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Publisher: Emerald   (Total: 342 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 342 Journals sorted alphabetically
A Life in the Day     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Academia Revista Latinoamericana de Administración     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.178, CiteScore: 1)
Accounting Auditing & Accountability J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32, SJR: 1.71, CiteScore: 3)
Accounting Research J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.144, CiteScore: 0)
Accounting, Auditing and Accountability J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 2.187, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Accounting Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.279, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Appreciative Inquiry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.451, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Autism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.222, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Dual Diagnosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47, SJR: 0.21, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Gender Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.16, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Intl. Marketing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 73, SJR: 0.296, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
African J. of Economic and Management Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.216, CiteScore: 1)
Agricultural Finance Review     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.406, CiteScore: 1)
Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 201, SJR: 0.354, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Annals in Social Responsibility     Full-text available via subscription  
Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.235, CiteScore: 1)
Arts and the Market     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Asia Pacific J. of Innovation and Entrepreneurship     Open Access  
Asia Pacific J. of Marketing and Logistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.425, CiteScore: 1)
Asia-Pacific J. of Business Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.234, CiteScore: 1)
Asian Association of Open Universities J.     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian Education and Development Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.233, CiteScore: 1)
Asian J. on Quality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Asian Review of Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.222, CiteScore: 1)
Aslib J. of Information Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.725, CiteScore: 2)
Aslib Proceedings     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 301)
Assembly Automation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.603, CiteScore: 2)
Baltic J. of Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.309, CiteScore: 1)
Benchmarking : An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.559, CiteScore: 2)
British Food J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.5, CiteScore: 2)
Built Environment Project and Asset Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.46, CiteScore: 1)
Business Process Re-engineering & Management J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Business Strategy Series     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Career Development Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.527, CiteScore: 2)
China Agricultural Economic Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.31, CiteScore: 1)
China Finance Review Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.245, CiteScore: 0)
Chinese Management Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.278, CiteScore: 1)
Circuit World     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.246, CiteScore: 1)
Collection Building     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.296, CiteScore: 1)
COMPEL: The Intl. J. for Computation and Mathematics in Electrical and Electronic Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.22, CiteScore: 1)
Competitiveness Review : An Intl. Business J. incorporating J. of Global Competitiveness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.274, CiteScore: 1)
Construction Innovation: Information, Process, Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.731, CiteScore: 2)
Corporate Communications An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.453, CiteScore: 1)
Corporate Governance Intl. J. of Business in Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.336, CiteScore: 1)
Critical Perspectives on Intl. Business     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.378, CiteScore: 1)
Cross Cultural & Strategic Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.504, CiteScore: 2)
Development and Learning in Organizations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.138, CiteScore: 0)
Digital Library Perspectives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.341, CiteScore: 1)
Direct Marketing An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Disaster Prevention and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.47, CiteScore: 1)
Drugs and Alcohol Today     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 138, SJR: 0.245, CiteScore: 1)
Education + Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Education, Business and Society : Contemporary Middle Eastern Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.707, CiteScore: 3)
Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Employee Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.551, CiteScore: 2)
Engineering Computations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.444, CiteScore: 1)
Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.653, CiteScore: 2)
English Teaching: Practice & Critique     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.417, CiteScore: 1)
Equal Opportunities Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Equality, Diversity and Inclusion : An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.5, CiteScore: 1)
EuroMed J. of Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.26, CiteScore: 1)
European Business Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.585, CiteScore: 3)
European J. of Innovation Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.454, CiteScore: 2)
European J. of Management and Business Economics     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.239, CiteScore: 1)
European J. of Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.971, CiteScore: 2)
European J. of Training and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.477, CiteScore: 1)
Evidence-based HRM     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.537, CiteScore: 1)
Facilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.503, CiteScore: 2)
Foresight     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.34, CiteScore: 1)
Gender in Management : An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.412, CiteScore: 1)
Grey Systems : Theory and Application     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Health Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.421, CiteScore: 1)
Higher Education, Skills and Work-based Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47, SJR: 0.426, CiteScore: 1)
History of Education Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.26, CiteScore: 0)
Housing, Care and Support     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.171, CiteScore: 0)
Human Resource Management Intl. Digest     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.129, CiteScore: 0)
Humanomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.333, CiteScore: 1)
IMP J.     Hybrid Journal  
Indian Growth and Development Review     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.174, CiteScore: 0)
Industrial and Commercial Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.301, CiteScore: 1)
Industrial Lubrication and Tribology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.334, CiteScore: 1)
Industrial Management & Data Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.904, CiteScore: 3)
Industrial Robot An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.318, CiteScore: 1)
Info     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Information and Computer Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.307, CiteScore: 1)
Information Technology & People     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44, SJR: 0.671, CiteScore: 2)
Interactive Technology and Smart Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.191, CiteScore: 1)
Interlending & Document Supply     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 61)
Internet Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37, SJR: 1.645, CiteScore: 5)
Intl. J. for Lesson and Learning Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.324, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. for Researcher Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Intl. J. of Accounting and Information Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.275, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Bank Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.654, CiteScore: 3)
Intl. J. of Climate Change Strategies and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.353, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Clothing Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.318, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Commerce and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Conflict Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.362, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Contemporary Hospitality Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 1.452, CiteScore: 4)
Intl. J. of Culture Tourism and Hospitality Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.339, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Development Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.139, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.387, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Educational Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.559, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Emergency Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.201, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Emerging Markets     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.474, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Energy Sector Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.349, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Entrepreneurial Behaviour & Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.629, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Event and Festival Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.388, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Gender and Entrepreneurship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.445, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Health Care Quality Assurance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.358, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Health Governance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.247, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Housing Markets and Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.211, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Human Rights in Healthcare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.205, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Information and Learning Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.226, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Innovation Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.197, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Intelligent Computing and Cybernetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.214, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Intelligent Unmanned Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Islamic and Middle Eastern Finance and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.375, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Law and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.217, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Law in the Built Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.227, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Leadership in Public Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Intl. J. of Lean Six Sigma     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.802, CiteScore: 3)
Intl. J. of Logistics Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.71, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Managerial Finance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.203, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Managing Projects in Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.36, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Manpower     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.365, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Mentoring and Coaching in Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.426, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Migration, Health and Social Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.307, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Numerical Methods for Heat & Fluid Flow     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.697, CiteScore: 3)
Intl. J. of Operations & Production Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 2.052, CiteScore: 4)
Intl. J. of Organizational Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.268, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Pervasive Computing and Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.138, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.25, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.821, CiteScore: 4)
Intl. J. of Prisoner Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.303, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Productivity and Performance Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.578, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Public Sector Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.438, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Quality & Reliability Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.492, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Quality and Service Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.309, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Retail & Distribution Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.742, CiteScore: 3)
Intl. J. of Service Industry Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Social Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.225, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Sociology and Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50, SJR: 0.3, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.269, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Structural Integrity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.228, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Sustainability in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.502, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Tourism Cities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.502, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Web Information Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.186, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Wine Business Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.562, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Workplace Health Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.303, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. Marketing Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.895, CiteScore: 3)
Irish J. of Occupational Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
ISRA Intl. J. of Islamic Finance     Open Access  
J. for Multicultural Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.237, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Accounting & Organizational Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.301, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Accounting in Emerging Economies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
J. of Adult Protection, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.314, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Advances in Management Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
J. of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45, SJR: 0.222, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.108, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Applied Accounting Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.227, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Applied Research in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49, SJR: 0.2, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Asia Business Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.245, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Assistive Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
J. of Business & Industrial Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.652, CiteScore: 2)
J. of Business Strategy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.333, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Centrum Cathedra     Open Access  
J. of Children's Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.243, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Chinese Economic and Foreign Trade Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.2, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Chinese Entrepreneurship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
J. of Chinese Human Resource Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.173, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Communication Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.625, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Consumer Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.664, CiteScore: 2)
J. of Corporate Real Estate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.368, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Criminal Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 131, SJR: 0.268, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Criminological Research, Policy and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44, SJR: 0.254, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.257, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Documentation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 180, SJR: 0.613, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Economic and Administrative Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
J. of Economic Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.733, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Economics, Finance and Administrative Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.217, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Educational Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.252, CiteScore: 2)
J. of Enabling Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.369, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Engineering, Design and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.212, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Enterprise Information Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.827, CiteScore: 4)
J. of Enterprising Communities People and Places in the Global Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.281, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Entrepreneurship and Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.262, CiteScore: 1)
J. of European Industrial Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
J. of European Real Estate Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.268, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Facilities Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.33, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Family Business Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
J. of Fashion Marketing and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.608, CiteScore: 2)
J. of Financial Crime     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 373, SJR: 0.228, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Financial Economic Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.186, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Financial Management of Property and Construction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.309, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Financial Regulation and Compliance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.159, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Financial Reporting and Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
J. of Forensic Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58, SJR: 0.205, CiteScore: 1)

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Journal Cover
International Journal of Culture Tourism and Hospitality Research
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.339
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 20  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1750-6182
Published by Emerald Homepage  [342 journals]
  • Customers’ emotions in real time: measuring affective responses to
           service and relationship quality at the reception desk
    • Pages: 173 - 184
      Abstract: International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, Volume 12, Issue 2, Page 173-184, June 2018.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to explore customers’ emotions during a host–guest interaction at the reception desk of a hotel. Guests’ emotional responses are analyzed in real time to understand their link to behavior and levels of service and relationship quality. Design/methodology/approach To achieve this aim, 225 random customers experience six different types of interactions (scenarios) at a staged reception desk, representing a high/low service or relationship quality. The emotions provoked within guests are (video) recorded and analyzed with the help of SHORETM, a facial recognition software that processes four basic emotions derived from human muscular activity and calculates average emotional scores per scenario. Findings Results reveal that customers respond more positively to service than to relationship quality. Informal approaches to interacting with guests are mixed; they can both excite or irritate customers. As with existing evidence in service marketing research, the results found out through this study demonstrate that a good service recovery process seems to immediately generate more satisfied customers than do constant high-quality standards. Research limitations/Implications The main limitations are related to the semi-staged nature of social interactions, which might cause distortions in measuring emotions and limitations in the comparability of cases. Practical Implications Practical implications are directed to service designers and managers in hospitality to improve service design and ensure effective service recoveries. Originality/value This paper introduces a novel approach for assessing host–guest interactions in tourism based on a real-time emotional assessment of service and relationship quality in hospitality. Technologically advanced observation techniques enable in-depth analyses of actions and emotional responses between hosts and guests across time. New insights concerning service design and service recovery management are gained for practitioners and for future research.
      Citation: International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research
      PubDate: 2018-07-30T11:53:19Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCTHR-06-2017-0072
       
  • Self-organised cruiser’s expenditures in a port of call: the interaction
           effect between city interface satisfaction and super-sized ships
    • Abstract: International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose This paper aims to provide a better understanding of self-organised cruiser’s expenditures, analysing the effect of city interface satisfaction (CIS) on total monetary impact on land (TMIoL) for cruisers travelling without touristic guide and investigating the size of cruise ships, such as those labelled super-sized ships (SSSh), as a moderator variable. Design/methodology/approach The study was conducted through an interview-based semi-structured questionnaire administered to 812 self-organised cruisers visiting one of main ports of call in the Mediterranean region. Findings The findings highlight that CIS positively influences TMIoL; the relationship is moderated by SSSh; age, cruise experience and time on land are confirmed to be critical predictors of cruiser’s expenditures in the tourism destination. Originality/value The increase in cruiser flows and vessel sizes has a significant economic and non-economic impact on cruise destinations. More players are involved in the value creation process and its sharing, such as port destinations, local governments and cruise liners. Value measurement and knowledge of its determinants (e.g. port facilities, destination attractiveness, cruiser satisfaction and experiences) are essential, in terms of competitiveness, for practitioner’s decision-making processes and scholars interested in analysing the cruise phenomenon. This paper contributes to the existing literature as it provides results concerning value creation that is not managed by any one single player, such as cruise companies, port destination or local government. Such knowledge can be useful above all for local governments because self-organised cruisers visit the city destination not as cruise tourists but as land tourists.
      Citation: International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research
      PubDate: 2018-10-12T02:16:45Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCTHR-02-2018-0021
       
  • Modeling guided tour participants’ experiences
    • Abstract: International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeThe purpose of this paper is to explore the influence of the experience economy and co-creation concepts on guided tours (GTs) and to analyze the process of the on-site (co-)creation of experience between the service provider and the consumer taking into account the consumer perspective. Design/methodology/approachThe objective of the study is fulfilled by reviewing the literature on experience economy and co-creation within a cultural heritage context and then using it to design appropriate research tools to collect empirical data through qualitative interviews within the context of a single case study. The Medieval Town of Rhodes (MTR), Greece, serves as the case in this study. In fact, this study analyzes primary data from 25 interviews with participants in GTs in the MTR. FindingsThe GT participant’s views of their GT experience were explored, and it was evaluated whether they fit any of the three generations of experience economy with an emphasis on co-creation of experience. The findings show that, in the MTR-GT services, the characteristics of mainly the first and second generation experience economies are found, while little emphasis is given to the third generation experience economy. Based on the empirical results, the RIF model (R: “Resources,” I: “Interactions,” F: “Feelings”) was created: this proposes that both the process of experience co-creation and optimal GT experiences are realized by providing participants with appropriate resources, multiple types of interactions and opportunities to generate positive and pleasant feelings. This model illustrates the intertwining, multi-dimensional facets of an optimal co-created GT experience that service providers and tour operators should provide to their customers. Research limitations/implicationsThe present study has several limitations that need to be mentioned. First, this research is a single case study; the MTR serves as the case, focusing on one cultural heritage service, GTs. This fact can put the study’s validity in question. Moreover, as the research is conducted by a single person, there is the risk of subjective bias. Another limitation is that this study is not a longitudinal one; the latter could lead to more accurate findings. The number and the nationality of participants constitute the 4th and final limitation of the research. More specifically, the sample is not perceived to be representative of the population nor generalizable, while visitors from more nationalities could have been interviewed. In relation to this, the judgmental sampling method was used because the population of the study could not be defined. This serves as the fifth limitation of the study. Practical implicationsTour operators and tour guides can exploit the characteristics of GT activities included in the proposed RIF model. By incorporating these elements in GT experiences, the process of experience co-creation could be effectively supported. An optimal GT experience that incorporates intertwining and multi-dimensional facets could be provided. To begin with, the physical setting where the tour takes place must be well preserved, so that it can capture the attention of the participants. The route of the tour should not be exhausting but convenient for all participants and should include various landscapes. On the other hand, tour guides should provide interesting, relevant and cohesive information. Moreover, a tour guide needs to display charismatic behavior to gain the tour group’s trust and generate positive feelings impressing and immersing participants in the experience and encouraging in them a sense of togetherness. Within the context of the tour, tangible elements such as brochures and maps should be provided, allowing vistors to tailor the experience according to their needs and preferences. Furthermore, interaction between the guide and the tour group, as well as among the participants themselves, should be encouraged. In relation to this, the tour group could be divided into sub-groups according to common features such as age. The guides could also come up with a topic to be jointly discussed and participatory activities such as games could be organized. Finally, participants should have some freedom during the tour; time to explore the setting on their own or a visit to specific places on request. Originality/valueThe originality of the paper lies in the development of the RIF model, illustrating the on-site optimal experience within the context of GTs taking place in the MTR, the setting of the research. The construction of the RIF model was based on an investigation into actual GT participant’s perspectives on GTs.
      Citation: International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research
      PubDate: 2018-10-10T08:42:01Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCTHR-10-2017-0104
       
  • Cultural identity in WHS tourist destinations: the case of Cordoba (Spain)
    • Abstract: International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to conduct an analysis of the relationships existing among three basic constructs in the visitor’s decision-making process (motivation and satisfaction) in a tourist destination that is a World Heritage Site, such as the city of Cordoba (Spain). Bearing in mind the perception of heritage by the foreign visitors, the following four types were determined: alternative tourists, cultural tourists, emotional tourists and heritage tourists. Design/methodology/approach This paper uses the multivariate technique of grouping cases (K-means clusters) to analyse the similarity existing among the surveyed persons. From the groups or segments obtained, statistics and measurements of association were applied that provide the information necessary to study the possible trends of association existing between variables from a table of bidimensional contingencies. In the same way, non-parametric statistical procedures were used (Kruskal–Wallis H test and the Mann–Whitney U test). Findings The results show the existence of four diverse motivational dimensions among the foreign tourists to visit it: hedonic, cultural, convenience and circumstantial. Of the four dimensions, the hedonic and the cultural are the most relevant. The results show the existence of a common cultural identity: the Arabic cultural identity. Originality/value This paper contributes to complete the academic literature existing on the links of the tourist with the historical and monumental heritage that he visits, and with the tourist’s behaviour.
      Citation: International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research
      PubDate: 2018-10-08T12:59:13Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCTHR-05-2018-0065
       
  • Sustainable management practices in UAE hotels
    • Abstract: International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose Sustainability has become an important objective for most organizations, as it is emerging as a competitive necessity. This study aims to develop a framework for the identification, categorization and prioritization of sustainable management practices (SMPs) in the hotel sector. Design/methodology/approach An extensive literature review was conducted to identify SMPs in the service sector, and a survey tool was used to categorize and prioritize the most important practices based on expert opinion. An analytical hierarchical process (AHP) was used to prioritize the main criteria and sub-criteria of SMPs. The study is composed of 8 main criteria and 33 sub-criteria relevant to the hotel sector. Findings It is observed that employee management and government management take top priority under the main criteria, and policy requirements, customer culture and education and training were determined to be the three most relevant sub-criteria as SMPs for hotels in UAE. The results indicate that hotels mostly focus on economic sustainability; however, the environmental and social dimensions of sustainability are ignored in management practices. Research limitations/implications The results are derived from four- and five-star hotels and therefore cannot be generalized. In addition, future research on specific categories of hotels is needed in other countries. The current research model can be also applied in different types of companies in tourism and other sectors. Practical implications Hotel managers should exert greater effort with regard to the environmental and social dimensions of sustainability practices, as they are highly important. Internationally, there has been considerable debate with regard to these issues, and at present, customers are well aware of such social and environmental efforts. Originality/value This study offers original insights into the area of SMP in UAE, especially in the hotel sector.
      Citation: International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research
      PubDate: 2018-10-08T12:58:12Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCTHR-10-2017-0100
       
  • Leisure-tourism connection behaviors by life stage and gender
    • Abstract: International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose Individuals’ daily leisure activities undertaken close to home often appear in tourism contexts when individuals are away from home. Previous studies have suggested that such leisure-tourism connection behaviors are enhanced by leisure involvement and leisure habits. However, few studies have examined if such a connection may have variations by life stage and gender. Therefore, this study aims to examine the roles of life stage and gender in consistency between leisure and tourism, in consideration of involvement and habit. The study samples were university graduates (n = 681) who had graduated from a university in the United States and were currently working and university students (n = 706) who were enrolled and taking classes at a university in the United States. Design/methodology/approach Data were analyzed using descriptive analysis, exploratory factor analysis, t-test, two-way ANOVA and multiple regression analysis. Findings The findings revealed differences in the effects of leisure involvement and habit factors on the leisure-tourism connection behaviors by life stage and gender. More details are presented in this paper. Originality/value This study is the first study to examine the leisure-tourism connection behaviors in consideration of life stage and gender.
      Citation: International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research
      PubDate: 2018-09-25T08:01:39Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCTHR-03-2018-0036
       
  • The role of familiarity in the assessment of Turkey’s
           country/destination image: going beyond soap operas
    • Abstract: International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose This paper aims to further enhance the understanding of elements relevant to creating affection for a country’s identity, culture and values. Design/methodology/approach An overview of theoretical contributions is followed by a description of exploratory research on the overall image of Turkey. Survey-based empirical data (a convenience sample consisting of 838 Croatian citizens) are analysed using Statistica v7; mean values and a t-test are applied. The importance-performance Analysis (IPA) is also performed. The level of the respondent’s actual knowledge of Turkey is analysed by examining the content of their associations. Findings Research findings support a proven multidimensionality of the country/destination image construct. Turkey has become an appealing tourist destination; its image consists of positive associations that point to the effectiveness of soap operas broadcast abroad and promotional investments into the creation of the country image in foreign markets. Negative perceptions are related to human rights and gender inequalities. Limitations implications The use of a convenience sample (with predominantly female respondents) places a clear constraint on generalising the findings. Consequently, the results should be treated only as indicative. Furthermore, the one-country nature of the study limits the implications to theory. Practical implications Findings that soap operas might be a valuable source for Turkey’s image formation, and as such affect subsequent consumer behaviour, provide valuable insights for tourism and international marketing professionals who are either already in business or who are planning to internationalise future activities. Originality/value The study adds to the existing knowledge suggesting that popular culture, i.e. soap operas, is an interesting dimension of country/destination image deserving of further research.
      Citation: International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research
      PubDate: 2018-09-25T07:57:39Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCTHR-06-2017-0066
       
  • Heritage attachment and domestic tourists’ visits to historic sites
    • Abstract: International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between heritage attachment and its dimensions on the one hand, and domestic tourists’ visits to historic sites in Bagamoyo in Tanzania on the other. Design/methodology/approach A self-administered questionnaire consisting of multiple-measurement items was administered to a convenience sample of 160 domestic tourists visiting historic sites in Bagamoyo town in Tanzania. Regression analysis tested whether and to what extent heritage attachment and its dimensions relate to domestic tourists’ visits. Findings As expected, heritage attachment showed a positive and significant relationship with domestic tourists’ visits to historic sites, meaning that the more a tourist is attached to historic sites, the more likely she or he will visit them. In addition, all five dimensions of heritage attachment of spirituality, identity, oneness, inheritance and ancestry had a positive relationship with domestic tourists’ visits. However, only spirituality and identity had a stronger and more statistically significant effect. Research limitations/implications The demographic, motivation, pull–push and cognitive theories have dominated explanations for why tourists visit. A major contribution of this study to this body of knowledge is its argument that the affective-based perspective is significant in explaining domestic tourists’ visits. It also provides managerial implications for practitioners in the tourist industry for the development of domestic and cultural tourism. Originality/value This study is among the first (if any) empirical demonstrations of the significance of heritage attachment and its dimensions in attracting domestic tourists to visit historic sites in Tanzania.
      Citation: International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research
      PubDate: 2018-09-25T07:54:17Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCTHR-09-2017-0091
       
  • An investigation of the domestic and foreign tourists’ museum visit
           experiences
    • Abstract: International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to identify the main factors contributing to museum experience and assess the differences in museum experience perceptions of domestic and foreign tourists. Furthermore, examining the relationship between museum visit experience and overall satisfaction for the domestic and foreign tourists is another purpose of the paper. Design/methodology/approach Data collection was conducted using the convenience sampling method. The on-site survey was carried out with the participation of domestic and foreign tourists visiting Antalya Historical and Archaeological Museum in Turkey. Findings Analysis of data from 151 domestic and 151 foreign tourists visiting to Antalya Historical and Archaeological Museum indicated that edutainment, comfort, escape and aesthetic are the underlying dimensions of museum experience. The aesthetic dimension was identified as the most important aspect of the museum visit experience. In addition, museum visit perceptions of the domestic and foreign tourists and overall satisfactions with their visit were found to be different from each other. Originality/value The findings of this study provide a better understanding of the museum experience from the domestic and foreign tourists’ perspectives. Furthermore, the paper presents a novel and integrated approach to investigate tourist experiences in the extending museum experience literature.
      Citation: International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research
      PubDate: 2018-09-07T12:55:53Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCTHR-02-2018-0029
       
  • Drawing a gastronomy landscape from food markets’ produce
    • Abstract: International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose Food markets represent a pathway to explore the authenticity and identity of a territory. Markets are a crucial example among food tourism practices in urban contexts. This paper aims to analyze the products that build the particular food landscape of Costa Daurada, Catalonia, Spain. Design/methodology/approach To achieve it, the research was based on the study of foods offered in three regional markets. Findings Results show how Costa Daurada is gastronomically characterized and what products convey the diversity and singularity of the region. Originality/value The originality of this paper lies on the building of a regional gastronomy landscape on the basis of the iconic products delivered at local food markets, regarded as shared spaces between locals and tourists.
      Citation: International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research
      PubDate: 2018-09-07T12:54:38Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCTHR-05-2018-0064
       
  • Representation of cultural tourism on the Web: critical discourse analysis
           of tourism websites
    • Abstract: International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose Culture is an important motivation force to people within the context of tourism. It provides new opportunities for destinations to promote cultural elements and attract more travellers. This study aims to investigate how the cultural heritage of Cyprus is promoted online and to identify whether the needs of travellers who focus on experiential aspects and prioritise culture can be fulfilled. Design/methodology/approach The research aim is fulfilled through a critical discourse analysis of selected WebPages concerning representation of the culture of Cyprus within the tourism context. Findings Eighteen websites were included, and the results suggest that Cyprus has Web exposure specifically promoting its cultural heritage. However, the websites have been established with different tourism scopes, with culture comprising just one part of the content. Thus, the development of specialised websites is dedicated exclusively to culture and tourism, and it seems appropriate to attract travellers interested in more educational activities with cultural and historical value. This approach would bring many benefits because this cohort of travellers is in an upper-scale tourist market. Originality/value This study is original in nature because it brings together the case of Cyprus, an island destination highly depended on tourism in relation to cultural tourism Web discourse. The promotion of cultural parameters will provide more opportunities for the island and escape from the 3S’s (sea, sun and sand) image to be positioned as a culturally sustainable destination.
      Citation: International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research
      PubDate: 2018-09-07T12:53:50Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCTHR-07-2017-0078
       
  • In praise of hospitality: the role extended by religious hosts as drivers
           of satisfaction and loyalty
    • Abstract: International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose This study aims to explore the hospitality and religious experience of Israeli travelers visiting the globally prevalent Jewish Orthodox Chabad Houses that provide religious, spiritual, educational and hospitality havens in their locales, regardless of the degree of observance. Design/methodology/approach Using Schmitt’s (1999b) experiential consumption dimensions of Sense, Feel, Think, Relate and Act, this study measured the various visitors’ experiences, satisfaction and loyalty using a sample of 488 Israeli travelers obtained from online social media sites, popular with Israeli travelers. Findings The findings reveal that Israeli visits to Chabad Houses were primarily characterized by Act, Feel and Relate experiences like meeting fellow Israeli travelers, a sense of togetherness and a feeling of belonging. In predicting satisfaction and loyalty, the visitors’ religious experience did not play a major role, but rather the actual hospitality extended by their religious hosts, like a home-like feeling, comfort, tasty food and a sense of togetherness did. Research limitations/implications Collecting data from an online sample might yield results that would not be applicable to the typical Chabad House visitor. Due to the Chabad Houses’ global presence, their visitors’ experiences may vary from one house to another and the findings may not represent an accurate picture of the typical Chabad House visit. Practical implications To continue its hospitality brand, the Chabad movement’s decision-makers should continue focusing on innovative visitor experiences and balance the religious and secular components of their hospitality, as well as consider carefully how to direct their marketing and operational budgets. Originality/value Adding to the body of literature on travelers’ experience at religious sites, this research is a pioneering attempt to study and explore visitors’ religious and hospitality experiences while visiting small non-conspicuous religious centers that extend their global hospitality brand to travelers.
      Citation: International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research
      PubDate: 2018-08-02T10:58:24Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCTHR-04-2018-0049
       
  • Travel motivation of Indonesian seniors in choosing destination overseas
    • First page: 185
      Abstract: International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose This study focuses on the Indonesian seniors’ motivation in terms of travelling to a destination abroad. Using the push–pull motivation constructs and recognising the role of culture in influencing travel behaviour, the purpose of this study is to develop a better understanding of the underlying factors that explain why Indonesian seniors travel to and select an international destination. Design/methodology/approach A questionnaire-based survey was completed to collect data from 246 Indonesian seniors aged 55 years and over who had travelled overseas. Factor analysis was applied to reduce the total of 34 push and pull travel motivation items into new underlying factors. Informal interviews were also undertaken to support the analysis. Findings Personal development, relaxation and relationship enhancement appeared to be the three factors that internally pushed the seniors to travel abroad. Meanwhile, facilities and hygiene, destination familiarity, value for money and destination proximity, local attractions and supporting travel facilities were found to be the factors that pulled the seniors to select an international destination they would like to visit. The emergence of relationship enhancement, destination familiarity and value for money and destination proximity factors were evident that the unique aspect of Indonesian cultural values could shape the motivation of Indonesian seniors to go travelling. Originality/value Although studies on senior travel motivation are abundant, empirical research studies that focus on examining Indonesian senior travel behaviour are still rare. This study therefore serves as one of the first attempts to examine the behaviour of Indonesian seniors when undertaking outbound travel trip. Based on the study’s findings, practical recommendations were offered to tourism stakeholders involved in tailoring a specific tourism product and services for the Indonesian senior tourist market.
      Citation: International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research
      PubDate: 2018-06-29T07:33:07Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCTHR-09-2017-0095
       
  • Understanding destination image from the perspective of Western travel
           bloggers: the case of Istanbul
    • First page: 198
      Abstract: International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose Travelers’ narratives disseminated online about destination experiences are an important source of information for measuring the performance of tourist destinations and understanding travelers’ perceptions, behaviors and expectations. Drawing on data from travel narratives, the purpose of this study is to examine the destination image of Istanbul as revealed in Western travel blogs. In addition, this study aims to identify the demographic characteristics of travelers who are more likely to engage in destination blogging activities. Design methodology/approach A deductive content analysis approach was used on a sample of travel blog entries retrieved from TravelPod.com. Based on the dimensions and attributes of destination image identified by Beerli and Martín (2004), a coding scheme was established to guide the coding process. Findings The findings suggest that the online destination image of Istanbul is generally positive. Specifically, the destination is mainly appreciated for its cultural and historical heritage, as well as for its tourist infrastructure. However, the findings also highlight some issues that concern Western travelers, such as safety and traffic congestion. Originality/value This study is timely as it explores the online destination image of a key destination in a period of instability. The findings are expected to offer insights for destination management organizations in Turkey on how Western travelers view Istanbul as a tourist destination. These insights are also important to help policymakers and tourism destination marketers design effective strategies.
      Citation: International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research
      PubDate: 2018-07-11T11:53:59Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCTHR-12-2017-0124
       
  • Determinants of consumption intention of Chinese cuisines for foreigners:
           the mediating role of variety seeking behavior
    • First page: 213
      Abstract: International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The purpose of this study is to explore the factors affecting the consumption intention of Chinese cuisines for the foreigners living in China. The study also explains the role of variety seeking behavior of consumers in the consumption intention of Chinese cuisines. Design/methodology/approach The quantitative data were obtained using a structured questionnaire that is based on Dalian, Liaoning province, of People’s Republic of China. A total of 305 responses were collected, and out of which, 282 were analyzed using structural equation modeling. Findings The results indicate that food novelty and utilitarian value are better predictors of consumption intention of Chinese cuisines. The food quality is also found to be significant with consumption of Chinese cuisines. The variety seeking behavior of consumers found to mediate the relationship of food quality, food novelty and utilitarian value with consumption intention toward Chinese cuisines. Originality/value The contribution made by the current study is twofold. First, the value of study lies in identifying the factors that are responsible for food consumption intention of foreigners in China, which is an overlooked area in the previous literature. Second, the study also establishes the role of variety seeking behavior of consumers in consumption intention. The authoritative construct of variety seeking behavior matches well with the context of the current study, as the Chinese cuisine is well renowned in the world for its wide variety. Further, the findings are valuable to the stakeholders of restaurant industry in guiding them on how best they can attract foreign consumers toward local Chinese cuisines.
      Citation: International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research
      PubDate: 2018-07-09T10:23:47Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCTHR-05-2017-0061
       
  • Experiencing local Turkish hospitality in Istanbul, Turkey
    • First page: 223
      Abstract: International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to investigate tourists’ experiences of local hospitality and offer a typology of Turkish hospitality based on perspectives of international tourists. Design/methodology/approach Semi-structured interviews were conducted with tourists visiting Istanbul, Turkey. Interview transcripts were content-analyzed and -coded under different themes that characterize local hospitality. Findings The research findings revealed 64 items describing local Turkish hospitality. These were grouped under four distinct themes: sociability, care, helpfulness and generosity. Research limitations/implications Using the factors of local Turkish hospitality identified in this paper, future studies might measure the impacts of these antecedents of local hospitality on tourist satisfaction and positive behaviors such as loyalty and word of mouth in a quantitative study. Exploring local hospitality in different destinations with different characteristics might also reveal valuable insight into variance and intensity of local hospitality. Practical implications The research findings have implications for both commercial hospitality and destination management. By leveraging the local hospitality elements in their operations and human resources management practices, the commercial hospitality firms might create strong emotional bonds with their guests and create loyalty through these relationships. Destination planning and management might also adopt the findings to facilitate interactions between the hosts and tourists for more positive experiences for both sides to emerge. Social implications Destinations exposed to heavy visitation may not have the same level of hospitableness toward visitors. Hence, impact of tourism activity on local quality of life should be monitored and managed. Originality/value Despite hospitality having been researched in numerous previous studies, local hospitality has not yet been fully explored in tourism. This study presents and discusses empirical findings and offers a typology of local Turkish hospitality.
      Citation: International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research
      PubDate: 2018-06-13T08:14:33Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCTHR-06-2017-0070
       
  • Is tourism really an escape from everyday life' Everyday leisure
           activities vs leisure travel activities of expats and emirati nationals
           living in the UAE
    • First page: 238
      Abstract: International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The purpose of this study is to understand the linkage between everyday life activities with its various aspects of leisure and the leisure-related activities undertaken when traveling as a tourist. This comparison is based on information from individuals who take on both the roles of the everyday person and the traveling tourist. Moreover, as the study is based in the UAE, a multi-cultural country, leisure activities between local residents and expatriates living in UAE are contrasted as part of the investigation. Design/methodology/approach A newly modified International Social Survey Program about Leisure Time questionnaire was used in this study to define a comprehensive list of leisure activities. This was distributed to a sample of local residents and expats living in the UAE in 2015. Pearson χ2 was used to understand the association between everyday leisure activities and travel leisure activities. Findings The results show statistically significant differences in everyday leisure activities between expats and Emirati nationals living in UAE. Moreover, a moderate (V = 0.21; p = 0.25) strength of associations between everyday activities and travel leisure activities was found in the overall sample of all UAE residents. Research limitations/implications A non-probability sampling method was used to collect the data, and no general conclusions about the segments or the total population of residents can be made at this point. However, the sample size is sufficient to examine the proposed model and understand the differences between the two resident segments (Emirati nationals vs expats) and to compare the differences in behavior between everyday leisure and tourism-related leisure activities. Practical implications These findings are recommended for consideration by tourism authorities, holiday destination managers and trip organizers when targeting UAE residents, both Emirati nationals and expats. Social implications As a relation between everyday activities and travel activities was confirmed, the typical tourism motivation assumption that people are traveling to escape the everyday should be reconsidered. In addition, a managerial conclusion is that Emirati nationals and expats should be considered as two distinct groups when devising, preparing and marketing the leisure activities for the market in the UAE. Originality/value The problem of separating tourism travel from everyday life, as the common perspective of the time, was to treat tourism simply as a temporary escape from everyday life. This research enters this same area and attempts to fill the academic gap and address this issue which, to our knowledge, no specific studies have investigated or exposed the relationship between common everyday leisure activities and special travel leisure activities.
      Citation: International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research
      PubDate: 2018-06-14T11:22:07Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCTHR-01-2017-0009
       
 
 
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