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Publisher: Emerald   (Total: 344 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 344 Journals sorted alphabetically
A Life in the Day     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Academia Revista Latinoamericana de Administraci√≥n     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.178, CiteScore: 1)
Accounting Auditing & Accountability J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32, SJR: 1.71, CiteScore: 3)
Accounting Research J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.144, CiteScore: 0)
Accounting, Auditing and Accountability J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 2.187, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Accounting Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.279, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Appreciative Inquiry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.451, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Autism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.222, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Dual Diagnosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47, SJR: 0.21, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Gender Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.16, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Intl. Marketing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 73, SJR: 0.296, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
African J. of Economic and Management Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.216, CiteScore: 1)
Agricultural Finance Review     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.406, CiteScore: 1)
Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 201, SJR: 0.354, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Annals in Social Responsibility     Full-text available via subscription  
Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.235, CiteScore: 1)
Arts and the Market     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Asia Pacific J. of Innovation and Entrepreneurship     Open Access  
Asia Pacific J. of Marketing and Logistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.425, CiteScore: 1)
Asia-Pacific J. of Business Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.234, CiteScore: 1)
Asian Association of Open Universities J.     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian Education and Development Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.233, CiteScore: 1)
Asian J. on Quality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Asian Review of Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.222, CiteScore: 1)
Aslib J. of Information Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.725, CiteScore: 2)
Aslib Proceedings     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 299)
Assembly Automation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.603, CiteScore: 2)
Baltic J. of Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.309, CiteScore: 1)
Benchmarking : An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.559, CiteScore: 2)
British Food J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.5, CiteScore: 2)
Built Environment Project and Asset Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.46, CiteScore: 1)
Business Process Re-engineering & Management J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Business Strategy Series     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Career Development Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.527, CiteScore: 2)
China Agricultural Economic Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.31, CiteScore: 1)
China Finance Review Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.245, CiteScore: 0)
Chinese Management Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.278, CiteScore: 1)
Circuit World     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.246, CiteScore: 1)
Collection Building     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.296, CiteScore: 1)
COMPEL: The Intl. J. for Computation and Mathematics in Electrical and Electronic Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.22, CiteScore: 1)
Competitiveness Review : An Intl. Business J. incorporating J. of Global Competitiveness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.274, CiteScore: 1)
Construction Innovation: Information, Process, Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.731, CiteScore: 2)
Corporate Communications An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.453, CiteScore: 1)
Corporate Governance Intl. J. of Business in Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.336, CiteScore: 1)
Critical Perspectives on Intl. Business     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.378, CiteScore: 1)
Cross Cultural & Strategic Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.504, CiteScore: 2)
Development and Learning in Organizations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.138, CiteScore: 0)
Digital Library Perspectives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.341, CiteScore: 1)
Direct Marketing An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Disaster Prevention and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.47, CiteScore: 1)
Drugs and Alcohol Today     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 134, SJR: 0.245, CiteScore: 1)
Education + Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Education, Business and Society : Contemporary Middle Eastern Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.707, CiteScore: 3)
Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Employee Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.551, CiteScore: 2)
Engineering Computations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.444, CiteScore: 1)
Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.653, CiteScore: 2)
English Teaching: Practice & Critique     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.417, CiteScore: 1)
Equal Opportunities Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Equality, Diversity and Inclusion : An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.5, CiteScore: 1)
EuroMed J. of Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.26, CiteScore: 1)
European Business Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.585, CiteScore: 3)
European J. of Innovation Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.454, CiteScore: 2)
European J. of Management and Business Economics     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.239, CiteScore: 1)
European J. of Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.971, CiteScore: 2)
European J. of Training and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.477, CiteScore: 1)
Evidence-based HRM     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.537, CiteScore: 1)
Facilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.503, CiteScore: 2)
Foresight     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.34, CiteScore: 1)
Gender in Management : An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.412, CiteScore: 1)
Grey Systems : Theory and Application     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Health Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.421, CiteScore: 1)
Higher Education, Skills and Work-based Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47, SJR: 0.426, CiteScore: 1)
History of Education Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.26, CiteScore: 0)
Housing, Care and Support     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.171, CiteScore: 0)
Human Resource Management Intl. Digest     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.129, CiteScore: 0)
Humanomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.333, CiteScore: 1)
IMP J.     Hybrid Journal  
Indian Growth and Development Review     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.174, CiteScore: 0)
Industrial and Commercial Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.301, CiteScore: 1)
Industrial Lubrication and Tribology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.334, CiteScore: 1)
Industrial Management & Data Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.904, CiteScore: 3)
Industrial Robot An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.318, CiteScore: 1)
Info     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Information and Computer Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.307, CiteScore: 1)
Information Technology & People     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45, SJR: 0.671, CiteScore: 2)
Innovation & Management Review     Open Access  
Interactive Technology and Smart Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.191, CiteScore: 1)
Interlending & Document Supply     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 61)
Internet Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37, SJR: 1.645, CiteScore: 5)
Intl. J. for Lesson and Learning Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.324, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. for Researcher Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Intl. J. of Accounting and Information Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.275, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Bank Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.654, CiteScore: 3)
Intl. J. of Climate Change Strategies and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.353, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Clothing Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.318, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Commerce and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Conflict Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.362, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Contemporary Hospitality Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.452, CiteScore: 4)
Intl. J. of Culture Tourism and Hospitality Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.339, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Development Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.139, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.387, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Educational Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.559, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Emergency Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.201, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Emerging Markets     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.474, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Energy Sector Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.349, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Entrepreneurial Behaviour & Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.629, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Event and Festival Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.388, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Gender and Entrepreneurship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.445, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Health Care Quality Assurance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.358, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Health Governance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.247, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Housing Markets and Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.211, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Human Rights in Healthcare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.205, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Information and Learning Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.226, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Innovation Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.197, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Intelligent Computing and Cybernetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.214, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Intelligent Unmanned Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Islamic and Middle Eastern Finance and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.375, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Law and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.217, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Law in the Built Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.227, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Leadership in Public Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Intl. J. of Lean Six Sigma     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.802, CiteScore: 3)
Intl. J. of Logistics Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.71, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Managerial Finance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.203, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Managing Projects in Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.36, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Manpower     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.365, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Mentoring and Coaching in Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.426, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Migration, Health and Social Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.307, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Numerical Methods for Heat & Fluid Flow     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.697, CiteScore: 3)
Intl. J. of Operations & Production Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 2.052, CiteScore: 4)
Intl. J. of Organizational Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.268, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Pervasive Computing and Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.138, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.25, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.821, CiteScore: 4)
Intl. J. of Prisoner Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.303, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Productivity and Performance Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.578, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Public Sector Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 0.438, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Quality & Reliability Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.492, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Quality and Service Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.309, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Retail & Distribution Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.742, CiteScore: 3)
Intl. J. of Service Industry Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Social Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.225, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Sociology and Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50, SJR: 0.3, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.269, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Structural Integrity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.228, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Sustainability in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.502, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Tourism Cities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.502, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Web Information Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.186, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Wine Business Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.562, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Workplace Health Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.303, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. Marketing Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.895, CiteScore: 3)
Irish J. of Occupational Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
ISRA Intl. J. of Islamic Finance     Open Access  
J. for Multicultural Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.237, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Accounting & Organizational Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.301, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Accounting in Emerging Economies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
J. of Adult Protection, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.314, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Advances in Management Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
J. of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44, SJR: 0.222, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.108, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Applied Accounting Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.227, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Applied Research in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49, SJR: 0.2, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Asia Business Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.245, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Assistive Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
J. of Business & Industrial Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.652, CiteScore: 2)
J. of Business Strategy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.333, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Centrum Cathedra     Open Access  
J. of Children's Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.243, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Chinese Economic and Foreign Trade Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.2, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Chinese Entrepreneurship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
J. of Chinese Human Resource Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.173, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Communication Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.625, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Consumer Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.664, CiteScore: 2)
J. of Corporate Real Estate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.368, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Criminal Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 129, SJR: 0.268, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Criminological Research, Policy and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43, SJR: 0.254, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.257, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Documentation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 184, SJR: 0.613, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Economic and Administrative Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
J. of Economic Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.733, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Economics, Finance and Administrative Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.217, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Educational Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.252, CiteScore: 2)
J. of Enabling Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.369, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Engineering, Design and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.212, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Enterprise Information Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.827, CiteScore: 4)
J. of Enterprising Communities People and Places in the Global Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.281, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Entrepreneurship and Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.262, CiteScore: 1)
J. of European Industrial Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
J. of European Real Estate Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.268, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Facilities Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.33, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Family Business Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
J. of Fashion Marketing and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.608, CiteScore: 2)
J. of Financial Crime     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 372, SJR: 0.228, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Financial Economic Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.186, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Financial Management of Property and Construction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.309, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Financial Regulation and Compliance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.159, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Financial Reporting and Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)

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Journal Cover
International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.358
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 12  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0952-6862
Published by Emerald Homepage  [344 journals]
  • Porcelain for All – a nursing home study
    • Pages: 662 - 675
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 31, Issue 7, Page 662-675, August 2018.
      Purpose The Porcelain for All project was an initiative by Figgjo AS, a porcelain factory in Norway, which needed more research on different coloured porcelains. The paper aims to discuss this issue. Design/methodology/approach The study aimed to gain new knowledge about how different décor and dinner plate colours can positively influence dementia sufferer food intake and appetite. The intervention period lasted three weeks. Four days were randomly picked during that period. Each plate was photographed before and after the resident had eaten, researchers conducted observations during mealtimes. Two CurroCus® group interviews were used to collect additional empirical data. In total, 12 dementia sufferers (five females) between 65 and 85 years were observed during dinnertime. Findings Plates with a white well, yellow lip and red rim seemed to be preferred regarding food intake. Three main categories were noted from the observations and group interviews: mealtime dignity, porcelain design and appetite. Research limitations/implications Future research could incorporate well-being in people with dementia regarding food weight, testing different meal room environments, user involvement, food presentation and should include more nursing homes and residents. Practical implications This study only encompasses a small sample (12 residents), all diagnosed with dementia. Social implications Outcomes may help to prevent undernutrition among elderly people. Originality/value Combined coloured porcelain, food intake and residents with dementia is scarcely investigated.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2018-10-25T09:08:26Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-10-2016-0160
       
  • Hospital service quality – patient preferences – a discrete
           choice experiment
    • Pages: 676 - 683
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 31, Issue 7, Page 676-683, August 2018.
      Purpose High quality healthcare is important to all patients. If healthcare is felt to be high quality, then patients will be satisfied, and the relationship between patients and healthcare providers will improve. Patient satisfaction is among the most commonly used service quality indicators; however, it is not fully known which factors influence satisfaction. Therefore, it is necessary to pay attention to the elements that affect both healthcare quality and patient satisfaction. Nowadays, several methods are used in health economics to assess patient preferences, prioritize them and help health policy makers improve services. Discrete choice experiment (DCE) is one method that is useful to elicit patient preferences regarding healthcare services. The purpose of this paper is to apply DCE and elicit patient preferences in medical centers to rank certain healthcare quality factors. Design/methodology/approach The descriptive, analytical study used a cross-sectional questionnaire that the authors developed. In total, 12 scenarios were chosen after applying fractional factorials. The questionnaire was completed by patients who were admitted to Kerman General Teaching Hospitals, South-East Iran in 2015. Patient preferences were identified by calculating the characteristics’ marginal effects and prioritizing them. The generalized estimation equation (GEE) model was used to determine attribute effects on patient preferences. Findings In total, 167 patients completed the questionnaire. Prioritizing the attributes showed that “physical examination” was the most important attribute. Other key features included “cleanliness,” “training after discharging,” “medical staff attention,” “waiting for admission” and “staff attitude.” All attributes were statistically significant (p
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2018-10-25T09:07:57Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-01-2017-0006
       
  • Lean healthcare: scale, scope and sustainability
    • Pages: 684 - 696
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 31, Issue 7, Page 684-696, August 2018.
      Purpose Lean healthcare is highlighted in the literature as an approach to quality improvement and operational efficiency. The purpose of this paper is to study how Lean healthcare has been implemented by analyzing empirical outcomes. Design/methodology/approach The authors used a literature review as the primary research method, following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses process. Peer-reviewed journals were analyzed – searching for Lean healthcare implementation, tools used, wastes addressed, outcomes and sustainability. Findings Evidence suggests that Lean can improve healthcare operational effectiveness. However, empirical studies show implementation is still highly localized with small successes. Most transformations are focused on implementing one or two Lean tools that primarily target patient waiting times and there is minimal evidence about sustainability. Establishing clear definitions for healthcare-related Lean terminology may improve practice, especially episodic care and service quality. Originality/value This work provides a Lean healthcare case review. The research makes a significant contribution to Lean healthcare by increasing understanding (scale, scope and sustainability). From a theory building perspective, the authors suggest that barriers to adoption include a common healthcare-specific Lean terminology, and a need to expand implementation beyond small successes. This understanding will help identify key areas for further research in Lean healthcare management.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2018-10-25T09:08:30Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-02-2017-0023
       
  • Accreditation effects on health service quality: nurse viewpoints
    • Pages: 697 - 703
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 31, Issue 7, Page 697-703, August 2018.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to determine accreditation effects on Iranian military hospital health service quality through nurses’ viewpoints. Design/methodology/approach The paper is a cross-sectional questionnaire-based study. Sampling drew from a hospital nurse census (n=160). Descriptive statistics were used to analyze participant demographics and nurses’ views. Linear regression analysis determined the independent variables’ overall effect on the accreditation quality results dimension (dependent variable). Findings From the nurses’ viewpoints, accreditation effects on services quality mean score was 3.60±0.61. Linear regression analysis showed that leadership and quality management were identified as the most important accreditation quality predictors. The R2 value (0.698) showed that nearly 70 percent of the dependent variable changes were affected by the independent variables. Practical implications This study gives hospital managers a deeper insight into accreditation and its effects on military hospital service quality. Military hospitals benefit from military organization such as hierarchy and command chain, so managers should employ these characteristics to adopt appropriate policies to promote human resource management as a competitive advantage. Furthermore, results will guide public and private hospital managers on how to manage organizational variables that benefit from accreditation. Originality/value Accreditation was introduced as a hospital quality improvement program. However, implementing accreditation programs should be cost-effective. Hospital managers and employees should feel that accreditation can improve service quality. Nurses had positive viewpoints about accreditation and its effects on military hospital service quality.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2018-10-25T09:09:20Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-07-2017-0126
       
  • Informing quality in emergency care: understanding patient experiences
    • Pages: 704 - 717
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 31, Issue 7, Page 704-717, August 2018.
      Purpose Assessing performance and quality in healthcare organisations is moving from focussing solely on clinical care measurement to considering the patient experience as critical. Much patient experience research is quantitative and survey based. The purpose of this paper is to report a qualitative study gathering in-depth data in an emergency department (ED). Design/methodology/approach The authors used empirical data from seven focus groups to understand patient experience as participants progressed through a major teaching hospital in an Ireland ED. A convenience sampling technique was used, and 42 participants were invited to share their perceptions and outline key factors affecting their journey. A role-playing exercise was used to develop improvement themes. Data were analysed using thematic analysis and data analysis software (NVivo 10). Findings Capturing ED patient experience increases our understanding and process impact on the patient journey. Factors identified include information, access, assurance, responsiveness and empathy, reliability and tangibles such as surroundings, food and seating. Research limitations/implications Owing to the ED patient’s emergency nature, participants were recruited if triaged at levels 3–5 (Manchester Triage System). The study explored patients’ immediate rather than post hoc experiences where recollections may change over time. Originality/value To the authors’ knowledge, no study has examined in-depth, ED patient experience in Ireland using qualitative interviewing, obtaining critical process insights as it occurs. The potential to inform patient process improvements in Irish EDs is significant.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2018-10-25T09:09:01Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-03-2017-0052
       
  • Inpatient flow management: a systematic review
    • Pages: 718 - 734
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 31, Issue 7, Page 718-734, August 2018.
      Purpose In hospitals, several patient flows compete for access to shared resources. Failure to manage these flows result in one or more disruptions within a hospital system. To ensure continuous care delivery, solving flow problems must not be limited to one unit, but should be extended to other departments – a prerequisite for solving flow problems in the entire hospital. Since most current studies focus solely on overcrowding in emergency units, additional insights are needed on system-wide patient flow management. The purpose of this paper is to look at the information available in system-wide patient flow management studies, which were also systematically evaluated to demonstrate which interventions improve inpatient flow. Design/methodology/approach The authors searched PubMed and Web of Science (Core Collection) literature databases and collected full-text articles using two selection and classification stages. Stage 1 was used to screen articles relating to patient flow management for inpatient settings with typical characteristics. Stage 2 was used to classify the articles selected in Stage 1 according to the interventions and their impact on patient flow within a hospital system. Findings In Stage 1, 107 studies were selected. Although a growing trend was observed, there were fewer studies on patient flow management in inpatient than studies in emergency settings. In Stage 2, 61 intervention studies were classified. The authors found that most interventions were about creating and adding supply resources. Since many hospital managers these days cannot easily add capacity owing to cost and resource constraints, using existing capacity efficiently is important – unfortunately not addressed in many studies. Furthermore, arrival variability was the factor most frequently mentioned as affecting flow. Of all interventions addressed in this review, the most prominent for advancing patient access to inpatient units was employing a specialized individual or team to maintain patient flow and bed placement across hospital units. Originality/value This study provides the first patient flow management systematic overview within an inpatient setting context.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2018-10-25T09:08:51Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-03-2017-0054
       
  • High-cost sharing policies and non-urgent emergency department visits
    • Pages: 735 - 745
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 31, Issue 7, Page 735-745, August 2018.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to examine whether high-cost-sharing ambulatory care policies affect non-urgent emergency department (ED) care utilization differently among individuals with and without chronic conditions. Design/methodology/approach This retrospective cohort study used 2010–2011 US Medical Expenditure Panel Survey data. Difference-in-difference methods, multivariate logit model and survey procedures were employed. Time lag effect was used to address endogeneity concerns. Findings The sample included 4,347 individuals. Difference in non-urgent ED visits log odds between high- and low-cost-sharing policies was not significantly different between chronically ill and non-chronically ill individuals (β=−0.48, p=0.42). Sensitivity analysis with 15 and 25 percent cost-sharing levels also generated consistent insignificant results (p=0.33 and p=0.31, respectively). Ambulatory care incidence rates were not significantly different between high- and low-cost-sharing groups among chronically ill people (incidence rate ratio=0.849, p=0.069). Practical implications High-cost-sharing ambulatory care policies were not associated with increased non-urgent ED care utilization among chronically ill and healthy people. The chronically ill patients may have retained sizable ambulatory care that was necessary to maintain their health. Health plans or employers may consider low-level cost-sharing policies for ambulatory care among chronically ill enrollees or employees. Originality/value Findings contribute to insurance benefit design; i.e., whether high-cost-sharing ambulatory care policies should be implemented among chronically ill enrollees to maintain their health and save costs for health plans.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2018-10-25T09:08:19Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-05-2017-0089
       
  • Chinese residents’ educational disparity and social insurance
           coverage
    • Pages: 746 - 756
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 31, Issue 7, Page 746-756, August 2018.
      Purpose The Chinese society has embraced rapid social reforms since the late twentieth century, including educational and healthcare systems. The Chinese Central Government launched an ambitious health reform program in 2009 to improve service quality and provide affordable health services, regardless of individual socio-economic status. Currently, the Chinese social health insurance includes Urban Employee Basic Medical Insurance, Urban Resident Basic Medical Insurance, and New Cooperative Medical Insurance for rural residents. The purpose of this paper is to measure the association between individual education level and China’s social health insurance scheme following the reform. Design/methodology/approach Using the latest (2011) China Health and Nutrition Survey (CHNS) data and multivariable logistic regression models with cross-sectional design (n=11,960), the odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) are reported. Findings The authors found that education is associated with all social health insurance schemes in China after the reform (p
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2018-10-25T09:08:24Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-06-2017-0098
       
  • India’s rural healthcare systems: structural modeling
    • Pages: 757 - 774
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 31, Issue 7, Page 757-774, August 2018.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to identify factors related to rural healthcare services and establish a hierarchical model for the effective rural healthcare management in India. Design/methodology/approach A questionnaire survey identified and correlated numerous factors related to the Uttarakhand rural healthcare systems. Experts opinion were translated into a reachability matrix and an interpretive structural model. A fuzzy matriced impacts croises-multiplication applique and classment (FMICMAC) analysis arranged the factors as hierarchical stages using their driving power. Findings The interpretive structural and FMICMAC hierarchical models suggest four key driving factors: diseases, climatic conditions, population growth and political pressure. Practical implications Despite numerous issues, rural healthcare services can be improved by considering key driving factors that could be used as a prediction tool for policy makers. Originality/value Results demonstrate that population control, coordinating services with local bodies and rural health center annual maintenance can be game changers toward better healthcare services.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2018-10-25T09:09:13Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-02-2017-0020
       
  • Quality improvement measures: effects on rectal cancer tissue biopsy
           process
    • Pages: 775 - 783
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 31, Issue 7, Page 775-783, August 2018.
      Purpose Delay in histologically confirming rectal cancer may lead to late treatment as histological confirmation is required prior to chemo-radiotherapy or surgical intervention. Multidisciplinary colorectal meetings indicate that there are patients who require multiple tissue biopsy episodes prior to histologically confirming rectal cancer. The purpose of this paper is to examine a quality improvement (QI) measure’s impact on tissue biopsy process diagnostic yield. Design/methodology/approach The authors performed the study in two phases (pre- and post-QI), between February 2012 and April 2014 in a district general hospital. The QI measures were derived from process mapping a rectal cancer diagnostic pathway. The primary outcome was to assess the tissue biopsy process diagnostic yield. The secondary outcome included total breaches for a 62-day target in the pre- and post-QI study phases. Findings There was no significant difference in demographics or referral mode in both study phases. There were 81 patients in the pre-QI phase compared to 38 in the post-QI phase, 68 per cent and 74 per cent were referred via the two-week wait urgent pathway, respectively. Diagnostic tissue biopsy process yield improved from 58.1 to 77.6 per cent after implementing the QI measure (p=0.02). The 62-day target breach was reduced from 14.8 to 3.5 per cent (p=0.42). Practical implications Simple QI measures can achieve significant improvements in rectal cancer diagnostic tissue biopsy process yields. A multidisciplinary approach, involving process mapping and cause and effect modelling, proved useful tools. Originality/value A process mapping exercise and QI measures resulted in significant improvements in diagnostic yield, reducing the episodes per patient before histological diagnosis was confirmed.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2018-10-25T09:08:23Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-06-2017-0097
       
  • Infant mortality rate in India: mediating causes
    • Pages: 784 - 795
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 31, Issue 7, Page 784-795, August 2018.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to develop a new approach to health service quality assurance. Design/methodology/approach Data were collected using a structured, eight-section questionnaire. Stratified random samples were drawn from four villages based in four Indian regions. Findings Psychological discomfort is an infant mortality rate (IMR) mediating factor. The root mean square error of approximation fit statistic for the model was 0.08, which was considered the best fit. Practical implications Addressing mediating causes can reduce IMR in developing countries. Originality/value The model that the authors described helps health institution managers to map quality assurance health management and economics.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2018-10-25T09:09:18Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-06-2017-0103
       
  • Fostering a healthcare sector quality and safety culture
    • Pages: 796 - 809
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 31, Issue 7, Page 796-809, August 2018.
      Purpose Quality issues, increasing patient expectations and unsatisfactory media reports are driving patient safety concerns. Developing a quality and safety culture (QSC) is, therefore, crucial for patient and staff welfare, and should be a priority for service providers and policy makers. The purpose of this paper is to identify the most important QSC drivers, and thus propose appropriate operational actions for Saudi Arabian hospital managers and for managers in healthcare institutions worldwide. Design/methodology/approach Quantitative data from 417 questionnaires were analyzed using structural equation modeling. Respondents were selected from various hospitals and managerial positions at a national level. Findings Findings suggest that error feedback (FAE) and communication quality (QC) have a strong role fostering or enhancing QSC. Findings also show that fearing potential punitive responses to mistakes made on the job, hospital staff are reluctant to report errors. Practical implications To achieve a healthcare QSC, managers need to implement preemptive or corrective actions aimed at ensuring prompt and relevant feedback about errors, ensure clear and open communication and focus on continuously improving systems and processes rather than on failures related to individual performance. Originality/value This paper adds value to national healthcare, as Saudi study results are probably generalizable to other healthcare systems throughout the world.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2018-10-25T09:08:53Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-06-2017-0108
       
  • An integrative approach to improving patient care pathways
    • Pages: 810 - 821
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 31, Issue 7, Page 810-821, August 2018.
      Purpose Globally, healthcare managers continue to struggle with increasing demands for their services being delivered with limited or shrinking resources. It is, therefore, clear that systems, processes and practices need to change to meet these challenges. The purpose of this paper is to assess how integrating two improvement technologies, Lean and integrated care pathways (ICP) might help. Design/methodology/approach Lean and ICP in healthcare provide a platform to develop conceptual frameworks for integrating two approaches. Findings A conceptual integrated framework is provided to assist care pathway designers and implementers to consider the synergistic benefits of combining approaches to improvement. Research limitations/implications The authors provide a conceptual framework that requires empirically testing. Practical implications This research provides a conceptual framework to aid practitioners to improve healthcare design and delivery. Originality/value For the first time, the authors bring together two approaches to improving patient care pathway design and consider how these are linked in relation to improving healthcare delivery.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2018-10-25T09:08:04Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-07-2017-0132
       
  • Audit and feedback in mental healthcare: staff experiences
    • Pages: 822 - 833
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 31, Issue 7, Page 822-833, August 2018.
      Purpose Audit and feedback (A&F) often underlie implementation projects, described as a circular process; i.e. an A&F cycle. They are widely used, but effect varies with no apparent explanation. We need to understand how A&F work in real-life situations. The purpose of this paper, therefore, is to describe and explore mental healthcare full A&F cycle experiences. Design/methodology/approach This is a naturalistic qualitative study that uses four focus groups and qualitative content analysis. Findings Staff accepted the initial A&F stages, perceiving it to enhance awareness and reassure them about good practice. They were willing to participate in the full cycle and implement changes, but experienced poor follow-up and prioritization, not giving them a chance to own to the process. An important finding is the need for an A&F cycle facilitator. Practical implications Research teams cannot be expected to be involved in implementing clinical care. Guidelines will keep being produced to improve service quality and will be expected to be practiced. This study gives insights into planning and tailoring A&F cycles. Originality/value Tools to ease implementation are not enough, and the key seems to lie with facilitating a process using A&F. This study underscores leadership, designated responsibility and facilitation throughout a full audit cycle.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2018-10-25T09:08:02Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-08-2017-0142
       
  • Reducing pharmacy patient waiting time
    • Pages: 834 - 844
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 31, Issue 7, Page 834-844, August 2018.
      Purpose Pharmacy services start right from prescribing medicines and continue as the medication’s effect is monitored. Hospital and community pharmacy staff promote rational prescribing and medicine use. Consequentially, pharmacy is a complex and busy field. Often there are peak workload hours when patients must wait, which is associated with patient dissatisfaction that may negatively affect patient experience and the organisation’s reputation. The purpose of this paper is to enlist techniques, methods and technological advancements that have been successfully employed to reduce patient waiting time. Design/methodology/approach A database search was conducted in 2017 to locate articles addressing methods and technologies that reduce pharmacy waiting time. The literature revealed various techniques and technologies like queuing theory, tele-pharmacy, evidence-based pharmacy design, automated pharmacy systems (robotics), system modelling and simulation and the Six Sigma method for identifying potential problems associated with increased wait time. Findings The authors conclude that various techniques and methods, including automated queuing technology, tele-pharmacy, automated pharmacy devices/machines for quick and accurate filling and dispensing, computer simulation modelling, evidence-based pharmacy infrastructure for smooth workflow and Six Sigma can maintain customer satisfaction, reduce waiting time, attract new customers, decrease workload and improve the organisation’s reputation. Practical implications The authors conclude that various techniques and methods, including automated queuing technology, tele-pharmacy, automated pharmacy devices/machines for quick and accurate filling and dispensing, computer simulation modelling, evidence-based pharmacy infrastructure for smooth workflow and Six Sigma methodology can maintain customer satisfaction, reduce waiting time, attract new customers, decrease workload and improve the organisation’s reputation. Originality/value The authors carried out a literature search and identified the techniques that have been successfully implemented to reduce pharmacy patient waiting time and methods that can identify potential process behind medication dispensation delays.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2018-10-25T09:07:54Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-08-2017-0144
       
  • Improving out-of-hours surgical patient care
    • Pages: 845 - 854
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 31, Issue 7, Page 845-854, August 2018.
      Purpose The Royal College of Surgeons recognises patient handover as the point at which patients are collectively at their most vulnerable. Concerns were raised in a London teaching hospital surgical department regarding an unstructured handover system, poor access to relevant clinical information, and inadequate weekend staffing. A quality improvement programme was designed and implemented to respond to these concerns and improve patient safety. The paper aims to discuss these issues. Design/methodology/approach A structured questionnaire was distributed to staff and results used to construct a diagram outlining the main factors influencing weekend patient safety. This framework was used to design changes, including a new electronic handover tool, regular handover meetings and additional weekend staff. Regular staff training was provided, and success was assessed in a continuous audit cycle with the results fed back to team leaders. Findings Over a three-month period, the handover meeting recorded an attendance rate consistently above 80 per cent. The electronic handover entries were scored according to seven criteria (correct layout; key information, i.e.: patient location, clinical priority, active issues, resuscitation status, test results and weekend plan), averaging between 42.2 and 92.9 per cent, with progressive improvement seen over the assessment period. Weekend staffing was increased by 50 per cent, allowing a dedicated team to care for stable inpatients and to oversee discharges. Originality/value This improvement programme delivered lasting and significant change in response to staff concerns. It resulted in a more structured and reliable weekend system and established key mechanisms for dynamic performance feedback.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2018-10-25T09:08:20Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-08-2017-0148
       
  • Accreditation in one teaching hospital: a phenomenology study among
           Iranian nurses
    • Pages: 855 - 863
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 31, Issue 7, Page 855-863, August 2018.
      Purpose Accreditation helps to ensure safe and high-quality services in hospitals. Different occupational groups have various hospital accreditation experiences. The purpose of this paper is to investigate nurses’ accreditation experience and its effects on Iranian teaching hospital service quality. Design/methodology/approach This was a qualitative study involving a phenomenological approach to studying nurses’ hospital accreditation experience and understanding the effects on Iranian teaching hospital service quality. Data were collected using two focus groups in which nurses were selected using purposive sampling. Transcripts were analyzed using content analysis. Findings Nurses’ experiences showed that hospital administrators and nurses had greater role in implementing accreditation than other occupational groups. Accreditation improved patient-centeredness, patient safety, logistics and managerial processes and decision making. However, a weak incentive system, extra documentation and work stress were negative experiences. Practical implications Nurse experience, as the most important care team member, reveals accreditation’s strengths and weaknesses and its effects on service quality. Originality/value The author used a phenomenology approach to measure accreditation effects on service quality – a valuable tool for understanding a phenomenon among those that experience hospital accreditation processes.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2018-10-25T09:09:07Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-08-2017-0150
       
  • Levelling bed occupancy: reconfiguring surgery schedules via simulation
    • Pages: 864 - 876
      Abstract: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, Volume 31, Issue 7, Page 864-876, August 2018.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to present simulation modelling to reconfigure a 700-bed Hong Kong hospital’s master surgery schedule (MSS), aiming to improve patient flow, capacity management and resource allocation through levelling bed occupancy within the hospital. Design/methodology/approach A discrete-event simulation model was developed to understand how changes to the MSS would affect bed occupancy, thereby providing business intelligence for short- and long-term hospital planning. A decision tool was subsequently developed for hospital managers to test different scenarios. Findings Simulation modelling showed that significant bed occupancy levelling could be achieved through small and practicable changes to the MSS. Optimisation routines conducted using the simulation model then gave additional insights into how the schedule should be revamped for the long term. Practical implications The authors show how operations research methods are useful for guiding hospital operational planning. The authors show that a data-driven and evidence-based model enables hospital managers to critically explore various scheduling changes, while also providing a scientific common ground for discussion among important stakeholders. It is a crucial step forward when adopting advanced analytics for Hong Kong hospital operational planning. Originality/value The authors provide a robust method for evaluating the relationship between Hong Kong hospital’s MSS and its bed occupancy. Through simulating various changes to the surgical schedule, valuable and practicable insights were made available for hospital managers to make short- and longer-term changes that enhance the system’s overall efficiency and service quality.
      Citation: International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance
      PubDate: 2018-10-25T09:08:16Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJHCQA-12-2017-0237
       
 
 
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