Innovation Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.454, CiteScore: 2)
European J. of Management and Business Economics     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.239, CiteScore: 1)
European J. of Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.971, CiteScore: 2)
European J. of Training and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.477, CiteScore: 1)
Evidence-based HRM     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.537, CiteScore: 1)
Facilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.503, CiteScore: 2)
Foresight     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.34, CiteScore: 1)
Gender in Management : An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.412, CiteScore: 1)
Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 977, SJR: 0.261, CiteScore: 1)
Grey Systems : Theory and Application     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Health Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.421, CiteScore: 1)
Higher Education Evaluation and Development     Open Access  
Higher Education, Skills and Work-based Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46, SJR: 0.426, CiteScore: 1)
History of Education Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.26, CiteScore: 0)
Housing, Care and Support     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.171, CiteScore: 0)
Human Resource Management Intl. Digest     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.129, CiteScore: 0)
IMP J.     Hybrid Journal  
Indian Growth and Development Review     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.174, CiteScore: 0)
Industrial and Commercial Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.301, CiteScore: 1)
Industrial Lubrication and Tribology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.334, CiteScore: 1)
Industrial Management & Data Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.904, CiteScore: 3)
Industrial Robot An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.318, CiteScore: 1)
Info     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Information and Computer Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.307, CiteScore: 1)
Information Technology & People     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45, SJR: 0.671, CiteScore: 2)
Innovation & Management Review     Open Access  
Interactive Technology and Smart Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.191, CiteScore: 1)
Interlending & Document Supply     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 61)
Internet Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37, SJR: 1.645, CiteScore: 5)
Intl. J. for Lesson and Learning Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.324, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. for Researcher Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Intl. J. of Accounting and Information Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.275, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Bank Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.654, CiteScore: 3)
Intl. J. of Climate Change Strategies and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.353, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Clothing Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.318, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Commerce and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Conflict Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.362, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Contemporary Hospitality Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.452, CiteScore: 4)
Intl. J. of Culture Tourism and Hospitality Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.339, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Development Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.139, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.387, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Educational Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.559, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Emergency Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.201, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Emerging Markets     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.474, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Energy Sector Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.349, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Entrepreneurial Behaviour & Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.629, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Ethics and Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.333, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Event and Festival Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.388, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Gender and Entrepreneurship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.445, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Health Care Quality Assurance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.358, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Health Governance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.247, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Housing Markets and Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.211, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Human Rights in Healthcare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.205, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Information and Learning Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.226, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Innovation Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.197, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Intelligent Computing and Cybernetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.214, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Intelligent Unmanned Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Islamic and Middle Eastern Finance and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.375, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Law and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.217, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Leadership in Public Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Intl. J. of Lean Six Sigma     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.802, CiteScore: 3)
Intl. J. of Logistics Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.71, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Managerial Finance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.203, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Managing Projects in Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.36, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Manpower     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.365, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Mentoring and Coaching in Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.426, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Migration, Health and Social Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.307, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Numerical Methods for Heat & Fluid Flow     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.697, CiteScore: 3)
Intl. J. of Operations & Production Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 2.052, CiteScore: 4)
Intl. J. of Organization Theory and Behavior     Hybrid Journal  
Intl. J. of Organizational Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.268, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Pervasive Computing and Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.138, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.25, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.821, CiteScore: 4)
Intl. J. of Prisoner Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.303, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Productivity and Performance Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.578, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Public Sector Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32, SJR: 0.438, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Quality & Reliability Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.492, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Quality and Service Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.309, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Retail & Distribution Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.742, CiteScore: 3)
Intl. J. of Service Industry Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Social Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.225, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Sociology and Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54, SJR: 0.3, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.269, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Structural Integrity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.228, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Sustainability in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.502, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Tourism Cities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.502, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Web Information Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.186, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Wine Business Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.562, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Workplace Health Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.303, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. Marketing Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.895, CiteScore: 3)
Irish J. of Occupational Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
ISRA Intl. J. of Islamic Finance     Open Access  
J. for Multicultural Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.237, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Accounting & Organizational Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.301, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Accounting in Emerging Economies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
J. of Adult Protection, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.314, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Advances in Management Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
J. of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45, SJR: 0.222, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.108, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Applied Accounting Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.227, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Applied Research in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49, SJR: 0.2, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Asia Business Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.245, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Assistive Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
J. of Business & Industrial Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.652, CiteScore: 2)
J. of Business Strategy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.333, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Capital Markets Studies     Open Access  
J. of Centrum Cathedra     Open Access  
J. of Children's Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.243, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Chinese Economic and Foreign Trade Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.2, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Chinese Entrepreneurship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
J. of Chinese Human Resource Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.173, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Communication Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.625, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Consumer Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.664, CiteScore: 2)
J. of Corporate Real Estate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.368, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Criminal Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 134, SJR: 0.268, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Criminological Research, Policy and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48, SJR: 0.254, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.257, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Defense Analytics and Logistics     Open Access  
J. of Documentation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 189, SJR: 0.613, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Economic and Administrative Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
J. of Economic Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.733, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Economics, Finance and Administrative Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.217, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Educational Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.252, CiteScore: 2)
J. of Enabling Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.369, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Engineering, Design and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.212, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Enterprise Information Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.827, CiteScore: 4)
J. of Enterprising Communities People and Places in the Global Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.281, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Entrepreneurship and Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.262, CiteScore: 1)
J. of European Industrial Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
J. of European Real Estate Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.268, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Facilities Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.33, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Family Business Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
J. of Fashion Marketing and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.608, CiteScore: 2)

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Journal Cover
International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.358
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 12  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0952-6862
Published by Emerald Homepage  [356 journals]
  • Health care complaint journeys for system comparison
    • Pages: 878 - 887
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 31, Issue 8, Page 878-887, October 2018.
      Purpose The “patient journey” technique is one that has been used by health care providers to investigate the strengths and weaknesses of their service delivery. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the experience of adapting this approach for use in an atypical context – the comparison of two systems for managing health care complaints and notifications. It highlights a number of relevant considerations and provides suggestions for similar studies. Design/methodology/approach The design and methods of the study are described, with commentary on the success of key aspects and challenges encountered. To enable comparison between the two systems, this study had a “paired” design, in which examples were selected from each system so that they matched on basic, prescribed, criteria. Data about each matter’s journey were then collected from administrative records. Findings While, overall, the technique provided rich data on the processes of the systems under investigation, the type of data collected (related to administrative/communicative events) and the study’s comparative purpose required consideration and management of a number of issues. These included the implications of using administrative records and the impact of differences between the systems on the paired design. Originality/value This paper describes an attempt to apply the “journey” approach in a context that is uncommon in two ways: first, in its focus on regulatory processes (complaint/notification handling), rather than care provision to an individual patient; and second, in its objective of comparing two different systems. It is hoped this account will assist in further development of this technique.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2018-11-12T09:34:41Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-01-2017-0002
       
  • Factors associated with participation and completion of a survey-based
           study
    • Pages: 888 - 895
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 31, Issue 8, Page 888-895, October 2018.
      Purpose The Healthy Work Place (HWP) study investigated methods to improve clinicians’ dissatisfaction and burnout. The purpose of this paper is to identify factors that influenced study enrollment and completion and assess effects of initial clinic site enrollment rates on clinician outcomes, including satisfaction, burnout, stress and intent to leave practice. Design/methodology/approach In total, 144 primary care clinicians (general internists, family physicians, nurse practitioners and physician assistants) at 14 primary care clinics were analyzed. Findings In total, 72 clinicians enrolled in the study and completed the first survey (50 percent enrollment rate). Of these, 10 did not complete the second survey (86 percent completion rate). Gender, type, burnout, stress and intervention did not significantly affect survey completion. Hence, widespread agreement about most moral/ethical issues (72 percent vs 22 percent; p=0.0060) and general agreement on treatment methods (81 percent vs 50 percent; p=0.0490) were reported by providers that completed both surveys as opposed to just the initial survey. Providers with high initial clinic site enrollment rates (=50 percent providers) obtained better outcomes, including improvements in or no worsening of satisfaction (odds ratio (OR)=19.16; p=0.0217) and burnout (OR=6.24; p=0.0418). Social implications More providers experiencing workplace agreement completed the initial and final surveys, and providers at sites with higher initial enrollment rates obtained better outcomes including a higher rate of improvement or no worsening of job satisfaction and burnout. Originality/value There is limited research on clinicians’ workplace and other factors that influence their participation in survey-based studies. The findings help us to understand how these factors may affect quality of data collecting and outcome. Thus, the study provides us insight for improvement of quality in primary care.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2018-11-12T09:35:06Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-02-2017-0029
       
  • Registered nurses’ knowledge and care practices regarding patients with
           dysphagia in Saudi Arabia
    • Pages: 896 - 909
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 31, Issue 8, Page 896-909, October 2018.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to assess the knowledge and practices of nursing staff caring for patients with dysphagia to determine any needs for further education programmes. Design/methodology/approach A self-administered questionnaire with close-ended questions was completed by nurses at a tertiary hospital in Saudi Arabia to measure the depth of their dysphagia knowledge. Findings From 316 potential participants, a sample of 174 nurses completed the questionnaire. The results revealed that the participants had partial theoretical and practical knowledge about nursing care for patients with dysphagia. Of interest, 78 per cent of the nurses reported that they had received less than 1 h of training in dysphagia, and only 4 per cent were aware of speech and language pathologists’ role in dysphagia management. Practical implications As the medical professionals who have the most contact with the patients, nurses have a central role in the care of patients with dysphagia. This study provides information that will guide strategies for in-service nurse education dysphagia programmes. Originality/value The estimated Saudi prevalence of dysphagia is high due to increased incidence of medical conditions commonly associated with dysphagia, such as stroke, cerebral palsy and traumatic brain injuries from traffic accidents. Nurses play a pivotal role in caring for these patients. However, little is known about the level of care patients with dysphagia require in Saudi hospital settings.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2018-11-12T09:35:22Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-06-2017-0106
       
  • Environmental impact reduction as a new dimension for quality measurement
           of healthcare services
    • Pages: 910 - 922
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 31, Issue 8, Page 910-922, October 2018.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to provide a detailed accounting of energy and materials consumed during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Design/methodology/approach The first and second stages of ISO standard (ISO 14040:2006 and ISO 14044:2006) were followed to develop life cycle inventory (LCI). The LCI data collection took the form of observations, time studies, real-time metered power consumption, review of imaging department scheduling records and review of technical manuals and literature. Findings The carbon footprint of the entire MRI service on a per-patient basis was measured at 22.4 kg CO2eq. The in-hospital energy use (process energy) for performing MRI is 29 kWh per patient for the MRI machine, ancillary devices and light fixtures, while the out-of-hospital energy consumption is approximately 260 percent greater than the process energy, measured at 75 kWh per patient related to fuel for generation and transmission of electricity for the hospital, plus energy to manufacture disposable, consumable and reusable products. The actual MRI and standby energy that produces the MRI images is only about 38 percent of the total life cycle energy. Research limitations/implications The focus on methods and proof-of-concept meant that only one facility and one type of imaging device technology were used to reach the conclusions. Based on the similar studies related to other imaging devices, the provided transparent data can be generalized to other healthcare facilities with few adjustments to utilization ratios, the share of the exam types, and the standby power of the facilities’ imaging devices. Practical implications The transparent detailed life cycle approach allows the data from this study to be used by healthcare administrators to explore the hidden public health impact of the radiology department and to set goals for carbon footprint reductions of healthcare organizations by focusing on alternative imaging modalities. Moreover, the presented approach in quantifying healthcare services’ environmental impact can be replicated to provide measurable data on departmental quality improvement initiatives and to be used in hospitals’ quality management systems. Originality/value No other research has been published on the life cycle assessment of MRI. The share of outside hospital indirect environmental impact of MRI services is a previously undocumented impact of the physician’s order for an internal image.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2018-11-12T09:36:07Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-10-2016-0153
       
  • A strategic and good governance perspective on handling patient complaints
    • Pages: 923 - 934
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 31, Issue 8, Page 923-934, October 2018.
      Purpose The patient complaint is one of the main procedures of exercising patient’s rights in the Finnish health care system. Such complaints typically concern the quality of care and/or patient safety. The purpose of this paper is to examine the types of patient complaints received by a specialized medical care organization and the kinds of responses given by the organization’s personnel. The organization’s strategy and good governance principles provide the framework for understanding the organization’s action. Design/methodology/approach This study’s data comprise patient complaints and the responses from personnel of a specialized medical care organization from the start of 2012 to the end of January 2014. The data were analyzed through qualitative data analysis. Findings The results show many unwanted grievances, but also reveal the procedures employed to improve health care processes. The results are related to patients’ care experiences, provision of information, personnel’s professional skills and the approach to patient complaints handling. The integrative result of the analysis was to find consensus between the patients’ expectations and personnel’s evaluation of patients’ needs. Originality/value Few prior studies have examined patient complaints related to both strategy and good governance. Patient complaints were found to have several confluences with an organization’s strategic goals, objectives and good governance principles. The study recommends further research on personnel procedures for patient complaints handling, with a view to influencing strategic planning and implementation of strategies of organizations.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2018-11-12T09:34:34Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-11-2016-0168
       
  • Iatrogenic emergency medicine procedure complications and associated
           trouble-shooting strategies
    • Pages: 935 - 949
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 31, Issue 8, Page 935-949, October 2018.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to provide a consolidated reference for the acute management of selected iatrogenic procedural injuries occurring in the emergency department (ED). Design/methodology/approach A literature search was performed utilizing PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science and Google Scholar for studies through March of 2017 investigating search terms “iatrogenic procedure complications,” “error management” and “procedure complications,” in addition to the search terms reflecting case reports involving the eight below listed procedure complications. Findings This may be particularly helpful to academic faculty who supervise physicians in training who present a higher risk to cause such injuries. Originality/value Emergent procedures performed in the ED present a higher risk for iatrogenic injury than in more controlled settings. Many physicians are taught error-avoidance rather than how to handle errors when learning procedures. There is currently very limited literature on the error management of iatrogenic procedure complications in the ED.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2018-11-12T09:35:47Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-08-2017-0157
       
  • Managing the essential medicines stock at rural healthcare systems in
           India
    • Pages: 950 - 965
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 31, Issue 8, Page 950-965, October 2018.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to eliminate the medicine stock-out problem by building an optimum medicine stock in rural healthcare centers in India. Design/methodology/approach Data associated with inflow and outflow of a specific medicine (folic acid tablets) arer collected from all consecutive supply chain stages during the survey. While conducting the survey, it is found that several medicines are out of stock owing to uncertain lead time and demand. Integrating with quantity discount and min–max (s, S) inventory policy, two models are developed using system dynamics: one is Model 1 with constant lead time and uncertain demand, and the other is Model 2 with both uncertain lead time and demand. Findings Both models are simulated for a period of one year on Stella 9.1 platform. The results are compared with actual data, and the comparison shows significant improvement of the medicine stock at all downstream stages, while maintaining a certain safety stock. Further, Model 2 suggests a larger stock than Model 1 at each point of time. Practical implications Despite numerous issues, the stocks of medicine in rural healthcare systems can be improved as suggested by the models. The models depict the behavior of inventory stock at each stage of the supply chain and act as a function of time that could be used in the form of a prediction tool for the policymakers. Originality/value This paper is one of the first papers that had developed the model of the medicine supply chain in rural parts of a developing country. It provides a generic framework for the stock assessment and improvement throughout the supply chain.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2018-11-12T09:35:02Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-12-2016-0186
       
  • Surgical audit: are we not closing the loop'
    • Pages: 966 - 972
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 31, Issue 8, Page 966-972, October 2018.
      Purpose A clinical audit is a key component of the clinical governance framework. The rate of audit completion in general surgery has not been investigated. The purpose of this paper is to assess the rates of audit activity and completion and explore the barriers to successful audit completion. Design/methodology/approach This was a multi-centre study evaluating current surgical audit practice. A standardised audit proforma was designed. All clinical audits in general surgery during a two-year period were identified and retrospectively reviewed. Data held by the audit departments were collated, and individual audit teams were contacted to verify the data accuracy. Audit teams failing to complete the full audit cycle with a re-audit were asked to explain the underlying reasons behind this. Findings Of the six trusts approached, two refused to participate, and one failed to initiate the project. A total of 39 audits were registered across three surgical directorates. Only 15 out of 39 audits completed at least one audit cycle, with 4 deemed of no value to re-audit. Only seven audits were completed to re-audit. Achieving a publication or a presentation was the most cited reason for not completing the audit loop. Originality/value This study demonstrates that the poor rates of audit completion rate found in other areas of clinical medicine pervade general surgery. Improved completion of an audit is essential and strategies to achieve this are urgently needed.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2018-11-12T09:35:17Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-06-2017-0109
       
  • Effect of Lean Six Sigma on quality performance in Malaysian hospitals
    • Pages: 973 - 987
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 31, Issue 8, Page 973-987, October 2018.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effects of Lean Six Sigma (LSS) and workforce management on the quality performance of Malaysian hospitals. This paper also investigates the direct and indirect relationships between top management commitment and quality performance of the healthcare organisations in Malaysia. Design/methodology/approach This study applied stratified random sampling to collect data from 15 different hospitals in Peninsular Malaysia. The self-administered survey questionnaires were distributed among 673 hospital staff (i.e. doctors, nurses, pharmacists, and medical laboratory technologists) to obtain 335 useful responses with a 49.47 per cent valid response rate. The research data were analysed based on confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modelling by using AMOS version 23 software. Findings The research findings indicated that LSS and workforce management have a significant impact on quality performance of the Malaysian hospitals, whereas senior management commitment was found to have an insignificant relationship with quality performance. The research findings indicate that senior management commitment has no direct significant relationship with quality performance, but it has an indirect significant relationship with quality performance through the mediating effects of LSS and workforce management. Research limitations/implications This research focussed solely on healthcare organisations in Malaysia and thus the results might not be applicable for other countries as well as other service organisations. Originality/value This research provides theoretical, methodological, and practical contributions for the LSS approach and the research findings are expected to provide guidelines to enhance the level of quality performance in healthcare organisations in Malaysia as well as other countries.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2018-11-12T09:34:49Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-07-2017-0138
       
  • Development of the Persian patient satisfaction questionnaire
    • Pages: 988 - 999
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 31, Issue 8, Page 988-999, October 2018.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to explore the validity and reliability of the Persian version of the patient satisfaction questionnaire (PVPSQ). The study addressed the communication skills section of the PSQ specifically. Design/methodology/approach This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2015 to determine the validity and reliability of the Persian version of the patient satisfaction questionnaire (PSQ). In total, 538 patients (ten in pilot, 488 in tests, 40 in retest), 14 experts and 198 residents participated. The items’ impact score, content validity index, and content validity ratio were calculated. Construct validity and reliability of the scale were examined with exploratory factor analysis, Cronbach’s α, and the Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), respectively. Findings The questionnaire demonstrated a content validity index=0.94, content validity ratio=0.84, impact score=4.61, Cronbach’s α=0.93 and ICC=0.513 (p
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2018-11-12T09:35:28Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-06-2017-0101
       
  • Effects of job resources factors on nurses job performance (mediating role
           of work engagement)
    • Pages: 1000 - 1013
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 31, Issue 8, Page 1000-1013, October 2018.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to examine the mediating role of work engagement (vigor and dedication) between job resources (job characteristics, supervisor and co-worker support, participation in decision making and job security) and job performance (task and contextual) rated by the supervisor. Design/methodology/approach A sample of 364 nurses and their supervisors was used. Structural equation modeling with Amos 17 was used to obtain a model fit with path significance of work engagement as the mediator between job resources and job performance. Findings The results found support for the proposed conceptual claim and confirm that work engagement with a two-factor model (vigor and dedication) mediates the relationship between job resources (job characteristics, supervisor and co-worker support, participation in decision making and job security) and with a multidimensional construct of job performance (task and contextual performance) rated by the supervisor. Practical implications The findings of this research will help human resource managers and professionals to further develop the working environment, provide job security and opportunities for employees to participate in decision making in a way that enhances employee work engagement, which, ultimately, improves employee job performance. Originality/value Past studies have not previously tested the two-factor model of work engagement (vigor and dedication) as the mediating variable between job resources (job characteristics, supervisor and co-worker support, participation in decision making and job security) and job performance rated by the supervisor.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2018-11-12T09:35:52Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-07-2017-0129
       
  • Investigating health information systems-induced errors
    • Pages: 1014 - 1029
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 31, Issue 8, Page 1014-1029, October 2018.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to present a review of health information system (HIS)-induced errors and its management. This paper concludes that the occurrence of errors is inevitable but it can be minimised with preventive measures. The review of classifications can be used to evaluate medical errors related to HISs using a socio-technical approach. The evaluation could provide an understanding of errors as a learning process in managing medical errors. Design/methodology/approach A literature review was performed on issues, sources, management and approaches to HISs-induced errors. A critical review of selected models was performed in order to identify medical error dimensions and elements based on human, process, technology and organisation factors. Findings Various error classifications have resulted in the difficulty to understand the overall error incidents. Most classifications are based on clinical processes and settings. Medical errors are attributed to human, process, technology and organisation factors that influenced and need to be aligned with each other. Although most medical errors are caused by humans, they also originate from other latent factors such as poor system design and training. Existing evaluation models emphasise different aspects of medical errors and could be combined into a comprehensive evaluation model. Research limitations/implications Overview of the issues and discourses in HIS-induced errors could divulge its complexity and enable its causal analysis. Practical implications This paper helps in understanding various types of HIS-induced errors and promising prevention and management approaches that call for further studies and improvement leading to good practices that help prevent medical errors. Originality/value Classification of HIS-induced errors and its management, which incorporates a socio-technical and multi-disciplinary approach, could guide researchers and practitioners to conduct a holistic and systematic evaluation.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2018-11-12T09:35:40Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-07-2017-0125
       
  • Patients’ satisfaction as a dimension of quality: a survey on
           outpatients’ care in Dubai
    • Pages: 1030 - 1043
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 31, Issue 8, Page 1030-1043, October 2018.
      Purpose The last few years have seen a stronger emphasis on patient-centred care within the international healthcare setting. Patient-centred care is clearly perceived to be important to optimise the satisfaction and well-being of patients. The purpose of this paper is to review current patient-centred practices for outpatients in both private clinics and public hospitals in Dubai. Such a comparison contributes to the identification of best management practices as a means of enhancing healthcare delivery. Design/methodology/approach This study is based on an independent survey consisting of self-administered questionnaires, in which patients were asked to rate several aspects of private clinics or government hospitals in Dubai. The questionnaire used has been drawn from the Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems Clinician and Group Survey, Version 3.0. Responses from 420 patients form a data set that is analysed quantitatively. Findings In total, 420 respondents took part in this survey. The results of the survey show that there is a considerable difference between the expectation levels of patients from government hospitals and patients from private clinics. Patients from government hospitals consistently show that time is a critical aspect of the service received, with 68 per cent of the respondents reporting this issue. Additionally, poor customer care, as reported by 14 per cent of the respondents, is also a critical issue. Timely service and appointments are among the main factors that contribute to patient satisfaction. Patients in private clinics, instead, particularly value clear explanations from doctors and nurses – this is corroborated by the fact that 11 per cent of the respondents reported appreciation of this type of service. Practical implications This paper draws attention to a patient-centric perspective of healthcare, and highlights the importance of educating patients through clear explanations. Originality/value Little evidence exists on the standards of healthcare in Dubai. The authors explore this area and present direct evidence on quality standard implementation, identify implementation shortcomings and make recommendations for future research and practice.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2018-11-12T09:35:59Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-10-2017-0188
       
  • Effective quality systems: implementation in Australian public hospitals
    • Pages: 1044 - 1057
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 31, Issue 8, Page 1044-1057, October 2018.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to review the implementation of seven components of quality systems (QSs) linked with quality improvement in a sample of Australian hospitals. Design/methodology/approach The authors completed a systematic review to identify QS components associated with measureable quality improvement. Using mixed methods, the authors then reviewed the current state of these QS components in a sample of eight Australian hospitals. Findings The literature review identified seven essential QS components. Both the self-evaluation and focus group data suggested that none of the hospitals had all of these seven components in place, and that there were some implementation issues with those components that were in use. Although board and senior executives could point to a large number of quality and safety documents that they felt were supporting a vision and framework for safe, high-quality care, middle managers and clinical staff described the QSs as compliance driven and largely irrelevant to their daily pursuit of safe, high-quality care. The authors also found little specific training in quality improvement for staff, lack of useful data for clinicians on the quality of care they provide and confusion about how organisational QSs work. Practical implications This study provides a clearer picture of why QSs are not yet achieving the results that boards and executives want to achieve, and that patients require. Originality/value This is the first study to explore the implementation of QSs in hospitals in-depth from the perspective of hospital staff, linking the findings to the implementation of QS component identified in the literature.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2018-11-12T09:34:18Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-02-2017-0037
       
  • Identification of factors influencing the rise of cesarean sections rates
           in Pakistan, using MCDM
    • Pages: 1058 - 1069
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 31, Issue 8, Page 1058-1069, October 2018.
      Purpose The rate of cesarean sections has been rapidly increased in the last few decades in all the developing as well as developed countries. The rate of cesarean sections determined by the World Health Organization has been crossed by many countries, like Brazil, India, China, USA, Australia, etc. Similarly, this rate has also increased in Pakistan. The purpose of this paper is to explore and identify the factors that are responsible for the rising rate of cesarean sections in Pakistan. Design/methodology/approach These factors are categorized under medical and non-medical factors. The medical factors include the obesity of mother, age of mother, weight of the baby, umbilical cord prolapse, fetal distress, abnormal presentation, dystocia and failure to progress. The non-medical factors include financial incentives of doctors, time convenience for doctors, high tolerance to surgery, patient’s preference toward cesarean section, private hospitals, public hospitals, income status of patients, rural areas, urban areas and the education of patients. To identify the critical factors, data have been collected and a multi-criteria decision-making technique, called Decision Making Trial and Evaluation Laboratory, is used. Findings The result shows that the medical factors that are responsible for the rise in the rate of cesarean sections are umbilical cord prolapse, age of mother and obesity of mother. On the other hand, the non-medical factors that are the reasons for the increase in cesarean sections are the large number of private hospitals and the unethical acts of the doctors in these hospitals, preference of patients, and either the unavailability of doctors or poor conditions of hospitals in rural areas. Originality/value Cesarean section is an important surgical intervention and is considered to be very essential in the cases of existing as well as potential medical problems to the mother or the baby. Cesarean section is also performed for non-medical reasons. In Pakistan, the number of private hospitals has increased and these hospitals provide good health care. However, these hospitals do not work under the rules and regulations set by the government. The doctors in private hospitals perform unnecessary cesarean sections in order to fulfill the demands of private hospital’s owners. In addition to this, it is also found that, nowadays, most women prefer to give birth through cesarean section in order to eliminate the pain of normal vaginal delivery.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2018-11-12T09:34:47Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-04-2018-0087
       
  • Intravenous fluid delivery time improvement: application of cross-docking
           system
    • Pages: 1070 - 1081
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 31, Issue 8, Page 1070-1081, October 2018.
      Purpose The cost of pharmaceutical supply chain due to drug waste is one of the current major issues in health care. Drug waste associated with intravenous (IV) fluid form of medication is one of the crucial issues for many pharmacies. The purpose of this paper is to apply a cross-docking model to minimize the IV delivery lead time to reduce drug waste by scheduling staff in a local hospital’s inpatient pharmacy. Design/methodology/approach A mixed integer linear programming model is applied to the IV delivery system of a hospital. The parameters are selected based on the observations made in the inpatient pharmacy. Findings The result implies that cross-docking approach can be effectively applied to IV delivery system. In fact, the cross-docking optimization model employed in this case study reduces the IV delivery completion time of the inpatient pharmacy by 41 percent. Research limitations/implications The scope of this research is limited to the activities performed after IV preparation. Practical implications The application of cross-docking system in staff scheduling will be beneficial for health care organizations that aim to minimize medication waste. Originality/value The prime value of this study lies in the introduction of a cross-docking concept in an internal hospital ordering process. Cross-docking models are widely used in general supply chain systems; however, their application for specific activities inside hospitals is the novelty of this study, which can fill the research gap in terms of drug waste management within the inpatient pharmacy.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2018-11-12T09:35:09Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-09-2017-0164
       
  • Improving hospital food menu quality: an experimental approach
    • Pages: 1082 - 1088
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 31, Issue 8, Page 1082-1088, October 2018.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to examine whether the negative impressions consumers hold toward institutional food can be remedied by subtle changes in menu descriptions. While an expectancy-disconfirmation explanation would suggest this, a negativity bias explanation would suggest otherwise. Design/methodology/approach The authors test the research question using an experimental 2 × 2 full factorial design, with data collected from 100 university students. Findings The results show that when hospital menus are made somewhat fancier in their description, consumers evaluate the food as more attractive and menu variation to be greater. This implies that the judgments are more likely to be based on an expectancy-disconfirmation process that on being subject to negativity bias. Research limitations/implications The authors study perceived attractiveness and menu variation, but future research should include taste perceptions and consumption volume. Practical implications Institution managers could improve consumer perceptions of how attractive the food being served is, and the perceived variation in their menus, by subtly changing the course descriptions to become fancier. However, as such, a strategy based on an expectancy-disconfirmation process, institution managers should beware not to sweeten the pill too much, i.e., making promises they cannot keep may backfire if one makes the menus too fancy compared to what is delivered. Originality/value The authors extend current knowledge on menu label effects by addressing them for food suppliers, which are inherently associated with low food quality. The authors also show that when managers apply such strategies, the effect is due to a disconfirmation process rather than a negativity bias.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2018-11-12T09:35:34Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-07-2017-0128
       
 
 
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