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Publisher: Emerald   (Total: 309 journals)

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A Life in the Day     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Accounting Auditing & Accountability J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Accounting Research J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.148, h-index: 3)
Accounting, Auditing and Accountability J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.972, h-index: 30)
Advances in Accounting Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Advances in Appreciative Inquiry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.107, h-index: 4)
Advances in Dual Diagnosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45, SJR: 0.211, h-index: 3)
Advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
African J. of Economic and Management Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Agricultural Finance Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 194, SJR: 0.339, h-index: 15)
American J. of Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.309, h-index: 23)
Arts Marketing : An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Asia Pacific J. of Marketing and Logistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Asia-Pacific J. of Business Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.237, h-index: 4)
Asian Education and Development Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Asian J. on Quality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Asian Review of Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.174, h-index: 3)
Aslib J. of Information Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Aslib Proceedings     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 358, SJR: 0.558, h-index: 23)
Assembly Automation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.439, h-index: 20)
Baltic J. of Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.2, h-index: 10)
Benchmarking : An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.554, h-index: 28)
British Food J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.361, h-index: 25)
Built Environment Project and Asset Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.248, h-index: 3)
Business Process Management J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.841, h-index: 31)
Business Strategy Series     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.151, h-index: 3)
Campus-Wide Information Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.246, h-index: 12)
Career Development Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.721, h-index: 22)
China Agricultural Economic Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.419, h-index: 6)
China Finance Review Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Chinese Management Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.424, h-index: 7)
Circuit World     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.297, h-index: 15)
Clinical Governance: An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.176, h-index: 13)
Collection Building     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.461, h-index: 8)
COMPEL: The Intl. J. for Computation and Mathematics in Electrical and Electronic Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.224, h-index: 18)
Competitiveness Review : An Intl. Business J. incorporating J. of Global Competitiveness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Construction Innovation: Information, Process, Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Corporate Communications An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.394, h-index: 18)
Corporate Governance Intl. J. of Business in Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.345, h-index: 21)
Critical Perspectives on Intl. Business     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.311, h-index: 11)
Cross Cultural Management An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.648, h-index: 6)
Development and Learning in Organizations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.123, h-index: 6)
Direct Marketing An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Disaster Prevention and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.352, h-index: 24)
Drugs and Alcohol Today     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.129, h-index: 2)
Education + Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.39, h-index: 21)
Education, Business and Society : Contemporary Middle Eastern Issues     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.243, h-index: 6)
Employee Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.446, h-index: 16)
Engineering Computations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.567, h-index: 36)
Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.468, h-index: 20)
Equal Opportunities Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Equality, Diversity and Inclusion : An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.37, h-index: 4)
Ethnicity and Inequalities in Health and Social Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.109, h-index: 1)
EuroMed J. of Business     Hybrid Journal  
European Business Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.368, h-index: 15)
European J. of Innovation Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.442, h-index: 22)
European J. of Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.957, h-index: 38)
European J. of Training and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.296, h-index: 18)
Evidence-based HRM     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Facilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.34, h-index: 13)
foresight     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.62, h-index: 16)
Gender in Management : An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.495, h-index: 17)
Grey Systems : Theory and Application     Hybrid Journal  
Health Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.345, h-index: 13)
Higher Education, Skills and Work-based Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33, SJR: 0.121, h-index: 2)
History of Education Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.102, h-index: 1)
Housing, Care and Support     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.155, h-index: 3)
Human Resource Management Intl. Digest     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.105, h-index: 5)
Humanomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.104, h-index: 1)
Indian Growth and Development Review     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.131, h-index: 1)
Industrial and Commercial Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.318, h-index: 10)
Industrial Lubrication and Tribology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.46, h-index: 15)
Industrial Management & Data Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.989, h-index: 54)
Industrial Robot An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.421, h-index: 25)
Info     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.337, h-index: 17)
Information and Computer Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.29, h-index: 28)
Information Technology & People     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 192, SJR: 0.664, h-index: 21)
Interactive Technology and Smart Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Interlending & Document Supply     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 272, SJR: 0.593, h-index: 10)
Internet Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 245, SJR: 0.846, h-index: 44)
Intl. J. for Lesson and Learning Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. for Researcher Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Intl. J. of Accounting and Information Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.265, h-index: 4)
Intl. J. of Bank Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.672, h-index: 26)
Intl. J. of Climate Change Strategies and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.211, h-index: 3)
Intl. J. of Clothing Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.436, h-index: 20)
Intl. J. of Commerce and Management     Hybrid Journal  
Intl. J. of Conflict Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.322, h-index: 31)
Intl. J. of Contemporary Hospitality Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.2, h-index: 24)
Intl. J. of Culture Tourism and Hospitality Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.113, h-index: 1)
Intl. J. of Development Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Intl. J. of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.181, h-index: 5)
Intl. J. of Educational Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.508, h-index: 16)
Intl. J. of Emergency Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Emerging Markets     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Energy Sector Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.187, h-index: 7)
Intl. J. of Entrepreneurial Behaviour & Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.545, h-index: 20)

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Journal Cover   International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
  [SJR: 0.357]   [H-I: 25]   [8 followers]  Follow
    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 0952-6862
   Published by Emerald Homepage  [309 journals]
  • Sustainability: orthopaedic surgery wait time management strategies
    • Authors: Claudia Amar, Marie-Pascale Pomey, Claudia SanMartin, Carolyn De Coster, Tom Noseworthy
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 28, Issue 4, May 2015. Purpose This research examined Canadian organizational and systemic factors that made it possible to keep wait times within federally established limits for at least 18 months. Design/methodology/approach The research design is a multiple cases study. We selected three cases: case one staff were able to maintain compliance with requirements for more than 18 months; case two staff were able to meet requirements for 18 months, but unable to sustain this level; case three staff were never able to meet the requirements. For each case we interviewed persons involved in the strategies and collected documents. We analyzed systemic and organisational level factors; including governance and leadership, culture, resources, methods and tools. Findings Findings indicate that the hospital that was able to maintain compliance with the wait time requirements had specific characteristics: (i) an exclusive mandate to do only hip and knee replacement surgery; (ii) motivated staff who were not distracted by other concerns; and (iii) a strong team spirit. Originality/value Our research highlights an important gradient between three cases regarding the factors that sustain waiting times. We show that the hospital factory model seems attractive in a super-specialized surgery context. However, patients are selected for simple surgeries, without complications, and so this cannot be considered a unique model.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:14:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-11-2013-0131
       
  • Patient assessment of primary care physician communication: segmentation
           approach
    • Authors: Elena A. Platonova, Richard M. Shewchuk
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 28, Issue 4, May 2015. Purpose This article aims to examine how patient assessment of primary care physician (PCP) communication is related to patient satisfaction with the PCP, patient perception of PCP professional competence, patient assessment of the relationship with the doctor and patient demographic characteristics using a segmentation approach. Design/methodology/approach We surveyed 514 adult patients waiting for appointments with their PCPs in two US primary care clinics. A latent class analysis was used to identify mutually exclusive unobserved homogeneous classes of patients. Findings We identified three distinct classes/groups with regard to patient assessment of physician communication and the physician-patient relationship. The largest group (53% of the sample) assessed their PCP communication and other doctor-patient relationship aspects as excellent. However, 37% provided mostly negative assessments, expressed high general dissatisfaction with the physician and disagreed with the statement that their PCP was well qualified to manage their health problems. These patients were on average more educated and affluent and the group included more males. About 10% of patients expressed generally lower satisfaction with the PCP, though their dissatisfaction was not as extreme as in the highly dissatisfied group. Research limitations/implications Further studies are needed to help physicians develop skills to communicate with different patients. Originality/value Patient segmentation can be an important tool for healthcare quality improvement particularly for emerging approaches to primary care such as patient-centered care.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:13:58 GMT
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-11-2013-0136
       
  • Implementing hospital quality assurance policies in Iran: balancing
           licensing, annual evaluation, inspections and quality management systems
    • Authors: Asgar Aghaei Hashjin, Bahram Delgoshaei, Dionne S Kringos, Seyed Jamaladin Tabibi, Jila Manouchehri, Niek S Klazinga
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 28, Issue 4, May 2015. Purpose This article provides an overview of applied hospital quality assurance (QA) policies in Iran. Design/methodology/approach A mixed method (quantitative data and qualitative document analysis) study was carried out between 1996 and 2010. Findings The QA policy cycle forms a tight monitoring system to assure hospital quality by combining mandatory and voluntary methods in Iran. The licensing, annual evaluation and grading, and regulatory inspections statutorily implemented by the government as a national package to assure and improve hospital care quality, while implementing quality management systems (QMS) was voluntary for hospitals. The government’s strong QA policy legislation role and support has been an important factor for successful QA implementation in Iran, though it may affected QA assessment independency and validity. Increased hospital evaluation independency and repositioning, updating standards, professional involvement and effectiveness studies could increase QA policy impact and maturity. Practical implications The study highlights the current QA policy implementation cycle in Iranian hospitals. It provides a basis for further quality strategy development in Iranian hospitals and elsewhere. It also raises attention about finding the optimal balance between different QA policies, which is topical for many countries. Originality/value This article describes experiences when implementing a unique approach, combining mandatory and voluntary QA policies simultaneously in a developing country, which has invested considerably over time to improve hospital quality. The experiences with a mixed obligatory/voluntary approach and comprehensive policies in Iran may contain lessons for policy makers in developing and developed countries.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:13:51 GMT
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-03-2014-0034
       
  • Editorial, Volume 28.4: Asking health and social care staff to go the
           extra QA mile.
    • Authors: Keith Hurst
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 28, Issue 4, May 2015.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:13:50 GMT
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-03-2015-0031
       
  • Service quality framework for clinical laboratories
    • Authors: Vinaysing Ramessur, Dinesh Kumar Hurreeram, Kaylasson Maistry
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 28, Issue 4, May 2015. Purpose This article illustrates a service quality framework that enhances service delivery in clinical laboratories by gauging medical practitioner satisfaction and by providing avenues for continuous improvement. Design/methodology/approach The case study method has been used for conducting the exploratory study, with focus on the Mauritian public clinical laboratory. A structured questionnaire based on the SERVQUAL service quality model was used for data collection, analysis and for the development of the service quality framework. Findings The study confirms the pertinence of the following service quality dimensions within the context of clinical laboratories: tangibility, reliability, responsiveness, turnaround time, technology, test reports, communication and laboratory staff attitude and behaviour. Practical implications The service quality framework developed, termed LabSERV, is vital for clinical laboratories in the search for improving service delivery to medical practitioners. Originality/value This is a pioneering work carried out in the clinical laboratory sector in Mauritius. Medical practitioner expectations and perceptions have been simultaneously considered to generate a novel service quality framework for clinical laboratories.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:13:41 GMT
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-07-2014-0077
       
  • Small and big quality in health care
    • Authors: Paul Martin Lillrank
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 28, Issue 4, May 2015. Purpose This article’s purpose is to: (i) clarify healthcare quality’s ontological and epistemological foundations; and (ii) examine how these lead to different measurements and technologies. Design/methodology/approach Conceptual analysis. Findings Small quality denotes conformance to ex ante requirements. Big quality includes product and service design, based on customer requirements and expectations. Healthcare quality can be divided into three areas: (i) clinical decision-making; (ii) patient safety; and (iii) patient experience, each with distinct measurement and improvement technologies. Practical implications The conceptual model is expected to bring clarity to constructing specific definitions, measures, objectives and technologies for improving healthcare. Originality/value This article claims that before healthcare quality can be defined, measured and integrated into systems, it needs to be clearly separated into ontologically and epistemologically different parts.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:13:31 GMT
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-05-2014-0068
       
  • Clinical pathways in China – an evaluation
    • Authors: Jingwei Alex He, Wei Yang
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 28, Issue 4, May 2015. Purpose Clinical pathways are multidisciplinary care plans with essential care steps for patients with specific clinical problems. Clinical pathways were introduced in China in 2009 to assure quality, reduce risks, increase resource efficiency and control costs. We present a Chinese public hospital case study where a clinical pathway pilot was undertaken where we evaluate two main outcomes: stay and hospitalization costs for a tertiary hospital from 2010 to 2012 using a mixed methods approach. Design/methodology/approach Data were drawn from hospital records and in-depth interviews with hospital staff in a Shanxi Province tertiary hospital, northern China. Findings We found that the main objectives: to standardize treatment procedures by reducing stay and containing costs, were not fully achieved. Staff implementing clinical pathways clearly encountered several barriers; i.e., managers did not see the pilot as a useful managerial instrument driven by revenue generation. Physicians, too, lacked incentive to follow the guidelines due to income concerns. Practical implications We point to the daunting challenges brought about by perverse incentives embedded in the country’s health system. We argue that concerted efforts are needed to undertake difficult health policy reforms in China. Originality/value We present the first empirical study in the English-language literature that examines China’s ongoing clinical pathway pilots from a micro perspective. We combine qualitative and quantitative methods and reveal the hospital-level dynamics in its implementation.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:13:30 GMT
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-09-2014-0096
       
  • An improvement project within urological care
    • Authors: Annelie Khatami, Kristina Rosengren
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 28, Issue 4, May 2015. Purpose The article’s aim was to describe staff experiences in an on-going improvement project regarding patients with ureteral stones. Design/methodology/approach A qualitative descriptive study based on eight group interviews and 48 narratives, was performed. Data were analysed using qualitative content analysis. Trustworthiness was ensured by using a well-documented improvement process method during six months. Findings The results formed three categories: an absent comprehensive view; complexity and vulnerability within the organisation. A holistic perspective regarding urological care at the micro- meso- and macro-levels is needed to improve planning and caring processes. Research limitations/implications This study includes one team (six members, different health professionals) within the same urology department. Practical implications Results show that staff need information, such as guidelines and support throughout the improvement work to deliver high quality care. Moreover, there is a need for evidence-based guidelines at national level to support improvement work. Originality/value Urological improvement projects, generally, are lacking, which is why this study is important to improve nephrolithiasis patient care.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:13:24 GMT
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-10-2014-0104
       
  • Roadmap for developing a national quality indicator set for general
           practice
    • Authors: Ailis Ni Riain, Catherine Vahey, Conor Kennedy, Stephen Campbell, Claire Collins
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 28, Issue 4, May 2015. Purpose This article describes a national, comprehensive quality indicator set to support delivering high quality clinical care in Irish general practice. Design/methodology/approach Potential general practice quality indicators were identified through a literature review. A modified two-stage Delphi process was used to rationalise international indicators into an indicator set, involving both experts from key stakeholder groups (GPs, practice nurses, practice managers, patient and health policy representatives) and predominantly randomly selected GPs. An illustrative evaluation approach was used to road test the indicator set and supporting materials. Findings Eighty panellists completed the two Delphi rounds and staff in 13 volunteer practices participated in the road test. The original 171 indicators was reduced to 147 during the Delphi process and further reduced to 68 indicators during the road test. The indicators were set out in 14 sub-domains across three areas (practice infrastructure, practice processes and procedures, and practice staff). Practice staff planned 77 quality improvement activities after their assessment against the indicators and 31 (40%) were completed with 44 (57%) ongoing and two (3%) not advanced after a six month road test. A General Practice Indicators of Quality (GP-IQ) indicator set and support materials were produced at the conclusion. Practical implications It is important and relatively easy to customise existing quality indicators to a particular setting. The development process can be used to raise awareness, build capacity and drive quality improvement activity in general practices. Originality/value We describe in detail a method to develop general practice quality indicators for a regional or national population from existing validated indicators using consensus, action research and an illuminative evaluation.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:13:18 GMT
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-09-2014-0091
       
  • Medical laboratory quality systems – a management review
    • Authors: Dimitris Theodorou, Padelis Giannelos
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 28, Issue 3, April 2015. Purpose This article highlights changes in ISO 15189:2012 and ISO 15189:2007 concerning management review requirements and presents a management review checklist, which includes all the revised ISO 15189’s requirements. Design/methodology/approach The recent revised and updated ISO 15189 (2012) standard recommends a management review using a process approach and includes some additional topics. Findings The management review is a key element in many quality management systems, including medical laboratory management systems in accordance with ISO 15189. The process approach enables laboratory top managers and personnel to achieve all the quality management system’s important inputs and outputs. Originality/value As laboratory staff often encounter difficulties fully exploiting the management review process, this checklist helps laboratory staff carry out an effective management review covering all the quality management system’s important aspects.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: Thu, 05 Mar 2015 17:30:34 GMT
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-04-2014-0039
       
  • Perceived service quality’s effect on patient satisfaction and
           behavioural compliance
    • Authors: Bahari Mohamed, Noor Azlinna Azizan
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 28, Issue 3, April 2015. Purpose The study’s purpose was to advance healthcare service quality research using hierarchical component models. Design/methodology/approach This study used a quantitative approach with cross-sectional design as a survey method, combining cluster and convenience sampling, and partial least square structural equation modelling (PLS-SEM) to validate the research model and test the hypotheses. Findings The study extends health service quality literature by showing that: (i) patient satisfaction is dominant, significant and indirect determinant of behavioural compliance; (ii) perceived service quality has the strongest effect on behavioural compliance via patient satisfaction. Research limitations/implications Only one hospital was evaluated. Practical implications The study provides managers with a service quality model for conducting integrated service delivery systems analysis and design. Originality/value Overall, the study makes a significant contribution to healthcare organizations, better health outcomes for patients and better quality of life for the community.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: Thu, 05 Mar 2015 17:30:33 GMT
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-06-2014-0074
       
  • Can patients detect hazardous dental practice' A patient complaint
           study
    • Authors: Nora Hiivala, Helena Mussalo-Rauhamaa, Heikki Murtomaa
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 28, Issue 3, April 2015. Purpose This study aimed to: (i) determine the prevalence and distribution of patient/family-generated, dentistry-related complaints to Regional State Administrative Agencies (AVIs) and the National Supervisory Authority for Welfare and Health (Valvira) in Finland from 2000 to 2011; (ii) study patient/family safety incident experiences and other reasons for complaints; (iii) assess complaint validity and (iv) evaluate factors associated with disciplinary processes against dentists. Design/methodology/approach Data included closed cases handled by AVIs and Valvira (2000–2011) against dental practitioners or dental practice units (n = 782). We analysed the complaints distribution and examined the antecedent factors and circumstances. Findings This study demonstrated that patients/families can detect many dental treatment hazards, substandard processes and even serious safety risks rather well. The investigation processes revealed some physical harm or potential patient safety risks in more than half the alleged cases. Many complaints accumulated against certain individuals and statistically significant positive correlations were found between some patient/family complaints, dentist-specific variables and disciplinary actions. Practical implications Patient/family-generated complaints must be taken seriously and seen as relatively good safety risk indicators. However, more knowledge on how patients might cooperate with dental care providers to prevent errors is needed. Originality/value This work provides a unique opportunity to learn from several dentistry-related patient complaints. Despite some limitations, patient complaints appear to be useful as a complementary source together with other patient safety study methods.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: Thu, 05 Mar 2015 17:30:31 GMT
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-05-2014-0052
       
  • Does sustained involvement in a quality network lead to improved
           performance'
    • Authors: Jane Solomon, Crispin Day, Adrian Worrall, Peter Thompson
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 28, Issue 3, April 2015. Purpose This article’s purpose is to explore the effects of prolonged investment in one quality improvement method, which are uncertain. We examine (i) the extent to which sustained involvement in a quality network over five years led to improved performance against standards, and (ii) whether improvement was achieved in areas where service staff could exercise direct control. Design/methodology/approach A prospective cohort design was used to examine data from 48 United Kingdom inpatient child and adolescent mental health units between 2005/06 and 2009/10, which have been Quality Network for In-patient CAMHS members for two years. These were selected to remove the initial marked increase in compliance identified in an earlier study. The main outcome measure was compliance with organisation process standards. Findings Units meeting ‘excellent’ quality status across all standards rose from seven (14.6%) to 18 (37.5%). Standards for Environment and Facilities and Access, Admission and Discharge improved the most. Units meeting the ‘excellent’ quality status for criteria over which staff had direct control criteria rose from 17 (35.4%) to 29 (60.4%) over the five year period. The unit modal quality status categorisation for criteria where staff had no direct control in 2005/06 was ‘poor’ (n=25; 52.1%) but had progressed to ‘good’ in 2009/10 (n=24; 50.0%). Originality/value We provide evidence that sustained investment in one QI method raises service compliance against standards. Trends showed improvement for direct control standards from ‘good’ to ‘excellent’ levels and improvement for no direct control from ‘poor’ to ‘good’.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: Thu, 05 Mar 2015 17:30:30 GMT
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-05-2013-0054
       
  • National Early Warning Score (NEWS) evaluation in surgery
    • Authors: Peter M Neary, Mark Regan, Myles J Joyce, Oliver J Mcanena, Ian Callanan
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 28, Issue 3, April 2015. Purpose This study aimed to evaluate staff opinion on the impact of the National Early Warning Score (NEWS) system on surgical wards. In 2012, the NEWS system was introduced to Irish hospitals on a phased basis as part of a national clinical programme in acute care. Design/methodology/approach A modified established questionnaire was given to surgical nursing staff, surgical registrars, surgical senior house officers (SHOs) and surgical interns for completion six months following the introduction of the NEWS system into an Irish university hospital. Findings Amongst the registrars, 89% were unsure if the NEWS system would improve patient care. Less than half of staff felt consultants and surgical registrars supported the NEWS system. Staff felt the NEWS did not correlate well clinically with patients within the first 24 hours (day zero) post-operatively. Furthermore, 78-85% of nurses and registrars felt a rapid response team should be part of the escalation protocol. Research limitations/implications Senior medical staff were not convinced that the NEWS system may improve patient care. Appropriate audit proving a beneficial impact of the NEWS system on patient outcome may be essential in gaining support from senior doctors. Deficiencies with the system were also observed including the absence of a rapid response team as part of the escalation protocol and a lack of concordance of the NEWS in patients day zero post-operatively. These issues should be addressed moving forward. Originality/value Appropriate audit of the impact of the NEWS system on patient outcome may be pertinent to obtain the support from senior doctors. Deficiencies with the system were also observed including the absence of a rapid response team as part of the escalation protocol and a lack of concordance of the NEWS in patients day zero post-operatively. These issues should be addressed moving forward.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: Thu, 05 Mar 2015 17:30:29 GMT
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-01-2014-0012
       
  • Editorial, Volume 28.3: Supporting Healthcare Staff in their QA Duties.
    • Authors: Keith Hurst
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 28, Issue 3, April 2015.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: Thu, 05 Mar 2015 17:30:28 GMT
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-01-2015-0015
       
  • The trust-commitment challenge in service quality-loyalty relationships
    • Authors: Antonio Carrizo Moreira, Pedro Miguel Silva
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 28, Issue 3, April 2015. Purpose This research develops and empirically tests a model to examine service quality, satisfaction, trust and commitment as loyalty antecedents in a private healthcare service. Design/methodology/approach The approach was tested using structural equation modelling (SEM), involving 175 patients from a private Portuguese healthcare unit, using a revised SQAS scale for service quality evaluation. Findings The scale used to evaluate service quality is valid and meaningful. Service quality proved to be a multidimensional construct and relevant to build satisfaction. The path satisfaction → trust → loyalty was validated, whereas the path satisfaction → commitment → loyalty was not statistically supported. Research limitations/implications The revised SQAS scale showed good internal consistency in healthcare context. Further trust-commitment antecedents must be examined in a private healthcare landscape to generalise the findings. Practical implications Healthcare quality managers must explore the service quality dimensions to generate satisfaction among their patients. Developing trust generates positive patient attitudes and loyalty. Originality/value This study explores using the SQAS scale in a private healthcare context. We provide further evidence that service quality is an antecedent and different from satisfaction. All the measures used proved to be valid and reliable. Trust and commitment play different roles in their relationship with loyalty.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: Thu, 05 Mar 2015 17:30:27 GMT
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-02-2014-0017
       
  • TeamSTEPPS implementation in community hospitals: Adherence to recommended
           training approaches
    • Authors: Marcia M Ward, Xi Zhu, Michelle Lampman, Greg L. Stewart
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 28, Issue 3, April 2015. Purpose TeamSTEPPS (Team Strategies and Tools to Enhance Performance and Patient Safety) is being widely promoted in healthcare settings to train staff in evidence-based approaches that promote patient safety. It involves a comprehensive curriculum that spells out key principles and actionable tools for a culture change toward patient-safety-focused teamwork. Activities begin with selected personnel attending TeamSTEPPS Master Trainer Training and then organizing and providing TeamSTEPPS training for staff in their organization. We conducted interviews with respondents at community hospitals conducting TeamSTEPPS staff training. To structure our interviews, we used 11 key questions identified by Weaver et al., (2010) in their in-depth team training literature review. The primary objective was to examine approaches taken by community hospital personnel and compare those to the best practices recommended by Weaver et al., (2010). Design/methodology/approach We interviewed 57 staff and administrators at 22 community hospitals sending teams to TeamSTEPPS Master Trainer Training. Findings We find that training implementation in community hospitals differs significantly from the established, research-based principles for effective team training described in the research literature, which is largely based in academic medical centers. Originality/value The current findings suggest that several TeamSTEPPS training features could be enhanced in community hospitals including: (i) choosing staff who have the skills to be effective trainers in this train-the-trainer model; (ii) emphasising active learning; and (iii) sustaining lessons through on-the-job application, practice and feedback. These principles apply to many training approaches employed in small healthcare organizations.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: Thu, 05 Mar 2015 17:30:26 GMT
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-10-2013-0124
       
  • Human factors paradigm and customer care perceptions
    • Authors: Colin Clarke, Lesley-Jane Eales-Reynolds
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 28, Issue 3, April 2015. Purpose This article’s purpose is to examine if customer care (CC) can be directly linked to patient safety through a Human Factors (HF) framework. Design/methodology/approach Data from an online questionnaire, completed by a convenience healthcare worker sample (n=373), was interrogated using thematic analysis within the Vincent et al., (1998) HF theoretical framework. This proposes seven areas affecting patient safety: institutional context, organisation and management, work environment, team factors, individual, task and patient. Findings Analysis identified responses addressing all framework areas. Responses (597) principally focused on work environment 40.7% (n=243), organisation and management 28.8% (n=172). Nevertheless, reference to other framework areas were clearly visible within the data: teams 10.2% (n=61); individual 6.7% (n=40); patients 6.0% (n=36); tasks 4.2% (n=24) and institution 3.5% (n=21). Findings demonstrate congruence between CC perceptions and patient safety within a HF framework. Research limitations/implications The questionnaire requested participants to identify barriers to rather than CC enablers. Although this was at a single site complex organization, it was similar to those throughout the NHS and other international health systems. Practical implications Customer care can be viewed as consonant with patient safety rather than the potentially dangerous consumerisation stance, which could ultimately compromise patient safety. Originality/value This work provides an original perspective on the link between CC and patient safety and has the potential to re-focus healthcare perceptions.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: Thu, 05 Mar 2015 17:30:26 GMT
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-05-2014-0067
       
  • Editorial
    • Authors: Keith Hurst
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 28, Issue 2, March 2015.
      PubDate: Mon, 16 Feb 2015 16:10:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-12-2014-0116
       
  • Establishing an ISO 10001-based promise in inpatients care
    • Authors: Mohammad Ashiqur Rahman Khan et al
      First page: 100
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 28, Issue 2, Page 100-114, March 2015. Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore ISO 10001:2007 in planning, designing and developing a customer satisfaction promise (CSP) intended for inpatients care. Design/methodology/approach – Through meetings and interviews with research participants, who included a program manager, unit managers and registered nurses, information about potential promises and their implementation was obtained and analyzed. A number of promises were drafted and one was finally selected to be developed as a CSP. Findings – Applying the standard required adaptation and novel interpretation. Additionally, ISO 10002:2004 (Clause 7) was used to design the feedback handling activities. A promise initially chosen for development turned out to be difficult to implement, experience that helped in selecting and developing the final promise. Research participants found the ISO 10001-based method useful and comprehensible. Practical implications – This paper presents a specific health care example of how to adapt a standard’s guideline in establishing customer promises. The authors show how a promise can be used in alleviating an existing issue (i.e. communication between carers and patients). The learning can be beneficial in various health care settings. Originality/value – To the knowledge, this paper shows the first example of applying ISO 10001:2007 in a health care case. A few activities suggested by the standard are further detailed, and a new activity is introduced. The integrated use of ISO 10001:2007 and 10002:2004 is presented and how one can be “augmented” by the other is demonstrated.
      PubDate: Mon, 16 Feb 2015 16:09:43 GMT
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-05-2013-0050
       
  • HoNOS – their utility for payment by results in mental health
    • Authors: Barry L Speak et al
      First page: 115
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 28, Issue 2, Page 115-128, March 2015. Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to present findings from two studies exploring the Health of the Nation Outcome Scale’s (HoNOS) utility within a new payment by results (PbR) system for mental health services in England. Design/methodology/approach – In the first study principal axis factoring extraction was used to explore a sample of 23,641 HoNOS ratings. In a second study confirmatory factor analysis was used to evaluate four subscale structures on a new sample of 34,716 HoNOS ratings. Findings – No HoNOS factor structure evaluated in this study demonstrated adequate fit statistics across several clinical presentations. A new four-factor model was the only structure to achieve fit statistics across all clinical populations, but can only be championed on a “best fit” basis as opposed to “good fit” at the present time. Research limitations/implications – Data used in the current studies relate to six NHS mental health service providers. Replication using a national sample is recommended. Exploration of different HoNOS factor structures for different mental health clusters within the PbR system in England is also recommended. However, it is also possible that removing redundant or adding new items may result in a more stable HoNOS generic factor structure. Originality/value – This is the first HoNOS evaluation as a generic outcome measure for use within a PbR system and provides important insights into its mental health utility and limitations. The findings have significant implications for those developing the national PbR quality and outcomes framework for England’s mental health services. However, there are also implications for all nations in which HoNOS is used to report mental health outcomes.
      PubDate: Mon, 16 Feb 2015 16:10:03 GMT
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-08-2013-0096
       
  • Impact of hospital atmosphere on perceived health care outcome
    • Authors: Ritu Narang et al
      First page: 129
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 28, Issue 2, Page 129-140, March 2015. Purpose – Healthcare service quality studies primarily examine the relationships between patients' perceived quality and satisfaction with healthcare services, clinical effectiveness, service use, recommendations and value for money. These studies suggest that patient-independent quality dimensions (structure, process and outcome) are antecedents to quality. The purpose of this paper is to propose an alternative by looking at the relationship between hospital atmosphere and healthcare quality with perceived outcome. Design/methodology/approach – Data were collected from Finland, India, Nigeria and the People's Republic of China. Regression analysis used perceived outcome as the dependent variable and atmosphere and healthcare service quality as independent variables. Findings – Results showed that atmosphere and healthcare service quality have a statistically significant relationship with patient perceived outcomes. Research limitations/implications – The sample size was small and the sampling units were selected on convenience; thus, caution must be exercised in generalizing the findings. Practical implications – The study determined that service quality and atmosphere are considered significant for developing and developed nations. This result could have significant implications for policy makers and service providers developing healthcare quality and hospital atmosphere. Originality/value – Studies concentrate on healthcare outcome primarily regarding population health status, mortality, morbidity, customer satisfaction, loyalty, quality of life, customer behavior and consumption. However, the study exposes how patients perceive their health after treatment. Furthermore, the authors develop the healthcare service literature by considering atmosphere and perceived outcome.
      PubDate: Mon, 16 Feb 2015 16:09:30 GMT
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-12-2013-0142
       
  • Developing and evaluating guidelines for patient and public involvement
           (PPI) in research
    • Authors: Katherine Pollard et al
      First page: 141
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 28, Issue 2, Page 141-155, March 2015. Purpose – A growing literature reports the benefits and challenges of patient and public involvement (PPI) in research; nevertheless, understanding PPI in research design remains under-developed. The purpose of this paper is to report learning experiences from involving service users as research partners in two projects that developed and evaluated guidelines for good practice in this regard. The main objective was to evaluate these guidelines. Design/methodology/approach – PPI research guidelines were developed through five workshops involving service users/patients, carers, health and social care professionals/managers and academics. Using a participatory qualitative approach, these guidelines were evaluated through mapping them against the two service user research partners’ experience within another project. Findings – The guidelines were found to be fit for purpose, as they allowed problems to be easily identified and reassurance that required standards were being met. Both academic and service user research partners learned and gained relevant skills. Two service user research partners also found their daily living skills unexpectedly enhanced by project participation. Originality/value – The PPI guidelines, the authors developed were produced by consensus involving several stakeholders. Service users involved as research partners in the project experienced unanticipated personal benefits.
      PubDate: Mon, 16 Feb 2015 16:09:59 GMT
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-01-2014-0001
       
  • An EFQM excellence model for integrated healthcare governance
    • Authors: Carlo Favaretti et al
      First page: 156
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 28, Issue 2, Page 156-172, March 2015. Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to account for a ten-year experience with the European Foundation for Quality Management (EFQM) Excellence Model implemented in the Trento Healthcare Trust. Design/methodology/approach – Since 2000, the EFQM Excellence Model provided an overarching framework to streamline business process governance, to support and improve its enablers and results. From 2000 to 2009, staff performed four internal (self) and four external EFQM-based assessments that provided guidance for an integrated management system. Over the years, key controls and assurances improved service quality through business planning, learning and practice cycles. Findings – Rising assessment ratings and improving results characterized the journey. The average self-assessment score (on a 1,000 points scale) was 290 in 2001, which increased to 610 in 2008. Since 2006, the Trust has been Recognized for Excellence (four stars). The organization improved significantly on customer satisfaction, people results and key service delivery and outcomes. Practical implications – The EFQM Model can act as an effective tool to meet governance demands and promote system-level results. The approach to integrated governance discussed here may support similar change processes in comparable organizations. Originality/value – The paper describes a unique experience when implementing EFQM within a large Italian healthcare system, which had a broader reach and lasted longer than any experience in Italian healthcare.
      PubDate: Mon, 16 Feb 2015 16:09:50 GMT
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-02-2014-0022
       
  • Steering healthcare service delivery: a regulatory perspective
    • Authors: Gyan Prakash
      First page: 173
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 28, Issue 2, Page 173-192, March 2015. Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore regulation in India’s healthcare sector and makes recommendations needed for enhancing the healthcare service. Design/methodology/approach – The literature was reviewed to understand healthcare’s regulatory context. To understand the current healthcare system, qualitative data were collected from state-level officials, public and private hospital staff. A patient survey was performed to assess service quality (QoS). Findings – Regulation plays a central role in driving healthcare QoS. India needs to strengthen market and institutional co-production based approaches for steering its healthcare in which delivery processes are complex and pose different challenges. Research limitations/implications – This study assesses current healthcare regulation in an Indian state and presents a framework for studying and strengthening regulation. Agile regulation should be based on service delivery issues (pull approach) rather than monitoring and sanctions based regulatory environment (push approach). Practical implications – Healthcare pitfalls across the world seem to follow similar follies. India’s complexity and experience is useful for emerging and developed economies. Originality/value – The author reviewed around 70 publications and synthesised them in healthcare regulatory contexts. Patient’s perception of private providers could be a key input towards steering regulation. Identifying gaps across QoS dimensions would be useful in taking corrective measures.
      PubDate: Mon, 16 Feb 2015 16:09:20 GMT
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-03-2014-0036
       
  • Inter-organizational cooperation in community health organizations
    • Authors: Mário Franco et al
      First page: 193
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 28, Issue 2, Page 193-210, March 2015. Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to examine various aspects related to inter-organizational cooperation and how this phenomenon can be applied to healthcare institutions. Design/methodology/approach – To fulfil the aim, a qualitative investigation was adopted, focussing on the relationship between public hospital and a higher education institution in Portugal. Practical implications – The study supports health managers and higher education leaders, and other stakeholders involved inter-organizational cooperation drawing up strategies and understanding inter-organizational cooperation’s impact at the regional level. Originality/value – One contribution is to help fill a gap regarding the empirical research surrounding cooperation between organizations, especially in the health sector, where scientific studies are scarce. It also provides new insights by applying competence-based theory to analyze different approaches to hospital cooperation, which has received scant attention in the health sector.
      PubDate: Mon, 16 Feb 2015 16:09:56 GMT
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-07-2014-0081
       
  • A stronger voice
    • Authors: Sherrie Anne Hitchen et al
      First page: 211
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 28, Issue 2, Page 211-222, March 2015. Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to discuss learning about service-user and carer involvement from an action research (AR) study into self-directed support implementation in one English mental health trust. The paper promotes appointing and supporting carers and people with experience as co-researchers to obtain authentic local perspectives when undertaking service implementation or redesign. Design/methodology/approach – The researchers used an AR spiral method incorporating carers and people with mental health experience as co-researchers. The co-researchers worked alongside the lead researcher gathering data from focus groups, training sessions and other meetings over four years and attending collaborative steering group meetings alongside professional workers throughout the study. Findings – The authors suggest that participation gave co-researchers a powerful and effective voice in this service redesign. This approach revealed more authentic research data and required professionals to be more accountable for their perceptions and to make explicit their understandings throughout the study, which enabled more effective working. Steering group participation was central to securing this participation. Originality/value – The paper illustrates how carer and service-user co-researchers can be supported to benefit both mental health organisations undergoing change and to co-researchers themselves. It also identifies AR’s utility in uncovering learning as well as structuring change.
      PubDate: Mon, 16 Feb 2015 16:09:04 GMT
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-10-2014-0101
       
 
 
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