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Publisher: Emerald   (Total: 341 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 341 Journals sorted alphabetically
A Life in the Day     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Academia Revista Latinoamericana de Administración     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.178, CiteScore: 1)
Accounting Auditing & Accountability J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31, SJR: 1.71, CiteScore: 3)
Accounting Research J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.144, CiteScore: 0)
Accounting, Auditing and Accountability J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 2.187, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Accounting Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.279, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Appreciative Inquiry     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.451, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Autism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.222, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Dual Diagnosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46, SJR: 0.21, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Gender Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.16, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Intl. Marketing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 71, SJR: 0.296, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
African J. of Economic and Management Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.216, CiteScore: 1)
Agricultural Finance Review     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.406, CiteScore: 1)
Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 198, SJR: 0.354, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Annals in Social Responsibility     Full-text available via subscription  
Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.235, CiteScore: 1)
Arts and the Market     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Asia Pacific J. of Innovation and Entrepreneurship     Open Access  
Asia Pacific J. of Marketing and Logistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.425, CiteScore: 1)
Asia-Pacific J. of Business Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.234, CiteScore: 1)
Asian Association of Open Universities J.     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian Education and Development Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.233, CiteScore: 1)
Asian J. on Quality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Asian Review of Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.222, CiteScore: 1)
Aslib J. of Information Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.725, CiteScore: 2)
Aslib Proceedings     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 296)
Assembly Automation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.603, CiteScore: 2)
Baltic J. of Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.309, CiteScore: 1)
Benchmarking : An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.559, CiteScore: 2)
British Food J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.5, CiteScore: 2)
Built Environment Project and Asset Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.46, CiteScore: 1)
Business Process Re-engineering & Management J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Business Strategy Series     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Career Development Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.527, CiteScore: 2)
China Agricultural Economic Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.31, CiteScore: 1)
China Finance Review Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.245, CiteScore: 0)
Chinese Management Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.278, CiteScore: 1)
Circuit World     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.246, CiteScore: 1)
Collection Building     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.296, CiteScore: 1)
COMPEL: The Intl. J. for Computation and Mathematics in Electrical and Electronic Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.22, CiteScore: 1)
Competitiveness Review : An Intl. Business J. incorporating J. of Global Competitiveness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.274, CiteScore: 1)
Construction Innovation: Information, Process, Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.731, CiteScore: 2)
Corporate Communications An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.453, CiteScore: 1)
Corporate Governance Intl. J. of Business in Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.336, CiteScore: 1)
Critical Perspectives on Intl. Business     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.378, CiteScore: 1)
Cross Cultural & Strategic Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.504, CiteScore: 2)
Development and Learning in Organizations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.138, CiteScore: 0)
Digital Library Perspectives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.341, CiteScore: 1)
Direct Marketing An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Disaster Prevention and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.47, CiteScore: 1)
Drugs and Alcohol Today     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 131, SJR: 0.245, CiteScore: 1)
Education + Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Education, Business and Society : Contemporary Middle Eastern Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.707, CiteScore: 3)
Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Employee Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.551, CiteScore: 2)
Engineering Computations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.444, CiteScore: 1)
Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.653, CiteScore: 2)
English Teaching: Practice & Critique     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.417, CiteScore: 1)
Equal Opportunities Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Equality, Diversity and Inclusion : An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.5, CiteScore: 1)
EuroMed J. of Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.26, CiteScore: 1)
European Business Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.585, CiteScore: 3)
European J. of Innovation Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.454, CiteScore: 2)
European J. of Management and Business Economics     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.239, CiteScore: 1)
European J. of Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.971, CiteScore: 2)
European J. of Training and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.477, CiteScore: 1)
Evidence-based HRM     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.537, CiteScore: 1)
Facilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.503, CiteScore: 2)
Foresight     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.34, CiteScore: 1)
Gender in Management : An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.412, CiteScore: 1)
Grey Systems : Theory and Application     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Health Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.421, CiteScore: 1)
Higher Education, Skills and Work-based Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46, SJR: 0.426, CiteScore: 1)
History of Education Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.26, CiteScore: 0)
Housing, Care and Support     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.171, CiteScore: 0)
Human Resource Management Intl. Digest     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.129, CiteScore: 0)
Humanomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.333, CiteScore: 1)
IMP J.     Hybrid Journal  
Indian Growth and Development Review     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.174, CiteScore: 0)
Industrial and Commercial Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.301, CiteScore: 1)
Industrial Lubrication and Tribology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.334, CiteScore: 1)
Industrial Management & Data Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.904, CiteScore: 3)
Industrial Robot An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.318, CiteScore: 1)
Info     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Information and Computer Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.307, CiteScore: 1)
Information Technology & People     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43, SJR: 0.671, CiteScore: 2)
Interactive Technology and Smart Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.191, CiteScore: 1)
Interlending & Document Supply     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
Internet Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37, SJR: 1.645, CiteScore: 5)
Intl. J. for Lesson and Learning Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.324, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. for Researcher Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Intl. J. of Accounting and Information Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.275, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Bank Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.654, CiteScore: 3)
Intl. J. of Climate Change Strategies and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.353, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Clothing Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.318, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Commerce and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Conflict Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.362, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Contemporary Hospitality Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 1.452, CiteScore: 4)
Intl. J. of Culture Tourism and Hospitality Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.339, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Development Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.139, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.387, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Educational Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.559, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Emergency Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.201, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Emerging Markets     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.474, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Energy Sector Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.349, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Entrepreneurial Behaviour & Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.629, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Event and Festival Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.388, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Gender and Entrepreneurship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.445, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Health Care Quality Assurance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.358, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Health Governance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.247, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Housing Markets and Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.211, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Human Rights in Healthcare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.205, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Information and Learning Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.226, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Innovation Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.197, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Intelligent Computing and Cybernetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.214, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Intelligent Unmanned Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Islamic and Middle Eastern Finance and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.375, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Law and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.217, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Law in the Built Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.227, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Leadership in Public Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Intl. J. of Lean Six Sigma     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.802, CiteScore: 3)
Intl. J. of Logistics Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.71, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Managerial Finance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.203, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Managing Projects in Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.36, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Manpower     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.365, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Mentoring and Coaching in Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.426, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Migration, Health and Social Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.307, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Numerical Methods for Heat & Fluid Flow     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.697, CiteScore: 3)
Intl. J. of Operations & Production Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 2.052, CiteScore: 4)
Intl. J. of Organizational Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.268, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Pervasive Computing and Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.138, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.25, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.821, CiteScore: 4)
Intl. J. of Prisoner Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.303, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Productivity and Performance Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.578, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Public Sector Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.438, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Quality & Reliability Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.492, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Quality and Service Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.309, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Retail & Distribution Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.742, CiteScore: 3)
Intl. J. of Service Industry Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Social Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.225, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Sociology and Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49, SJR: 0.3, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.269, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Structural Integrity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.228, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Sustainability in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.502, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Tourism Cities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.502, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Web Information Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.186, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Wine Business Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.562, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Workplace Health Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.303, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. Marketing Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.895, CiteScore: 3)
Irish J. of Occupational Therapy     Open Access  
ISRA Intl. J. of Islamic Finance     Open Access  
J. for Multicultural Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.237, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Accounting & Organizational Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.301, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Accounting in Emerging Economies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
J. of Adult Protection, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.314, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Advances in Management Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
J. of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44, SJR: 0.222, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.108, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Applied Accounting Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.227, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Applied Research in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48, SJR: 0.2, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Asia Business Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.245, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Assistive Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
J. of Business & Industrial Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.652, CiteScore: 2)
J. of Business Strategy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.333, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Centrum Cathedra     Open Access  
J. of Children's Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.243, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Chinese Economic and Foreign Trade Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.2, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Chinese Entrepreneurship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
J. of Chinese Human Resource Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.173, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Communication Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.625, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Consumer Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.664, CiteScore: 2)
J. of Corporate Real Estate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.368, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Criminal Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 120, SJR: 0.268, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Criminological Research, Policy and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46, SJR: 0.254, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.257, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Documentation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 171, SJR: 0.613, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Economic and Administrative Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
J. of Economic Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.733, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Educational Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.252, CiteScore: 2)
J. of Enabling Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.369, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Engineering, Design and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.212, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Enterprise Information Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.827, CiteScore: 4)
J. of Enterprising Communities People and Places in the Global Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.281, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Entrepreneurship and Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.262, CiteScore: 1)
J. of European Industrial Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
J. of European Real Estate Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.268, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Facilities Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.33, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Family Business Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
J. of Fashion Marketing and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.608, CiteScore: 2)
J. of Financial Crime     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 367, SJR: 0.228, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Financial Economic Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.186, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Financial Management of Property and Construction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.309, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Financial Regulation and Compliance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.159, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Financial Reporting and Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
J. of Forensic Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56, SJR: 0.205, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Global Mobility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.377, CiteScore: 1)

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Journal Cover
Information Technology & People
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.671
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 43  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0959-3845
Published by Emerald Homepage  [341 journals]
  • Benefits realisation from IT-enabled innovation
    • Pages: 618 - 645
      Abstract: Information Technology & People, Volume 31, Issue 3, Page 618-645, June 2018.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to address the call for more public sector empirical studies on benefits realisation (BR), to contribute to the literature on BR as a dynamic capability (DC) within the context of IT-enabled innovation in a public sector context and to highlight the challenges facing organisations if they adopt a BR competence and capability framework. Design/methodology/approach The empirical research conducted within this paper is an exploratory survey. Exploratory surveys are particularly useful when investigating a little known phenomenon and can help to uncover or provide preliminary evidence of association among concepts. This survey was a census of all National Health Service acute hospital trusts in England. Findings The study indicates that most hospitals that participated in the survey have a basic approach to BR and have yet to develop a more mature approach that would provide the strong micro-foundations of a BR capability. Research limitations/implications The BR framework that has been the basis of the survey is interesting in terms of its components but is limited with regards to the micro-foundations of a benefits realisation capability within an organisation. The research suggests that organisations in the public sector need to focus much more on staff development and recruitment in the area of BR to ensure that they have the appropriate skills sets for a rapidly changing environment. Originality/value The paper proposes a framework for BR capabilities and IT-enabled change, and suggests that although the concept of maturity is valuable when considering the micro-foundations of BR, DCs change and respond to stimuli within the external and internal environment and must be renewed and refreshed regularly.
      Citation: Information Technology & People
      PubDate: 2018-05-08T12:33:02Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ITP-06-2015-0151
       
  • Facebook users’ loneliness based on different types of interpersonal
           relationships
    • Pages: 646 - 665
      Abstract: Information Technology & People, Volume 31, Issue 3, Page 646-665, June 2018.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to investigate: first, the effects of a user’s grandiosity on the loneliness of another user on Facebook who detected it in terms of his/her well-being status; second, the mediational role of envy between grandiosity and loneliness; and, third, whether different effects are given on narcissism, envy, and loneliness depending on social or para-social relationships on Facebook. Design/methodology/approach This study’s focus is to investigate how observing others’ grandiose behaviors impact on individuals’ feeling of loneliness. The authors propose that this relationship is mediated by the feeling of envy. The authors further postulate that social relationships that participants may have with other Facebook users would play a key role in feeling different types of envy (i.e. malicious vs benign). Therefore, the current study employed a 2 (levels of grandiosity: high vs low) × 2 (social relationship: para-social vs social) between-subjects design. Findings The authors found that one’s grandiosity as reflected on Facebook significantly affects other users’ loneliness through malicious envy. However, no moderated mediation via envy (either benign or malicious) was found within the social relationship group. Originality/value Social comparison generated by the use of Facebook was found to have an effect on the user’s loneliness through the mediation of envy. In particular, the possibility that such effects could be triggered in para-social relationships was identified.
      Citation: Information Technology & People
      PubDate: 2018-05-02T08:10:06Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ITP-04-2016-0095
       
  • The effects of online trust-building mechanisms on trust and repurchase
           intentions
    • Pages: 666 - 687
      Abstract: Information Technology & People, Volume 31, Issue 3, Page 666-687, June 2018.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to extend the current literature on trust-building mechanisms in e-commerce and provide a comprehensive view of how the perceived usefulness of three types of online trust-building mechanisms affects trust in the e-seller and trust in the e-marketplace, which, in turn, shape the customer repurchase intentions. Design/methodology/approach Survey data were collected from 193 eBay customers to test the proposed research model. Findings The study found that the perceived usefulness of seller-based mechanism affects both trust in the e-marketplace and trust in the e-seller. Meanwhile, the perceived usefulness of experience-based mechanism only influences trust in the e-seller and the perceived usefulness of institution-based mechanism (IBM) only affects trust in the e-marketplace. Furthermore, this study found that trust in the e-marketplace can substitute for the effect of trust in the e-seller on customer repurchase intentions. Practical implications In an e-marketplace like eBay that does not involve much in the transaction process, e-sellers should invest more resources in building attractive and informative websites about their products and organizations. Moreover, e-marketplace owners should provide guidelines and enforce policies to improve the perceived usefulness of an IBM to increase an e-marketplace’s credibility. While such e-marketplace credibility does not affect customer repurchase intentions directly, it reduces customer concerns about individual e-sellers, which makes it easier for e-sellers to retain customers. Originality/value This study delineates how the perceived usefulness of three types of online trust-building mechanisms imposes different effects on trust in the e-marketplace and trust in the e-seller. Moreover, this study reveals the intertwined relationship between trust in the e-marketplace and trust in the e-seller that is different from extant studies conducted in marketplaces like Amazon.
      Citation: Information Technology & People
      PubDate: 2018-05-04T02:13:23Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ITP-10-2016-0242
       
  • Social value and online social shopping intention: the moderating role of
           experience
    • Pages: 688 - 711
      Abstract: Information Technology & People, Volume 31, Issue 3, Page 688-711, June 2018.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to explore how the shoppers’ social value perception affects their purchase intention in online shopping context through its distinct role and relationships with other value dimensions. The moderating effect of the characteristics of other members on the relationship among value dimensions and the difference of value perception between experienced and inexperienced members were also tested to identify the boundary conditions of the proposed model. Design/methodology/approach The survey included 272 consumers from a well-known social shopping website in China to test the hypotheses. Findings The results indicate that hedonic and utilitarian value fully mediate the relationship between social value and purchase intention. Perceived expertise positively moderates the relationship between social value and the other two values. In particular, the results found that while inexperienced members can acquire both higher utilitarian and hedonic value from social value and their purchase intention relies more on the hedonic value, experienced members place greater emphasis on the utilitarian value. Practical implications The results may help vendors regain confidence in the social shopping business mode and offer specific policy implications on how to leverage shoppers’ social value perception to generate their purchase intention in a social shopping context. Originality/value This study focuses on the legitimacy of the independent role of social value and sheds light on the relationships among social value and other value dimensions based on social capital theory, which was under-explored by previous studies. Besides, this study clarifies the moderating role of experience, which highlights the previously unnoticed changing role of consumers’ value perception.
      Citation: Information Technology & People
      PubDate: 2018-05-16T12:23:06Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ITP-10-2016-0236
       
  • Perceptions of control legitimacy in information systems development
    • Pages: 712 - 740
      Abstract: Information Technology & People, Volume 31, Issue 3, Page 712-740, June 2018.
      Purpose Existing studies of information systems development (ISD) control commonly examine controller-centric considerations, such as the antecedents and performance impacts of control mode choices. In contrast, little is known about the controllee-centric factors that may influence the effectiveness of control activities. Drawing on institutional theory, the purpose of this paper is to introduce the concept of control legitimacy to the ISD literature – a concept that past organizational research has linked to outcomes such as employee commitment and performance. Specifically, the authors explore how different dimensions of control activities (mode, degree, style) relate to controllee perceptions of control legitimacy in terms of justice, autonomy, group identification, and competence development. Design/methodology/approach Interviews were conducted with 20 practitioners across three companies. A structured data coding approach was employed and analysis was conducted within and across each case study. Findings The authors find that the control degree and control style can help explain control legitimacy perceptions better than control modes alone. For example, the results suggest that formal controls enacted in a bilateral style correspond with higher perceptions of justice and autonomy, when compared to formal controls enacted in a unilateral style. Originality/value The study results imply that ISD managers should be increasingly mindful of enacting controls in a way that is perceived to be legitimate by subordinates, thereby potentially enhancing both staff well-being and ISD performance.
      Citation: Information Technology & People
      PubDate: 2018-05-04T02:00:23Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ITP-11-2016-0275
       
  • Exploring the dual-role of cognitive heuristics and the moderating effect
           of gender in microblog information credibility evaluation
    • Pages: 741 - 769
      Abstract: Information Technology & People, Volume 31, Issue 3, Page 741-769, June 2018.
      Purpose Although microblogs have become an important information source, the credibility of their postings is still a critical concern due to the open and unregulated nature. To understand the antecedents of microblog information credibility, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the dual-role of cognitive heuristics (i.e. the additivity and bias roles) and the effect of gender differences. Design/methodology/approach This study collected data via an online field survey of active microblog users, and a total of 204 valid responses was received. Findings This study demonstrates the dual-role of source credibility and vividness, the additivity role of microblog platform credibility, and the bias role of social endorsement. Furthermore, this study also found out gender difference that the additivity role of cognitive heuristics was stronger for men while bias role was stronger for women. Research limitations/implications This research enriches the microblog literature by examining the cognitive heuristic determinants as key predictors of microblog information credibility, and contributes to the information credibility literature by identifying and analyzing the dual-role effect of cognitive heuristics and corresponding gender differences. Practical implications This study can help organizations better manage their reputation, especially during the reputation crises, and also serves as a reminder to microblog platform operators of the importance of their microblog platform credibility. Social implications This study can help organizations better manage their reputation, especially during the reputation crises, and serves as a reminder to the microblog platform operators of the importance of their microblog platform credibility. Originality/value This study investigates the dual-role effect of cognitive heuristics (i.e. the additivity role and bias role) and corresponding gender differences that are less touched on before, and thus provides a more nuanced understanding of the more complex effects of cognitive heuristics.
      Citation: Information Technology & People
      PubDate: 2018-05-16T12:26:26Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ITP-12-2016-0300
       
  • Child online safety and parental intervention: a study of Sri Lankan
           internet users
    • Pages: 770 - 790
      Abstract: Information Technology & People, Volume 31, Issue 3, Page 770-790, June 2018.
      Purpose Today’s world of digital and mobile media does not require actual physical contact, between the suitable target and the motivated offender, as with traditional crime. In fact, as Mesch (2009) contended that the internet is not merely an information channel but it creates a new space of activities for children, where they are exposed to motivated offenders and the actors of fourth party. Therefore, for the sake of children’s safety, the practice of parental mediation control is increasingly becoming more pertinent everyday. Thus, the purpose of this paper is to examine how parental mediation control in Sri Lanka is influenced by their internet self-efficacy, their experience as online victims and their trust in online users. Design/methodology/approach This paper uses a unique data set of computer and internet users from Sir Lanka to examine parental intervention in their children’s online activities. Specifically, the data set contains 347 responses from computer and internet users. To analyze the data, the authors use a binary dependent (probit) model. Findings The results show that such factors alter the baseline probability of parental intervention. However, some differences are found between younger and older parents, with the latter group responding more to trust in online users and victimization experience while the former is mainly driven from computer self-efficacy. In particular, the older group is less likely to trust online internet users in terms of never adding unknown persons in the social media. Finally, being self-employed and an older parent has a positive effect on the likelihood of adopting parental controls, possibly because of the non-pecuniary attributes of self-employment. Originality/value This study adds to the emerging parental mediation control literature by looking at the likelihood of younger and older parents who were victims of cybercrimes, who have greater internet self-efficacy and lower online third-party trust to adopt parental mediation control behaviors. Also another contribution to the literature is the role of occupation type on parental monitoring behaviors.
      Citation: Information Technology & People
      PubDate: 2018-05-14T01:22:56Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ITP-09-2016-0213
       
  • Tapping into the wearable device revolution in the work environment: a
           systematic review
    • Pages: 791 - 818
      Abstract: Information Technology & People, Volume 31, Issue 3, Page 791-818, June 2018.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to expand current knowledge about the recent trend of wearable technology to assess both its potential in the work environment and the challenges concerning the utilisation of wearables in the workplace. Design/methodology/approach After establishing exclusion and inclusion criteria, an independent systematic search of the ACM Digital Library, IEEE Xplore, ScienceDirect and Web of Science databases for relevant studies was performed. Out of a total of 359 articles, 34 met the selection criteria. Findings This review identifies 23 categories of wearable devices. Further categorisation of the devices based on their utilisation shows they can be used in the work environment for activities including monitoring, augmenting, assisting, delivering and tracking. The review reveals that wearable technology has the potential to increase work efficiency among employees, improve workers’ physical well-being and reduce work-related injuries. However, the review also reveals that technological, social, policy and economic challenges related to the use of wearable devices remain. Research limitations/implications Many studies have investigated the benefits of wearable devices for personal use, but information about the use of wearables in the work environment is limited. Further research is required in the fields of technology, social challenges, organisation strategies, policies and economics to enhance the adoption rate of wearable devices in work environments. Originality/value Previous studies indicate that occupational stress and injuries are detrimental to employees’ health; this paper analyses the use of wearable devices as an intervention method to monitor or prevent these problems. Introducing a categorisation framework during implementation may help identify which types of device categories are suitable and could be beneficial for specific utilisation purposes, facilitating the adoption of wearable devices in the workplace.
      Citation: Information Technology & People
      PubDate: 2018-05-14T01:20:54Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ITP-03-2017-0076
       
  • Explaining the emergence of team agility: a complex adaptive systems
           perspective
    • Pages: 819 - 844
      Abstract: Information Technology & People, Volume 31, Issue 3, Page 819-844, June 2018.
      Purpose Agile software development helps software producing organizations to respond to manifold challenges. While prior research focused on agility as a project or process phenomenon, the authors suggest that agility is an emergent phenomenon on the team level. The paper aims to discuss this issue. Design/methodology/approach Using the theory of complex adaptive systems (CASs), the study captures the multiple influencing levels of software development teams (SDTs) and their interplay with self-organization and emergence. The authors investigate three agile SDTs in different contextual environments that participate with four or more different roles each. Findings The results suggest self-organization as a central process when understanding team agility. While contextual factors often provide restriction on self-organization, they can help the team to enhance its autonomy. Research limitations/implications The theoretical contributions result from the development and test of theory grounded propositions and the investigation of mature agile development teams. Practical implications The findings help practitioners to improve the cost-effectiveness ratio of their team’s operations. Originality/value The study provides empirical evidence for the emergence of team agility in agile SDTs. Using the lens of CAS, the study suggests the importance of the team’s autonomy.
      Citation: Information Technology & People
      PubDate: 2018-05-08T01:54:44Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ITP-04-2017-0125
       
  • Tertiary-level internet users’ opinions and perceptions of cyberhate
    • Pages: 845 - 868
      Abstract: Information Technology & People, Volume 31, Issue 3, Page 845-868, June 2018.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to elaborate the opinions and perceptions of internet users regarding online hate speech, and bring cyberhate to the attention of internet users and policy stakeholders. Design/methodology/approach A sectional research design and survey method was adopted throughout the study to examine the opinions and perceptions of internet users regarding cyberhate by descriptively exploring the existing situation from various perspectives. The participants of the study were determined by purposive sampling methods to attain maximum variety among internet users who are considered as highly literate in technology use. The data were collected through a personal data form and a survey (Cyberhate Perception Scale) from 372 internet users living in Turkey and the USA. Findings The findings of the study revealed that the majority of participants do not perceive cyberhate as a part of freedom of speech and they believe that online hate behaviors, which they also consider to be a violation of human rights, should be deemed illegal and be punished accordingly. The findings, which were discussed in line with the existing research, indicated some significant predictors of internet users’ perceptions on cyberhate. Originality/value As cyberhate is an understudied area that raises concerns in terms of internet user exposure, the objective of this research is to understand tendencies about the opinions and perceptions of internet users regarding online hate speech, and bring cyberhate to the attention of internet users and policy stakeholders.
      Citation: Information Technology & People
      PubDate: 2018-05-14T01:25:15Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ITP-05-2017-0147
       
  • The role of internet in stock market participation: just a matter of
           habit'
    • Pages: 869 - 885
      Abstract: Information Technology & People, Volume 31, Issue 3, Page 869-885, June 2018.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to adopt a behavioural approach to explain how the internet use influences stock market participation (SMP) decisions. Design/methodology/approach Drawing on the literature on sociability and SMP, this paper analyses whether virtual sociability affects SMP decision in a sample of 34,715 individuals in 14 European countries. Findings The results show that internet users are more likely to be stockowners. However, the obtained evidence does not support either an informational effect or a social multiplier effect of the virtual sociability. After controlling by the country’s SMP rates, a positive effect of internet usage on SMP decision remains, suggesting that contextual factors matter rather than internet usage per se. Thus, in countries where individuals are “used” to being stockholders, the habit of using internet increases SMP, but the “breeding ground” is a necessary condition. Originality/value The massive use of the internet provides a valuable opportunity to find evidence of the frictional costs which would act as inhibitors of the SMP, as economic theory hypothesised. After some promising results, the differences in the evolution of both the SMP and internet usage rates have not confirmed the initial enthusiasm. In addition, the question of why the SMP rates systematically differ across countries still remains open.
      Citation: Information Technology & People
      PubDate: 2018-05-16T12:32:30Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ITP-06-2017-0191
       
  • Does product design matter' Exploring its influences in consumers’
           psychological responses and brand loyalty
    • Pages: 886 - 907
      Abstract: Information Technology & People, Volume 31, Issue 3, Page 886-907, June 2018.
      Purpose Unique product design is a highlight of sustainable branding. The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether product design affects customers’ psychological responses (i.e. cognitive and affective responses) to smartphones, and, in turn, affects their brand loyalty (i.e. attitudinal and behavioral brand loyalty), further advancing the knowledge of product design and brand management. Design/methodology/approach This work used survey data from 456 Taiwanese with experience using smartphone. Structural equation modeling was employed to test the proposed model and hypotheses. Findings The results indicate that the product design significantly affects both cognitive response and affective response, which, in turn, significantly affect both attitudinal brand loyalty and behavioral brand loyalty. The findings also suggest that the moderating effect of product involvement on the relationship between product design and affective response is statistically significant, although it does not positively and significantly moderate the link between product design and cognitive response. Research limitations/implications This study has two main limitations. First, this study was conducted in the context of smartphones, thus potentially constraining the generalization of the results to other industries. Second, the data in this study were obtained from a cross-sectional design. Practical implications These findings can permit companies to generate more brand loyalty in their customers and guide their management of assets and marketing activities. Originality/value This paper presents new insights into the nature and importance of product design in brand value.
      Citation: Information Technology & People
      PubDate: 2018-05-08T12:31:20Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ITP-07-2017-0206
       
  • Software platform establishment: effectuation and entrepreneurial
           awareness
    • Abstract: Information Technology & People, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose Faced with environments rife with technological uncertainties, software platforms have gained interest as enablers of innovative businesses and development processes. While extant research has focused on mature platforms, the authors know less about the early phases in a platform’s life cycle. Drawing inspiration from the effectual perspective on entrepreneurship, the purpose of this paper is to further the understanding of how software platforms are established. Design/methodology/approach The authors develop a framework that describes four types of entrepreneurial awareness and then apply it to a qualitative case study of a platform that has emerged from the initial “creation” phase and is now in a period of rapid growth. Findings The study indicates that successful establishment of a software platform depends upon the provider’s ability to integrate business acumen with technical proficiency and leverage these combined skills to ensure short-term viability and long-term relevance in the market. Research limitations/implications This paper contributes to literature on platform strategy, which has previously focused on mature platforms, by addressing entrepreneurial behavior during a software platform’s establishment. As it is based on a single qualitative study, additional studies of different platforms are needed to verify the results. Originality/value The paper highlights the dependence of software platform establishment on the ability to enact both explorative and exploitative activity patterns, and embrace both strategic foresight and systemic insight cognitive patterns. The combined patterns of activity and cognition form four types of awareness, pertaining to markets, resources, technology and contexts.
      Citation: Information Technology & People
      PubDate: 2018-07-17T06:19:23Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ITP-11-2016-0285
       
  • Are users competent to comply with information security policies' An
           analysis of professional competence models
    • Abstract: Information Technology & People, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose Information security policies (ISPs) are used by organizations to communicate rules on the use of information systems (IS). Research studies show that compliance with the ISPs is not a straightforward issue and that several factors influence individual behavior toward ISP compliance, such as security awareness or individual perception of security threats. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the competencies associated with users’ ISP compliance behavior. Design/methodology/approach In order to reveal the competencies that are associated with the users’ ISP compliance behavior, the authors systematically analyze the ISP compliance literature and the authors develop an ISP compliance competency model. The authors then target to explore if IS users are equipped with these competencies; to do so, the authors analyze professional competence models from various industry sectors and compare the competencies that they include with the developed ISP compliance competencies. Findings The authors identify the competencies associated with ISP compliance and the authors provide evidence on the lack of attention in information security responsibilities demonstrated in professional competence frameworks. Research limitations/implications ISP compliance research has focused on identifying the antecedents of ISP compliance behavior. The authors offer an ISP compliance competency model and guide researchers in investigating the issue further by focusing on the professional competencies that are necessary for IS users. Practical implications The findings offer new contributions to practitioners by highlighting the lack of attention on the information security responsibilities demonstrated in professional competence frameworks. The paper also provides implications for the design of information security awareness programs and information security management systems in organizations. Originality/value To the best of the authors’ knowledge, the paper is the first study that addresses ISP compliance behavior from a professional competence perspective.
      Citation: Information Technology & People
      PubDate: 2018-07-17T06:06:22Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ITP-02-2017-0052
       
  • Impact of referral reward program on innovative customers’ follow-up
           e-referral
    • Abstract: Information Technology & People, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose With the rise of customer engagement in online products and services innovation, enterprises are seeking effective referral reward program (RRP) to encourage customers’ follow-up electronic-referral (e-referral) behaviors. Therefore, how to stimulate more customers to participate in the RRP is very important to enterprises. However, little empirical work has systemically investigated the impact of RRP on customers’ follow-up e-referral, as well as the moderating effects of customers’ characteristics. To fill those research gaps, the purpose of this paper is to explore the effects of RRP (particularly, reward amount and reward type) on customers’ follow-up e-referral, and the role of creative self-efficacy. Design/methodology/approach Based on the self-perception theory and the context of online customer innovation, this paper establishes a theoretical model and uses an experiment with 160 participants to test the hypotheses on the role of reward (amount and type) and the moderating effect of creative self-efficacy. Findings The results of the experiment suggest that both reward amount and reward type in RRP positively impact customers’ follow-up e-referral. Furthermore, customers’ creative self-efficacy moderates the relationship between rewards and customers’ follow-up e-referral. Customers with low creative self-efficacy, reward amount significantly stimulate their follow-up e-referral, but such effect is insignificant when customers’ creative self-efficacy is high. In terms of reward type, gift reward has more positive effect on customers’ follow-up e-referral when they have high (rather than low) creative self-efficacy, but cash reward has more positive effect on those with low (rather than high) creative self-efficacy. Originality/value First, based on the self-perception theory, the study clarifies the inconsistent relationship between reward and customers’ e-referral and contributes to related research. Second, the study broadens the existing research perspective by introducing creative self-efficacy, which shows interesting and powerful moderating effect but has been ignored in previous studies. Third, the study provides valuable advice on how enterprises design an effective RRP to enhance customers’ follow-up e-referral.
      Citation: Information Technology & People
      PubDate: 2018-07-16T07:47:34Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ITP-06-2017-0188
       
  • How digital natives make their self-disclosure decisions: a cross-cultural
           comparison
    • Abstract: Information Technology & People, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose Digital natives have become significant users of social network sites (SNSs); therefore, their disclosed personal information can be misused by SNS providers and/or other users. The purpose of this paper is to understand how digital natives make their self-disclosure decisions on SNSs, as well as whether the concept of culture can still be relevant to digital natives. Design/methodology/approach The hypotheses were tested with survey data collected from the USA and China. Findings The results show that trust in SNSs and trust in SNS users are positively related to social rewards. Social rewards are positively related to intention to self-disclose, while privacy risk is positively related to privacy concerns. Further, culture significantly moderates the relationship between trust and social rewards. Research limitations/implications The study clarifies the effects of different types of trust on privacy in the context of SNSs. Further, the study shows the effects of culture when digital natives make self-disclosure decisions. Practical implications SNS providers also need to focus on different types of trust when operating in different cultural contexts. Further, SNS providers expanding their markets should emphasize social rewards to increase the likelihood of self-disclosure. Originality/value The results show that while culture can still be helpful to explain digital natives’ trust beliefs, digital natives have started to converge regarding their perceptions about privacy concerns and self-disclosure.
      Citation: Information Technology & People
      PubDate: 2018-07-16T07:44:55Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ITP-10-2017-0339
       
  • Gamification in aquarium context
    • Abstract: Information Technology & People, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to consider issues related to gamification through the non-game aquarium context and explore how the intention of aquarium visitors to play a game that imparts knowledge about marine animals and promotes the conservation of these animals is influenced by visitors’ attitudes toward marine animals, motivations to visit the aquarium and perceptions of the game’s benefits. Design/methodology/approach This study surveyed individuals who have visited Taiwan’s National Museum of Marine Biology and Aquarium at least once in the past three years and who use smartphones. They were shown a description of a hypothetical game scenario that they were asked to imagine to be available while at the aquarium. The partial least squares method was used to analyze the data from 225 returns. Findings The study shows that gamification can satisfy a visitor’s desire to learn and enjoy the aquarium simultaneously. Gamification is limited by the visit motivation and the attitudes toward marine animals that visitors bring with them. The usefulness of gamification is limited when visitors desire relaxation during the visit. Originality/value This study considers the application of gamification in the context of aquariums and the tourism field and the non-technology-related antecedents to the use of gamification. Gamification is not silver bullet for every situation, and a good understanding of potential users is important for its success and targeting of players. The importance of intrinsic benefits over extrinsic benefits is confirmed. Thus, this study addresses several gaps in the gamification literature.
      Citation: Information Technology & People
      PubDate: 2018-07-13T02:49:36Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ITP-02-2017-0054
       
  • Intention to donate via social network sites (SNSs)
    • Abstract: Information Technology & People, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to explore the differences in the external factors influencing intention to donate via social network sites (SNSs), and the online donation knowledge and awareness effect on the willingness to donate via SNS in the future between Malaysian and South Korean users. Design/methodology/approach In total, 288 samples’ data obtained from online survey using the snowball technique were analyzed through using cross-tabulation with χ2 tests and multiple regression analysis. Findings The results show that there is no significant difference between those countries regarding the online donation knowledge and awareness. However, the online donation knowledge and awareness significantly affect the willingness to donate via SNSs for South Korean, but not for Malaysian. As for Malaysian, the results reveal that only SNS features factor does significantly influence the attitude toward online donations. As for South Korean, the charity project and internet technology features factor significantly influence the attitude toward online donations. The attitude toward online donations of both countries influences on their intention to donate via SNS. Research limitations/implications The sample was gathered from certain regions in Malaysia and South Korea, and had slightly unbalanced characteristics (i.e. age), limiting the generalizability to the general population of both countries. Practical implications The findings suggest that non-profit organizations should consider the culture context in planning their future SNS donation program and focus on how to deal with the internet issues (e.g. trust, security), SNS features and charity project. As for Malaysian, promoting the internet and online donation awareness should be the priority before engaging in SNS donation program. Originality/value Whilst research on culture context in donation area is plentiful, the area of SNS donation remains underexplored. This paper offers an in-depth understanding of what influences SNS donation related to the identified culture context.
      Citation: Information Technology & People
      PubDate: 2018-07-13T02:47:01Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ITP-12-2015-0307
       
  • Impact of BYOD on organizational commitment: an empirical investigation
    • Abstract: Information Technology & People, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose Bring your own device (BYOD) refers to employees utilizing their personal mobile devices to perform work tasks. Drawing on the job demands-resources (JD-R) model and the task-technology fit (TTF) model, the purpose of this paper is to develop a model that explains how BYOD affects employee well-being (through job satisfaction), job performance self-assessment, and organizational commitment through perceived job autonomy, perceived workload and TTF. Design/methodology/approach Survey data from 400 full-time employees in different industry sectors in Mauritius were used to test a model containing 13 hypotheses using confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling. Findings The SEM results support the hypothesized model. Findings indicate that BYOD indirectly affects job satisfaction, job performance and organizational commitment via job demands (perceived workload), job resources (perceived job autonomy) and TTF. Further, job resources influences job demands while TTF predicted job performance. Finally, job satisfaction and job performance self-assessment appear to be significant determinants of organizational commitment. Practical implications The findings are congruent with the JD-R and TTF models, and confirm that BYOD has an impact on job satisfaction, job performance self-assessment and organizational commitment. This could inform organizations’ policies and practices relating to BYOD, leading to improved employee well-being, performance and higher commitment. Originality/value The expanded model developed in this study explains how employee well-being, performance and organizational commitment are affected by BYOD, and is one of the first studies to investigate these relationships.
      Citation: Information Technology & People
      PubDate: 2018-07-12T03:01:01Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ITP-11-2017-0378
       
  • Organizational cloud security and control: a proactive approach
    • Abstract: Information Technology & People, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to unfold the perceptions around additional security in cloud environments by highlighting the importance of controlling mechanisms as an approach to the ethical use of the systems. The study focuses on the effects of the controlling mechanisms in maintaining an overall secure position for the cloud and the mediating role of the ethical behavior in this relationship. Design/methodology/approach A case study was conducted, examining the adoption of managed cloud security services as a means of control, as well as a large-scale survey with the views of IT decision makers about the effects of such adoption to the overall cloud security. Findings The findings indicate that there is indeed a positive relationship between the adoption of controlling mechanisms and the maintenance of overall cloud security, which increases when the users follow an ethical behavior in the use of the cloud. A framework based on the findings is built suggesting a research agenda for the future and a conceptualization of the field. Research limitations/implications One of the major limitations of the study is the fact that the data collection was based on the perceptions of IT decision makers from a cross-section of industries; however the proposed framework should also be examined in industry-specific context. Although the firm size was indicated as a high influencing factor, it was not considered for this study, as the data collection targeted a range of organizations from various sizes. Originality/value This study extends the research of IS security behavior based on the notion that individuals (clients and providers of cloud infrastructure) are protecting something separate from themselves, in a cloud-based environment, sharing responsibility and trust with their peers. The organization in this context is focusing on managed security solutions as a proactive measurement to preserve cloud security in cloud environments.
      Citation: Information Technology & People
      PubDate: 2018-07-12T02:59:00Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ITP-04-2017-0131
       
  • Examining situational continuous mobile game play behavior from the
           perspectives of diversion and flow experience
    • Abstract: Information Technology & People, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to investigate users’ continuous adoption behaviors on mobile game playing from the perspective of situational habit formation. Design/methodology/approach Based on the literature research, a continuous adoption model for situational mobile game is proposed. And the research model is assessed based on data gathered from a sample of 226 mobile game players by employing the structural equation model methodology. Findings The results show that situational cues represented by availability, perceived ease of use and diversion lead to repeated performance that can be represented by flow experience and satisfaction in the situational mobile game playing context. But only flow experience and diversion influence continuous usage directly. Additionally diversion, as a critical situational variable, not only indirectly affects continuous usage intention through flow experience, but also directly affects continuous usage intention for situational mobile game playing. Originality/value Mobile game adoption has been studied from different perspectives, but most research is based on the technology acceptance model. They could not explain the common fact that young people tend to be highly motivated by mobile games and can be regarded as pro-active mobile game players, but many people play mobile games only when they are bored and need a diversion. So this study attempts to illustrate the phenomena to fill the gaps.
      Citation: Information Technology & People
      PubDate: 2018-07-12T02:39:16Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ITP-02-2016-0042
       
  • Consumers’ understanding of autonomous driving
    • Abstract: Information Technology & People, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to explore consumers’ understanding of autonomous driving by comparing perceptions of occasional drivers (ODs) and frequent drivers (FDs). Design/methodology/approach Data were gathered through semi-structured interviews with 41 drivers. Their responses were categorized into thematic categories or topics on the basis of content analysis, and the topics were structured based on the core-periphery model. Finally, the authors visualized the structure on a perceptual map by adopting a maximum tree approach. Findings Respondents’ understanding of autonomous driving were categorized into 10 topics. There were significant differences in topics and their relationships between ODs and FDs. Findings also show that FD can better detect hazardousness from autonomous driving environments than ODs. Research limitations/implications Differently from prior studies’ focus on its technological aspect and some derived benefits, the study examines it from the viewpoint of consumers, who are critical participants in the dissemination of autonomous driving. Practical implications The findings suggest that rather than focusing on developing the highest level of autonomous cars, developing in an evolutionary way by adding automated functions to existing cars can be the better strategy to dominate the autonomous vehicle market. Originality/value This study is a pioneering work in that it can be an initial empirical work on autonomous driving from the customer standpoint.
      Citation: Information Technology & People
      PubDate: 2018-07-09T09:35:02Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ITP-10-2017-0338
       
  • When did fun become so much work
    • Abstract: Information Technology & People, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to investigate the negative impact the invasive nature of social media technologies (SMTs) can have on a user’s continued intention to use it. Design/methodology/approach In order to understand the impact technology invasiveness (TI) has on people’s continued SMT behavior, a research model and corresponding survey were developed based on a comprehensive literature review and data collected from actual SMT users. Findings The authors found perceived usefulness has a large impact on user’s attitudes. Additionally, social networking (SN) has a significant and direct impact on both attitude toward the use of the SMT and its continued use. Another interesting finding is how strongly SN increases a user’s TI. The negative impact technology has on users’ lives comes from the need users feel to continue to update and manage their online persona. Practical implications Social media tools are becoming part of the workplace environment. If not careful, companies may introduce increased pressures on their workers to constantly be “connected” to SMTs. In order to obtain the advantages of SMT usage, companies would be wise to set expectation standards that alleviate some of this pressure. Social implications This growth in social media would lead one to assume that all is well with SMTs and their usage is similar to other web-based technologies. However, there are some negative effects of SMT that warrant society and companies pausing to rethink the focus on these technologies. Originality/value Previous research has looked at IT from system success and acceptance. In this paper, we investigate the negative impact the invasive nature of SMTs can have on a user’s continued intention to use it.
      Citation: Information Technology & People
      PubDate: 2018-07-06T12:48:37Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ITP-10-2016-0239
       
  • How to keep brand fan page followers' The lens of person-environment
           fit theory
    • Abstract: Information Technology & People, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose Companies create brand fan pages (BFPs) on social media platforms to broadcast product information, increase brand awareness and engage customers. A common challenge facing BFPs is how to attract and retain followers effectively. Through the lens of the theory of person–environment fit (TPEF), the purpose of this paper is to develop and validate a theoretical model to explain the role of multidimensional fit perceptions in cultivating BFP users’ continued following intention. Design/methodology/approach Data collected from 193 active followers of BFPs on Sina Weibo, the most prevalent social media platform in China, were used to test the proposed model. The partial least squares method was employed to assess the relationships in the model. Findings The findings reveal that users will continue to follow the BFP if their needs align with what the BFP provides, and if they perceive their values and characteristics to match those of the brand and fellow followers. Originality/value This study is among the first to extend the research context of the TPEF from organizational behaviors to examining how perceived fit influences users’ continued intention to follow in the social media context. In addition to the theoretical contributions, the findings of this study have important implications for practitioners who undertake social media management or user behavior analysis.
      Citation: Information Technology & People
      PubDate: 2018-07-06T12:46:36Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ITP-04-2016-0076
       
  • Promoting uncommon use of knowledge in information system departments
    • Abstract: Information Technology & People, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to gain a clear understanding of the impact of uncommon use of knowledge (adaptation and augmentation) on the performance of information systems (IS) departments, and to explore the effects of human-resources management (HRM) practices on uncommon use of knowledge. Design/methodology/approach A questionnaire-based survey was used to measure the constructs of the research model. A survey package was delivered to project managers or team leads and 133 responses were returned. Findings The empirical results indicate that knowledge adaptation has a significant effect on departmental performance, whereas knowledge augmentation is more important to innovation than to routine departmental performance. The results also show that, while knowledge adaptation can be enhanced by communication and an uncertainty-avoidance culture, knowledge augmentation is an outcome of shared decision-making, the use of teams, and innovation-based policies. Research limitations/implications Given the positive impact of uncommon use of knowledge on IS department performance, future research should explore other factors besides HRM practices to boost it. Practical implications The results can serve as guidance for managers looking to select HRM practices to promote uncommon use of knowledge. Originality/value This study introduces knowledge adaptation and knowledge augmentation as the component processes of uncommon use of knowledge to the IS discipline, and empirically validates the antecedents and consequences of uncommon use of knowledge using survey data.
      Citation: Information Technology & People
      PubDate: 2018-07-06T01:13:40Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ITP-09-2016-0215
       
  • Technological media and development
    • Abstract: Information Technology & People, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to characterize and identify the existing studies on the relationship between technological media and development Design/methodology/approach The authors conducted a systematic mapping study to identify and analyze the related literature. The authors identified 196 primary studies, dated from 2000 to 2017 and categorized them with respect to research focus, types of research and research method. Findings A total of 97 studies were identified and mapped, synthesizing the available evidence on the relationship between technological media and development. “Social development” with 54 articles and “communication” with 34 articles were the dominant research focus. Regarding the research type, “Solution proposal” is the most frequently employed research type. “Case study,” “discussion paper” and “interview,” respectively were the most used research methods. However, “SNA,” “focus group” and “time series” were used less often. “Solution proposal” was the most common research type between 2015 and 2017, and after that “philosophical paper” was the dominant research paper type. Further, the number of publications has increased between 2006 and 2017. Originality/value This mapping study is the first systematic exploration of the state-of-art on technological media-development nexus. The existing body of knowledge is limited to a few high quality studies.
      Citation: Information Technology & People
      PubDate: 2018-07-06T01:11:40Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ITP-11-2017-0383
       
  • The impact of relationship between IT staff and users on employee outcomes
           of IT users
    • Abstract: Information Technology & People, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose Firms invest much money in information technology (IT) since IT support has been recognized as a critical enabler of employee outcomes. However, the value obtained by organizations and their employees is not always as much as they anticipated because of, at least partly, a poor relationship between IT staff and users. The purpose of this paper is to apply the social capital theory to examine relationship management between IT and business and explores mechanisms through which social capital between IT staff and users affect users’ employee outcomes, including job satisfaction and job performance. Design/methodology/approach Based on social capital theory and past literature, the researchers propose a research model and explore the effect of social capital on knowledge sharing, IT users’ perceived service quality, job satisfaction and ultimately job performance. Based on a survey of 289 respondents, this study applies the partial least square technique to test the research model. Findings Mediation test was performed to explore the effect mechanisms of social capital on employee outcomes, and the results indicate that three dimensions of social capital affect IT users’ job satisfaction and job performance in different approaches. Originality/value This study uses social capital theory to direct how to improve the poor relationship between IT staff and users and provides a useful insight into the mechanisms through which three dimensions of social capital improve users’ job satisfaction and job performance.
      Citation: Information Technology & People
      PubDate: 2018-07-02T03:43:42Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ITP-03-2017-0075
       
 
 
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