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Publisher: Emerald   (Total: 335 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 335 Journals sorted alphabetically
A Life in the Day     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Academia Revista Latinoamericana de Administración     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.144, h-index: 4)
Accounting Auditing & Accountability J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Accounting Research J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.26, h-index: 7)
Accounting, Auditing and Accountability J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.88, h-index: 40)
Advances in Accounting Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.514, h-index: 5)
Advances in Appreciative Inquiry     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.124, h-index: 5)
Advances in Autism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Dual Diagnosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48, SJR: 0.228, h-index: 2)
Advances in Gender Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.229, h-index: 7)
Advances in Intl. Marketing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.123, h-index: 11)
Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56, SJR: 0.29, h-index: 5)
Advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
African J. of Economic and Management Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.125, h-index: 2)
Agricultural Finance Review     Hybrid Journal  
Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 143, SJR: 0.391, h-index: 18)
American J. of Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Annals in Social Responsibility     Full-text available via subscription  
Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.215, h-index: 25)
Arts and the Market     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Asia Pacific J. of Marketing and Logistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.244, h-index: 15)
Asia-Pacific J. of Business Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.182, h-index: 7)
Asian Association of Open Universities J.     Open Access  
Asian Education and Development Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Asian J. on Quality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Asian Review of Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.29, h-index: 7)
Aslib J. of Information Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.65, h-index: 29)
Aslib Proceedings     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 202)
Assembly Automation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.657, h-index: 26)
Baltic J. of Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.354, h-index: 14)
Benchmarking : An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.556, h-index: 38)
British Food J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.329, h-index: 35)
Built Environment Project and Asset Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.232, h-index: 4)
Business Process Re-engineering & Management J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.614, h-index: 42)
Business Strategy Series     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.201, h-index: 6)
Career Development Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.686, h-index: 32)
China Agricultural Economic Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.238, h-index: 10)
China Finance Review Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Chinese Management Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.216, h-index: 12)
Circuit World     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.346, h-index: 17)
Collection Building     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.829, h-index: 10)
COMPEL: The Intl. J. for Computation and Mathematics in Electrical and Electronic Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.269, h-index: 22)
Competitiveness Review : An Intl. Business J. incorporating J. of Global Competitiveness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Construction Innovation: Information, Process, Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.508, h-index: 8)
Corporate Communications An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.703, h-index: 26)
Corporate Governance Intl. J. of Business in Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.309, h-index: 29)
Critical Perspectives on Intl. Business     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.32, h-index: 15)
Cross Cultural & Strategic Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.356, h-index: 13)
Development and Learning in Organizations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.138, h-index: 8)
Digital Library Perspectives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Direct Marketing An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Disaster Prevention and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.533, h-index: 32)
Drugs and Alcohol Today     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 110, SJR: 0.241, h-index: 4)
Education + Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.532, h-index: 30)
Education, Business and Society : Contemporary Middle Eastern Issues     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.141, h-index: 10)
Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies     Hybrid Journal  
Employee Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.435, h-index: 22)
Engineering Computations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.387, h-index: 39)
Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.541, h-index: 28)
Equal Opportunities Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Equality, Diversity and Inclusion : An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.239, h-index: 9)
EuroMed J. of Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.145, h-index: 9)
European Business Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.481, h-index: 21)
European J. of Innovation Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.596, h-index: 30)
European J. of Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.933, h-index: 55)
European J. of Training and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.489, h-index: 23)
Evidence-based HRM     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Facilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.371, h-index: 18)
Foresight     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.486, h-index: 20)
Gender in Management : An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.359, h-index: 22)
Grey Systems : Theory and Application     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Health Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.383, h-index: 17)
Higher Education, Skills and Work-based Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41, SJR: 0.172, h-index: 4)
History of Education Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.141, h-index: 2)
Housing, Care and Support     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.174, h-index: 4)
Human Resource Management Intl. Digest     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.121, h-index: 6)
Humanomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.14, h-index: 4)
IMP J.     Hybrid Journal  
Indian Growth and Development Review     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.163, h-index: 4)
Industrial and Commercial Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.217, h-index: 14)
Industrial Lubrication and Tribology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.322, h-index: 19)
Industrial Management & Data Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.63, h-index: 69)
Industrial Robot An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.375, h-index: 32)
Info     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.25, h-index: 21)
Information and Computer Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Information Technology & People     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45, SJR: 0.576, h-index: 28)
Interactive Technology and Smart Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.112, h-index: 1)
Interlending & Document Supply     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60, SJR: 0.48, h-index: 13)
Internet Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43, SJR: 1.746, h-index: 57)
Intl. J. for Lesson and Learning Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. for Researcher Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Intl. J. of Accounting and Information Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.304, h-index: 7)
Intl. J. of Bank Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.515, h-index: 38)
Intl. J. of Climate Change Strategies and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.416, h-index: 7)
Intl. J. of Clothing Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.279, h-index: 25)
Intl. J. of Commerce and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Conflict Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.763, h-index: 38)
Intl. J. of Contemporary Hospitality Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.329, h-index: 35)
Intl. J. of Culture Tourism and Hospitality Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.399, h-index: 5)
Intl. J. of Development Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Intl. J. of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.225, h-index: 7)
Intl. J. of Educational Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.424, h-index: 32)
Intl. J. of Emergency Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.179, h-index: 1)
Intl. J. of Emerging Markets     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.199, h-index: 5)
Intl. J. of Energy Sector Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.25, h-index: 12)
Intl. J. of Entrepreneurial Behaviour & Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.694, h-index: 28)
Intl. J. of Event and Festival Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.32, h-index: 8)
Intl. J. of Gender and Entrepreneurship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.638, h-index: 6)
Intl. J. of Health Care Quality Assurance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.352, h-index: 32)
Intl. J. of Health Governance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.277, h-index: 15)
Intl. J. of Housing Markets and Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.201, h-index: 5)
Intl. J. of Human Rights in Healthcare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.13, h-index: 2)
Intl. J. of Information and Learning Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Intl. J. of Innovation Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.173, h-index: 5)
Intl. J. of Intelligent Computing and Cybernetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.258, h-index: 10)
Intl. J. of Intelligent Unmanned Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.145, h-index: 2)
Intl. J. of Islamic and Middle Eastern Finance and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Intl. J. of Law and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.107, h-index: 2)
Intl. J. of Law in the Built Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.111, h-index: 2)
Intl. J. of Leadership in Public Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Intl. J. of Lean Six Sigma     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.562, h-index: 15)
Intl. J. of Logistics Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.998, h-index: 15)
Intl. J. of Managerial Finance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.212, h-index: 11)
Intl. J. of Managing Projects in Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Manpower     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.354, h-index: 37)
Intl. J. of Mentoring and Coaching in Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Intl. J. of Migration, Health and Social Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.261, h-index: 5)
Intl. J. of Numerical Methods for Heat & Fluid Flow     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.594, h-index: 32)
Intl. J. of Operations & Production Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 2.198, h-index: 94)
Intl. J. of Organizational Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.222, h-index: 11)
Intl. J. of Pervasive Computing and Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.165, h-index: 9)
Intl. J. of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.304, h-index: 12)
Intl. J. of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.694, h-index: 66)
Intl. J. of Prisoner Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.254, h-index: 10)
Intl. J. of Productivity and Performance Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.785, h-index: 31)
Intl. J. of Public Sector Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.272, h-index: 37)
Intl. J. of Quality & Reliability Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.544, h-index: 63)
Intl. J. of Quality and Service Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.133, h-index: 1)
Intl. J. of Retail & Distribution Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.543, h-index: 36)
Intl. J. of Service Industry Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Social Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.227, h-index: 25)
Intl. J. of Sociology and Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46, SJR: 0.361, h-index: 5)
Intl. J. of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship     Hybrid Journal  
Intl. J. of Structural Integrity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.325, h-index: 8)
Intl. J. of Sustainability in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.616, h-index: 29)
Intl. J. of Tourism Cities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Web Information Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.208, h-index: 13)
Intl. J. of Wine Business Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.196, h-index: 12)
Intl. J. of Workplace Health Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.358, h-index: 8)
Intl. Marketing Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.076, h-index: 57)
J. for Multicultural Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.124, h-index: 11)
J. of Accounting & Organizational Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.346, h-index: 7)
J. of Accounting in Emerging Economies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
J. of Adult Protection, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.291, h-index: 7)
J. of Advances in Management Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
J. of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47, SJR: 0.177, h-index: 9)
J. of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
J. of Applied Accounting Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.22, h-index: 5)
J. of Applied Research in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
J. of Asia Business Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.115, h-index: 1)
J. of Assistive Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.215, h-index: 6)
J. of Business & Industrial Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.664, h-index: 48)
J. of Business Strategy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.381, h-index: 17)
J. of Centrum Cathedra     Open Access  
J. of Children's Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.167, h-index: 9)
J. of Chinese Economic and Foreign Trade Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.188, h-index: 4)
J. of Chinese Entrepreneurship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
J. of Chinese Human Resource Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.112, h-index: 3)
J. of Communication Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.735, h-index: 6)
J. of Consumer Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.613, h-index: 62)
J. of Corporate Real Estate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.633, h-index: 5)
J. of Criminal Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 106, SJR: 0.13, h-index: 1)
J. of Criminological Research, Policy and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
J. of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.109, h-index: 5)
J. of Documentation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 166, SJR: 0.936, h-index: 50)
J. of Economic and Administrative Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
J. of Economic Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.498, h-index: 26)
J. of Educational Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.848, h-index: 36)
J. of Engineering, Design and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.173, h-index: 10)
J. of Enterprise Information Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.433, h-index: 38)
J. of Enterprising Communities People and Places in the Global Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.212, h-index: 8)
J. of Entrepreneurship and Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
J. of European Industrial Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
J. of European Real Estate Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.52, h-index: 7)
J. of Facilities Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
J. of Family Business Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
J. of Fashion Marketing and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.529, h-index: 30)
J. of Financial Crime     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 326, SJR: 0.158, h-index: 5)
J. of Financial Economic Policy     Hybrid Journal  
J. of Financial Management of Property and Construction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.234, h-index: 1)
J. of Financial Regulation and Compliance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
J. of Financial Reporting and Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
J. of Forensic Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40, SJR: 0.225, h-index: 8)
J. of Global Mobility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
J. of Global Responsibility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
J. of Health Organisation and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.67, h-index: 27)
J. of Historical Research in Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.376, h-index: 8)
J. of Hospitality and Tourism Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.672, h-index: 10)
J. of Human Resource Costing & Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
J. of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)

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Journal Cover Cross Cultural & Strategic Management
  [SJR: 0.356]   [H-I: 13]   [7 followers]  Follow
    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 2059-5794
   Published by Emerald Homepage  [335 journals]
  • The upside of cultural differences: Towards a more balanced treatment of
           culture in cross-cultural management research
    • First page: 2
      Abstract: Cross Cultural & Strategic Management, Volume 24, Issue 1, February 2017.
      Purpose This introductory paper to the Special Issue encourages scholars to look at commonly considered phenomena in international business and cross-cultural research in new ways and to theorize and explore how cultural diversity, distance, and foreignness create value for global organizations. These considerations should result in a more balanced treatment of culture in cross-cultural management research. Design/methodology/approach The idea that there are negative consequences associated with cultural differences is pervasive in hypotheses formulation and empirical testing in international business and cross-cultural management literature, as reflected in widely used constructs such as “cultural distance”, “cultural misfit”, “foreignness”, and related concepts. Consistent with a Positive Organizational Scholarship (POS) perspective on culture and cultural differences, the authors emphasize the positive role of distance and diversity across national, cultural, institutional, and organizational dimensions. In addition, they provide an overview of the contributions to the Special Issue. Findings Examining the positive side of culture is not only beneficial theoretically in terms of filling the existing gaps in the literature, but is also crucial for the practice of international and global business. Accordingly, the contributions to the Special Issue highlight how explicitly considering positive phenomena can help better understand when and how cultural diversity, distance, and foreignness can enhance organizational effectiveness and performance at multiple levels. They include five research papers, a Distinguished Scholar Essay by Kim Cameron, the founder of the POS movement, and an interview piece with Richard Nisbett, a pioneer researcher in culture and cognition. Originality/value The overemphasis on adverse outcomes associated with cultural differences in existing research has hindered our understanding of the processes and conditions that help organizations leverage the benefits of cultural differences in a wide range of contexts. This introductory paper together with the contributions included in the Special Issue showcases the positive dynamics and outcomes associated with cultural differences, distance, and diversity in a wide range of international business contexts.
      Citation: Cross Cultural & Strategic Management
      PubDate: 2017-01-07T12:34:34Z
      DOI: 10.1108/CCSM-11-2016-0191
       
  • Cross-cultural research and positive organizational scholarship
    • First page: 13
      Abstract: Cross Cultural & Strategic Management, Volume 24, Issue 1, February 2017.
      Purpose In view of the emphasis in cross-cultural research on negative factors such as cultural misfit, cultural distance, and the liability of foreignness, this article offers one explanation for why this is the case and highlights the advantages of giving at least equal emphasis to research on positive factors. Three propositions are offered to guide future cross-cultural research. Design/methodology/approach Summaries of empirical studies on the inherent inclinations of human systems toward the negative, as well as inclinations toward the positive, produce explanations for each of these biases and their implications for cross-cultural scholarship. Findings By prioritizing positive factors instead of negative factors, individuals and organizations perform at much higher levels than when the reverse is the case. Virtuous practices, in particular, are associated with positively deviant performance. Inasmuch as virtuousness is universally valued, its emphasis can address some of the liabilities of difference inherent in cross-cultural contexts. Originality/value The three propositions offered in the article explain why negative biases exist, how positive biases provide an advantage to individuals and organizations, and highlight future directions for cross-cultural research. Social scientists have been challenged to help enable 51 percent of the world's population to flourish by mid-century, and prioritizing positive cross-cultural phenomena is one prescription for achieving that objective.
      Citation: Cross Cultural & Strategic Management
      PubDate: 2017-01-07T12:34:38Z
      DOI: 10.1108/CCSM-02-2016-0021
       
  • The double-edged sword of cultural distance in international
           alliances—how perceived cultural distance influences trust and task
           discourse to drive new product development performance
    • First page: 33
      Abstract: Cross Cultural & Strategic Management, Volume 24, Issue 1, February 2017.
      Purpose While previous studies have primarily assumed dysfunctional effects of cultural distance in joint ventures and M&A, this paper elucidates from a Positive Organizational Scholarship (POS) perspective how perceived cultural distance can advance firms’ new product development (NPD) within non-equity alliances. This paper explains how perceived cultural distance stimulates task discourse that supports alliance partners’ employees in recognizing and applying culture-related differences as complementary problem-solving potentials. Due to a lower integration level in non-equity alliances compared to joint ventures or M&A, this paper assumes that the positive effects outweigh the negative effects of cultural distance. Design/methodology/approach This study applies structural equation modeling to test the hypothesized effects on a sample of 246 international alliances in the manufacturing industry. Findings The analysis mainly supports the hypothesized model and unravels how positive effects can emerge from perceived cultural distance. Practical implications The findings provide managerial implications. Alliance managers should note that cultural distance can have positive and negative effects, and thus it is not a barrier per se in alliances. Firms can benefit from cultural distance if they are able to leverage culture-specific complementarities through task discourse among partners in alliances. Originality/value The manuscript uses a unique dataset of 246 international alliances from the global manufacturing industry. The manuscript has not been published elsewhere.
      Citation: Cross Cultural & Strategic Management
      PubDate: 2017-01-07T12:34:44Z
      DOI: 10.1108/CCSM-03-2016-0065
       
  • Creating the asset of foreignness: Schrödinger’s cat and
           lessons from the Nissan revival
    • First page: 55
      Abstract: Cross Cultural & Strategic Management, Volume 24, Issue 1, February 2017.
      Purpose This paper challenges the assumption in cross-cultural research of Liability of Foreignness (LOF). The literature review demonstrates that LOF comes from pressures for isomorphism, while Asset of Foreignness (AOF) can derive from the active process of breaking norms. The study explores how leaders can initiate and sustain AOF. Design/methodology/approach The paper analyzes the case of the Nissan Revival led by Carlos Ghosn and the impact in the years after. The analysis is based on the authors’ interviews and discussions with Ghosn and senior leaders at Nissan and Renault, complemented with published interviews and assessments. Findings Analysis confirmed the potential for AOF, and further uncovered four patterns of behavior that created AOF virtuous cycles among Nissan leaders: initiating trust; shaping identity; anchoring and transcending common language; and acting positively on ignorance. The virtuous cycles were sustainable and transformed into new global strategic perspectives. Research limitations/implications The paper proposes a research model identifying moderators between foreignness and performance. Generalizability is limited by the focus on a single case study. Practical implications The four sets of behaviors can serve as guides to action for leaders when working in foreign contexts. Originality/value This research goes beneath the surface of a famous example to analyze leadership dynamics over time, and provides insight on positive aspects of foreignness.
      Citation: Cross Cultural & Strategic Management
      PubDate: 2017-01-07T12:34:32Z
      DOI: 10.1108/CCSM-12-2015-0194
       
  • Facilitating culturally diverse groups with visual templates in
           collaborative systems: Increasing structuration to improve precision
    • First page: 78
      Abstract: Cross Cultural & Strategic Management, Volume 24, Issue 1, February 2017.
      Purpose The use of visual templates has proven instrumental in supporting group meetings. This study explores whether visual templates enable culturally diverse groups to achieve greater task precision in face-to-face meetings. Design/methodology/approach Building on Adaptive Structuration Theory (AST), it is argued that visual templates provide structuration for face-to-face meetings, even more so when they are embedded in computer-supported collaborative systems. In particular, it is hypothesized that the higher the degree of structuration imposed by visual templates, the higher the degree of task precision will be. It is also hypothesized that this relationship is positively moderated by group cultural diversity: higher cultural diversity will further sustain the positive effects of visual templates that provide higher structuration. Findings Results of an experiment with 229 managers from 49 countries confirm that facilitating groups with visual templates embedded in a computer-supported collaborative system significantly increases task precision at high levels of cultural diversity. Research limitations/implications This study contributes to Positive Organizational Scholarship (POS) by investigating the use of visual templates as a contingency factor that increases performance – specifically task precision – of co-located, culturally diverse groups. Practical implications Results indicate that visual templates embedded in a computer-supported collaborative system are an effective method for increasing task precision in face-to-face meetings of culturally diverse groups. Originality/value Theories from information systems and visualization are integrated into cross-cultural management with a view to sustaining the effectiveness of culturally diverse groups. The study sample is characterized by highly culturally diverse groups interacting in face-to-face meetings.
      Citation: Cross Cultural & Strategic Management
      PubDate: 2017-01-07T12:34:38Z
      DOI: 10.1108/CCSM-12-2015-0200
       
  • Thinking style across cultures: An interview with Richard Nisbett
    • First page: 99
      Abstract: Cross Cultural & Strategic Management, Volume 24, Issue 1, February 2017.
      Purpose The author seeks to gain some insights from a leading scholar of the cross-cultural cognitive social psychology field on how cultural differences are viewed, understood, and dealt with, and thus to contribute to enrich the way cultural differences are framed in cross-cultural management research. Design/methodology/approach The author conducts a formal, semi-structured interview with Richard Nisbett for a duration of 90 minutes. The author extracts the key message from the interview and re-structures the conversation in a meaningful manner. Findings From his cognitive social psychology lens, Richard Nisbett views that any cross-cultural contact between different thinking styles is advantageous because differences help address the limitations of one’s own thinking style. Research limitations/implications The insights from cross-cultural cognitive social psychology encourage cross-cultural management researchers to further investigate the positive consequences of cultural differences. Originality/value Richard Nisbett’s own journey from a young scientist who describes himself as an extreme universalist, to a mature intellectual who understands and appreciates different thinking style, is itself a concrete example of how differences can lead to the positive. The author concludes that such positive outcome seems to have come from at least three essential ingredients from the actor- curiosity and openness to differences, habit of critical thinking, and deep engagement with different others.
      Citation: Cross Cultural & Strategic Management
      PubDate: 2017-01-07T12:34:33Z
      DOI: 10.1108/CCSM-10-2016-0181
       
  • Corporate social responsibility and firms’ cost of equity: How does
           culture matter'
    • First page: 105
      Abstract: Cross Cultural & Strategic Management, Volume 24, Issue 1, February 2017.
      Purpose The paper examines the relationship between CSR and cost of equity in an international context assessing the moderating effect of culture on the relation between CSR and the cost of equity. Design/methodology/approach We use an international sample of 42 countries, and company‐level data from 2002‐2013, to address cross‐country variations in the effects of CSR on cost of equity in different cultural contexts. Findings We first substantiate previous research and show that the more a company is engaged in CSR, the lower its cost of equity. We then find that the relationship between CSR and cost of equity is stronger in countries with lower levels of assertiveness and higher levels of humane orientation and institutional collectivism. Practical implications Our study advances understanding of how national culture promote socially and environmentally responsible behavior. The implementation of CSR strategies depends on cultural norms, so companies need to be sensitive to local demands and adjust their CSR approaches accordingly. Originality/value The paper highlights the need to study how culture influences the relationship between CSR and cost of equity.
      Citation: Cross Cultural & Strategic Management
      PubDate: 2017-01-07T12:34:31Z
      DOI: 10.1108/CCSM-11-2015-0169
       
  • Cross-cultural management education rebooted: Creating positive value
           through scientific mindfulness
    • First page: 125
      Abstract: Cross Cultural & Strategic Management, Volume 24, Issue 1, February 2017.
      Purpose Graduates of cross-cultural management (CCM) courses should be capable of both tackling international and cross-cultural situations and creating positive value from the diversity inherent in these situations. Such value creation is challenging because these situations are typically complex due to differences in cultural values, traditions, social practices and institutions, such as legal rules, coupled with variation in, for example, wealth and civil rights among stakeholders. Design/methodology/approach We argue that a scientific mindfulness approach to teaching CCM can help students identify and leverage positive aspects of differences and thereby contribute to positive change in cross-cultural situations. Findings Scientific mindfulness combines mindfulness and scientific thinking with the explicit goal to drive positive change in the world. Originality/value We explain how the action principles of scientific mindfulness enable learners to build positive value from cultural diversity. We then describe the enactment of these principles in the context of CCM education.
      Citation: Cross Cultural & Strategic Management
      PubDate: 2017-01-07T12:34:36Z
      DOI: 10.1108/CCSM-01-2016-0010
       
  • Components and process in social science explanation: Is there a role for
           Yin-Yang balancing
    • First page: 152
      Abstract: Cross Cultural & Strategic Management, Volume 24, Issue 1, February 2017.
      Purpose To consider the proposal by Peter Li about developing an inclusive research paradigm bringing together Eastern and Western research approaches. To make a proposal for a division of labour in this endeavour. Design/methodology/approach Literature review and consideration of opposing intellectual traditions and their origins. Findings If the Western approach were to deal with structures and institutions, and the Eastern approach were to deal with process, then some progress might be possible towards a valuable fusion. But there may be sociological as well as intellectual reasons why this would be difficult. Research limitations/implications As it is a commentary there are no specific limitations except for what can be covered in the space available. Practical implications If the proposal can be made to bear fruit the chances of much greater East-West collaboration in research are higher. Originality/value The main idea is new.
      Citation: Cross Cultural & Strategic Management
      PubDate: 2017-01-07T12:34:35Z
      DOI: 10.1108/CCSM-11-2016-0195
       
  • An experiment into the impact of foreign languages on cooperative
           behavior: Cultural alienation, and a surprisingly consistent gender effect
           
    • First page: 167
      Abstract: Cross Cultural & Strategic Management, Volume 24, Issue 1, February 2017.
      Purpose We experimentally study the effect of using foreign languages on cooperative behavior in a prisoner’s dilemma setting. The cultural accommodation hypothesis suggests that people are less cooperative in English, associated with the Anglophone cultural cluster, than in French, which is—as is Belgium—associated with the more cooperative Latin-European cultural cluster. Design/methodology/approach Choices are framed as pricing strategies in the context of duopolistic competition. 422 Flemish-Belgium participants with English and French as foreign and Dutch as their native language played in one of three language treatments. Findings While we observe differences between the native and both foreign languages, which are moderated by gender, we do not find any difference in effects between the two foreign languages that are associated with different cultures. Extending cultural accommodation arguments, our data suggests an effect specific to the use of the two selected foreign languages. Originality/value We contribute to this literature by reporting an experimental test of cultural accommodation and alienation effects related to two foreign languages. WE explore novel arguments, relating to cognitive psychology and gender effects.
      Citation: Cross Cultural & Strategic Management
      PubDate: 2017-01-07T12:34:41Z
      DOI: 10.1108/CCSM-01-2016-0008
       
  • Competitive dynamics: Eastern roots, Western growth
    • Pages: 510 - 530
      Abstract: Cross Cultural & Strategic Management, Volume 23, Issue 4, Page 510-530, October 2016.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to bridge the understanding of apparent dichotomies such as East and West, philosophy and social sciences, and antiquity and modernity, and to continue the vibrant expansion of competitive dynamics study into the realm of East-West theoretical fusion. Design/methodology/approach The author looks to classical Chinese philosophy to discover the origins and nature of competitive dynamics. The paper develops the premise that the foundational thrusts of this contemporary Western management topic spring from ancient Eastern conceptions of duality, relativity, and time. Findings Research inroads are made along two paths. First, the paper traces the theoretical and philosophical underpinnings of competitive dynamics to Eastern thinking. Then by bridging what have customarily been perceived as fundamentally different paradigms, it reveals, in a new light, empirical findings in this strategy subfield. Research limitations/implications Linking Western management science, and specifically the study of competitive dynamics, to classical Eastern philosophy raises new research questions in the areas of international management and management education as well as competitive dynamics. In the latter, the paper suggests opportunities for exploring connections between traditional Chinese concepts and contemporary organizational and competition research issues, including competitive and cooperative relationships at the industry level. Future research may also investigate the fundamental differences and similarities between Eastern and Western philosophies, and their implications for competitive strategies. Originality/value From a relatively obscure corner of business academia, competitive dynamics now occupies a distinct place in strategic management research and is a topic of intense interest to scholars in a variety of disciplines. The usual view is that competitive dynamics fits squarely in the spectrum of social sciences, an organically home-grown area of Western study. This paper examines the topic from a distinctly different angle – through the lens of ancient Eastern philosophy – to discern deeper a deeper meaning and wider application.
      Citation: Cross Cultural & Strategic Management
      PubDate: 2016-09-22T07:30:28Z
      DOI: 10.1108/CCSM-05-2016-0098
       
  • Blind spots in global strategy: applications in emerging markets
    • Pages: 531 - 550
      Abstract: Cross Cultural & Strategic Management, Volume 23, Issue 4, Page 531-550, October 2016.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to apply the concept of blind spot to illustrate the misapplication of extant global strategies to emerging markets. The authors discuss cases of multinationals and indigenous local companies to draw insights on firm operations in emerging markets. The authors unpack four specific blind spots that have resonated repeatedly in their operations: an adherence to unqualified scaling, the intractability of localization, the opacity of non-government intervention, and an undue attention to disruption rather than transformation. The study concludes with recommendations that can help companies be better aware of the blind spots and manage more effectively in emerging markets. Design/methodology/approach Conceptual. Findings Four blind spots: an adherence to unqualified scaling, the intransitivity of localization, the illusion of non-government intervention, and an undue attention to disruption rather than transformation. Practical implications The paper is primarily for practitioners. Originality/value This study presents some of the key findings from our previous studies on emerging market issues. The authors recently published four different books on various themes on emerging markets. The findings presented in this paper come strictly from these previous projects.
      Citation: Cross Cultural & Strategic Management
      PubDate: 2016-09-22T07:31:23Z
      DOI: 10.1108/CCSM-02-2016-0039
       
  • Moving towards a geocentric, polycultural theory of organizational paradox
    • Pages: 551 - 557
      Abstract: Cross Cultural & Strategic Management, Volume 23, Issue 4, Page 551-557, October 2016.
      Purpose This paper comments on “Global implications of the indigenous epistemological system from the east” (Li, 2016), which provides an indigenous Chinese perspective on organizational paradox. Li introduces Yin-Yang balancing as an epistemological system that can help scholars examine and practitioners manage paradoxes. In this commentary, the purpose of this paper is to discuss the merits of Yin-Yang balancing and how this approach and other indigenous theories might enrich organizational paradox theory. Design/methodology/approach The authors provide a commentary and suggestions for future research. The authors distinguish between Yin-Yang balancing as a normative theory, a meta-theory and a lay theory. The authors encourage both geocentrism and polycentrism as goals for future paradox research, enabling attention to the diversity of ideas across and within varied cultures. Originality/value The commentary connects Yin-Ying balancing with extant research on organizational paradox.
      Citation: Cross Cultural & Strategic Management
      PubDate: 2016-09-22T07:30:41Z
      DOI: 10.1108/CCSM-06-2016-0124
       
  • Being versus becoming ontology of paradox management
    • Pages: 558 - 562
      Abstract: Cross Cultural & Strategic Management, Volume 23, Issue 4, Page 558-562, October 2016.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to discuss the theoretical contribution of Li’s (2016) “Yin-Yang balancing” approach of paradox management, as well as its future development to guide paradox management research across the east and west contexts. Design/methodology/approach It begins by recognizing the importance of paradox management research, especially the indigenous epistemological approach as Li (2016) has followed. The authors take “being” and “becoming” ontology toward social reality as the basic premise in this commentary, and summarize the knowledge that the study has contributed to existing literature. Findings The “Yin-Yang balancing” approach can extend the knowledge about paradox management phenomena at least from four aspects: the “either/and” frame to view a paradox system, the importance of “seed” or “threshold” in defining moderate rather than extreme groups, duality map as a novel tool for paradox management, and comparison of being and becoming ontology. Originality/value Based on the comparison of “being” and “becoming” ontological view, the authors suggest to further develop this “Yin-Yang balancing” approach by emphasizing the following issues: eastern culture does not have exclusive ownership of the “becoming” ontology toward the world, elaboration of alternative theoretical explanation to win out the identity approach about organizational existence, the linkage between the “Yin-Yang balancing” epistemological system and process research method, and boundary condition of the “Yin-Yang balancing” approach.
      Citation: Cross Cultural & Strategic Management
      PubDate: 2016-09-22T07:30:10Z
      DOI: 10.1108/CCSM-05-2016-0104
       
  • Why replication studies are essential: learning from failure and success
    • Pages: 563 - 568
      Abstract: Cross Cultural & Strategic Management, Volume 23, Issue 4, Page 563-568, October 2016.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to discuss the pervasive problem of a lack of replication studies in international business based on van Witteloostuijn’s (2016) commentary “What happened to Popperian Falsification'” Design/methodology/approach The author presents two short case studies from her own research, one in which no replication studies took place, and one in which a replication study was conducted shortly after the original study was published. Findings The author shows how the lack of replication in the first case study example resulted in the creation of research myths, whereas the judicious replication in her second case study strengthened arguments for a new – less biased – measure of research performance. The author also discusses why most journals in the field are not open to replication studies and provides recommendations on how to move forward. Originality/value Using two real-life case studies provides a vivid illustration of the problems created by a lack of replications and illustrates the benefits of good replication studies.
      Citation: Cross Cultural & Strategic Management
      PubDate: 2016-09-22T07:30:48Z
      DOI: 10.1108/CCSM-07-2016-0133
       
  • Averting risk or embracing opportunity' Exploring the impact of
           ambidextrous capabilities on innovation of Chinese firms in
           internationalization
    • Pages: 569 - 589
      Abstract: Cross Cultural & Strategic Management, Volume 23, Issue 4, Page 569-589, October 2016.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to examine the impacts of ambidextrous capabilities, explorative capability and exploitative capability on product innovation performance in the context of internationalization and cross-cultural environment; and to examine the moderating effects of CEO’s preference of risks and opportunities in the international market on the relationship between ambidextrous capabilities and multinational enterprises’ (MNEs) product innovation performance. Design/methodology/approach Data were collected from 189 MNEs located in China, which develop international business through export, outsourcing, foreign equity investment or foreign direct investment. Measurement reliability and validity were examined and hierarchical linear regression was used to test the hypotheses. Findings Results indicated that both explorative and exploitative capability are positively related to MNEs’ new product development and commercialization of Chinese MNEs; and CEO’s preference of risks and opportunities in international market plays a significant moderating role in the two phases of product innovation. Research limitations/implications This study extends organizational ambidextrous capabilities theory to better understand the effects of explorative capability and exploitative capability on innovation performance in the context of internationalization and national cultural differences. Sample constitution is a possible limitation. Practical implications MNEs, especially those from emerging economies, should develop both explorative and exploitative capability to be flexible and competitive in dealing with cultural differences. fully take risks and opportunities should be taken into consideration regarding the international market and national cultural differences, and take an effective contingency strategy, driven by the ambidextrous capabilities toward new product innovation development and commercialization. Originality/value An empirical examination of how ambidextrous capabilities impact on Chinese MNEs’ new product development and commercialization connects the organizational ambidexterity theory to the innovation and characteristics of upper echelons.
      Citation: Cross Cultural & Strategic Management
      PubDate: 2016-09-22T07:30:22Z
      DOI: 10.1108/CCSM-07-2014-0085
       
  • A failure before analysis: the soup to nuts of preparing for multicountry
           analyses
    • Pages: 590 - 612
      Abstract: Cross Cultural & Strategic Management, Volume 23, Issue 4, Page 590-612, October 2016.
      Purpose A large and growing number of researchers set out to cross-culturally examine empirical relationships. The purpose of this paper is to provide researchers, who are new to multicountry investigations, a discussion of the issues that one needs to address in order to be properly prepared to begin the cross-cultural analyses of relationships. Design/methodology/approach Thus, the authors consider two uniquely different but integrally connected challenges to getting ready to conduct the relevant analyses for just such multicountry studies. The first challenge is to collect the data. The second challenge is to prepare (clean) the collected data for analysis. Accordingly, the authors divide this paper into two parts to discuss the steps involved in both for multicountry studies. Findings The authors highlight the fact that in the process of collecting, there are a number of key issues that should be kept in mind including building trust with new team members, leading the team, and determining sufficient contribution of team members for authorship. Subsequently, the authors draw the reader’s attention to the equally important, but often-overlooked, data cleaning process and the steps that constitute it. This is important because failing to take serious the quality of the data can lead to violations of assumptions and mis-estimations of parameters and effects. Originality/value This paper provides a useful guide to assist researchers who are engaged in data collection and cleaning efforts with multiple country data sets. The review of the literature indicated how truly important a guideline of this nature is, given the expanding nature of cross-cultural investigations.
      Citation: Cross Cultural & Strategic Management
      PubDate: 2016-09-22T07:30:18Z
      DOI: 10.1108/CCSM-05-2016-0105
       
  • Kristine Marin Kawamura, PhD interviews Ikujiro Nonaka, PhD
    • Pages: 613 - 632
      Abstract: Cross Cultural & Strategic Management, Volume 23, Issue 4, Page 613-632, October 2016.

      Citation: Cross Cultural & Strategic Management
      PubDate: 2016-09-22T07:30:38Z
      DOI: 10.1108/CCSM-06-2014-0056
       
  • Bridging the gap between justice and citizenship behavior in Asian culture
    • Pages: 633 - 656
      Abstract: Cross Cultural & Strategic Management, Volume 23, Issue 4, Page 633-656, October 2016.
      Purpose Based on social exchange, equity, and other orientation theories this study examines the effect of organizational justice on two dimensions of employees’ citizenship behavior in the Asian context. Moreover, the purpose of this paper is to investigate whether Islamic work ethic (IWE) can moderate the relationships between organizational justice and two dimensions of citizenship behavior. Design/methodology/approach Data were collected using self-administered questionnaire. In total, 337 employees from Islamic financial institutions in Malaysia participated in the survey. Structural equation modeling specifically partial least square was used to analysis the hypothetical model developed in this study. Findings The finding of this study revealed that justice has direct effect on citizenship behavior directed toward individual and organization alike. These relationships found to be more effective for employees who are high in IWE and weak for employees who are low in IWE. Moreover, the findings of this study provide insight about the validity and reliability of the existing scales pertaining to the study constructs in Asian culture. Practical implications The current study enhance researchers understanding about the crucial role of dispositional variables as moderator in relation to justice and citizenship behavior, confirmed the predictive role of organizational justice in Asian context, and stresses the importance of justice at workplace which can encourage employees to go the extra mile and show good behavior toward their co-workers and/or organization. Originality/value This is a pioneer study that empirically investigates the moderating role of IWE between organizational justice and citizenship behavior, and emphasized the validity and reliability of the used scales in eastern context.
      Citation: Cross Cultural & Strategic Management
      PubDate: 2016-09-22T07:30:59Z
      DOI: 10.1108/CCSM-08-2015-0097
       
 
 
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