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Publisher: Emerald   (Total: 335 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 335 Journals sorted alphabetically
A Life in the Day     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Academia Revista Latinoamericana de Administración     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.144, h-index: 4)
Accounting Auditing & Accountability J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Accounting Research J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.26, h-index: 7)
Accounting, Auditing and Accountability J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.88, h-index: 40)
Advances in Accounting Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.514, h-index: 5)
Advances in Appreciative Inquiry     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.124, h-index: 5)
Advances in Autism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Dual Diagnosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48, SJR: 0.228, h-index: 2)
Advances in Gender Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.229, h-index: 7)
Advances in Intl. Marketing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.123, h-index: 11)
Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60, SJR: 0.29, h-index: 5)
Advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
African J. of Economic and Management Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.125, h-index: 2)
Agricultural Finance Review     Hybrid Journal  
Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 181, SJR: 0.391, h-index: 18)
American J. of Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Annals in Social Responsibility     Full-text available via subscription  
Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.215, h-index: 25)
Arts and the Market     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Asia Pacific J. of Marketing and Logistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.244, h-index: 15)
Asia-Pacific J. of Business Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.182, h-index: 7)
Asian Association of Open Universities J.     Open Access  
Asian Education and Development Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Asian J. on Quality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Asian Review of Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.29, h-index: 7)
Aslib J. of Information Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.65, h-index: 29)
Aslib Proceedings     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 257)
Assembly Automation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.657, h-index: 26)
Baltic J. of Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.354, h-index: 14)
Benchmarking : An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.556, h-index: 38)
British Food J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.329, h-index: 35)
Built Environment Project and Asset Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.232, h-index: 4)
Business Process Re-engineering & Management J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.614, h-index: 42)
Business Strategy Series     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.201, h-index: 6)
Career Development Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.686, h-index: 32)
China Agricultural Economic Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.238, h-index: 10)
China Finance Review Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Chinese Management Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.216, h-index: 12)
Circuit World     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.346, h-index: 17)
Collection Building     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.829, h-index: 10)
COMPEL: The Intl. J. for Computation and Mathematics in Electrical and Electronic Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.269, h-index: 22)
Competitiveness Review : An Intl. Business J. incorporating J. of Global Competitiveness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Construction Innovation: Information, Process, Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.508, h-index: 8)
Corporate Communications An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.703, h-index: 26)
Corporate Governance Intl. J. of Business in Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.309, h-index: 29)
Critical Perspectives on Intl. Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.32, h-index: 15)
Cross Cultural & Strategic Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.356, h-index: 13)
Development and Learning in Organizations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.138, h-index: 8)
Digital Library Perspectives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Direct Marketing An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Disaster Prevention and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.533, h-index: 32)
Drugs and Alcohol Today     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 130, SJR: 0.241, h-index: 4)
Education + Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.532, h-index: 30)
Education, Business and Society : Contemporary Middle Eastern Issues     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.141, h-index: 10)
Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Employee Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.435, h-index: 22)
Engineering Computations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.387, h-index: 39)
Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.541, h-index: 28)
Equal Opportunities Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Equality, Diversity and Inclusion : An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.239, h-index: 9)
EuroMed J. of Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.145, h-index: 9)
European Business Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.481, h-index: 21)
European J. of Innovation Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.596, h-index: 30)
European J. of Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.933, h-index: 55)
European J. of Training and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.489, h-index: 23)
Evidence-based HRM     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Facilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.371, h-index: 18)
Foresight     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.486, h-index: 20)
Gender in Management : An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.359, h-index: 22)
Grey Systems : Theory and Application     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Health Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.383, h-index: 17)
Higher Education, Skills and Work-based Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45, SJR: 0.172, h-index: 4)
History of Education Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.141, h-index: 2)
Housing, Care and Support     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.174, h-index: 4)
Human Resource Management Intl. Digest     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.121, h-index: 6)
Humanomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.14, h-index: 4)
IMP J.     Hybrid Journal  
Indian Growth and Development Review     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.163, h-index: 4)
Industrial and Commercial Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.217, h-index: 14)
Industrial Lubrication and Tribology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.322, h-index: 19)
Industrial Management & Data Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.63, h-index: 69)
Industrial Robot An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.375, h-index: 32)
Info     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.25, h-index: 21)
Information and Computer Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Information Technology & People     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45, SJR: 0.576, h-index: 28)
Interactive Technology and Smart Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.112, h-index: 1)
Interlending & Document Supply     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 62, SJR: 0.48, h-index: 13)
Internet Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42, SJR: 1.746, h-index: 57)
Intl. J. for Lesson and Learning Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. for Researcher Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Intl. J. of Accounting and Information Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.304, h-index: 7)
Intl. J. of Bank Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.515, h-index: 38)
Intl. J. of Climate Change Strategies and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.416, h-index: 7)
Intl. J. of Clothing Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.279, h-index: 25)
Intl. J. of Commerce and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Conflict Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.763, h-index: 38)
Intl. J. of Contemporary Hospitality Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.329, h-index: 35)
Intl. J. of Culture Tourism and Hospitality Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.399, h-index: 5)
Intl. J. of Development Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Intl. J. of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.225, h-index: 7)
Intl. J. of Educational Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.424, h-index: 32)
Intl. J. of Emergency Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.179, h-index: 1)
Intl. J. of Emerging Markets     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.199, h-index: 5)
Intl. J. of Energy Sector Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.25, h-index: 12)
Intl. J. of Entrepreneurial Behaviour & Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.694, h-index: 28)
Intl. J. of Event and Festival Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.32, h-index: 8)
Intl. J. of Gender and Entrepreneurship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.638, h-index: 6)
Intl. J. of Health Care Quality Assurance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.352, h-index: 32)
Intl. J. of Health Governance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.277, h-index: 15)
Intl. J. of Housing Markets and Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.201, h-index: 5)
Intl. J. of Human Rights in Healthcare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.13, h-index: 2)
Intl. J. of Information and Learning Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Intl. J. of Innovation Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.173, h-index: 5)
Intl. J. of Intelligent Computing and Cybernetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.258, h-index: 10)
Intl. J. of Intelligent Unmanned Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.145, h-index: 2)
Intl. J. of Islamic and Middle Eastern Finance and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Intl. J. of Law and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.107, h-index: 2)
Intl. J. of Law in the Built Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.111, h-index: 2)
Intl. J. of Leadership in Public Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Intl. J. of Lean Six Sigma     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.562, h-index: 15)
Intl. J. of Logistics Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.998, h-index: 15)
Intl. J. of Managerial Finance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.212, h-index: 11)
Intl. J. of Managing Projects in Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Manpower     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.354, h-index: 37)
Intl. J. of Mentoring and Coaching in Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Intl. J. of Migration, Health and Social Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.261, h-index: 5)
Intl. J. of Numerical Methods for Heat & Fluid Flow     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.594, h-index: 32)
Intl. J. of Operations & Production Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 2.198, h-index: 94)
Intl. J. of Organizational Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.222, h-index: 11)
Intl. J. of Pervasive Computing and Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.165, h-index: 9)
Intl. J. of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.304, h-index: 12)
Intl. J. of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.694, h-index: 66)
Intl. J. of Prisoner Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.254, h-index: 10)
Intl. J. of Productivity and Performance Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.785, h-index: 31)
Intl. J. of Public Sector Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.272, h-index: 37)
Intl. J. of Quality & Reliability Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.544, h-index: 63)
Intl. J. of Quality and Service Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.133, h-index: 1)
Intl. J. of Retail & Distribution Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.543, h-index: 36)
Intl. J. of Service Industry Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Social Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.227, h-index: 25)
Intl. J. of Sociology and Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47, SJR: 0.361, h-index: 5)
Intl. J. of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Structural Integrity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.325, h-index: 8)
Intl. J. of Sustainability in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.616, h-index: 29)
Intl. J. of Tourism Cities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Web Information Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.208, h-index: 13)
Intl. J. of Wine Business Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.196, h-index: 12)
Intl. J. of Workplace Health Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.358, h-index: 8)
Intl. Marketing Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.076, h-index: 57)
J. for Multicultural Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.124, h-index: 11)
J. of Accounting & Organizational Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.346, h-index: 7)
J. of Accounting in Emerging Economies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
J. of Adult Protection, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.291, h-index: 7)
J. of Advances in Management Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
J. of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49, SJR: 0.177, h-index: 9)
J. of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
J. of Applied Accounting Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.22, h-index: 5)
J. of Applied Research in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
J. of Asia Business Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.115, h-index: 1)
J. of Assistive Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.215, h-index: 6)
J. of Business & Industrial Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.664, h-index: 48)
J. of Business Strategy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.381, h-index: 17)
J. of Centrum Cathedra     Open Access  
J. of Children's Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.167, h-index: 9)
J. of Chinese Economic and Foreign Trade Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.188, h-index: 4)
J. of Chinese Entrepreneurship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
J. of Chinese Human Resource Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.112, h-index: 3)
J. of Communication Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.735, h-index: 6)
J. of Consumer Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.613, h-index: 62)
J. of Corporate Real Estate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.633, h-index: 5)
J. of Criminal Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 118, SJR: 0.13, h-index: 1)
J. of Criminological Research, Policy and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54)
J. of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.109, h-index: 5)
J. of Documentation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 186, SJR: 0.936, h-index: 50)
J. of Economic and Administrative Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
J. of Economic Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.498, h-index: 26)
J. of Educational Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.848, h-index: 36)
J. of Engineering, Design and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.173, h-index: 10)
J. of Enterprise Information Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.433, h-index: 38)
J. of Enterprising Communities People and Places in the Global Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.212, h-index: 8)
J. of Entrepreneurship and Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
J. of European Industrial Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
J. of European Real Estate Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.52, h-index: 7)
J. of Facilities Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
J. of Family Business Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
J. of Fashion Marketing and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.529, h-index: 30)
J. of Financial Crime     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 343, SJR: 0.158, h-index: 5)
J. of Financial Economic Policy     Hybrid Journal  
J. of Financial Management of Property and Construction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.234, h-index: 1)
J. of Financial Regulation and Compliance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
J. of Financial Reporting and Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
J. of Forensic Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49, SJR: 0.225, h-index: 8)
J. of Global Mobility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
J. of Global Responsibility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
J. of Health Organisation and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.67, h-index: 27)
J. of Historical Research in Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.376, h-index: 8)
J. of Hospitality and Tourism Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.672, h-index: 10)
J. of Human Resource Costing & Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
J. of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)

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Journal Cover International Journal of Culture Tourism and Hospitality Research
  [SJR: 0.399]   [H-I: 5]   [16 followers]  Follow
    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 1750-6182
   Published by Emerald Homepage  [335 journals]
  • Editorial
    • Pages: 273 - 273
      Abstract: International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, Volume 11, Issue 3, Page 273-273, August 2017.

      Citation: International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research
      PubDate: 2017-08-31T09:46:12Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCTHR-06-2017-0075
       
  • Push and pull escape travel motivations of Emirati nationals to Australia
    • Pages: 274 - 296
      Abstract: International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, Volume 11, Issue 3, Page 274-296, August 2017.
      Purpose The purpose of this study is to examine the escape motivations of the emerging market and provide suggestions for Australia’s promotion. This study adopts the push and pull framework to identify travel motivations of Emirati nationals to Australia. Design/methodology/approach This study uses a series of focus groups and in-depth interviews to understand the escape motivations that encourage Emiratis to leave their home country and travel to Australia for a holiday. Findings The results indicate that Emiratis are motivated to travel to Australia by three escape factors: physical, interpersonal and fun. The internal motivations that encourage Emiratis to escape their home country are inseparable from Australia’s external attributes that attract the Emiratis to the country. Originality/value The study contributes to the theory of tourist motivation by supporting it in the culturally different Muslim/Arab context, which has not been explored before. The authors argue that it is not so much what Australia offers and what escape needs the Emiratis can fulfil in Australia, but rather that Australia serves the Emiratis well and meets their escape needs.
      Citation: International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research
      PubDate: 2017-08-31T09:44:49Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCTHR-04-2016-0039
       
  • Linking internal marketing orientation to balanced scorecard outcomes in
           small businesses: the case of travel agencies
    • Pages: 297 - 308
      Abstract: International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, Volume 11, Issue 3, Page 297-308, August 2017.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to examine how internal marketing orientation affects balanced scorecard outcomes (financial performance, customer, internal process, learning and growth) in a small service businesses context. Design/methodology/approach Drawing from the small businesses, the relationship between internal marketing orientation and performance is hypothesized and tested. A structural equation modeling (SEM) test with maximum likelihood estimation was performed to test the relationship between the research variables. Findings The results obtained from the SEM analyzes revealed that internal marketing orientation positively impacts the levels of financial and non-financial performance. The results also indicate that non-financial performance measures (that is, customer, internal process, learning and growth) directly affect financial performance. Originality/value This study unpacks the mechanism between internal marketing orientation and balanced scorecard outcomes and contributes to the academic research of internal marketing orientation in the context of small businesses.
      Citation: International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research
      PubDate: 2017-08-31T09:45:00Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCTHR-03-2016-0024
       
  • Reunion or disconnection' Emotional labor among individual roots
           tourists who are second-generation Chinese Americans
    • Pages: 309 - 320
      Abstract: International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, Volume 11, Issue 3, Page 309-320, August 2017.
      Purpose The purpose of this study is to illustrate the process of emotional work undertaken by Chinese Americans who independently visit their ancestral land without joining organized tours to define who they are and where they belong. Design/methodology/approach A qualitative approach was chosen, as few studies have investigated the experiences of individual roots tourists. Face-to-face, in-depth individual interviews were conducted with 25 Chinese American roots tourists. To analyze the data, a cross-case approach was used. Findings The interview narratives revealed that the interviewees have mixed feelings about being identified as Americans while they also made negative remarks about being identified as local Chinese. The close interaction with the locals emphasized, rather than blurred, the differences in language, political loyalty and economic status between the diaspora and local residents. The results show that Chinese Americans draw a clear boundary between themselves as “we” and locals as “they”. Originality/value This study explores the experiences of roots tourists who visit their ancestral land without joining an organized tour. This is a focus that has been lacking in the literature because past studies of roots tourism, particularly among second- and later-generation of immigrants, have predominantly focused on the experiences of those who join group tours to visit their ancestral country. The findings showed that similar to organized roots tourists, independent roots tourists experienced intense “emotional labor” in negotiating and making sense of competing identities, indicating that the social boundaries between the diaspora and local residents are enmeshed in their daily lives. This finding adds important knowledge to the literature on the tourism experiences of the diaspora, a growing segment of visiting friends and relatives market.
      Citation: International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research
      PubDate: 2017-08-31T09:46:40Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCTHR-05-2016-0041
       
  • Visiting Warsaw for the first time: imagined and experienced urban places
    • Pages: 321 - 340
      Abstract: International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, Volume 11, Issue 3, Page 321-340, August 2017.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to focus on social representations of Warsaw (Poland) as a tourist destination of 210 first visitors from seven EU and extra-EU countries (France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Poland, United Kingdom and United States of America) interviewed before and after their visit. In the framework of the social representations theory, the “cultural baggage”, rooted in the collective and social memory, forms anticipatory representations of the imagined places that may undergo transformations after the visit. How does this transformation occur' Design/methodology/approach The authors consider the transformation of social representations as detected by means of a self-administered questionnaire that comprised the following tools: scales to measure the strength of various information sources about Warsaw (school, literature, movies, songs, internet, press, tourist guides, documentaries, interpersonal communication and other); associative networks (de Rosa, 2002) with the stimulus word “Warsaw”; a list of adjectives describing the city and its centre, as well as a list of the most important places in Warsaw. The questionnaires were coded to ensure anonymity of participants while enabling the researcher to administer them for the second time (after the visit). According to the modelling approach to social representations (de Rosa, 2013a), the research was guided by three related hypotheses concerning transformation of social representations of Warsaw. Findings The results confirmed the hypotheses of potential changes in the representations that shift the focus from Warsaw as “communist” to “green” capital city, and of the role of the Polish language as a “communicative barrier” for recalling specific names of city-places after their visit. Research limitations/implications Social representations exist in people’s minds, and they include images that are further interpreted (Howarth, 2011). Especially when visitors are asked about places, it is likely that they recall specific images, but not their names. Since the questionnaires required them to write down the answers, words often did not correspond to the volatile and dynamic images that the human mind creates. In spite of recalling a specific park or fountain, participants resorted to general categories and simply wrote “park” or “fountain”. However, this limitation is familiar to the majority of social psychological researchers and very difficult, if not impossible, to overcome. The new research directions launched to integrate the research line of field studies with investigations based on new media offer complementary insights and opportunities (de Rosa and Bocci, 2014). Practical implications Destination branding has numerous practical implications. According to Ekinci and Hosany (2006), developing efficient communication methods is crucial to launching a distinctive and attractive destination personality. Hosany et al. (2006) have demonstrated that personality traits are ubiquitous in consumers’ evaluations of tourism destinations and therefore promotional campaigns should emphasize the distinctive personality of tourism destinations, based on the emotional components of destination image. European capital cities compete for visitors in the mature and saturated market, where brand strength is positively related to tourism intensity (Mikulić et al., 2016). Originality/value Examining how social representations of a city are transformed by the visit from the perspective of the supra-disciplinary theory of Moscovici constitutes an original way to link imagery and tourist practices. The major cultural issues, such as history, language, art and traditions affect the theory and practice of urban tourism. For the first time, this theoretical framework is being used in case of a post-communist European destination such as Warsaw.
      Citation: International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research
      PubDate: 2017-08-31T09:45:27Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCTHR-07-2016-0074
       
  • Modelling Chinese consumer choice behavior with budget accommodation
           services
    • Pages: 341 - 354
      Abstract: International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, Volume 11, Issue 3, Page 341-354, August 2017.
      Purpose This study aims to identify key factors influencing Chinese domestic travelers’ behaviors in hotel selection from a pool of budget hotel attribute-based factors and customer personal characteristics and determine the extent to which these factors impact on domestic Chinese travelers’ hotel selection preferences. Design/methodology/approach This study uses a discrete choice experimental design and a multinomial logit model to examine the key influential factors contributing to Chinese domestic travelers’ choice behavior to budget hotels. Both hotel attribute-based and personal trait factors were tested. Findings Results indicate that location, price and business functions were factors influencing guest choice behavior. For budget hotels, being located in the traditional central business districts and having a restaurant would leverage guest preference to stay. Among consumers’ personal characteristics, income, occupation, purpose of travel, personal attitude and past experience were found to be determinants of guest choice behavior. Practical implications This study contributes to the understanding of Chinese domestic travelers’ choice behaviors toward budget hotels and offers insights for industry practitioners to better design budget hotel products and service. Originality/value This research is the first that integrates hotel attributes with travelers’ characteristics and quantitatively evaluate the determinants affecting hotel choice behavior in China. The insights are of value academically to our understanding of cognitive mechanism underlying choice behavior.
      Citation: International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research
      PubDate: 2017-08-31T09:46:28Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCTHR-02-2016-0019
       
  • Hostel front desk employees’ perception of customers: a comparative
           analysis based on cultural background
    • Pages: 355 - 371
      Abstract: International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, Volume 11, Issue 3, Page 355-371, August 2017.
      Purpose Despite their popularity among tourists, information about low-cost accommodation is limited. The study aims to focus on hostels as tourist accommodation. The purpose of this paper is to document the perceptions of hostel front-desk employees about customers and examine employees’ perceptions from a cultural perspective. As culture moderates behavior in general, in light of the cultural difference postulate which proposes that guests and hosts who are from similar or proximate cultures are more likely to experience positive service encounter and that encounter between guests and hosts from distant cultures may be more challenging to service providers, the study compares the perceptions of hostel Western front-desk employees with those of Eastern front-desk employees of their customers. Customers are categorized into four groups – Western customers, Eastern, Middle Eastern/Arab and African. Exploratory interviews paved the development of perception items, which were later on used in a questionnaire to serve the study’s purpose. The paper has managerial and theoretical implications and offers suggestions for further research to advance understanding about this neglected tourism environment. Design/methodology/approach Preliminary/exploratory short interviews with hostel employees in London paved the development of perception items, which were later on used in a questionnaire. There are about 190 hostels in the London area. The questionnaire was self-administered and successfully completed by 113 front-desk employees working in London hostels. t-test statistics was used to examine whether the two groups of employees hold different perceptions about their culturally different group of customers. Findings Results indicate that, generally, differences in perception exist among hostel employees about their customer groups. For example, Western customers are perceived as nicer and more tip-givers than Eastern customers, but they also complain more and are more demanding than their counterparts. Asian customers are perceived to be friendlier, least troublesome and least demanding than the other customer groups. African customers are the least positively perceived. As for Middle Eastern (Arab) customers, they are perceived rather somewhat positively and yet the least favorite. Furthermore, no statistical differences were observed between Western employees and Eastern employees’ perceptions about their customer groups, except that the latter perceives Asian customers to be more troublesome and more complaining. Research limitations/implications Although researchers have compared Western people’s behaviors and attitudes with those of Eastern people, differences may also exist within cultural groups, especially between East Europeans and West Europeans, between Middle Eastern and North Africans or between Americans and Canadians, despite cultural proximity. Therefore, it is always reasonable to interpret cultural differences studies cautiously. Practical implications Hostel management is advised not to take cultural proximity/distance between employees and customers for granted and, thus, should not assume that Eastern employees are more likely to provide better service to Eastern customers than Western employees or that Western employees are more likely to do so to Western customers because they are culturally similar or proximate. In an increasingly globalized world and mobile and culturally diverse workforce in the hospitality sector, it becomes necessary to raise employees’ awareness about cultural differences and their probable effects on perceptions. This is especially true for hostels because of their social characteristic. Originality/value Despite the importance of hostels to the tourism and hospitality industry, not much is known about their customers or their employees. In addition to contributing to employee perception in general, which is also a neglected area of study, this paper used cultural distance/proximity to assess differences in perception between Eastern employees and Western employees about four culturally different groups of hostel customers. In light of the impacts of globalization on consumer behavior, this paper joins other research to challenge the cultural distance postulate in the service encounter context.
      Citation: International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research
      PubDate: 2017-08-31T09:46:13Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCTHR-07-2016-0068
       
  • Customer co-creation and adoption intention towards newly developed
           services: an empirical study
    • Pages: 372 - 391
      Abstract: International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, Volume 11, Issue 3, Page 372-391, August 2017.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to develop a conceptual framework to empirically examine and explain the antecedent factors of consumers’ adoption intention toward co-creatively developed new travel services using smart phone apps. The antecedents include consumer innovativeness, trust, degree of co-creation that results in positive adoption intention. In this study, tourists’ degree of co-creation acts as a mediator between trust and adoption intention. Design/methodology/approach Data were collected through online surveys from tourists that resulted into a total of 152 valid responses. An analysis of data was done by applying the confirmatory factor analysis along with structural equation modeling. Findings The findings of this study indicate that both consumer innovativeness and trust significantly affect adoption intention directly and indirectly via degree of co-creation among tourists and e-travel service providers. Degree of co-creation acts as a mediator between the above-mentioned relationships. Research limitations/implications Use of smart phone apps by tourists’ and e-travel companies to co-create new services and tourists’ adoption intention have been examined in context of co-created service innovation that limits the generalizability of the results to other industries. A few other limitations are also discussed. Practical implications The findings of this study guides the policy planners and e-travel company managers toward application of mobile technology in consumer co-creation in context of service innovation. Originality/value Tourists’ trust in the e-travel companies and their innovativeness were found to influence their degree of co-creation, which are instrumental in developing adoption intention toward co-creative new service innovation using smart phone apps in India. This is a significant addition to the existing literature, as studies on co-creation activities aiming to co-develop new services by tourists and e-travel companies in India are scant in number. In addition to this, the newly developed conceptual model also highlights the role of degree of co-creation as a mediator between two antecedents (trust and innovativeness) and outcome (tourists’ adoption intention), which are considered as new additions to the co-creative service innovation literature.
      Citation: International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research
      PubDate: 2017-08-31T09:45:38Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCTHR-07-2016-0070
       
  • Using, spending, wasting and killing time in airports
    • Pages: 392 - 405
      Abstract: International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, Volume 11, Issue 3, Page 392-405, August 2017.
      Purpose Travelers are both surrounded by and perform places, thus making places ambiguous sites that “come alive” when travelers use them and engage in various performances. A place many travelers pass through is the airport. Airports are places where travelers’ performances are restricted in many ways and waiting is a key element of the airport experience. This paper contributes with knowledge on what airport terminals “are”, not as designs or material objects but as places enacted by travelers. In doing so, the paper aims to emphasize on both how travelers “see” airports and how they use them. Design/methodology/approach The study uses different qualitative methods and notions of time and waiting. Sources of data are small-scale netnography, focus group interviews, observations done at airports and qualitative interviews. Findings The study shows that airport terminals are heterogeneously enacted environments that are heavily inscribed with the mundane act of waiting and travelers use a series of different strategies to “use”, “spend” and “kill” time. Furthermore, whereas more affluent travelers spend waiting time using airports’ commercial offerings (shopping, restaurants, bars, etc.), less affluent travelers do not have the same options. Research limitations/implications The research points to airport terminals as not only “places of movement and mobility” but also “places of waiting” inscribed with boredom and travelers actively fight boredom by spending, using and killing time in a variety of ways. Furthermore, the study points to significant differences between affluent travelers and other travelers and differences between people travelling alone and in groups. Therefore, a call is made for research focusing on less affluent travelers, people traveling in groups and on waiting and waiting time. Practical implications The study suggests that airports are more than consumerscapes and places of movement, hereby questioning the current focus on commercial revenues. Social implications The study points to airport space as space “inhabited” not only by travelers willingly taking on the roles as consumers but also by travelers that kill, spend and use waiting time in other ways, hereby questioning the idea that airports are places for the “elite”. Originality/value Travelers associate airports with boredom and inscribe them with waiting. However, travelers “fight” boredom and waiting with performances and acts designed to use, spend, pass and “kill” time. Hereby, travelers not only accept but also construct the seemingly mundane act of waiting as restricted, negotiated and confined, but nevertheless meaningful performances.
      Citation: International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research
      PubDate: 2017-08-31T09:46:34Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCTHR-05-2016-0045
       
  • Host-guest interactions between first-generation immigrants and their
           visiting relatives: social exchange, relations of care and travel
    • Pages: 406 - 420
      Abstract: International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, Volume 11, Issue 3, Page 406-420, August 2017.
      Purpose This paper aims to examine the social interactions between Filipino immigrant-hosts residing in New Zealand and their visiting relatives (VRs) or guests from the Philippines using social exchange theory to understand their experiences. Design/methodology/approach This qualitative, multi-sited study used in-depth interviews to examine social interactions between Filipino immigrant-host families in New Zealand and their respective visiting relatives from the Philippines. Findings Hosting VRs reflects aspects of social exchange theory, and the interdependence and familial obligations related to VR travel demonstrate mutual relations of care. Maintaining relations of care within the family is an ongoing process involving intergenerational relationships that bind together immigrant-host families and their VRs. Research limitations/implications The conceptualization of the social interactions between immigrants-hosts and VRs is not generalizable owing to the small sample size and lack of representativeness. However, despite a small sample, this qualitative inquiry uncovered a series of personal meanings and understandings attached to the maintenance of familial bonds. Practical implications As immigrant-receiving countries become more culturally diverse through migration, research about other cultures will assist tourism planners in understanding the values and actions of a more varied array of residents. A better understanding of travel experiences and interactions between immigrants and their guests may provide marketers with insights into host-guest dynamics within a VR context, thus potentially enabling tourism marketers to create better marketing campaigns. Social implications Future studies may be undertaken from non-Western and Western perspectives that examine the social interactions between hosts and guests in the context of VR travel. Very little research has been conducted that addresses the meanings and understandings attached to these interactions from the perspectives of both hosting and visiting groups. This research highlights the importance of families in tourism, a contrast with the relative blindness of tourism scholarship toward relations of domesticity and sociality. Originality/value What separates the social interactions between family members in the context of visiting friends and relatives travel from the traditional host-guest paradigm is that it does not involve strangers. This study uses social exchange theory to examine social interactions between hosts and guests who are familiar with each other.
      Citation: International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research
      PubDate: 2017-08-31T09:46:06Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCTHR-11-2016-0115
       
  • How customer’s display of emotions relates to task performance: social
           interaction model in hospitality
    • Pages: 421 - 435
      Abstract: International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, Volume 11, Issue 3, Page 421-435, August 2017.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to understand the emotional cycle of the relationship between service employees and customers using a social interaction model. Design/methodology/approach A total of 22 five-star hotels in Seoul area are selected. The survey was conducted by a mixed mail and visiting format. Of 340 questionnaires distributed, 27 were incomplete and thus eliminated from the study. As a result, 313 questionnaires were accepted for the purpose of final analysis, representing a response rate of 92 per cent. Findings The study found that service employees’ orientation and emotions are critical for predicting customers’ display of emotions and ensuring employees’ mood. In addition, employees’ emotions and service orientation have positive relationships with customers’ display of emotions; customers’ display of emotions have positive relationships with employees’ moods and task performance; and employees’ moods have positive relationships with task performance. Research limitations/implications A key limitation of this study is that it is difficult to capture precisely the emotions of employees and customers using the five-point Likert scale. Second, there might be representative issue in his study because the survey was limited to brief encounter within in the hotel industry that focused only on five-star hotels in Seoul. Practical implications Through the study, to overcome the emotional labor, this study shows that an answer could lie in the connection between business outcomes and positive mood of employees. Managers should create a good environment for employee to work in a pleasant atmosphere. In addition, during the employee selection process, managers might hire talented and qualified front employees with friendly, courteous and extroverted characteristics. Originality/value The essential contribution of this study is that it provides initial empirical support for the social interaction model in an employee and customer service setting in the field of hospitality.
      Citation: International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research
      PubDate: 2017-08-31T09:45:22Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCTHR-08-2016-0086
       
  • Social inclusion and audience development at the Royal Opera House: a
           tourist perspective
    • Pages: 436 - 449
      Abstract: International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, Volume 11, Issue 3, Page 436-449, August 2017.
      Purpose The Royal Opera House, located at the epicentre of Covent Garden, stands as the UK’s leading provider of opera and ballet performances. Having been extensively redeveloped, its front facade is not visible from the area’s central market place and the perceived exclusivity and elitism commonly associated with its art forms also impose a challenge. This study aims to analyze the influence that the Opera House exerts on the tourist’s perception and experience of the world-renowned London’s “Theatreland”. Design/methodology/approach In all, three hundred and six semi-structured interviews with domestic, international, first-time and repeat tourists were conducted in six different locations throughout the area and inside the flagship building using a convenience sampling approach. These were then analyzed with the assistance of qualitative data analysis software (QSR N*Vivo) in two stages leading to an initial set of categorical topics that derived in a number of findings related to the factors that influence the tourist’s perception and experience of place. Findings The Opera House’s perceived urban concealment proved to have an impact on its influence on Covent Garden’s sense of place. But its social inclusion and audience development initiatives that foster a new generation of opera and ballet theatre-goers emerged as important findings as the House’s open door policy for daytime visitors along with live relays of current opera and ballet productions in other locations spark an interest in experiencing the building from the inside. Research limitations/implications This paper focuses exclusively on findings related to audience development and social inclusion initiatives currently used at the Royal Opera House and their impact on the tourist’s perception and experience of place. However, many other factors influence these processes and scope for further research is highlighted. Practical implications The Royal Opera House’s perceived urban concealment imposes a challenge to the task of developing new audiences for its current and future productions. Its learning and participation unit must endeavor to engage younger and international markets by focusing on the quality of the House’s performances, its heritage and added facilities of the venue such as exhibitions and shop. Social implications The Royal Opera House’s creed of “excellence, access and artistic development” is implemented by extending opportunities to younger target markets to engage with its cultural produce. Originality/value This paper addresses the gap in knowledge related to the development of the niche Opera House tourist segment of the cultural tourism market.
      Citation: International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research
      PubDate: 2017-08-31T09:45:35Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCTHR-07-2016-0071
       
  • Intersectoral local development in Italy: the cultural, creative and
           tourism industries
    • Pages: 450 - 462
      Abstract: International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, Volume 11, Issue 3, Page 450-462, August 2017.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role of intersectoriality within the cultural, creative and tourism industries in Italian local development. Design/methodology/approach The research design builds on the literature on culture-led development and adapts the established body of empirical research on industrial districts to tourism and cultural development. The quantitative analysis of intersectoral specialization and the clustering of cultural, creative and tourism industries in Italian local labour systems (LLSs) combines specialization indexes with principal component analysis and cluster analysis. Findings About 50 per cent of Italian LLSs specialize in the economy of culture and tourism, mostly in material culture, although tourism has the highest level of specialization. There are three main patterns of agglomeration and clustering. The largest cluster is that of the cultural heritage and content and information industries, which coincides with the systems of medium-sized and large cities, followed by systems of tourism monoculture. The smallest is made up of material culture, typically made-in-Italy sectors. The tourism and material culture industries are monocultures – where tourism agglomerates, but material culture does not. Research limitations/implications The analytical approach is quantitative and based on Istat’s Industry and Trade (2012) data set. Further studies are needed on the interaction between agglomerated specialized industries. Originality/value This paper contributes to the theoretical and political debate on the value generation and innovation potential of culture and creativity, and bridges the knowledge domains of local development and managerial studies. Novel statistical evidence on intersectoral specialization and the clustering of the cultural, creative and tourism sectors in Italy at the inter-municipal level is provided. This study helps to identify an Italian model of the economy of culture and tourism.
      Citation: International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research
      PubDate: 2017-08-31T09:46:10Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCTHR-03-2016-0032
       
  • Sex Museums: The Politics and Performance of Display
    • Pages: 463 - 464
      Abstract: International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, Volume 11, Issue 3, Page 463-464, August 2017.

      Citation: International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research
      PubDate: 2017-08-31T09:45:21Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCTHR-03-2017-0036
       
 
 
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