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Publisher: Emerald   (Total: 335 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 335 Journals sorted alphabetically
A Life in the Day     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Academia Revista Latinoamericana de Administración     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.144, h-index: 4)
Accounting Auditing & Accountability J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Accounting Research J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.26, h-index: 7)
Accounting, Auditing and Accountability J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.88, h-index: 40)
Advances in Accounting Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.514, h-index: 5)
Advances in Appreciative Inquiry     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.124, h-index: 5)
Advances in Autism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Dual Diagnosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47, SJR: 0.228, h-index: 2)
Advances in Gender Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.229, h-index: 7)
Advances in Intl. Marketing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.123, h-index: 11)
Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 59, SJR: 0.29, h-index: 5)
Advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
African J. of Economic and Management Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.125, h-index: 2)
Agricultural Finance Review     Hybrid Journal  
Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 171, SJR: 0.391, h-index: 18)
American J. of Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Annals in Social Responsibility     Full-text available via subscription  
Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.215, h-index: 25)
Arts and the Market     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Asia Pacific J. of Marketing and Logistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.244, h-index: 15)
Asia-Pacific J. of Business Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.182, h-index: 7)
Asian Association of Open Universities J.     Open Access  
Asian Education and Development Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Asian J. on Quality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Asian Review of Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.29, h-index: 7)
Aslib J. of Information Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.65, h-index: 29)
Aslib Proceedings     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 246)
Assembly Automation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.657, h-index: 26)
Baltic J. of Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.354, h-index: 14)
Benchmarking : An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.556, h-index: 38)
British Food J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.329, h-index: 35)
Built Environment Project and Asset Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.232, h-index: 4)
Business Process Re-engineering & Management J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.614, h-index: 42)
Business Strategy Series     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.201, h-index: 6)
Career Development Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.686, h-index: 32)
China Agricultural Economic Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.238, h-index: 10)
China Finance Review Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Chinese Management Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.216, h-index: 12)
Circuit World     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.346, h-index: 17)
Collection Building     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.829, h-index: 10)
COMPEL: The Intl. J. for Computation and Mathematics in Electrical and Electronic Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.269, h-index: 22)
Competitiveness Review : An Intl. Business J. incorporating J. of Global Competitiveness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Construction Innovation: Information, Process, Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.508, h-index: 8)
Corporate Communications An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.703, h-index: 26)
Corporate Governance Intl. J. of Business in Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.309, h-index: 29)
Critical Perspectives on Intl. Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.32, h-index: 15)
Cross Cultural & Strategic Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.356, h-index: 13)
Development and Learning in Organizations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.138, h-index: 8)
Digital Library Perspectives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Direct Marketing An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Disaster Prevention and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.533, h-index: 32)
Drugs and Alcohol Today     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 127, SJR: 0.241, h-index: 4)
Education + Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.532, h-index: 30)
Education, Business and Society : Contemporary Middle Eastern Issues     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.141, h-index: 10)
Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Employee Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.435, h-index: 22)
Engineering Computations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.387, h-index: 39)
Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.541, h-index: 28)
Equal Opportunities Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Equality, Diversity and Inclusion : An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.239, h-index: 9)
EuroMed J. of Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.145, h-index: 9)
European Business Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.481, h-index: 21)
European J. of Innovation Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.596, h-index: 30)
European J. of Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.933, h-index: 55)
European J. of Training and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.489, h-index: 23)
Evidence-based HRM     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Facilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.371, h-index: 18)
Foresight     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.486, h-index: 20)
Gender in Management : An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.359, h-index: 22)
Grey Systems : Theory and Application     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Health Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.383, h-index: 17)
Higher Education, Skills and Work-based Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43, SJR: 0.172, h-index: 4)
History of Education Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.141, h-index: 2)
Housing, Care and Support     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.174, h-index: 4)
Human Resource Management Intl. Digest     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.121, h-index: 6)
Humanomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.14, h-index: 4)
IMP J.     Hybrid Journal  
Indian Growth and Development Review     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.163, h-index: 4)
Industrial and Commercial Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.217, h-index: 14)
Industrial Lubrication and Tribology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.322, h-index: 19)
Industrial Management & Data Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.63, h-index: 69)
Industrial Robot An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.375, h-index: 32)
Info     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.25, h-index: 21)
Information and Computer Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Information Technology & People     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45, SJR: 0.576, h-index: 28)
Interactive Technology and Smart Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.112, h-index: 1)
Interlending & Document Supply     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 62, SJR: 0.48, h-index: 13)
Internet Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42, SJR: 1.746, h-index: 57)
Intl. J. for Lesson and Learning Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. for Researcher Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Intl. J. of Accounting and Information Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.304, h-index: 7)
Intl. J. of Bank Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.515, h-index: 38)
Intl. J. of Climate Change Strategies and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.416, h-index: 7)
Intl. J. of Clothing Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.279, h-index: 25)
Intl. J. of Commerce and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Conflict Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.763, h-index: 38)
Intl. J. of Contemporary Hospitality Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.329, h-index: 35)
Intl. J. of Culture Tourism and Hospitality Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.399, h-index: 5)
Intl. J. of Development Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Intl. J. of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.225, h-index: 7)
Intl. J. of Educational Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.424, h-index: 32)
Intl. J. of Emergency Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.179, h-index: 1)
Intl. J. of Emerging Markets     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.199, h-index: 5)
Intl. J. of Energy Sector Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.25, h-index: 12)
Intl. J. of Entrepreneurial Behaviour & Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.694, h-index: 28)
Intl. J. of Event and Festival Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.32, h-index: 8)
Intl. J. of Gender and Entrepreneurship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.638, h-index: 6)
Intl. J. of Health Care Quality Assurance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.352, h-index: 32)
Intl. J. of Health Governance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.277, h-index: 15)
Intl. J. of Housing Markets and Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.201, h-index: 5)
Intl. J. of Human Rights in Healthcare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.13, h-index: 2)
Intl. J. of Information and Learning Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Intl. J. of Innovation Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.173, h-index: 5)
Intl. J. of Intelligent Computing and Cybernetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.258, h-index: 10)
Intl. J. of Intelligent Unmanned Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.145, h-index: 2)
Intl. J. of Islamic and Middle Eastern Finance and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Intl. J. of Law and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.107, h-index: 2)
Intl. J. of Law in the Built Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.111, h-index: 2)
Intl. J. of Leadership in Public Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Intl. J. of Lean Six Sigma     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.562, h-index: 15)
Intl. J. of Logistics Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.998, h-index: 15)
Intl. J. of Managerial Finance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.212, h-index: 11)
Intl. J. of Managing Projects in Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Manpower     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.354, h-index: 37)
Intl. J. of Mentoring and Coaching in Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Intl. J. of Migration, Health and Social Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.261, h-index: 5)
Intl. J. of Numerical Methods for Heat & Fluid Flow     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.594, h-index: 32)
Intl. J. of Operations & Production Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 2.198, h-index: 94)
Intl. J. of Organizational Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.222, h-index: 11)
Intl. J. of Pervasive Computing and Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.165, h-index: 9)
Intl. J. of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.304, h-index: 12)
Intl. J. of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.694, h-index: 66)
Intl. J. of Prisoner Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.254, h-index: 10)
Intl. J. of Productivity and Performance Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.785, h-index: 31)
Intl. J. of Public Sector Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.272, h-index: 37)
Intl. J. of Quality & Reliability Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.544, h-index: 63)
Intl. J. of Quality and Service Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.133, h-index: 1)
Intl. J. of Retail & Distribution Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.543, h-index: 36)
Intl. J. of Service Industry Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Social Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.227, h-index: 25)
Intl. J. of Sociology and Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48, SJR: 0.361, h-index: 5)
Intl. J. of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Structural Integrity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.325, h-index: 8)
Intl. J. of Sustainability in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.616, h-index: 29)
Intl. J. of Tourism Cities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Web Information Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.208, h-index: 13)
Intl. J. of Wine Business Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.196, h-index: 12)
Intl. J. of Workplace Health Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.358, h-index: 8)
Intl. Marketing Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.076, h-index: 57)
J. for Multicultural Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.124, h-index: 11)
J. of Accounting & Organizational Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.346, h-index: 7)
J. of Accounting in Emerging Economies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
J. of Adult Protection, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.291, h-index: 7)
J. of Advances in Management Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
J. of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47, SJR: 0.177, h-index: 9)
J. of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
J. of Applied Accounting Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.22, h-index: 5)
J. of Applied Research in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
J. of Asia Business Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.115, h-index: 1)
J. of Assistive Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.215, h-index: 6)
J. of Business & Industrial Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.664, h-index: 48)
J. of Business Strategy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.381, h-index: 17)
J. of Centrum Cathedra     Open Access  
J. of Children's Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.167, h-index: 9)
J. of Chinese Economic and Foreign Trade Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.188, h-index: 4)
J. of Chinese Entrepreneurship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
J. of Chinese Human Resource Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.112, h-index: 3)
J. of Communication Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.735, h-index: 6)
J. of Consumer Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.613, h-index: 62)
J. of Corporate Real Estate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.633, h-index: 5)
J. of Criminal Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 121, SJR: 0.13, h-index: 1)
J. of Criminological Research, Policy and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54)
J. of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.109, h-index: 5)
J. of Documentation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 183, SJR: 0.936, h-index: 50)
J. of Economic and Administrative Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
J. of Economic Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.498, h-index: 26)
J. of Educational Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.848, h-index: 36)
J. of Engineering, Design and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.173, h-index: 10)
J. of Enterprise Information Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.433, h-index: 38)
J. of Enterprising Communities People and Places in the Global Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.212, h-index: 8)
J. of Entrepreneurship and Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
J. of European Industrial Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
J. of European Real Estate Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.52, h-index: 7)
J. of Facilities Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
J. of Family Business Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
J. of Fashion Marketing and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.529, h-index: 30)
J. of Financial Crime     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 381, SJR: 0.158, h-index: 5)
J. of Financial Economic Policy     Hybrid Journal  
J. of Financial Management of Property and Construction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.234, h-index: 1)
J. of Financial Regulation and Compliance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
J. of Financial Reporting and Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
J. of Forensic Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49, SJR: 0.225, h-index: 8)
J. of Global Mobility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
J. of Global Responsibility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
J. of Health Organisation and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.67, h-index: 27)
J. of Historical Research in Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.376, h-index: 8)
J. of Hospitality and Tourism Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.672, h-index: 10)
J. of Human Resource Costing & Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
J. of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)

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Journal Cover International Journal of Educational Management
  [SJR: 0.424]   [H-I: 32]   [5 followers]  Follow
    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 0951-354X
   Published by Emerald Homepage  [335 journals]
  • Predictors of academic performance for finance students
    • Pages: 854 - 864
      Abstract: International Journal of Educational Management, Volume 31, Issue 7, Page 854-864, September 2017.
      Purpose The study uses data drawn from a senior finance major cohort of 78 female undergraduates at Zayed University (ZU)-UAE to investigate factors, which increase the likelihood of achieving better academic performance in an Islamic finance course based on information about socioeconomic background of female students. The paper aims to discuss these issues. Design/methodology/approach The research was conducted based on a survey designed to collect one-time individual data. Even though gender is considered as a variable affecting students’ performance as documented in the literature, it shall not be addressed in this study as the sample of our survey is limited to the female gender only. Whereas the population under investigation is a cohort of undergraduate female students enrolled at a finance course: Islamic finance and banking (BUS426) at one of the national universities in the UAE. ZU was established in 1998 by the federal government of the United Arab Emirates to educate UAE national women, in 2008 ZU started to accept male students in a separated campus building. The university is organized academically into six colleges: Arts and Sciences, Business Sciences, Communication and Media Sciences, Education, Information Technology, and University College. The primary language of instruction is English, though graduates are expected to be fully fluent in both English and Arabic (Zayed University, 2016). BUS426 is one of the major courses offered to students majoring in finance. The course is taught in English and requires mathematical skills on basic levels, but is mostly dependent on logical and critical thinking skills. Findings The study found that among the socioeconomic variables tested that being married, having a highly educated mother and having high pre-entry qualifications were significant variables as they increase the likelihood of an “A grade” performance. Originality/value The extent to which socioeconomic factors and lifestyle could contribute to student performance outcomes in an Arab culture setting is not clear due to the scarcity of research on this particular topic; hence the study attempts to fill this gap.
      Citation: International Journal of Educational Management
      PubDate: 2017-08-31T09:45:17Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJEM-12-2015-0171
       
  • Which types of leadership styles do followers prefer' A decision tree
           approach
    • Pages: 865 - 877
      Abstract: International Journal of Educational Management, Volume 31, Issue 7, Page 865-877, September 2017.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to propose a new method to find the appropriate leadership styles based on the followers’ preferences using the decision tree technique. Design/methodology/approach Statistical population includes the students of the University of Isfahan. In total, 750 questionnaires were distributed; out of which, 680 accurate questionnaires were used for data analysis. This research in five steps proposes a framework to extract the information about the leadership styles that followers like and this method is examined for situational leadership theory’s styles among the university students. Findings Based on the results of the decision tree model, 27 rules were discovered. Also, the findings imply that, most undergraduate, postgraduate, and PhD students prefer directing, coaching, and supporting styles, respectively. Originality/value The results of this research help leaders to find a better understanding about the followers’ preferences.
      Citation: International Journal of Educational Management
      PubDate: 2017-08-31T09:44:59Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJEM-04-2016-0079
       
  • Promoting the school learning processes: principals as learning boundary
           spanners
    • Pages: 878 - 894
      Abstract: International Journal of Educational Management, Volume 31, Issue 7, Page 878-894, September 2017.
      Purpose The ongoing challenge to sustain school learning and improvement requires schools to explore new ways, and at the same time exploit previous experience. The purpose of this paper is to attempt to expand the knowledge of mechanisms that can facilitate school learning processes by proposing boundary activities and learning mechanisms in which principals can engage to promote learning processes. Design/methodology/approach The authors refer to Bourdieu’s theoretical approach that human actions occur within fields of interaction. The authors delineate principals’ internal and external boundary activities as mechanisms for promoting school learning processes while acknowledging that principals are embedded within competing fields, encompassing demands from the economic, political, and even global fields. The authors discuss how the principal boundary activities can not only facilitate the exploitation of knowledge embedded in the school system, but also the exploration of external knowledge across multiple fields of interaction. The authors then present the principal learning mechanisms as complementary activities to school learning improvement. Findings Promoting school learning processes may require constant management of the school learning boundary so that the school neither becomes isolated from its environment nor loses its capacity for knowledge integration and exploitation. The boundary activities, combined with learning mechanisms, can enable the principal to balance these competing demands. Originality/value The organizational learning processes of exploration and exploitation have been under-investigated in the educational context, as to the role of the principal in balancing the tension between these processes. This study conceptualizes boundary activities and learning mechanisms, suggesting a framework through which principals can engage to promote school learning.
      Citation: International Journal of Educational Management
      PubDate: 2017-08-31T09:43:47Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJEM-02-2016-0023
       
  • Temporal withdrawal behaviors in an educational policy context
    • Pages: 895 - 907
      Abstract: International Journal of Educational Management, Volume 31, Issue 7, Page 895-907, September 2017.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to investigate the differential relations between two teacher withdrawal behaviors: work absence and lateness, and two types of school ethics: organizational justice (distributive, procedural) and ethical climate (formal, caring), all in the context of school turbulent environment. Design/methodology/approach Data were collected from 1,016 teachers in 35 Israeli high schools. The GLIMMIX procedure was used to consider simultaneously the hierarchical structure of the data, as well as the two dependent variables (absence and lateness). Findings The results showed that lateness was negatively related to two relatively short-term aspects of school ethics: distributive justice, in particular for women, and formal ethical climate. Absence was negatively related to a relatively long-term aspect of school ethics: caring climate, in particular for low- to medium-level seniority teachers. Research limitations/implications The paper’s theoretical contribution is to explicate the unique relation of each temporal withdrawal behavior to specific dimensions of the school ethical constructs studied. Practical implications In order to reduce teachers’ temporal withdrawal behaviors, school management may need to attenuate policy that taps into organizational ethics, while considering the effects of school culture and turbulent environment. Originality/value This study offers a time perspective, which fine-tunes understanding of teachers’ lateness and absence behaviors, while pointing out the unique relations of lateness and absence to school ethical within educational policy context.
      Citation: International Journal of Educational Management
      PubDate: 2017-08-31T09:43:58Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJEM-12-2015-0165
       
  • A project perspective on doctoral studies – a student point of view
    • Pages: 908 - 921
      Abstract: International Journal of Educational Management, Volume 31, Issue 7, Page 908-921, September 2017.
      Purpose Many doctoral students never obtain a doctoral degree, and many do not finish their studies in time. To promote aspects of effectiveness and efficiency in doctoral studies, the purpose of this paper is to explore a project perspective, more specifically how doctoral students experience their studies in terms of key dimensions of projects. Design/methodology/approach Written reflections concerning a project perspective in doctoral studies, based on 18 students at a Swedish university, have been categorised and analysed by the means of the qualitative research software NVivo. Findings Main findings are reflections on the project manager role including both the supervisor and the doctoral student, and different views on project control parameters and the concepts goal-seeking and goal-orientation. A more comprehensive picture of project planning is presented, compared with the Individual Study Plan, including different project methods and tools that can be suitable in a doctoral project. Research limitations/implications The study is based on a limited number of doctoral students; however, the aim has been to give examples of project perspectives. The findings could be valuable for increased understanding of doctoral studies and of the project management field in general. Practical implications The study can induce awareness among doctoral students and supervisors of a project perspective in doctoral studies, promoting aspects of efficiency and effectiveness. Originality/value Compared to previous research, this study explicitly tries to understand how doctoral students make sense of their doctoral studies from a project perspective.
      Citation: International Journal of Educational Management
      PubDate: 2017-08-31T09:45:19Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJEM-04-2016-0075
       
  • There is no “T” in school improvement: the missing team
           perspective
    • Pages: 922 - 929
      Abstract: International Journal of Educational Management, Volume 31, Issue 7, Page 922-929, September 2017.
      Purpose The concept of teams tends to be marginalized in the scholarly discussion of school improvement. The purpose of this paper is to argue that teams play a crucial role in promoting an holistic integration of school operation necessary to support school change. Specifically, the paper outlines the dynamic of effective teams at times of school improvement. Design/methodology/approach The paper presents the concept of teams, elaborates on their central function as a “coupling mechanism,” and describes the reciprocal relations between teams and school change. Findings The paper emphasizes the reciprocal effects of teams and change, suggesting that teams can serve as key change agents in school restructuring processes, specifically when balancing between “coping” and “pushing” forces. Based on the model, effective team leadership and effective school leadership at times of school change are introduced. Practical implications are discussed for school leaders. Originality/value The integration of the concept of teams into the school improvement discourse might assist school leaders to develop processes and procedures that will enable both school teams and schools to react more effectively in times of change and restructuring.
      Citation: International Journal of Educational Management
      PubDate: 2017-08-31T09:43:36Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJEM-04-2016-0069
       
  • International students’ college choice is different!
    • Pages: 930 - 943
      Abstract: International Journal of Educational Management, Volume 31, Issue 7, Page 930-943, September 2017.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the needs and aspirations of international students studying at a comprehensive university campus in the USA in comparison to domestic students represented by factors that drive students’ college choice. Design/methodology/approach The study opted for a survey design through questionnaire and employed descriptive and inferential statistics to assess differences between international and domestic students. Findings Findings suggest that international students are different from domestic students on seven choice factors: on-campus housing, recommendation from family, academic reputation, reputation of faculty, participation in intercollegiate sports, printed material or video and need-based financial aid. Research limitations/implications The study was conducted at a four-year comprehensive public university campus in California. Findings and conclusions may be relevant only to such context. Practical implications International and domestic students have different preferences and their college choices are affected to different degrees by the varying choice factors. Education administrators and policy makers can have targeted strategic marketing plans that are responsive to the different types populations’ needs. Originality/value This is the first study that compares international students’ to domestic students’ needs and aspirations when choosing a university campus.
      Citation: International Journal of Educational Management
      PubDate: 2017-08-31T09:44:38Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJEM-05-2016-0095
       
  • Critical incidents of student satisfaction at German universities
    • Pages: 944 - 957
      Abstract: International Journal of Educational Management, Volume 31, Issue 7, Page 944-957, September 2017.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to advance a classification of satisfactory and unsatisfactory critical incidents of student-university relationships at German universities. Design/methodology/approach Using the Critical Incident Technique (CIT), this paper reports the results of an exploratory study of 15 tertiary education students at three German universities. Findings Participants perceive satisfaction and dissatisfaction stemming primarily from their courses of study, their interactions with faculty, and their perceptions of administrative and student services. Research limitations/implications The sample was small, dominated by female participants, and the recollection of past events is assumed to be accurate. Practical implications University administrators should consider creating institutional environments that ensure the responsiveness and engagement of faculty, the assessment of student perceptions of their university experience, and the improvement of administrative and student services to aid the satisfaction of students. Originality/value The CIT method allows participants to express what matters most to them in their university experience rather than following researcher-generated questions, which tends to be the norm in traditional studies on the university student experience. Given that this study was conducted in Germany with German students, it highlights a different understanding of satisfaction that counters the dominant western-focused research on this topic.
      Citation: International Journal of Educational Management
      PubDate: 2017-08-31T09:45:34Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJEM-06-2015-0071
       
  • The instructional practice of school principals and its effect on
           teachers’ job satisfaction
    • Pages: 958 - 972
      Abstract: International Journal of Educational Management, Volume 31, Issue 7, Page 958-972, September 2017.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to present the results of a piece of research concerning the practice of Cypriot school principals’ instructional role and its effect on teachers’ job satisfaction, and also to investigate whether higher levels of teachers’ job satisfaction can be predicted when school principals deal with and accomplish their instructional tasks. Design/methodology/approach Quantitative methods were used (two questionnaires) together with qualitative methods (observation, interviews, informal conversations, and collection of artifacts). Findings The results of multiple regression analysis indicated that higher levels of teachers’ job satisfaction are not predicted when principals deal with and accomplish their instructional tasks. This result is rather unexpected, considering the trends of modern bibliography regarding the value and effects on teachers of principal’s instructional and transformational leadership. The triangulation of the results helped the authors to re-examine the research question and creates a deeper understanding of the practice of principals’ instructional role and the sources of teachers’ job satisfaction. Practical implications The results are analyzed and discussed in order to reach conclusions about the evaluation, selection, and training of school principals. Through the description of the instructional practice of school principals, useful information concerning teachers’ job satisfaction are also provided. Finally, the conclusions of this research may prove useful for educational policy makers, since they can guide them on the successful implementation of changes. Changes are needed in the evaluation and promotion system of Cyprus and in the content of principals’ training programs. School principals must be taught different leadership styles (e.g. transformational and transactional leadership) and learn to modify their leadership behavior according to the situation and the professional maturity of their teachers. In this way, they will be able to increase the level of teachers’ satisfaction as to become more effective in their teaching. Originality/value At a time when instructional/transformational leadership is presented to be a panacea for many educational issues, including raising teachers’ job satisfaction, this research with its mixed methodology highlights the complexity and the various interpretations of these concepts and also provides explanations on why many principals do not act as instructional leaders.
      Citation: International Journal of Educational Management
      PubDate: 2017-08-31T09:44:44Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJEM-11-2016-0253
       
  • The relationships between brand association, trust, commitment, and
           satisfaction of higher education institutions
    • Pages: 973 - 985
      Abstract: International Journal of Educational Management, Volume 31, Issue 7, Page 973-985, September 2017.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to explore structural relationships among the variables of brand association, student trust, commitment, and satisfaction in the higher education sector. Design/methodology/approach A survey was used to collect data from a sample of 500 students who studied at universities in Taiwan in 2016. These data were gathered using a convenience sampling method and analyzed using a structural equation model. A total of 371 questionnaires (74.2 percent) were considered valid. Due to testing and identifying the hypothesis and structure among those variables, structural equation modeling was used to determine the best model among brand association, trust, commitment, and satisfaction. Findings For the conceptual framework, the author found that this structural equation model complies with the empirical data. The structural equation model shows that brand association, student trust, and commitment were significantly related to student satisfaction. Brand association has a direct influence on student trust, commitment, and satisfaction in higher education institutions. Student trust and commitment also had a direct influence on student satisfaction, and they are all mediating variables. Originality/value The findings of the current study add to the existing literature by contributing to a better perception of university management and providing acceptable strategies to improve the higher education industry.
      Citation: International Journal of Educational Management
      PubDate: 2017-08-31T09:45:24Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJEM-10-2016-0212
       
  • Using experiential learning to teach entrepreneurship: a study with
           Brazilian undergraduate students
    • Pages: 986 - 999
      Abstract: International Journal of Educational Management, Volume 31, Issue 7, Page 986-999, September 2017.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to provide further understanding of entrepreneurship education, seeking to comprehend the use of experience in this context. Based on the theory of experiential learning, the authors sought to develop and test a conceptual model for teaching entrepreneurship at the undergraduate degree level. Design/methodology/approach Due to the need to develop a model, the authors used design science research as a method to develop and test an artifact. First, bibliographic research was conducted to develop the model, which was then tested through empirical application. This empirical application was conducted at a Brazilian educational institution, with the participation of 110 students. A total of 440 activities were analyzed through content analysis. Findings The authors found advantages and disadvantages regarding the use of experience in entrepreneurship learning, such as greater student engagement, sense of empowerment and aspects related to the course and assessments. Practical implications In this paper, the authors offer suggestions for undergraduate teachers and to faculty members on how to teach entrepreneurship, with the student as the main actor in the learning process. Furthermore, the authors have access to a study addressing a contemporary theme that is emerging in Brazilian universities. Originality/value In this paper, the authors contribute with the debate on entrepreneurship education, realizing that the understanding of this issue continues to require closer study due to a lack of empirical consensus in previous works. Its originality lies in the development and testing of a model for undergraduates, drawn from a theory whose main use is in graduate school.
      Citation: International Journal of Educational Management
      PubDate: 2017-08-31T09:43:30Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJEM-09-2016-0189
       
  • Learning challenges and preferred pedagogies of international students
    • Pages: 1000 - 1016
      Abstract: International Journal of Educational Management, Volume 31, Issue 7, Page 1000-1016, September 2017.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to understand the challenges international students face during their higher education in the USA. This research study was conducted at a private university in the Eastern region of the USA from October 2012 through May 2013 (Fall and Spring semesters) with undergraduate and graduate international students. International students for this study are defined as those students who are on an international student visa status (F1). Design/methodology/approach This research adopts an online survey method to understand the challenges international students encounter in a single university. A total of 111 students responded providing a response rate of 33 percent. The results were analyzed using frequencies and percentages. Findings The findings of this study suggest that the primary learning challenges of international students are inadequate writing skills, non-participation, and comprehension abilities. The predominant learning needs are writing academic papers, enhancing class participation, and having local mentors. The students recommend that professors offer detailed feedback, encourage nurturing environments, and provide informal feedback for assignments. The preferred pedagogies are class lectures, class discussions, and individual assignments. Practical implications This study provides implications for both faculty and administrative staff in managing international students better. Originality/value This paper provides a holistic picture of the challenges international students face during their higher education in the USA. Most of the research on this population focuses only on one of the elements addressed in this research. The results of this empirical study will help guide both local faculty and global academic institutions in understanding this student population better.
      Citation: International Journal of Educational Management
      PubDate: 2017-08-31T09:45:45Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJEM-01-2016-0001
       
  • Attracting doctoral students: case of Baltic universities
    • Pages: 1017 - 1041
      Abstract: International Journal of Educational Management, Volume 31, Issue 7, Page 1017-1041, September 2017.
      Purpose In the context of falling demand for higher education and, in particular, doctoral studies, it is important to understand how to attract new students. The purpose of this paper is to present an analysis of the decision-making process the PhD students of Baltic universities followed when choosing whether to continue their education at doctoral level and in which institution to do it. Design/methodology/approach It uses the data gathered in 2014 from all major Baltic universities providing access to higher education at doctoral level. Findings At macro-level, the three Baltic countries (Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania) are rather different in the supply of doctoral programmes and the level and dynamics of the popularity of doctoral-level studies in the population. Besides, strong country-specific effects on the goals students pursued when they enrolled in a doctoral programme and the information about the university or the programme they found useful are observed at micro-level. The main result is related to systematic differences in the perceptions students have about the benefits they will get from a doctoral degree across the current (at doctoral level) and previous (at Bachelor’s and Master’s levels) fields of study, as well as depending on labour-market experience and family and social circle. Practical implications These findings suggest that Baltic higher education institutions should employ different marketing communication strategies when attracting new doctoral students, depending on the field of study and the country they operate in. Originality/value This is the first comprehensive study on the motivation of enrolment at doctoral level in the Baltic countries. It gives the management of Baltic universities a general picture of the motivation to get a PhD degree and factors affecting the choice of university, which can be readily incorporated into universities’ strategy.
      Citation: International Journal of Educational Management
      PubDate: 2017-08-31T09:44:05Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJEM-07-2015-0093
       
  • The effect of short-term study abroad experience on American students’
           leadership skills and career aspirations
    • Pages: 1042 - 1053
      Abstract: International Journal of Educational Management, Volume 31, Issue 7, Page 1042-1053, September 2017.
      Purpose Building on existing study abroad literature, the purpose of this paper is to assess the impact of both short-term and long-term study abroad programs on students’ leadership skills and their career aspirations. Design/methodology/approach A sample of college students were invited to complete an electronic survey about their experiences with study abroad programs. This survey included study abroad participants and non-study abroad participants and aimed to assess areas such as academic performance, leadership qualities, international exposure, and study abroad. Findings The authors’ results suggest that study abroad programs have a significant effect on leadership skills and career aspirations. Short-term programs, in particular, were found to impact both leadership skills and career aspirations. Research limitations/implications The limitations of this study lie within the nature of the survey data used. Surveys are subjective and it was left to the respondent to determine, for example, what defines a leadership position. Nonetheless, the survey data collected implies how students feel about study abroad programs and the results provided implications about the importance of these programs. Social implications According to the results, study abroad programs have value to students who participated in these programs. The authors conclude that study abroad is an important supplement to post-secondary education and participation in such programs should be encouraged. Originality/value This paper contributes to the study abroad literature by focusing on short-term programs, which have not been heavily studied in the field. The authors’ results suggest that study abroad has a significant impact on students, thus has practical implications for college students and educators.
      Citation: International Journal of Educational Management
      PubDate: 2017-08-31T09:43:41Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJEM-10-2016-0203
       
  • Developing relationships with school customers: the role of market
           orientation
    • Pages: 1054 - 1068
      Abstract: International Journal of Educational Management, Volume 31, Issue 7, Page 1054-1068, September 2017.
      Purpose While the role of relationship marketing to consumers’ overall satisfaction with schools has been discussed in the education management literature, empirical studies on the marketing mechanisms that underpin school-customer relationships are limited. The purpose of this paper is to establish the association between market orientation (MO) in the school context and key relationship marketing performance indicators. Design/methodology/approach MO and four relationship constructs (brand trust, affective commitment, attitudinal loyalty, and advocacy) were measured using existing and established scales from the education and behavioral literatures. A model reflecting causal ordering derived from the literature and an understanding of school-customer relationships was developed. Data were collected from 205 parents of school-aged children in the USA and analyzed using structural equation analysis. Findings Results show that a positive relationship between market-oriented behaviors of school organizations and three of the identified indicators of successful school relationship marketing (affective commitment, attitudinal loyalty, and advocacy) are mediated by brand trust. Originality/value The study contributes to an understanding of the theoretical relationship between market-oriented behaviors and relationship marketing for schools. The results suggest that, for school organizations, MO impacts important outcomes and thus may be vital to sustainability and growth.
      Citation: International Journal of Educational Management
      PubDate: 2017-08-31T09:44:08Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJEM-08-2016-0171
       
  • Collaborative inquiry and the shared workspace of professional learning
           communities
    • Pages: 1069 - 1091
      Abstract: International Journal of Educational Management, Volume 31, Issue 7, Page 1069-1091, September 2017.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to explore educator collaborative inquiry in the shared workspace in professional learning communities (PLCs). Specifically, this investigation was part of an ongoing investigation of well-established PLC collaborative interactions and self-directed learning of educators as part of the shared workspace as a component of school improvement. Design/methodology/approach A qualitative design was used for this investigation. Participants were purposefully selected to provide qualitative data on existent, well-established PLCs and their practice as educators in the shared workspace. Qualitative data were collected about participant perception. Data were collected from each participant by conducting semi-structured interviews, observations, and the collection of document and artifacts. Findings Findings from this ongoing investigation point to positive collaborative physical interactions and intellectual discourse that lead to educator learning through the collaborative inquiry process. Originality/value Theories on PLCs and educator job-embedded professional learning are unique in this paper. The concepts of PLCs and the collaborative inquiry process have been well developed but not in the context of the shared workspace. Recent literature on effective collaborative inquiry educators undergo in PLCs as a continuing professional development model provides a foundation for the work done in this ongoing case study. Sustained collaboration and continued professional development of teaching innovations as a product of the collaborative inquiry process in the shared workspace are underdeveloped as yet but further developed in this paper.
      Citation: International Journal of Educational Management
      PubDate: 2017-08-31T09:43:27Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJEM-10-2015-0143
       
  • Employing needs-based funding formulae – some unavoidable tradeoffs
    • Pages: 1092 - 1102
      Abstract: International Journal of Educational Management, Volume 31, Issue 7, Page 1092-1102, September 2017.
      Purpose The method by which the state allocates resources to its schooling system can serve as an important instrument for achieving desired improvements in levels of educational attainment, social equity and other social policy goals. In many school systems, the allocation of school resources is done according to a needs-based funding formula. The purpose of this paper is to provide a deeper understanding of some significant tradeoffs involved in employing needs-based funding formulae. Design/methodology/approach The paper is based on theoretical investigations of normative aspects involved in using needs-based funding formulae. Findings There are a number of underexplored complications and difficulties that arise from the use of needs-based funding formulae. Dealing with these involves significant tradeoffs that require taking normative decisions. Understanding these tradeoffs is important for improving the use of needs-based funding formulae. Originality/value The paper highlights three under-examined issues that emerge from the current use of needs-based funding formulae. These issues are: to what extent funding formulae should be responsive to social and economic needs' To what extent should funding formulae allow for the use of discretion in resource allocation' To what degree needs-based formulae funding should be linked to outcomes' By discussing these issues and the tradeoffs involved in them, the paper provides a deeper understanding of significant aspects stemming from the use of needs-based funding formulae. This, in turn, can serve as a basis for an improved and better informed process for decision making regarding the use of funding formulae.
      Citation: International Journal of Educational Management
      PubDate: 2017-08-31T09:43:46Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJEM-01-2017-0008
       
  • Leader perceptions and student achievement
    • Pages: 1103 - 1118
      Abstract: International Journal of Educational Management, Volume 31, Issue 7, Page 1103-1118, September 2017.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to examine what factors affect student achievement in reading and mathematics. The research questions addressed the perceptions of school principals and background characteristics related to student achievement in Korea and the USA with respect to differences among students in low, middle and high quantiles. Design/methodology/approach Data were taken from the Program for International Student Assessment 2012. Scores in the reading and mathematics were analyzed in conjunction with a principal survey. The Quantile Regression method was used for data analysis with three quantile points. T-statistics were used to test for significance. The predictor set consisted of seven school-leadership variables, and four to six additional covariates. Findings The most important finding for the USA was a relationship between organizational hindrance (HND) and low student achievement for the middle and upper quantiles in mathematics and for all quantiles in reading. The (HND) variable included poor teacher-student relations, low expectation of students, overly strict enforcement of rules, lack of attention to student needs, resistance to change, lateness to class, and lack of preparation. The most important finding for Korea was that there were significant associations across all groups between teacher attitude (TCHATT) and student reading achievement and with the low group in mathematics. Research limitations/implications This study adds to knowledge about school capacity and suggests that the leadership role of the principal is to overcome negative environmental factors and create a positive organization. Originality/value The non-Gaussian approach of regression analysis allowed us to identify significant differences that we otherwise might not have found.
      Citation: International Journal of Educational Management
      PubDate: 2017-08-31T09:43:43Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJEM-03-2016-0054
       
  • International students’ engagement in their university’s
           social media
    • Pages: 1119 - 1134
      Abstract: International Journal of Educational Management, Volume 31, Issue 7, Page 1119-1134, September 2017.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to understand the lived experiences of the international students using their university’s social media, through a lens of customer engagement (CE) in the services marketing literature. Design/methodology/approach A case study was conducted in an Australian university. Three semi-structured focus groups with ten international students, along with a preliminary netnographic analysis of the university’s social media account, provided a rich description of the phenomenon in the real-world context. Findings The results suggest that these students are likely to engage in their university’s social media as part of their acculturation and social identity construction strategy. Their engagement was cognitive and emotional, being influenced by the instrumental value of the social media page, engagement with campus rituals and artefacts, social identity and bonds with other students and perceptions of the page administrator. Furthermore, these students’ engagement influenced their identification with the university and its student community, manifested in a sense of belonging and pride. Research limitations/implications The paper contributes to the higher education literature by offering relationship implications of social media CE. Limitations include small sample size and the single institutional context. Practical implications The paper informs student communication practice, especially the design of university-initiated social media content and policy. Originality/value Universities and faculties today use social media to engage with students outside classrooms. However, little has been known about how international student sojourners view and respond to such initiatives. The paper addresses this gap by offering insight into how they engage with their university on social media and its relationship implications.
      Citation: International Journal of Educational Management
      PubDate: 2017-08-31T09:44:27Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJEM-12-2016-0260
       
  • Understanding reflection for teacher change in Hong Kong
    • Pages: 1135 - 1146
      Abstract: International Journal of Educational Management, Volume 31, Issue 7, Page 1135-1146, September 2017.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to study how reflection affects the teacher change with a focus on teaching practices under education reforms in Hong Kong. Design/methodology/approach This study adopted narratives as the research design to unveil the contents of teachers’ reflection and how the contents affect their change in teaching practices under education reforms. Findings The study finds that teachers’ reflection starts with completion of curriculum (“technical level”), then consideration of students’ learning needs (“practical level”) and finally, the social justice and equality (“critical level”). The levels of reflection teachers engage have significant influence on their change. The higher the level of reflection teachers have, the more motivated the teachers to explore new teaching practices not only for the learning needs of students in classroom but also for the society outside classroom. Originality/value This study underlines the value of reflection in the process of teacher change in their teaching practices.
      Citation: International Journal of Educational Management
      PubDate: 2017-08-31T09:44:25Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJEM-01-2016-0007
       
  • Leading Research in Educational Administration: A Festschrift for Wayne K.
           Hoy
    • Pages: 1147 - 1149
      Abstract: International Journal of Educational Management, Volume 31, Issue 7, Page 1147-1149, September 2017.

      Citation: International Journal of Educational Management
      PubDate: 2017-08-31T09:45:44Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJEM-06-2013-0089
       
  • Professional Development: What Works
    • Pages: 1149 - 1151
      Abstract: International Journal of Educational Management, Volume 31, Issue 7, Page 1149-1151, September 2017.

      Citation: International Journal of Educational Management
      PubDate: 2017-08-31T09:44:36Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJEM-10-2012-0112
       
 
 
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