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Publisher: Emerald   (Total: 335 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 335 Journals sorted alphabetically
A Life in the Day     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Academia Revista Latinoamericana de Administración     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.144, h-index: 4)
Accounting Auditing & Accountability J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Accounting Research J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.26, h-index: 7)
Accounting, Auditing and Accountability J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.88, h-index: 40)
Advances in Accounting Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.514, h-index: 5)
Advances in Appreciative Inquiry     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.124, h-index: 5)
Advances in Autism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Dual Diagnosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48, SJR: 0.228, h-index: 2)
Advances in Gender Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.229, h-index: 7)
Advances in Intl. Marketing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.123, h-index: 11)
Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54, SJR: 0.29, h-index: 5)
Advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
African J. of Economic and Management Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.125, h-index: 2)
Agricultural Finance Review     Hybrid Journal  
Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 136, SJR: 0.391, h-index: 18)
American J. of Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Annals in Social Responsibility     Full-text available via subscription  
Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.215, h-index: 25)
Arts and the Market     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Asia Pacific J. of Marketing and Logistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.244, h-index: 15)
Asia-Pacific J. of Business Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.182, h-index: 7)
Asian Association of Open Universities J.     Open Access  
Asian Education and Development Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Asian J. on Quality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Asian Review of Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.29, h-index: 7)
Aslib J. of Information Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.65, h-index: 29)
Aslib Proceedings     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 201)
Assembly Automation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.657, h-index: 26)
Baltic J. of Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.354, h-index: 14)
Benchmarking : An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.556, h-index: 38)
British Food J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.329, h-index: 35)
Built Environment Project and Asset Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.232, h-index: 4)
Business Process Re-engineering & Management J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.614, h-index: 42)
Business Strategy Series     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.201, h-index: 6)
Career Development Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.686, h-index: 32)
China Agricultural Economic Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.238, h-index: 10)
China Finance Review Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Chinese Management Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.216, h-index: 12)
Circuit World     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.346, h-index: 17)
Collection Building     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.829, h-index: 10)
COMPEL: The Intl. J. for Computation and Mathematics in Electrical and Electronic Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.269, h-index: 22)
Competitiveness Review : An Intl. Business J. incorporating J. of Global Competitiveness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Construction Innovation: Information, Process, Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.508, h-index: 8)
Corporate Communications An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.703, h-index: 26)
Corporate Governance Intl. J. of Business in Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.309, h-index: 29)
Critical Perspectives on Intl. Business     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.32, h-index: 15)
Cross Cultural & Strategic Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.356, h-index: 13)
Development and Learning in Organizations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.138, h-index: 8)
Digital Library Perspectives     Hybrid Journal  
Direct Marketing An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Disaster Prevention and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.533, h-index: 32)
Drugs and Alcohol Today     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 106, SJR: 0.241, h-index: 4)
Education + Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.532, h-index: 30)
Education, Business and Society : Contemporary Middle Eastern Issues     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.141, h-index: 10)
Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies     Hybrid Journal  
Employee Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.435, h-index: 22)
Engineering Computations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.387, h-index: 39)
Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.541, h-index: 28)
Equal Opportunities Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Equality, Diversity and Inclusion : An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.239, h-index: 9)
EuroMed J. of Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.145, h-index: 9)
European Business Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.481, h-index: 21)
European J. of Innovation Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.596, h-index: 30)
European J. of Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.933, h-index: 55)
European J. of Training and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.489, h-index: 23)
Evidence-based HRM     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Facilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.371, h-index: 18)
Foresight     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.486, h-index: 20)
Gender in Management : An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.359, h-index: 22)
Grey Systems : Theory and Application     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Health Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.383, h-index: 17)
Higher Education, Skills and Work-based Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40, SJR: 0.172, h-index: 4)
History of Education Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.141, h-index: 2)
Housing, Care and Support     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.174, h-index: 4)
Human Resource Management Intl. Digest     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.121, h-index: 6)
Humanomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.14, h-index: 4)
IMP J.     Hybrid Journal  
Indian Growth and Development Review     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.163, h-index: 4)
Industrial and Commercial Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.217, h-index: 14)
Industrial Lubrication and Tribology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.322, h-index: 19)
Industrial Management & Data Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.63, h-index: 69)
Industrial Robot An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.375, h-index: 32)
Info     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.25, h-index: 21)
Information and Computer Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Information Technology & People     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45, SJR: 0.576, h-index: 28)
Interactive Technology and Smart Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.112, h-index: 1)
Interlending & Document Supply     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 62, SJR: 0.48, h-index: 13)
Internet Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43, SJR: 1.746, h-index: 57)
Intl. J. for Lesson and Learning Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. for Researcher Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Intl. J. of Accounting and Information Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.304, h-index: 7)
Intl. J. of Bank Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.515, h-index: 38)
Intl. J. of Climate Change Strategies and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.416, h-index: 7)
Intl. J. of Clothing Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.279, h-index: 25)
Intl. J. of Commerce and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Conflict Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.763, h-index: 38)
Intl. J. of Contemporary Hospitality Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.329, h-index: 35)
Intl. J. of Culture Tourism and Hospitality Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.399, h-index: 5)
Intl. J. of Development Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Intl. J. of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.225, h-index: 7)
Intl. J. of Educational Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.424, h-index: 32)
Intl. J. of Emergency Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.179, h-index: 1)
Intl. J. of Emerging Markets     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.199, h-index: 5)
Intl. J. of Energy Sector Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.25, h-index: 12)
Intl. J. of Entrepreneurial Behaviour & Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.694, h-index: 28)
Intl. J. of Event and Festival Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.32, h-index: 8)
Intl. J. of Gender and Entrepreneurship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.638, h-index: 6)
Intl. J. of Health Care Quality Assurance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.352, h-index: 32)
Intl. J. of Health Governance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.277, h-index: 15)
Intl. J. of Housing Markets and Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.201, h-index: 5)
Intl. J. of Human Rights in Healthcare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.13, h-index: 2)
Intl. J. of Information and Learning Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Intl. J. of Innovation Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.173, h-index: 5)
Intl. J. of Intelligent Computing and Cybernetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.258, h-index: 10)
Intl. J. of Intelligent Unmanned Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.145, h-index: 2)
Intl. J. of Islamic and Middle Eastern Finance and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Intl. J. of Law and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.107, h-index: 2)
Intl. J. of Law in the Built Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.111, h-index: 2)
Intl. J. of Leadership in Public Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Intl. J. of Lean Six Sigma     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.562, h-index: 15)
Intl. J. of Logistics Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.998, h-index: 15)
Intl. J. of Managerial Finance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.212, h-index: 11)
Intl. J. of Managing Projects in Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Manpower     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.354, h-index: 37)
Intl. J. of Mentoring and Coaching in Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Intl. J. of Migration, Health and Social Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.261, h-index: 5)
Intl. J. of Numerical Methods for Heat & Fluid Flow     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.594, h-index: 32)
Intl. J. of Operations & Production Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 2.198, h-index: 94)
Intl. J. of Organizational Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.222, h-index: 11)
Intl. J. of Pervasive Computing and Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.165, h-index: 9)
Intl. J. of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.304, h-index: 12)
Intl. J. of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.694, h-index: 66)
Intl. J. of Prisoner Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.254, h-index: 10)
Intl. J. of Productivity and Performance Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.785, h-index: 31)
Intl. J. of Public Sector Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.272, h-index: 37)
Intl. J. of Quality & Reliability Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.544, h-index: 63)
Intl. J. of Quality and Service Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.133, h-index: 1)
Intl. J. of Retail & Distribution Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.543, h-index: 36)
Intl. J. of Service Industry Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Social Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.227, h-index: 25)
Intl. J. of Sociology and Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46, SJR: 0.361, h-index: 5)
Intl. J. of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship     Hybrid Journal  
Intl. J. of Structural Integrity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.325, h-index: 8)
Intl. J. of Sustainability in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.616, h-index: 29)
Intl. J. of Tourism Cities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Web Information Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.208, h-index: 13)
Intl. J. of Wine Business Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.196, h-index: 12)
Intl. J. of Workplace Health Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.358, h-index: 8)
Intl. Marketing Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 1.076, h-index: 57)
J. for Multicultural Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.124, h-index: 11)
J. of Accounting & Organizational Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.346, h-index: 7)
J. of Accounting in Emerging Economies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
J. of Adult Protection, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.291, h-index: 7)
J. of Advances in Management Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
J. of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47, SJR: 0.177, h-index: 9)
J. of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
J. of Applied Accounting Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.22, h-index: 5)
J. of Applied Research in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
J. of Asia Business Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.115, h-index: 1)
J. of Assistive Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.215, h-index: 6)
J. of Business & Industrial Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.664, h-index: 48)
J. of Business Strategy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.381, h-index: 17)
J. of Centrum Cathedra     Open Access  
J. of Children's Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.167, h-index: 9)
J. of Chinese Economic and Foreign Trade Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.188, h-index: 4)
J. of Chinese Entrepreneurship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
J. of Chinese Human Resource Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.112, h-index: 3)
J. of Communication Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.735, h-index: 6)
J. of Consumer Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.613, h-index: 62)
J. of Corporate Real Estate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.633, h-index: 5)
J. of Criminal Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 103, SJR: 0.13, h-index: 1)
J. of Criminological Research, Policy and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54)
J. of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.109, h-index: 5)
J. of Documentation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 159, SJR: 0.936, h-index: 50)
J. of Economic and Administrative Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
J. of Economic Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.498, h-index: 26)
J. of Educational Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.848, h-index: 36)
J. of Engineering, Design and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.173, h-index: 10)
J. of Enterprise Information Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.433, h-index: 38)
J. of Enterprising Communities People and Places in the Global Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.212, h-index: 8)
J. of Entrepreneurship and Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
J. of European Industrial Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
J. of European Real Estate Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.52, h-index: 7)
J. of Facilities Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
J. of Family Business Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
J. of Fashion Marketing and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.529, h-index: 30)
J. of Financial Crime     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 327, SJR: 0.158, h-index: 5)
J. of Financial Economic Policy     Hybrid Journal  
J. of Financial Management of Property and Construction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.234, h-index: 1)
J. of Financial Regulation and Compliance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
J. of Financial Reporting and Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
J. of Forensic Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40, SJR: 0.225, h-index: 8)
J. of Global Mobility     Hybrid Journal  
J. of Global Responsibility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
J. of Health Organisation and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.67, h-index: 27)
J. of Historical Research in Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.376, h-index: 8)
J. of Hospitality and Tourism Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.672, h-index: 10)
J. of Human Resource Costing & Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
J. of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)

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Journal Cover International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
  [SJR: 0.352]   [H-I: 32]   [6 followers]  Follow
    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 0952-6862
   Published by Emerald Homepage  [335 journals]
  • Editorial: is QA investment worth it?
    • Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 30, Issue 1, February 2017.

      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2017-01-11T10:10:53Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-09-2016-0131
       
  • Measuring health literate discharge practices
    • Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 30, Issue 1, February 2017.
      Purpose Health literate discharge practices meet patient and family health literacy needs in preparation for care transitions from hospital to home. The study’s purpose was to measure health literate discharge practices in Ontario hospitals using a new organizational survey-questionnaire tool and to perform psychometric testing of this new survey Design/methodology/approach This survey was administered to hospitals in Ontario, Canada. Exploratory factor analysis and reliability testing were performed. Findings The participation rate of hospitals was 46%. Exploratory factor analysis demonstrated that there were five factors. The survey, and each of the five factors, had moderate to high levels of reliability. Research limitations/implications There is a need to expand the focus of further research to examine the experiences of patients and families. Repeating this study with a larger sample would facilitate further survey development. Practical implications Measuring health literate discharge practices with an organizational survey will help hospital managers to understand their performance and will help direct quality improvement efforts to improve patient care at hospital discharge and to decrease hospital readmission Originality/value There has been little research into how patients are discharged from hospital. This study is the first to use an organizational survey tool to measure health literate discharge practices.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2017-01-11T10:10:51Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-06-2016-0080
       
  • Factor selection for service quality evaluation: a hospital case study
    • Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 30, Issue 1, February 2017.
      Purpose The study aimed to develop a systematic approach to predict service quality dimension’s influence on service quality using a novel analysis based on data envelopment and SERVQUAL. Design/methodology/approach To assess hospital service quality in Tehran, expectation and perception of those who received the services were evaluated using SERVQUAL. The hospital service quality dimensions were found by exploratory factor analysis. To compare customer expectation and perception, perceived service quality index (PSQI) was measured using a new method based on common weights. A novel sensitivity approach was used to test the service quality factor’s impact on the PSQI. Findings A new service quality dimension named ‘trust in services’ was found using exploratory factor analysis, which is not an original SERVQUAL factor. Our approach was applied to assess the hospital’s service quality. Since the PSQI value was 0.76 it showed that improvements are needed to meet customer expectations. The results showed the factor order that affect PSQI. “Trust in services” has the strongest influence on PSQI followed by “tangibles”, “assurance”, “empathy” and “responsiveness”, respectively. Practical implications This work gives managers insight into service quality by following a systematic method; i.e., measuring perceived service quality from the customer viewpoint and service factors’ impact on customer perception. Originality/value Our procedure helps managers to select the required service quality dimensions which need improvement and predict their effects on customer perception.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2017-01-11T10:10:49Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-05-2016-0070
       
  • Framework for establishing records control in hospitals as an ISO 9001
           requirement
    • Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 30, Issue 1, February 2017.
      Purpose This article aims to present the process followed to control records in a Jordanian private community hospital as an ISO 9001:2008 standard requirement. Design/methodology/approach Under the hospital quality council's supervision, the quality management and development office staff were responsible for designing, planning and implementing the quality management system using the ISO 9001:2008 standard. A policy for records control was established. An action plan for establishing the control records control was developed and implemented. On completion, a coding system for records was specified to be used by hospital staff. Finally, an internal audit was performed to verify conformity to the ISO 9001:2008 standard requirements. Findings Successful certification by a neutral body ascertained that the hospital's quality management system conformed to the ISO 9001:2008 requirements. A framework was developed that describes the records controlling process, which can be used by staff in any healthcare organization wanting to achieve ISO 9001:2008 accreditation. Originality/value Given the increase interest in healthcare organizations to achieve the ISO 9001 certification, the proposed framework for establishing records control is developed and is expected to be a valuable management tool to improve and sustain healthcare quality.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2017-01-11T10:10:46Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-02-2016-0022
       
  • Quality improvement in hospitals: barriers and facilitators
    • Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 30, Issue 1, February 2017.
      Purpose This study examined QI initiatives in acute care hospitals, the factors associated with success, and the impacts on patient care and safety. Design/methodology/approach An extensive online survey was completed by senior managers responsible for QI. The survey assessed QI project types, QI methods, staff engagement, and barriers and factors in the success of QI initiatives. Findings The response rate was 37%, 46 surveys were completed from 125 acute care hospitals. QI initiatives had positive impacts on patient safety and care. Staff in all hospitals reported conducting past or present hand hygiene QI projects and C. difficile and surgical site infection were the next most frequent foci. Hospital staff not having time and problems with staff prioritizing QI with other duties were identified as important QI barriers. All respondents reported hospital leadership support, data utilization and internal champions as important QI facilitators. Multiple regression models identified nurses’ active involvement and medical staff engagement in QI with improved patient care and physicians’ active involvement and medical staff engagement with greater patient safety. Practical implications There is the need to study how best to support and encourage physicians and nurses to become more engaged in QI. Originality/value QI initiatives were shown to have positive impacts on patient safety and patient care and barriers and facilitating factors were identified. The results indicated patient care and safety would benefit from increased physician and nurse engagement in QI initiatives.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2017-01-11T10:10:44Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-12-2015-0144
       
  • Nursing home care quality: a cluster analysis
    • Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 30, Issue 1, February 2017.
      Purpose To explore potential differences in how nursing home residents rate care quality and to explore cluster characteristics. Design/methodology/approach A cross-sectional design was used, with one questionnaire including questions from Quality from Patients’ Perspective (QPP) and Big Five personality traits, together with questions related to socio-demographic aspects and health condition. Residents (N=103) from four Norwegian nursing homes participated (74.1% response rate). Hierarchical cluster analysis identified clusters with respect to care quality perceptions. Chi squared tests and one-way between-groups ANOVA were performed to characterise the clusters (p
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2017-01-11T10:10:42Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-12-2015-0145
       
  • Academic detailing among psychiatrists - feasibility and acceptability
    • Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 30, Issue 1, February 2017.
      Purpose Research has shown that academic detailing (AD), which includes repeated in-person educational messages in an interactive format in a physician’s office, is among the most effective Continuing Medical Education (CME) forms for improving prescribing practices and reducing drug costs. This project was designed to investigate AD’s feasibility and acceptability as an educational tool among psychiatrists and its ability to facilitate positive changes in antipsychotic prescribing. Design/methodology/approach All psychiatrists practicing in Southwestern Ontario, Canada were invited to participate. Participants [32/299(10.7%)] were provided with two educational sessions by a healthcare professional. Participants evaluated their AD visits and completed a pre- and post-AD questionnaire measuring various prescribing practice aspects. Findings A total of 26 out of 32 (81.3%) participants completed the post-AD evaluation; most of them (61.5%, n = 16) felt that AD gave noteworthy information on tools for monitoring side-effects and 50.0% (n = 13) endorsed using these in practice. Thirteen participants (50.0%) felt that the AD sessions gave them helpful information on tools for documenting polypharmacy use, which 46.2% (n = 12) indicated they would implement in their practice. No significant differences were found between participants’ pre- and post-assessment prescribing behaviours. Practical implications There is great need for raising AD program’s awareness and improving physician engagement in this process locally, provincially and nationally. Originality/value To our knowledge, this is the first AD program in Canada to target specialists solely. Participant psychiatrists accepted the AD intervention and perceived it as a feasible CME method.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2017-01-11T10:10:41Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-04-2016-0047
       
  • What drives continuous improvement project success in healthcare?
    • Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 30, Issue 1, February 2017.
      Purpose The primary research purpose is to present findings from a study of factors that affect continuous improvement project success in hospitals. Design/methodology/approach Quantitative regression analysis was performed on Likert scale survey responses. Qualitative thematic analysis was performed on open-ended survey responses and written reports on continuous improvement projects. Findings The article identifies managerial and employee factors that affect project success. These factors include managerial support, communication and affective commitment. Affective commitment is the extent to which employees perceive the change as being needed or necessary. Practical implications The results highlight how managerial decisions, approaches to communication – including communication before, during and after continuous improvement projects affect project success. The results also show that success depends on the way employees perceive proposed changes. This suggests the need for a more individualized approach to continuous improvement, lean, and broader change initiatives. Originality/value This research is the first to fuse project success and sustainability theory to continuous improvement projects, beyond kaizen events, in healthcare environments. The research is particularly important at a time when healthcare organizations are required to make rapid changes with limited resources as they work toward outcome based assessment and reimbursement rules.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2017-01-11T10:10:39Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-03-2016-0035
       
  • Understanding performance management in primary care
    • Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 30, Issue 1, February 2017.
      Purpose Principal-agent theory has been used to understand relationships among different professional groups and explain performance management between organisations, but is rarely used for research within primary care. This paper explores whether principal-agent theory can be used attain a better understanding of performance management in primary care. Design/methodology/approach Purposive sampling was used to identify a range of general practices in the north west of England. Interviews were carried out with directors, managers and clinicians in commissioning and regional performance management organisations and within general practices, and the data analysed using matrix analysis techniques to produce a case study of performance management. Findings There are various elements of the principal-agent framework that can be applied in primary care. Goal alignment is relevant, but can only be achieved through clear, strategic direction and consistent interpretation of objectives at all levels. There is confusion between performance measurement and performance management and a tendency to focus on things that are easy to measure whilst omitting aspects of care that are more difficult to capture. Appropriate use of incentives, good communication, clinical engagement, ownership and trust affect the degree to which information asymmetry is overcome and goal alignment achieved. Achieving the right balance between accountability and clinical autonomy is important to ensure governance and financial balance without stifling innovation. Originality/value The principal-agent theoretical framework can be used to attain a better understanding of performance management in primary care; although it is likely that only partial goal alignment will be achieved, dependent on the extent and level of alignment of a range of factors.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2017-01-11T10:10:37Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-10-2015-0128
       
  • Editorial
    • Pages: 818 - 819
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 29, Issue 8, Page 818-819, October 2016.

      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2016-09-27T11:56:03Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-06-2016-0092
       
  • Evaluation of patient wristbands and patient identification process in a
           training hospital in Turkey
    • Pages: 820 - 834
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 29, Issue 8, Page 820-834, October 2016.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the utilisation of patient wristbands (PWs) and patient identification (PI) process in a training hospital in Ankara, Turkey. Design/methodology/approach This descriptive and cross-sectional study was conducted in a training hospital with 640 beds, accreditied by Joint Commission International. The views of 348 patients and 419 hospital personnel on the implementation of patient wristbands and identification process were evaluated. Findings The results indicated that lack of information among patients about the importance of PWs and the misknowledge among staff participants on when, where, and by whom PWs should be put on and verified were the weakest points in this hospital. Research limitations/implications PI process must be strictly implemented according to the standard procedures of patient safety. Both patients and hospital personnel should be trained continuously, and training sessions must be held to increase their awareness about the importance of PWs and identification process. Practical implications Finding new ways and using new methods for increasing knowledge about PI and PWs are necessary. Hospital management should prepare a written PI and PW policy and procedure documents by taking the views of patients and hospital personnel and share these with them. Originality/value This study incorporates the views and attitudes of patients and health care personnel in improving health care quality by increasing awareness about PI and wristbands.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2016-09-27T11:56:57Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-04-2016-0052
       
  • Barriers to accurately measuring patients’ dietary intake in hospitals
           using the visual estimation method
    • Pages: 835 - 845
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 29, Issue 8, Page 835-845, October 2016.
      Purpose Visual estimation, an easy-to-perform technique, is commonly used in hospitals to assess dietary intake in patients. The authors performed a qualitative study where the authors interviewed nurses and dietitians about their perceptions of barriers to accurately measuring patients’ dietary intake in hospitals using the visual estimation method. The paper aims to discuss these issues. Design/methodology/approach Ten dietitians and ten clinical nurses responded to 30-minute individual interviews in Tokyo, Japan, in September 2014. Each interview was conducted using a common protocol of open-ended questions focusing on the challenges of the visual estimation method and barriers to accurately measuring patients’ dietary intake as part of their routine work. The tape-recorded interviews were transcribed and analyzed based on grounded theory. Findings Five main categories emerged: hospitals, meals, colleagues, raters, and patients. Various individual barriers such as skill, attitude, knowledge, and others that had not been considered in previous studies also emerged. External barriers that were out of the raters’ control, such as shortage of time, human resources, financial ability, and others, emerged from the “hospitals” category. Research limitations/implications Research participants were all females and many of them had less than ten years of experience. Practical implications In addition to standardizing the visual estimation process, medical staff need to overcome various other internal and external barriers to accurate measurements. Originality/value This is the first study to articulate some important barriers that influence reliability and validity when measuring patients’ dietary intake by visual estimation methods in typical clinical settings.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2016-09-27T11:56:05Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-04-2016-0042
       
  • Dispensing medication refills without counselling
    • Pages: 846 - 852
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 29, Issue 8, Page 846-852, October 2016.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to assess the safety and efficiency of, and acceptance by, patients for an express refill service (ERS). Design/methodology/approach A pilot uncontrolled, cross-sectional, single-centred study was conducted at the outpatient pharmacy of a tertiary acute care hospital. Under ERS, prescriptions were dispensed without clinical review and counselling for patients refilling prescription medications. Efficiency was assessed by comparing processing times of ERS prescriptions with regular prescriptions. Safety was assessed by independent review of prescriptions by two pharmacists. Patient acceptance was assessed by a survey. Findings ERS reduced processing time of prescriptions by more than 30 per cent compared to the regular fill process. ERS was generally safe for patients, with drug-related problems identified in only one prescription which may have warranted closer monitoring. It was accepted by patients who opted for the service, as 91.4 per cent agreed or strongly agreed that they were satisfied with the service. Research limitations/implications The study was conducted on a small convenience sample of patients in a single centre, with no control group. Practical implications Results showed that ERS was efficient, safe and well-accepted for select patients refilling their prescriptions. This leads to shorter waiting times and greater patient satisfaction. Originality/value This is the first published study that has explored the feasibility of an express prescription refill service. Despite some limitations, this study showed that omitting prospective clinical review and patient counselling for a defined population segment is safe, and can reduce processing time and improve patient satisfaction.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2016-09-27T11:56:07Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-04-2016-0040
       
  • Improving patient and staff outcomes using practice development
    • Pages: 853 - 863
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 29, Issue 8, Page 853-863, October 2016.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of a practice development program, “Essentials of Care” (EOC), on patient and staff outcomes, workplace culture and service delivery. Design/methodology/approach A descriptive study design was used to explore the impact of EOC in a district hospital rehabilitation ward. EOC focuses on embedding a person-centered culture within clinical areas and is structured from practice development methodologies. EOC was implemented in a metropolitan district hospital rehabilitation, older person 20-bed, ward. Findings Two projects were implemented during EOC. These projects led to nine significant patient and staff outcomes for medication and continence care practices. Outcomes included a reduction in older person complaints by 80 percent, pressure injuries by 62 percent, ward multi resistant staphylococcus aureus infection rates by 50 percent, clinical incidents by 22 percent, older person falls by 14 percent (per 1,000 bed days) and nursing sick leave by 10 percent. There was also a 13 percent improvement in the post nursing workplace satisfaction survey. Research limitations/implications This is a single site study and findings may not be suitable for generalizing across ward settings and broader population groups. Originality/value The EOC program led to significant improvements for and in clinical practices, staff satisfaction and ward culture. Specifically, the EOC program also identified significant cost savings and brought together the healthcare team in a cohesive and integrated way not previously experienced by staff. Practice development strategies can champion service quality improvement, optimal patient outcomes and consistency within healthcare.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2016-09-27T11:56:04Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-02-2016-0020
       
  • Stakeholders’ roles and responsibilities regarding quality of care
    • Pages: 864 - 876
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 29, Issue 8, Page 864-876, October 2016.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to describe how different stakeholders (society, managers, employees and clients) can together ensure the quality of care. Design/methodology/approach Qualitative data were collected from four focus group interviews conducted in three countries. All interviewees were pursuing a master’s degree in social and/or health care management and had begun working in their field after completing their bachelor’s degree. The data were analysed using inductive content analysis. Findings The society and managers are responsible for the care system as a whole and must apply system-oriented, rather than sector-oriented, thinking. Employees are responsible for ensuring the continuity of client services in their work, and managers and employees share the responsibility of achieving the organisational goals and quality standards. The clients are responsible for acting as responsible service users and providing the required information to obtain care. Communication was strongly emphasised in the data, and it necessitates cross-professional and organisational boundaries, professional and political boundaries, as well as boundaries between the professional and the client. Research limitations/implications Since the interviewees were all pursuing a master’s degree in social and/or health care management, when reflecting on their work experience, they may have also been reflecting what they had learned in university. Practical implications This study emphasises the importance of collaboration and communication between stakeholders in ensuring the quality of care. Unpredictable economies, the ageing population and the ongoing integration and reorganisation of health and social care services in Europe highlight systematic and strategic approach in quality of care. Originality/value This paper claims that communication between different care stakeholders gives a more systematic and coherent framework for the quality of care. Quality of care is a strategic choice and part of the strategic decision making at the societal, political, organisational and managerial levels.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2016-09-27T11:56:38Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-06-2015-0070
       
  • The impact of Lean bundles on hospital performance: does size matter?
    • Pages: 877 - 894
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 29, Issue 8, Page 877-894, October 2016.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to study the effect of the implementation of Lean bundles on hospital performance in private hospitals in Jordan and evaluate how much the size of organization can affect the relationship between Lean bundles implementation and hospital performance. Design/methodology/approach The research is considered as quantitative method (descriptive and hypothesis testing). Three statistical techniques were adopted to analyse the data. Structural equation modeling techniques and multi-group analysis were used to examine the research’s hypothesis, and to perform the required statistical analysis of the data from the survey. Reliability analysis and confirmatory factor analysis were used to test the construct validity, reliability and measurement loadings that were performed. Findings Lean bundles have been identified as an effective approach that can dramatically improve the organizational performance of private hospitals in Jordan. Main Lean bundles – just in time, human resource management, and total quality management are applicable to large, small and medium hospitals without significant differences in advantages that depend on size. Originality/value According to the researchers’ best knowledge, this is the first research that studies the impact of Lean bundles implementation in healthcare sector in Jordan. This research also makes a significant contribution for decision makers in healthcare to increase their awareness of Lean bundles.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2016-09-27T11:56:09Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-07-2015-0083
       
  • Healthcare and aging: do European Union countries differ?
    • Pages: 895 - 906
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 29, Issue 8, Page 895-906, October 2016.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to evaluate socio-economic inequalities in the use, accessibility and satisfaction with health services amongst 60-84 year old people from seven European urban communities. Design/methodology/approach Data for this study were collected in 2009. The target population was people aged 60-84 years from Stuttgart (Germany), Athens (Greece), Ancona (Italy), Kaunas (Lithuania), Porto (Portugal), Granada (Spain) and Stockholm (Sweden). The total sample comprised 4,467 respondents with a mean response rate across these countries of 45.2 per cent. Findings The study demonstrated that the majority of respondents had contact with a health care provider within the last 12 months. The highest percentages were reported by respondents from Spain (97.8 per cent) and Portugal (97.7 per cent). The results suggest that 13.0 per cent of respondents had refrained from seeking care services. The highest rates were amongst seniors from Lithuania (24.0 per cent), Germany (16.2 per cent) and Portugal (15.4 per cent). Logistic regression suggests that seniors who refrained from seeking health care was statistically significant associated with those with higher levels of education (odds ratios (OR)=1.21; 95 per cent confidence intervals (CI)=1.01-1.25) and financial strain (OR=1.26; 95 per cent CI=1.16-1.37). Furthermore, the majority of respondents were satisfied with health care services. Originality/value The findings from the “Elder Abuse: a multinational prevalence survey” study indicate the existence of significant variations in use, accessibility and satisfaction with health services by country and for socio-economic factors related to organizing and financing of care systems.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2016-09-27T11:56:08Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-09-2015-0110
       
  • Health providers’ perception of quality of care for neonates in health
           facilities in a municipality in Southern Ghana
    • Pages: 907 - 920
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 29, Issue 8, Page 907-920, October 2016.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to assess available human resources for neonatal care and their skills, in order to explore health providers’ perceptions of quality of neonatal care in health facilities in Ghana. Design/methodology/approach Data were gathered using qualitative interviews with health providers working in the maternity and paediatric wards and midwives; direct observation; and documentary review at a regional hospital, a municipal hospital and four health centres in a municipality in a region in Southern Ghana. Data were analysed using thematic framework through the process of coding in six phases to create and establish meaningful patterns. Findings The study revealed that health providers were concerned about the number of staff available, their competence and also equipment available for them to work more efficiently. Some essential equipment for neonatal care was either not available or was non-functional where it was available, while aseptic procedures were not adhered to. Moreover, personal protective equipment such as facemask, caps, aprons were not used except in the labour wards where staff had to change their footwear before entering. Research limitations/implications Limited number of health providers and facilities used, lack of exploration of parents of neonates’ perspective of quality of neonatal care in this study and other settings, including the teaching hospitals. The authors did not examine issues related to the ineffective use of IV cannulation for neonates by nurses as well as referral of neonates. Additionally, the authors did not explore the perspectives of management of the municipal and regional health directorates or policy makers of the Ministry of Health and Ghana Health Service regarding the shortage of staff, inadequate provision of medical equipment and infrastructure. Practical implications This paper suggests the need for policy makers to redirect their attention to the issues that would improve the quality of neonatal health care in health facilities in Ghana and in countries with similar challenges. Social implications The study found that the majority of nursing staff catering for sick newborns were not trained in neonatal nursing. Babies were found sleeping in separate cots but were mixed with older children. The study suggests that babies should be provided with a separate room and not mixed with older babies. Originality/value There seemed to be no defined policy framework for management of neonatal care in the country’s health care facilities. The study recommends the adoption of paediatric and neonatal care nursing as a specialty in the curricula of health training institutions. In-service trainings should encompass issues related to management of sick babies, care of preterm babies, neonatal resuscitation and intravenouscannulation, among others.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2016-09-27T11:56:37Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-04-2016-0055
       
 
 
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