for Journals by Title or ISSN
for Articles by Keywords
help

Publisher: Emerald   (Total: 341 journals)

 A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

        1 2 | Last   [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

Showing 1 - 200 of 341 Journals sorted alphabetically
A Life in the Day     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Academia Revista Latinoamericana de Administración     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.178, CiteScore: 1)
Accounting Auditing & Accountability J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31, SJR: 1.71, CiteScore: 3)
Accounting Research J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.144, CiteScore: 0)
Accounting, Auditing and Accountability J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 2.187, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Accounting Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.279, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Appreciative Inquiry     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.451, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Autism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.222, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Dual Diagnosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46, SJR: 0.21, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Gender Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.16, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Intl. Marketing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 71, SJR: 0.296, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
African J. of Economic and Management Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.216, CiteScore: 1)
Agricultural Finance Review     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.406, CiteScore: 1)
Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 199, SJR: 0.354, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Annals in Social Responsibility     Full-text available via subscription  
Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.235, CiteScore: 1)
Arts and the Market     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Asia Pacific J. of Innovation and Entrepreneurship     Open Access  
Asia Pacific J. of Marketing and Logistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.425, CiteScore: 1)
Asia-Pacific J. of Business Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.234, CiteScore: 1)
Asian Association of Open Universities J.     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian Education and Development Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.233, CiteScore: 1)
Asian J. on Quality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Asian Review of Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.222, CiteScore: 1)
Aslib J. of Information Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.725, CiteScore: 2)
Aslib Proceedings     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 296)
Assembly Automation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.603, CiteScore: 2)
Baltic J. of Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.309, CiteScore: 1)
Benchmarking : An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.559, CiteScore: 2)
British Food J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.5, CiteScore: 2)
Built Environment Project and Asset Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.46, CiteScore: 1)
Business Process Re-engineering & Management J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Business Strategy Series     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Career Development Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.527, CiteScore: 2)
China Agricultural Economic Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.31, CiteScore: 1)
China Finance Review Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.245, CiteScore: 0)
Chinese Management Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.278, CiteScore: 1)
Circuit World     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.246, CiteScore: 1)
Collection Building     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.296, CiteScore: 1)
COMPEL: The Intl. J. for Computation and Mathematics in Electrical and Electronic Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.22, CiteScore: 1)
Competitiveness Review : An Intl. Business J. incorporating J. of Global Competitiveness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.274, CiteScore: 1)
Construction Innovation: Information, Process, Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.731, CiteScore: 2)
Corporate Communications An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.453, CiteScore: 1)
Corporate Governance Intl. J. of Business in Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.336, CiteScore: 1)
Critical Perspectives on Intl. Business     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.378, CiteScore: 1)
Cross Cultural & Strategic Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.504, CiteScore: 2)
Development and Learning in Organizations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.138, CiteScore: 0)
Digital Library Perspectives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.341, CiteScore: 1)
Direct Marketing An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Disaster Prevention and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.47, CiteScore: 1)
Drugs and Alcohol Today     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 132, SJR: 0.245, CiteScore: 1)
Education + Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Education, Business and Society : Contemporary Middle Eastern Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.707, CiteScore: 3)
Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Employee Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.551, CiteScore: 2)
Engineering Computations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.444, CiteScore: 1)
Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.653, CiteScore: 2)
English Teaching: Practice & Critique     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.417, CiteScore: 1)
Equal Opportunities Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Equality, Diversity and Inclusion : An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.5, CiteScore: 1)
EuroMed J. of Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.26, CiteScore: 1)
European Business Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.585, CiteScore: 3)
European J. of Innovation Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.454, CiteScore: 2)
European J. of Management and Business Economics     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.239, CiteScore: 1)
European J. of Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.971, CiteScore: 2)
European J. of Training and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.477, CiteScore: 1)
Evidence-based HRM     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.537, CiteScore: 1)
Facilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.503, CiteScore: 2)
Foresight     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.34, CiteScore: 1)
Gender in Management : An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.412, CiteScore: 1)
Grey Systems : Theory and Application     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Health Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.421, CiteScore: 1)
Higher Education, Skills and Work-based Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46, SJR: 0.426, CiteScore: 1)
History of Education Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.26, CiteScore: 0)
Housing, Care and Support     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.171, CiteScore: 0)
Human Resource Management Intl. Digest     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.129, CiteScore: 0)
Humanomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.333, CiteScore: 1)
IMP J.     Hybrid Journal  
Indian Growth and Development Review     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.174, CiteScore: 0)
Industrial and Commercial Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.301, CiteScore: 1)
Industrial Lubrication and Tribology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.334, CiteScore: 1)
Industrial Management & Data Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.904, CiteScore: 3)
Industrial Robot An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.318, CiteScore: 1)
Info     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Information and Computer Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.307, CiteScore: 1)
Information Technology & People     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43, SJR: 0.671, CiteScore: 2)
Interactive Technology and Smart Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.191, CiteScore: 1)
Interlending & Document Supply     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
Internet Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37, SJR: 1.645, CiteScore: 5)
Intl. J. for Lesson and Learning Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.324, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. for Researcher Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Intl. J. of Accounting and Information Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.275, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Bank Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.654, CiteScore: 3)
Intl. J. of Climate Change Strategies and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.353, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Clothing Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.318, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Commerce and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Conflict Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.362, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Contemporary Hospitality Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 1.452, CiteScore: 4)
Intl. J. of Culture Tourism and Hospitality Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.339, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Development Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.139, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.387, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Educational Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.559, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Emergency Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.201, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Emerging Markets     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.474, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Energy Sector Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.349, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Entrepreneurial Behaviour & Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.629, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Event and Festival Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.388, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Gender and Entrepreneurship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.445, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Health Care Quality Assurance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.358, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Health Governance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.247, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Housing Markets and Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.211, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Human Rights in Healthcare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.205, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Information and Learning Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.226, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Innovation Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.197, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Intelligent Computing and Cybernetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.214, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Intelligent Unmanned Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Islamic and Middle Eastern Finance and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.375, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Law and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.217, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Law in the Built Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.227, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Leadership in Public Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Intl. J. of Lean Six Sigma     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.802, CiteScore: 3)
Intl. J. of Logistics Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.71, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Managerial Finance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.203, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Managing Projects in Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.36, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Manpower     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.365, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Mentoring and Coaching in Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.426, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Migration, Health and Social Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.307, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Numerical Methods for Heat & Fluid Flow     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.697, CiteScore: 3)
Intl. J. of Operations & Production Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 2.052, CiteScore: 4)
Intl. J. of Organizational Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.268, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Pervasive Computing and Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.138, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.25, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.821, CiteScore: 4)
Intl. J. of Prisoner Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.303, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Productivity and Performance Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.578, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Public Sector Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.438, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Quality & Reliability Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.492, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Quality and Service Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.309, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Retail & Distribution Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.742, CiteScore: 3)
Intl. J. of Service Industry Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Social Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.225, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Sociology and Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49, SJR: 0.3, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.269, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Structural Integrity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.228, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Sustainability in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.502, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Tourism Cities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.502, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Web Information Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.186, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Wine Business Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.562, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Workplace Health Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.303, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. Marketing Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.895, CiteScore: 3)
Irish J. of Occupational Therapy     Open Access  
ISRA Intl. J. of Islamic Finance     Open Access  
J. for Multicultural Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.237, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Accounting & Organizational Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.301, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Accounting in Emerging Economies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
J. of Adult Protection, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.314, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Advances in Management Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
J. of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44, SJR: 0.222, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.108, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Applied Accounting Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.227, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Applied Research in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48, SJR: 0.2, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Asia Business Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.245, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Assistive Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
J. of Business & Industrial Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.652, CiteScore: 2)
J. of Business Strategy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.333, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Centrum Cathedra     Open Access  
J. of Children's Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.243, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Chinese Economic and Foreign Trade Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.2, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Chinese Entrepreneurship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
J. of Chinese Human Resource Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.173, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Communication Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.625, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Consumer Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.664, CiteScore: 2)
J. of Corporate Real Estate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.368, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Criminal Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 120, SJR: 0.268, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Criminological Research, Policy and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46, SJR: 0.254, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.257, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Documentation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 171, SJR: 0.613, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Economic and Administrative Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
J. of Economic Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.733, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Educational Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.252, CiteScore: 2)
J. of Enabling Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.369, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Engineering, Design and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.212, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Enterprise Information Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.827, CiteScore: 4)
J. of Enterprising Communities People and Places in the Global Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.281, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Entrepreneurship and Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.262, CiteScore: 1)
J. of European Industrial Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
J. of European Real Estate Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.268, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Facilities Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.33, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Family Business Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
J. of Fashion Marketing and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.608, CiteScore: 2)
J. of Financial Crime     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 367, SJR: 0.228, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Financial Economic Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.186, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Financial Management of Property and Construction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.309, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Financial Regulation and Compliance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.159, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Financial Reporting and Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
J. of Forensic Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56, SJR: 0.205, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Global Mobility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.377, CiteScore: 1)

        1 2 | Last   [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

Journal Cover
International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.358
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 11  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0952-6862
Published by Emerald Homepage  [341 journals]
  • Who reads editorials any more'
    • Pages: 450 - 450
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 31, Issue 6, Page 450-450, July 2018.

      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2018-06-29T08:51:46Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-05-2018-0118
       
  • Doctors attitudes towards medication errors at 2002 & 2015
    • Pages: 451 - 463
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 31, Issue 6, Page 451-463, July 2018.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to explore the attitudes and beliefs of doctors towards medication error reporting following 15 years of a national patient safety agenda. Design/methodology/approach This is a qualitative descriptive study utilising semi-structured interviews. A group of ten doctors of different disciplines shared their attitudes and beliefs about medication error reporting. Using thematic content analysis, findings were reflected upon those collected by the same author of a similar study 13 years before (2002). Findings Five key themes were identified: lack of incident feedback, non-user-friendly incident reporting systems, supportive cultures, electronic prescribing and time pressures. Despite more positive responses to the benefits of medication error reporting in 2015 compared to 2002, doctors at both times expressed a reluctance to use the hospital’s incident reporting system, labelling it time consuming and non-user-friendly. A more supportive environment, however, where error had been made was thought to exist compared to 2002. The role of the pharmacist was highlighted as critical in reducing medication error with the introduction of electronic prescribing being pivotal in 2015. Originality/value To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study to compare doctors’ attitudes on medication errors following a period of time of increased patient safety awareness. The results suggest that error reporting today is largely more positive and organisations are more supportive than in 2002. Despite a change from paper to electronic methods, there is a continuing need to improve the efficacy of incident reporting systems and ensure an open, supportive environment for clinicians.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2018-06-29T08:52:01Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-04-2016-0038
       
  • Workplace violence prevention standardization using lean principles across
           a healthcare network
    • Pages: 464 - 473
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 31, Issue 6, Page 464-473, July 2018.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to describe the process used to standardize a Workplace Violence Prevention Program (WVPP) within a five-hospital healthcare system in Veterans Health Administration (VHA). Design/methodology/approach A description of the lean process improvement principles, used to bring the WVPP into compliance with Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and other agencies through streamlining/standardizing processes. Findings There was significant standardization in both the threat assessment and education arms of the WVPP. Compliance with all major US Department of Labor OSHA requirements, as well as substantial time savings, were realized as part of this process improvement. Originality/value VHA is leading the way in inter/multidisciplinary assessment and mitigation of workplace violence, however, there are significant competing demands on staff time. This first ever use of lean principles to streamline processes around workplace violence prevention freed up clinician time for care while improving internal and external customer satisfaction, representing a major step forward in workplace violence risk mitigation.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2018-06-29T08:51:47Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-05-2017-0085
       
  • Quality assurance in segmental neck of femur fractures
    • Pages: 474 - 482
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 31, Issue 6, Page 474-482, July 2018.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to report a rare case of segmental neck of femur fracture (SNoFF) and highlight its quality assurance and governance implications with respect to national guidelines, care pathways and best practice tariff. Design/methodology/approach Case report of an SNoFF in a 67-year-old woman treated at a district general hospital (DGH) was used in this study. Findings SNoFF required additional implants that delayed the surgery by five days. The authors were unable to adhere to the British Orthopaedic Association standards for trauma and Scottish Inter-Collegiate Guidelines Network recommendations which indicate that all neck of femur fractures (NoFFs) be fixed within 48 h. Though the patient was discharged without any untoward event and had an uneventful recovery, this case led us to introspect and learn how best to avoid such an incident from repeating again. Research limitations/implications This case led to an overhaul of NoFF and trauma services. The local logistics was restructured to procure “Trochanteric grip plates” within 24 h to provide mandated quality of care in an effort towards improving patient experience/outcomes. Originality/value SNoFF are rare injuries and its diagnosis is either delayed or missed in at least 20 per cent of the cases on initial evaluation. The non-availability of additional implants readily on the shelf coupled with lack of a trauma bed at the tertiary centre resulted in an unacceptable delay from admission to definitive surgery. The authors recommend that all DGHs have a mechanism/emergency procurement procedure system in place to obtain the required instrumentation kits rapidly through a sharing scheme with regional hospitals or through implant vendor to avoid unacceptable delays to surgery.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2018-06-29T08:52:05Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-09-2017-0167
       
  • Structural quality of healthcare facilities in India
    • Pages: 483 - 488
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 31, Issue 6, Page 483-488, July 2018.
      Purpose Although India has a number of health issues, the healthcare facilities in India are insufficient due to poor quality of care. The purpose of this paper is to examine the factors affecting the structural quality of healthcare facilities in India. Design/methodology/approach This study used the medical facility data from the India Human Development Survey-II, 2011–2012 (ICPSR 36151) (n=4,218). Logistic regression was conducted to predict structural quality of healthcare facilities. Findings The results suggest that it is difficult to have all standard resources available at health care facilities in India. Surprisingly, having a drinking water source inside the health facility appears to be an indicator of poor structural quality of health care facilities. Having a water source inside a health care facility is associated with not having a separate exam room and not having a sink to wash hands. A higher registration fee was associated with good structural quality and with having a separate exam room and having a sink to wash hands. Originality/value This study shows the complexity of providing quality health care to the poor, particularly in developing countries. Research on quality of healthcare facilities in India is needed to improve the health of the population. Little research has been done on the factors influencing the structural quality of the healthcare facilities in India. This study is an important contribution to the current knowledge of structural healthcare facility standards and its influences in India.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2018-06-29T08:51:59Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-11-2016-0179
       
  • Service quality and satisfaction in healthcare sector of Pakistan— the
           patients’ expectations
    • Pages: 489 - 501
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 31, Issue 6, Page 489-501, July 2018.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to assess the influence of patients’ expectations from healthcare service quality on their satisfaction with nursing in public and private hospitals of Pakistan. Design/methodology/approach Data (n=456) were collected from three public sector hospitals and three private sector hospitals of Lahore, the capital of Pakistan’s most populous province. Male and female patients who have experience of both sectors were surveyed using a self-administered questionnaire developed using the original SERVQUAL approach. Data were analyzed using the statistical techniques and the Laplace criterion. Findings This paper attempts to explain degree of influences of five service quality constructs (empathy, responsiveness, tangibility, reliability and assurance) on Pakistani patients’ expectations from the private and public sector hospitals and thus patient satisfaction. Further, this work can offer several intuitions into the effect of five constructs of service quality on patients’ expectations of healthcare service quality and patient satisfaction with the service providers/nursing. The results reveal that the patient satisfaction is most strongly related to empathy in public sector and to responsiveness in private sector. Research limitations/implications In light of the previous studies and the current research findings, the study anticipates no apparently significant improvement in healthcare sector of Pakistan in near future considering various factors discussed in the study. The study will also help the service providers and the policy makers in understanding the deteriorating situation of the Pakistani healthcare sector and will guide them in identifying the areas by improving which not only the healthcare service quality in the country can be improved but also the image of healthcare sector among the masses and competitiveness of the healthcare sector can be enhanced. Originality/value The value of the study rests in its critical analysis of the current status of the healthcare sector of Pakistan with a view to suggest the areas that need to be worked on by the service providers and policy makers. Also, the study tries to settle a controversy within Pakistani healthcare literature concerning the question that who is producing more satisfied patients: private hospitals or their public counterparts'
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2018-06-29T08:51:48Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-08-2016-0110
       
  • Nursing staff perceptions regarding the clinical audit tool used for
           relicensing inspections within eThekwini private hospitals in South Africa
           
    • Pages: 502 - 519
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 31, Issue 6, Page 502-519, July 2018.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to assess nursing staff perceptions regarding the clinical audit tool used for relicensing inspections within private hospitals in eThekwini district. Design/methodology/approach An exploratory sequential mixed method research design was used with a qualitative first phase involving a total population of 40 nurse managers through purposive sampling. Nurse managers (n=24) were interviewed. This was followed by a quantitative phase in which a structured questionnaire was administered to nurses (n=270) who were randomly sampled for the study from (n=4) hospitals. Documentation review, a third phase was used to corroborate the findings of the first two phases of the study. Findings The results of the study showed that the participants perceptions of the selected private hospitals in eThekwini district is that they have not fully implemented the approach to practice standards and healthcare audits in relation to three clinical domains of the National Core Standards and the Batho Pele principles. These findings were significant and denoted the need for a standardised clinical audit tool for private hospitals in eThekwini district. Research limitations/implications This study was confined to an independent group of hospitals and the findings may not be suitable for generalising across all private hospitals in eThekwini district. Originality/value These findings led to the development of a clinical audit tool with measurements representing elements of care that are critical to the provision of safe, quality health care services.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2018-06-29T08:52:04Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-12-2017-0242
       
  • Public awareness of adverse drug reaction medical safety
    • Pages: 520 - 530
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 31, Issue 6, Page 520-530, July 2018.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the literature by assessing factors that typically engender adverse drug reactions (ADRs) jeopardizing medical safety. These factors are population knowledge, clarity in disclosure of the risks inhering ADRs and ADRs incidence. It seeks to minimize negative effect by early identification of drug reactions. Design/methodology/approach On the one hand, the study employs a model that shows relationships between various factors, and on the other hand, ADRs medical safety in the public healthcare sector. Findings Clarity of consultancy services in public healthcare significantly impact ADR medical safety. Population and healthcare provider education on ADRs medical safety are necessities. Implementation of an ADR reporting system in every healthcare institute is essential. This helps service providers to give a clear and accurate information to patients. It also makes patients more aware of consequences of ADRs. Research limitations/implications Time, place and sampling method are found to be the main study limitations. Researchers should take into their consideration the significant relationships between the factors and ADRs medical safety to improve level of awareness in the healthcare public sector. Practical implications Ways to improve ADR medical safety in healthcare sector are underscored. Healthcare service providers and professionals need to take into account the stipulated study factors in order to improve medical safety and reduce unnecessary medical costs. Originality/value Very few studies have been conducted on this topic; most of those that have been conducted were undertaken in western countries. This study assesses the level of healthcare safety in the country and suggests mechanisms to elevate that level.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2018-06-29T08:51:56Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-02-2017-0027
       
  • Registered nurses’ use of computerised decision support in
           medication reviews
    • Pages: 531 - 544
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 31, Issue 6, Page 531-544, July 2018.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to explore the implications of registered nurses’ (RNs) use of a computerized decision support system (CDSS) in medication reviews. Design/methodology/approach The paper employs a quasi-experimental, one-group pre-test/post-test design with three- and six-month follow-ups subsequent to the introduction of a CDSS. In total, 11 RNs initiated and prepared a total of 54 medication reviews. The outcome measures were the number of drug-related problems (DRPs) as reported by the CDSS and the RNs, respectively, the RNs’ views on the CDSS, and changes in the quality of drug treatment. Findings The CDSS significantly indicated more DRPs than the RNs did, such as potential adverse drug reactions (ADRs). The RNs detected additional problems, outside the scope of the CDSS, such as lack of adherence. They considered the CDSS beneficial and wanted to continue using it. Only minor changes were found in the quality of drug treatments, with no significant changes in the drug-specific quality indicators (e.g. inappropriate drugs). However, the use of renally excreted drugs in reduced renal function decreased. Practical implications The RNs’ use of a CDSS in medication reviews is of value in detecting potential ADRs and interactions. Yet, in order to have an impact on outcomes in the quality of drug treatment, further measures are needed. These may involve development of inter-professional collaboration, such as established procedures for the implementation of medication reviews, including the use of CDSS. Originality/value This is, to the best of the authors’ knowledge, the first study to explore the implications of medication reviews, initiated and prepared by RNs who use a CDSS. The paper adds further insight into the RNs’ role in relation to quality of drug treatments.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2018-06-29T08:51:05Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-01-2017-0009
       
  • Ensuring quality immediate discharge letters from mental health
    • Pages: 545 - 551
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 31, Issue 6, Page 545-551, July 2018.
      Purpose Immediate discharge letters (IDLs) from the mental health unit at Forth Valley Royal Hospital are vital in ensuring safe patient transfer to primary care. The purpose of this paper is to develop a standardised list of information that should be included in all IDLs, and to assess its use in practice. Design/methodology/approach Three audit cycles analysed IDLs over two-week periods for their inclusion of the standardised list. The data were assessed qualitatively. Findings Baseline measurement showed 48.7 per cent of discharges had a brief reason for admission, 15.4 per cent included a description of the patient’s progress during inpatient admission, 35.9 per cent had medication alterations included and 23.1 per cent included follow-up arrangements. Following a series of interventions, analysis of subsequent IDLs demonstrated that 76.2 per cent of discharges had a brief reason for admission, 76.2 per cent included a description of the patient’s progress during inpatient admission, 76.2 per cent had medication alterations included and 71.4 per cent included follow-up arrangements. Originality/value The standardised list developed will ensure quality communication and safe patient transfer to primary care; the application of this list was effective and cost neutral.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2018-06-29T08:51:11Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-08-2017-0141
       
  • Implementation of an in-hospital stroke simulation protocol
    • Pages: 552 - 562
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 31, Issue 6, Page 552-562, July 2018.
      Purpose A major component of hospital stroke care involves prompt identification of stroke in admitted patients. Delays in recognizing stroke symptoms and initiating treatment for in-hospital stroke can adversely impact patient outcomes. This quality improvement intervention used simulation together with a traditional lecture to instruct nurses at a university hospital about a new stroke protocol being implemented to increase rapid recognition of stroke and meet Joint Commission National Hospital Inpatient Quality Measures. The paper aims to discuss these issues. Design/methodology/approach In total, 86 registered nurses from the neurology and cardiology units attended a lecture and participated in a simulation scenario with a standardized patient exhibiting stroke symptoms. Participants completed a ten-item pre-test to measure their knowledge of stroke care prior to the lecture; they repeated the test pre-simulation and once again post-simulation to evaluate changes in knowledge. Findings Overall mean stroke knowledge scores increased significantly from pre-lecture to pre-simulation, and from pre-simulation to post-simulation. Simulation plus lecture was more effective than lecture alone in increasing knowledge about hospital stroke protocol despite assigned unit (cardiology or neurology), years of experience, or previous exposure to simulation. Research limitations/implications All eligible nurses who agreed to participate received training, making it impossible to compare improvements in knowledge to those who did not receive the training. Originality/value A diverse array of nursing professionals and their patients may benefit from simulation training. This quality improvement intervention provides a feasible model for establishing new care protocols in a hospital setting.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2018-06-29T08:51:42Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-08-2017-0149
       
  • The success of strategic planning in health care organizations of Iran
    • Pages: 563 - 574
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 31, Issue 6, Page 563-574, July 2018.
      Purpose Although strategic planning promised to boost organizational performance, many health care managers found it difficult to implement it successfully. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the success of strategic planning in health care organizations of Iran. Design/methodology/approach This descriptive and cross-sectional study was conducted in 2016 using a valid and reliable questionnaire completed by 99 health care managers in Tehran province, Iran. Findings Strategic planning was positively related to organizational performance including employees’ and patients’ satisfaction and organizational productivity. However, strategic planning was moderately successful in enhancing organizational performance of Iranian health care organizations (score of 2.84 out of 5). The most and least success was observed in the planning and employee management constructs of organizational performance. Process management, organizational culture and customer management constructs had the most effect on the success of strategic plans in health care organizations. Practical implications Strategic planning is effective and provides a clear focused direction for health care organizations. Understanding the success factors of strategic planning would enable managers to develop more effective methods for developing, implementing and evaluating strategic plans in health care organizations. Originality/value This paper highlights the relationship between strategic planning and organizational performance and offers suggestions on how to develop and implement strategic plans to achieve higher organizational performance.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2018-06-29T08:50:56Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-08-2017-0145
       
  • Factors affecting sentinel events in hospital emergency department: a
           qualitative study
    • Pages: 575 - 586
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 31, Issue 6, Page 575-586, July 2018.
      Purpose A sentinel event is an unexpected occurrence resulting in death or serious physical or psychological injury or the risk thereof. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the influencing factors of sentinel events in the emergency department of a military hospital in Tehran to find out some of the effective solutions. Design/methodology/approach In this qualitative study with content analysis approach, 20 hospital healthcare personnel participated as participants from the fields of medicine and nursing. Purposive random sampling and semi-structured interviews were used for data collection. Atlas.ti software version 5.2 was used for data analysis. Findings Four themes and 32 subthemes were identified by numerous revisions and combining the codes. The four main themes of sentinel events were: causes, incidence barriers, cause prevention solutions, and barriers’ improvement solutions. Moreover, these main factors were related to these issues: staff and patients’ education, communication, assessment, patients and their companions, employee rights, leadership, care continuum, human factors, physical environment, information management and medication use. Some solutions were also suggested according to these factors and a policy was recommended. Practical implications Hospital managers and authorities should try to find the main causes of sentinel events by periodical analysis to find ways to prevent them in the future, using logical and reasonable solutions. Originality/value This study confirms that strategies to reduce the sentinel events in emergency departments should focus on empowerment of all staff.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2018-06-29T08:51:31Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-07-2017-0137
       
  • Enabling continuous learning and quality improvement in health care
    • Pages: 587 - 599
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 31, Issue 6, Page 587-599, July 2018.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to examine how the design and implementation of learning models for performance management can foster continuous learning and quality improvement within a publicly funded, multi-site community hospital organization. Design/methodology/approach Niagara Health’s patient flow performance management system, a learning model, was studied over a 20-month period. A descriptive case study design guided the analysis of qualitative observational data and its synthesis with organizational learning theory literature. Emerging from this analysis were four propositions to inform the implementation of learning models and future research. Findings This performance management system was observed to enable: ongoing performance-related knowledge exchange by creating opportunities for routine social interaction; collective recognition and understanding of practice and performance patterns; relationship building, learning for improvement, and “higher order” learning through dialogue facilitated using humble inquiry; and, alignment of quality improvement efforts to organizational strategic objectives through a multi-level feedback/feed-forward communication structure. Research limitations/implications The single organization and descriptive study design may limit the generalizability of the findings and introduce confirmation bias. Future research should more comprehensively evaluate the impact of learning models on organizational learning processes and performance outcomes. Practical implications This study offers novel insight which may inform the design and implementation of learning models for performance management within and beyond the study site. Originality/value Few studies have examined the mechanics of performance management systems in relation to organizational learning theory and research. Broader adoption of learning models may be key to the development of continuously learning and improving health systems.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2018-06-29T08:51:44Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-10-2017-0198
       
  • Performance evaluation of a coagulation laboratory using Sigma metrics
    • Pages: 600 - 608
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 31, Issue 6, Page 600-608, July 2018.
      Purpose Two-thirds of medical decisions are based on laboratory test results. Therefore, laboratories should practice strict quality control (QC) measures. Traditional QC processes may not accurately reflect the magnitude of errors in clinical laboratories. Six Sigma is a statistical tool which provides opportunity to assess performance at the highest level of excellence. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate performance of the coagulation laboratory utilizing Sigma metrics as the highest level of quality. Design/methodology/approach Quality indicators of the coagulation laboratory from January 1, 2009, to December 31, 2015, were evaluated. These QIs were categorized into pre-analytical, analytical and post-analytical. Relative frequencies of errors were calculated and converted to Sigma scale to determine the extent of control over each process. The Sigma level of 4 was considered optimal performance. Findings During the study period, a total of 474,655 specimens were received and 890,535 analyses were performed. These include 831,760 (93.4 percent) routine and 58,775 (6.6 percent) special tests. Stat reporting was requested for 166,921 (18.7 percent). Of 7,535,146 total opportunities (sum of the total opportunities for all indicators), a total of 4,005 errors were detected. There were 2,350 (58.7 percent) pre-analytical, 11 (0.3 percent) analytical and 1,644 (41 percent) post-analytical errors. Average Sigma value obtained was 4.8 with 12 (80 percent) indicators achieving a Sigma value of 4. Three (20 percent) low-performance indicators were: unacceptable proficiency testing (3.8), failure to inform critical results (3.6) and delays in stat reporting (3.9). Practical implications This study shows that a small number of errors can decrease Sigma value to below acceptability limits. If clinical laboratories start using Sigma metrics for monitoring their performance, they can identify gaps in their performance more readily and hence can improve their performance and patient safety. Social implications This study provides an opportunity for the laboratorians to choose and set world-class goals while assessing their performance. Originality/value To the best of the authors’ knowledge and belief, this study is the first of its kind that has utilized Sigma metrics as a QC tool for monitoring performance of a coagulation laboratory.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2018-06-29T08:51:08Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-07-2017-0134
       
  • Implementation of the surgical safety checklist in hospitals of Iran;
           operating room personnel’s attitude, awareness and acceptance
    • Pages: 609 - 618
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 31, Issue 6, Page 609-618, July 2018.
      Purpose The WHO Surgical Safety Checklist (SSC) has improved patient safety effectively. Despite the known benefits of applying the checklist before surgery, its implementation is less than universal in practice. The purpose of this paper is to determine the operating room personnel’s attitude, their awareness and knowledge of the SSC, and to evaluate staff acceptance of the SSC (including personal beliefs). Design/methodology/approach This cross-sectional study was conducted in eight tertiary general hospitals in Tehran, Iran. Some 145 operating room personnel (surgeons, anaesthetists and nurses) were selected for the study. Data collection was carried out via a validated questionnaire in three parts which included socio-demographic, attitude, awareness and acceptance. Data were then analysed using the Kruskal–Wallis and χ2 statistical test. Findings Out of the 145 participants in the study, 92 per cent were aware of the existence of the SSC and 73.9 per cent of them were aware of the objectives of SSC. Overall, the attitude to SSC was positive. The attitude of surgeons was positive towards the impact of the SSC on safety and teamwork. Surgeons were significantly more sensitive to the barriers of SSC application compared to nurses and anaesthetists (p=0.046). Among the three groups, nurses had the highest level of support for SSC (p=0.001). Practical implications Despite high acceptance of the checklist among staff, there is still a gap in knowledge about when exactly the checklist should be used. Therefore, involvement of all surgical team members to complete the checklist process, support of senior managers, on-going education and training and consideration of the barriers to its implementation are all key areas that need to be taken into account. Originality/value This is the first research to examine the operating room personnel’s attitude, awareness and acceptance about SSC in Iranian hospitals. The outcomes of this study provide documentation and possible justification for effective establishment of SSC in Iran and other countries.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2018-06-29T08:51:58Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-03-2017-0051
       
  • Overcoming public health risks to staff during the management of waste
           from healthcare facilities
    • Pages: 619 - 630
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 31, Issue 6, Page 619-630, July 2018.
      Purpose The management of public health risks is a key focus for the European Union. One of the key factors that has been shown to pose a public health risk is that of the management of needles from healthcare facilities. The paper aims to discuss this issue. Design/methodology/approach Using audits of two case study hospitals based in northern Italy, this study sought to examine the key factors that resulted in needle stick injuries amongst staff and suggest measures to minimise these risks. Findings The number of needle stick injuries was influenced by various key factors including the time period during the year, the length of time employed, the location within the site, staff category and working hours. Practical implications Suggestions for overcoming the risk factors, including redesigning working patterns, staff training and awareness building, and the use of safety-engineered devices are outlined. Originality/value This study examined the incidence of needle stick injuries amongst healthcare staff in two Italian hospitals, which was lower than in other countries due to various factors, including recapping of needles not being allowed, the introduction of self-retractable needles and awareness campaigns about the correct disposal procedures of potentially infectious waste.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2018-06-29T08:50:55Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-09-2016-0128
       
  • Relationship marketing strategy
    • Pages: 631 - 645
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 31, Issue 6, Page 631-645, July 2018.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to explore how strategies are put in place to formulate policies regarding the introduction and implementation of relationship marketing (RM) in the health sector, and how RM strategies are designed as part of the curricula for the training of prospective health professionals in Ghana. Design/methodology/approach Data were gathered using interviews and documentary review. A purposive sampling technique was used to recruit policy makers and health educationists in Accra for in-depth interviews. Qualitative interviews were analysed using framework analysis. Findings The findings revealed that, currently, there is no policy framework on RM in the health sector nor included in the curricula of health training institutions in the country. Research limitations/implications Due to limited time and funding constraints, the study could not include many policy makers, educationists, health providers, facilities and regions outside the Greater Accra region of Ghana. This means that the authors missed out on useful insights from other relevant policy makers/educationists who would have added to the knowledge that this study contributes. There were still some areas that this study could not cover, including the lack of an exploration of the perceptions of health providers and patients. Practical implications Evidence from the current research provides the basis for scaling up of a similar study to the whole country to address the perennial RM or quality of care/patient satisfaction issues persisting in health facilities in the country. The outcome of this large-scale study would help to confirm the findings of the current study on the adoption and incorporation of RM into both policy framework and curricula of health training institutions in Ghana. The findings would culminate in the preparation and utilisation of guidelines on RM for client-centred service delivery in the health sector of the country. Social implications This paper argues that RM orientation could enable health professionals to improve upon their healthcare service performance and quality of care so as to enhance patient satisfaction. Originality/value The study recommends that RM should be adopted by health policy makers and designers of curricula for health training institutions.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2018-06-29T08:51:12Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-05-2017-0086
       
  • Supply chain partnership assessment of a diabetes clinic
    • Pages: 646 - 658
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 31, Issue 6, Page 646-658, July 2018.
      Purpose Diabetes is one of the major healthcare challenges in India. The chronic nature of the disease makes the lifetime cost of the treatment exorbitantly high. The medicine cost contributes a major size of expense in diabetes management. To make healthcare available to poorest of the poor, it is imperative to control the rising cost of diabetes treatment. The earlier research works done in this area focuses more on inventory management techniques to control the cost of healthcare. Less interest is shown in the role of better supply chain partnership (SCP) in reducing the cost of procurement of medicine. The purpose of this paper is to develop and use the SCP assessment framework for a diabetes clinic. The approach is generalized enough to be adopted for other similar organization. Design/methodology/approach This paper adopts self-assessment criteria of the European Foundation for Quality Management (EFQM) business excellence model for analysis of SCP in the supply chain of a private diabetes clinic in Varanasi. The paper uses analytic hierarchy process (AHP) method for calculation of weights of criteria. Findings The EFQM-based framework can be adopted as easy-to-use tool to make an objective assessment of the SCP. The proposed model in the study is a balanced model between enablers and results, which includes multiple assessment dimensions. The supply chain performance score of the diabetes clinic under study was found as the Tool Pusher, which means the effort in direction of SCP is not too good. The organization needs to clearly define the SCP goal and analyze the results to identify the gap areas. Originality/value The study is first of its kind and contributes to the literature by providing non-prescriptive and easy-to-use SCP assessment framework, for chronic disease care. The case study approach provides a procedure for the healthcare organization willing to adopt this approach.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2018-06-29T08:51:33Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-06-2017-0113
       
 
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
Fax: +00 44 (0)131 4513327
 
Home (Search)
Subjects A-Z
Publishers A-Z
Customise
APIs
Your IP address: 54.198.170.159
 
About JournalTOCs
API
Help
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-