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Publisher: Emerald   (Total: 342 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 342 Journals sorted alphabetically
A Life in the Day     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Academia Revista Latinoamericana de Administraci√≥n     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.178, CiteScore: 1)
Accounting Auditing & Accountability J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31, SJR: 1.71, CiteScore: 3)
Accounting Research J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.144, CiteScore: 0)
Accounting, Auditing and Accountability J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 2.187, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Accounting Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.279, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Appreciative Inquiry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.451, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Autism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.222, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Dual Diagnosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47, SJR: 0.21, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Gender Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.16, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Intl. Marketing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 72, SJR: 0.296, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
African J. of Economic and Management Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.216, CiteScore: 1)
Agricultural Finance Review     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.406, CiteScore: 1)
Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 199, SJR: 0.354, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Annals in Social Responsibility     Full-text available via subscription  
Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.235, CiteScore: 1)
Arts and the Market     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Asia Pacific J. of Innovation and Entrepreneurship     Open Access  
Asia Pacific J. of Marketing and Logistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.425, CiteScore: 1)
Asia-Pacific J. of Business Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.234, CiteScore: 1)
Asian Association of Open Universities J.     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian Education and Development Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.233, CiteScore: 1)
Asian J. on Quality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Asian Review of Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.222, CiteScore: 1)
Aslib J. of Information Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.725, CiteScore: 2)
Aslib Proceedings     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 300)
Assembly Automation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.603, CiteScore: 2)
Baltic J. of Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.309, CiteScore: 1)
Benchmarking : An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.559, CiteScore: 2)
British Food J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.5, CiteScore: 2)
Built Environment Project and Asset Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.46, CiteScore: 1)
Business Process Re-engineering & Management J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Business Strategy Series     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Career Development Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.527, CiteScore: 2)
China Agricultural Economic Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.31, CiteScore: 1)
China Finance Review Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.245, CiteScore: 0)
Chinese Management Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.278, CiteScore: 1)
Circuit World     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.246, CiteScore: 1)
Collection Building     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.296, CiteScore: 1)
COMPEL: The Intl. J. for Computation and Mathematics in Electrical and Electronic Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.22, CiteScore: 1)
Competitiveness Review : An Intl. Business J. incorporating J. of Global Competitiveness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.274, CiteScore: 1)
Construction Innovation: Information, Process, Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.731, CiteScore: 2)
Corporate Communications An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.453, CiteScore: 1)
Corporate Governance Intl. J. of Business in Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.336, CiteScore: 1)
Critical Perspectives on Intl. Business     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.378, CiteScore: 1)
Cross Cultural & Strategic Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.504, CiteScore: 2)
Development and Learning in Organizations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.138, CiteScore: 0)
Digital Library Perspectives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.341, CiteScore: 1)
Direct Marketing An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Disaster Prevention and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.47, CiteScore: 1)
Drugs and Alcohol Today     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 135, SJR: 0.245, CiteScore: 1)
Education + Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Education, Business and Society : Contemporary Middle Eastern Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.707, CiteScore: 3)
Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Employee Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.551, CiteScore: 2)
Engineering Computations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.444, CiteScore: 1)
Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.653, CiteScore: 2)
English Teaching: Practice & Critique     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.417, CiteScore: 1)
Equal Opportunities Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Equality, Diversity and Inclusion : An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.5, CiteScore: 1)
EuroMed J. of Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.26, CiteScore: 1)
European Business Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.585, CiteScore: 3)
European J. of Innovation Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.454, CiteScore: 2)
European J. of Management and Business Economics     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.239, CiteScore: 1)
European J. of Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.971, CiteScore: 2)
European J. of Training and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.477, CiteScore: 1)
Evidence-based HRM     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.537, CiteScore: 1)
Facilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.503, CiteScore: 2)
Foresight     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.34, CiteScore: 1)
Gender in Management : An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.412, CiteScore: 1)
Grey Systems : Theory and Application     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Health Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.421, CiteScore: 1)
Higher Education, Skills and Work-based Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47, SJR: 0.426, CiteScore: 1)
History of Education Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.26, CiteScore: 0)
Housing, Care and Support     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.171, CiteScore: 0)
Human Resource Management Intl. Digest     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.129, CiteScore: 0)
Humanomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.333, CiteScore: 1)
IMP J.     Hybrid Journal  
Indian Growth and Development Review     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.174, CiteScore: 0)
Industrial and Commercial Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.301, CiteScore: 1)
Industrial Lubrication and Tribology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.334, CiteScore: 1)
Industrial Management & Data Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.904, CiteScore: 3)
Industrial Robot An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.318, CiteScore: 1)
Info     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Information and Computer Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.307, CiteScore: 1)
Information Technology & People     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44, SJR: 0.671, CiteScore: 2)
Interactive Technology and Smart Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.191, CiteScore: 1)
Interlending & Document Supply     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
Internet Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37, SJR: 1.645, CiteScore: 5)
Intl. J. for Lesson and Learning Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.324, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. for Researcher Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Intl. J. of Accounting and Information Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.275, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Bank Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.654, CiteScore: 3)
Intl. J. of Climate Change Strategies and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.353, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Clothing Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.318, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Commerce and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Conflict Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.362, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Contemporary Hospitality Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 1.452, CiteScore: 4)
Intl. J. of Culture Tourism and Hospitality Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.339, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Development Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.139, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.387, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Educational Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.559, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Emergency Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.201, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Emerging Markets     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.474, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Energy Sector Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.349, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Entrepreneurial Behaviour & Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.629, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Event and Festival Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.388, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Gender and Entrepreneurship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.445, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Health Care Quality Assurance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.358, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Health Governance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.247, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Housing Markets and Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.211, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Human Rights in Healthcare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.205, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Information and Learning Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.226, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Innovation Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.197, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Intelligent Computing and Cybernetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.214, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Intelligent Unmanned Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Islamic and Middle Eastern Finance and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.375, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Law and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.217, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Law in the Built Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.227, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Leadership in Public Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Intl. J. of Lean Six Sigma     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.802, CiteScore: 3)
Intl. J. of Logistics Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.71, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Managerial Finance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.203, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Managing Projects in Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.36, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Manpower     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.365, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Mentoring and Coaching in Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.426, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Migration, Health and Social Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.307, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Numerical Methods for Heat & Fluid Flow     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.697, CiteScore: 3)
Intl. J. of Operations & Production Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 2.052, CiteScore: 4)
Intl. J. of Organizational Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.268, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Pervasive Computing and Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.138, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.25, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.821, CiteScore: 4)
Intl. J. of Prisoner Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.303, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Productivity and Performance Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.578, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Public Sector Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.438, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Quality & Reliability Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.492, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Quality and Service Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.309, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Retail & Distribution Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.742, CiteScore: 3)
Intl. J. of Service Industry Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Social Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.225, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Sociology and Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49, SJR: 0.3, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.269, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Structural Integrity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.228, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Sustainability in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.502, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Tourism Cities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.502, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Web Information Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.186, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Wine Business Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.562, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Workplace Health Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.303, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. Marketing Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.895, CiteScore: 3)
Irish J. of Occupational Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
ISRA Intl. J. of Islamic Finance     Open Access  
J. for Multicultural Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.237, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Accounting & Organizational Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.301, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Accounting in Emerging Economies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
J. of Adult Protection, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.314, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Advances in Management Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
J. of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44, SJR: 0.222, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.108, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Applied Accounting Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.227, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Applied Research in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49, SJR: 0.2, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Asia Business Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.245, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Assistive Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
J. of Business & Industrial Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.652, CiteScore: 2)
J. of Business Strategy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.333, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Centrum Cathedra     Open Access  
J. of Children's Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.243, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Chinese Economic and Foreign Trade Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.2, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Chinese Entrepreneurship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
J. of Chinese Human Resource Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.173, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Communication Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.625, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Consumer Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.664, CiteScore: 2)
J. of Corporate Real Estate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.368, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Criminal Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 127, SJR: 0.268, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Criminological Research, Policy and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44, SJR: 0.254, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.257, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Documentation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 175, SJR: 0.613, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Economic and Administrative Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
J. of Economic Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.733, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Economics, Finance and Administrative Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.217, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Educational Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.252, CiteScore: 2)
J. of Enabling Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.369, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Engineering, Design and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.212, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Enterprise Information Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.827, CiteScore: 4)
J. of Enterprising Communities People and Places in the Global Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.281, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Entrepreneurship and Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.262, CiteScore: 1)
J. of European Industrial Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
J. of European Real Estate Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.268, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Facilities Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.33, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Family Business Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
J. of Fashion Marketing and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.608, CiteScore: 2)
J. of Financial Crime     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 368, SJR: 0.228, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Financial Economic Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.186, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Financial Management of Property and Construction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.309, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Financial Regulation and Compliance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.159, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Financial Reporting and Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
J. of Forensic Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57, SJR: 0.205, CiteScore: 1)

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Journal Cover
Journal of Financial Economic Policy
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.186
Number of Followers: 1  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1757-6385
Published by Emerald Homepage  [342 journals]
  • Dynamics influences of Tobin’s Q and CEO compensation on US stocks
    • Pages: 2 - 16
      Abstract: Journal of Financial Economic Policy, Volume 10, Issue 1, Page 2-16, April 2018.
      Purpose This paper aims to empirically explore the influences of Tobin’s Q and CEO compensation of 249 US companies on their stock returns. Design/methodology/approach Heterogeneous panel data for these companies over 2004-2012 are used invoking panel cointegration techniques. Findings Panel unit root tests and Pedroni cointegration tests confirm nonstationarity of each variable and cointegration among the above three variables. The panel vector error-correction model (VECM) estimates reveal long-run convergence with tepid adjustment. The short-run net interactive feedback effects are positive. The panel generalized method of moments estimates lend further support to the panel VECM inferences. Originality/value The topic is unique and the existing literature on this topic is scant. Relatively new econometric techniques have been applied for estimation using panel data. The results are quite insightful, in the authors’ view.
      Citation: Journal of Financial Economic Policy
      PubDate: 2018-03-16T01:31:50Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JFEP-03-2017-0017
       
  • Banking, insurance and economic growth in India
    • Pages: 17 - 37
      Abstract: Journal of Financial Economic Policy, Volume 10, Issue 1, Page 17-37, April 2018.
      Purpose Understanding the role of financial intermediaries towards financial development and thereby the growth of an economy, this study aims to examine the long-run relationship between the development of banking and insurance sector and economic growth in India by covering different regimes including the regulated and the liberalized period. Design/methodology/approach For examining the long-run relationship between these sectors, the study uses VAR-VECM technique. Further, Granger causality test is used to check if there is the presence of any causal link among these sectors. Findings The findings clearly indicate long-run relationship between economic growth and the development of banking and insurance sector, while the causality results show demand following relationship in the complete period where there is bi-directional causality in the post-liberalized period from insurance to economic growth. Research limitations/implications As banking development is not found to support economic growth, this raises serious concerns towards the complex role of banks as against theory and demands further analysis to understand their role in an economy. Practical implications As causality pattern has changed from demand following to bi-directional causality, it is vital to understand the importance of liberalization towards the economic growth of the country as well as the contribution of insurance sector towards economic growth in the liberalized environment. Originality/value This is the first effort to empirically explore the relationship between economic growth and the development of banking and insurance sector in India by covering the complete period (regulated and liberalized).
      Citation: Journal of Financial Economic Policy
      PubDate: 2018-03-16T01:32:14Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JFEP-03-2017-0022
       
  • Essay on spillovers from advanced economics (AE) to emerging economics
           (EM) during the global financial crisis
    • Pages: 38 - 54
      Abstract: Journal of Financial Economic Policy, Volume 10, Issue 1, Page 38-54, April 2018.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to estimate the bond market linkages between emerging markets (EM) and advanced markets (AM) yields by estimating yield equations for EMs as a function of AM yields and illustrating the quantitative macroeconomic effects on EMs of global yield shocks in a multi-country dynamic stochastic general equilibrium modeling model. Design/methodology/approach The research used a monthly sample of 45 advanced and EM economies covering the period 1998Q1 to 2010Q6. In this paper, the authors have shown that, indeed, there is a spillover effect from AD to EM countries and that most transmission channels, although they vary in significance, are all economically relevant. The main results of the paper underline the importance of international spillover across countries in the financial market. The strongest international transmission of shocks to EM is from the USA and the UK. Findings The authors find evidence that shocks in the volatility index and commodity fuels have a positive and significant impact on EM bond yield. Moreover, shocks in three-month US treasury bills, credit default swap, the London gold price and the Brent petrol price have a significant negative impact on EM bond yield. Finally, the result shows that global external shocks are found to be significant in determining bond yield and causing spillover into the EM. Originality/value These findings are especially important for policy makers in understanding the transmission of shocks in the bond market across different countries, as well as for risk management.
      Citation: Journal of Financial Economic Policy
      PubDate: 2018-03-16T01:32:26Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JFEP-02-2017-0011
       
  • CEO power, corporate risk taking and role of large shareholders
    • Pages: 55 - 72
      Abstract: Journal of Financial Economic Policy, Volume 10, Issue 1, Page 55-72, April 2018.
      Purpose This paper aims to investigate whether a powerful chief executive officer (CEO) impacts corporate risk taking in the distinctive institutional and market setting of China' Second, in case such relationship exists, the paper further aims to investigate whether the presence of large shareholders affects it, and finally, whether this effect of large shareholders varies in state-owned enterprises (SOEs) and non-state-owned enterprises (NSOEs). Design/methodology/approach The authors have used a sample of 1,502 Chinese firms listed on Shanghai and Shenzhen stock exchanges. Sample period is 2008-2013. Besides conventional fixed-effect regression, dynamic panel data estimation (generalized method of moments) is applied to address the potential endogeneity. Findings The results show that CEO power is negatively related with corporate risk taking in two risk proxies, i.e. total risk and idiosyncratic risk. Second, the presence of large shareholders significantly affects this relationship, but does not change the primary negative relationship between CEO power and corporate risk taking. Finally, the results show that the relationship between CEO power and corporate risk taking is different in SOEs and NSOEs. The findings of this paper contend the organizational and behavioral theory viewpoint that individual decisions are more extreme. Practical implications This study provides useful implication for policymakers and suggests that while evaluating CEO’s performance, institutional and market settings should be considered. Originality/value This study provides new insights on the impact of CEO power on corporate risk taking under the two distinctive features in a developing country, i.e. presence of large shareholders and state-owned enterprises.
      Citation: Journal of Financial Economic Policy
      PubDate: 2018-03-16T01:32:05Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JFEP-04-2017-0033
       
  • Access to finance and firm innovation
    • Pages: 73 - 94
      Abstract: Journal of Financial Economic Policy, Volume 10, Issue 1, Page 73-94, April 2018.
      Purpose The study aims to examine the importance of access to finance in firm innovation by using firm-level data from the World Bank enterprise survey (WBES) on selected African countries. Design/methodology/approach This study utilises firm-level data from the WBES database and computes aggregate innovation index by using multiple correspondent analysis. The authors then apply instrumental variable models (to control for possible endogeneity between innovation and finance) to assess the link between finance and innovation. Findings The research finds that finance in the form of overdraft overwhelmingly drives innovation in all selected countries – Cameroon, Kenya, Morocco, Nigeria and South Africa. Trade credit enhances innovation among firms in Nigeria, South Africa and Cameroon, while asset finance drives innovation amongst firms in Cameroon, Nigeria and South Africa. Practical implications Policy incentives such as tax breaks could be put in place for financial intermediaries that have shown proof of extending loans to financially constraint firms to enable them to innovate. Furthermore, different financial institutions such as microfinance institutions can be supported to increase credit to enterprises. Partnerships with organisations willing to fund firms and support start-ups should be encouraged. One of such support mechanisms could be specialised schemes such as a credit guarantee scheme to encourage and secure lending to enterprises to promote innovation. Originality/value This paper provides empirical insights into how finance enhances innovation in African enterprises. It also shows how different finance structures (overdraft, asset finance and trade credit) affect firm innovation in different African countries.
      Citation: Journal of Financial Economic Policy
      PubDate: 2018-03-16T01:32:00Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JFEP-10-2016-0070
       
  • Paradox of external finance in the Indian manufacturing sector
    • Pages: 95 - 111
      Abstract: Journal of Financial Economic Policy, Volume 10, Issue 1, Page 95-111, April 2018.
      Purpose This paper aims to examine how financial development affects the growth of industries that are more dependent on external finance, demystifying the roles played by the banks, stock and bond markets. Design/methodology/approach The authors apply panel fixed-effects and dynamic panel generalized methods of moments on disaggregated industry-level data of the Indian manufacturing sector for the period of 2001-2015 to examine the relationship between financial development, banking market structure and economic growth. Findings The study finds that financial development has a significant impact on the growth process by reducing cost of external finance. Among the three sources of finance, the study finds that while the banking sector has been the most preferred source of external finance, increasing concentration and selective disbursement of credit have continued to dent the prospects of the industry. This paradoxical result explains the dismal performance of the Indian manufacturing sector. Originality/value The effect of financial development (encompassing banking market structure) on economic growth has received sparing attention. Related literature is unclear regarding the impact of banking market structure on the growth process in the context of emerging economies. The authors attempt to fill this important gap in the literature. Moreover, they add novelty to the literature by calculating the external dependence at the firm level, diverging from using US industry as a proxy for calculation of external dependence.
      Citation: Journal of Financial Economic Policy
      PubDate: 2018-03-16T01:32:33Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JFEP-08-2017-0069
       
  • Economic policy uncertainty and stock market liquidity
    • Pages: 112 - 135
      Abstract: Journal of Financial Economic Policy, Volume 10, Issue 1, Page 112-135, April 2018.
      Purpose This study aims to examine the relationship between economic policy uncertainty and stock market liquidity in an order-driven emerging stock market. Design/methodology/approach Empirical estimates are based on vector autoregressive Granger-causality tests, impulse response functions and variance decomposition analysis. Findings The empirical findings suggest that economic policy uncertainty moderately influences stock market liquidity during normal market conditions. However, the role of economic policy uncertainty for determining stock market liquidity is significant in times of financial crises. The authors have also observed a significant portion of variation in stock market liquidity that is attributed to investor sentiments during financial crises. Originality/value This study is original in nature and provides evidence to consider economic policy uncertainty as a possible source of commonality in liquidity in the context of an emerging market.
      Citation: Journal of Financial Economic Policy
      PubDate: 2018-03-16T01:31:43Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JFEP-09-2017-0088
       
  • Modeling the impact of Basel III regulations on loan demand
    • Pages: 136 - 164
      Abstract: Journal of Financial Economic Policy, Volume 10, Issue 1, Page 136-164, April 2018.
      Purpose The purpose of this study is to provide an econometric modeling of demand for bank credit and not only offer useful insights to the decision-makers in the public and private sector but also support researchers and analysts in recognizing the determinants of lending in a major dynamic economic context. Design/methodology/approach This study addresses the “supply-versus-demand-puzzle” by using a demand relationship and model loan demand as a function of interest rates and economic activity that may also capture supply effects. Loan demand modeled as a function of interest rates and economic activity not only represents a demand relationship but also captures supply effects. Using the generalized methods of moments estimation, the estimations are made robust to heteroskedasticity and/or autocorrelation of unknown form. GMM–Time series (HAC) option extends the robustness by using the weighting matrix that is robust to the contemporaneous correlation of unknown form to the autocorrelation of unknown form. Findings In a bank-dominated financial system like India, lending rates play a significant role in the transmission of monetary policy, as well as triggering and controlling loan demand and thereby exercising a pervasive effect on the output in the economy. The estimates indicate that the elasticity of loan demand is largely determined by the lending rate (0.6) and the economic activity (0.688). For one percentage point increase in capital ratio, the loan spread would rise by 31.4 basis points, which in turn would cause an increase of 18.8 basis points in loan demand assuming that risk-weighted assets are unchanged. Originality/value This is the first of its kind studying a banking system dominated emerging economy. Second, this study is based on a rich data set covering the period from 1979 to 2012, than other papers did, to capture the long-run association involving credit booms and busts and, thus, helps in avoiding the problem of estimation spanning the dominance of either boom or the bust alone. With a newer approach for quantification of the impacts of new regulatory standards, this study offers novel insights for the estimation of lending spreads.
      Citation: Journal of Financial Economic Policy
      PubDate: 2018-03-16T01:32:30Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JFEP-06-2017-0057
       
  • Risk and capital in Indonesian large banks
    • Pages: 165 - 184
      Abstract: Journal of Financial Economic Policy, Volume 10, Issue 1, Page 165-184, April 2018.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to examine the behavior of banking risk in the emerging economies, particularly Indonesia and contribute to the discussion on the existing policy debate regarding the impact of capital on bank risk. Design/methodology/approach This study investigates the relationship between bank risk and capital using data on 15 Indonesian large banks between 2008 and 2015, using z-score and Delta-CoVaR to measure both idiosyncratic and systemic risks. Findings The empirical investigation suggests that capital has a negative and significant relationship with these risk measures. The authors also find that higher systemic risk encourages banks to increase their capital. However, similar evidence is not found in the idiosyncratic risk models. Finally, the role of capital in reducing risk is considered robust only during the normal periods, as banks may increase their assets risk during times of financial distress. Originality/value Systemic risk (CoVaR) is used to represent bank risk. This study focuses on the Indonesian banking sector (capture institutional arrangements and regulatory environment). It covers the period of 2008 GFC and post-crisis period.
      Citation: Journal of Financial Economic Policy
      PubDate: 2018-03-16T01:32:21Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JFEP-06-2017-0055
       
  • A policymaker’s dilemma: real linkages or irrational behaviors'
    • Pages: 185 - 200
      Abstract: Journal of Financial Economic Policy, Volume 10, Issue 1, Page 185-200, April 2018.
      Purpose This paper aims to test whether the latest global financial crisis propagated contagiously from the USA to the rest of the world. Design/methodology/approach If the reason of the propagation of a crisis is a normal time interdependence with the crisis origin country due to real linkages, the spread of crisis can be limited by implementing well-defined preventive policies. On the other hand, if a crisis propagates because of the speculative attacks or irrational behaviors, the “national policymakers will face difficulties in protecting their markets from such a crisis” (Kleimeier et al., 2003, p. 2). Therefore, separation of contagion and interdependence may provide crucial insights for policymakers to implement appropriate policies to prevent and/or stop the financial crisis. Hence, this paper compares the heteroscedasticity-corrected conditional correlations and dynamic conditional correlations in the tranquil and shock periods. Findings The findings were quite straightforward and consistent for both Forbes and Rigobon heteroscedasticity correction technique and dynamic conditional correlation (DCC) model. The Forbes and Rigobon technique failed to reject the null of no contagion for 25 countries in our data sample, while the DCC model failed to reject the null of no contagion for 21 countries. While heteroscedasticity-corrected correlation technique confirmed the presence of a contagion for six countries, the DCC technique confirmed the presence of a contagion for ten countries. Originality/value This study particularly investigates whether the subprime mortgage crisis spilled over contagiously to the rest of the world. To investigate whether there is a significant increase in the cross-market correlations between the crisis origin country, the USA and the rest of the world markets during the latest financial crisis, both heteroscedasticity-corrected correlation technique and DCC model are used.Therefore, this study possibly contributes well to the literature using a large country set and conducting the analysis from different angles for important properties.
      Citation: Journal of Financial Economic Policy
      PubDate: 2018-03-16T01:31:38Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JFEP-05-2017-0037
       
  • Bondholder reorganization of systemically important financial institutions
    • Abstract: Journal of Financial Economic Policy, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose This paper aims to describe a resolution process for faltering financial firms that quickly allocates losses to bondholders and transfers ownership of the firm to them. This process overcomes the most serious flaws in resolution plans submitted by banks under Dodd–Frank Title I and in the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) receivership procedure in Dodd–Frank Title II by restoring the balance sheet of a failing financial institution and immediately replacing the management and board of directors who allowed its demise. Design/methodology/approach Feasibility of the proposed resolution procedure is assessed by comparing long-term bonds outstanding for the largest American banks just before the 2008 crisis to the capital needed by these banks to restore their balance sheets after their losses prior to and during the crisis. Findings In almost all bank failures, this process would eliminate the need for government involvement beyond court certification of the reorganization. The procedure overcomes the serious incentive distortions and inefficiencies created by bailouts, and avoids the destruction of value and financial market turmoil that would result from the bankruptcies and liquidations that Dodd–Frank requires for distressed and failing banks. Originality/value Title II of the Dodd–Frank Act would require liquidation of any banks that enter into its resolution process. The case of Lehman Brothers indicates the severity of losses to investors that liquidation imposes and the disruption to financial markets and the economy. The procedure developed in this paper would avoid the disruptions that Dodd–Frank requires, preserving core functions of faltering financial firms and maintaining them as going concerns, even in a severe financial crisis.
      Citation: Journal of Financial Economic Policy
      PubDate: 2018-07-11T12:28:11Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JFEP-09-2017-0087
       
  • Does financial development accelerate economic growth'
    • Abstract: Journal of Financial Economic Policy, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose This study aims to empirically explore whether there is causality and in which direction, i.e. whether financial development generates economic growth or whether financial development merely follows economic growth in transition European countries, including Russian Federation and Turkey, during 1998-2015. Design/methodology/approach The study uses different techniques such as pooled OLS, fixed and random effects and the Hausman–Taylor model with instrumental variables. Findings The regression results show a positive relationship between financial development indicators and real GDP per capita growth, thus supporting the hypothesis that finance leads economic growth. The result also shows that financial crisis has a negative effect on real GDP per capita growth. Furthermore, these findings show that government spending and inflation have a negative impact on real GDP per capita growth. The study also shows that financial development plays growth-supporting role in real GDP per capita growth in 20 European countries in transition, including Russian Federation and Turkey. Practical implications As financial development generates real GDP per capita growth, on the basis of the results of the study, a course of action that involves institutional improvement and incentivizing competition in the financial sector is recommended to the Central Banks’ policymakers in transition economies. These will in turn lead to higher real GDP per capita growth. Originality/value The study is original in nature and makes effort to promote financial development in transition European countries, including Russian Federation and Turkey. The findings of this study will be of value to Central Banks and other policymakers.
      Citation: Journal of Financial Economic Policy
      PubDate: 2018-07-06T08:41:39Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JFEP-11-2017-0118
       
  • Implications of Central banks’ negative policy rates on financial
           stability
    • Abstract: Journal of Financial Economic Policy, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose While central bankers have widely discussed the trade-offs of negative interest rates on monetary policy, the consequences of negative rates on financial stability are less well understood. The purpose of this paper is to examine the likely and possible financial stability consequences of a negative rates policy with particular focus on banks, short-term funding markets, foreign exchange markets, asset managers, pension funds and insurers. Design/methodology/approach It draws from international experience with negative interest rates to identify financial stability threats posed to any economy by negative interest rates, and it also highlights where the US experience is likely to differ. Findings In time, financial market threats and other logistical issues of a negative interest rate policy can be managed or overcome. Even cumulatively, these threats are likely to be small as long as the rates remain only modestly negative. However, if the rates remain negative for long periods or they become more sharply negative, the rewards of avoiding negative rates increase. Originality/value Does the negative interest rate policy directly or through these challenges of implementation present a substantial obstacle to achieving financial stability objectives' As policy rates go negative in a greater share of the global economy, the financial stability consequences remain poorly understood and under discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Financial Economic Policy
      PubDate: 2018-07-03T10:28:52Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JFEP-10-2017-0096
       
  • A discourse analysis of financial inclusion: post-liberalization mapping
           in rural and urban India
    • Abstract: Journal of Financial Economic Policy, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The purpose of this study is to measure the availability, accessibility and usability of financial products and services in both rural and urban India from 1991 to 2014. Design/methodology/approach This paper uses principal component analysis (PCA) method to construct financial inclusion index that serves as a proxy variable for indicating the inclusiveness of financial products and services among the rural and urban people. To fulfill this objective, the study proposes separate indexes of financial inclusion for both rural and urban India from 1991 to 2014. The paper uses annual time series data from 1991 to 2014 to construct the rural-urban financial inclusion index. The used data have been collected from the basic statistical returns of Reserve Bank of India and Economic Political Weekly research foundation. Findings The study inferences that though there is a remarkable increase in financial inclusion in India from 1991 onwards, it does not result in sizeable growth of financial access to rural masses in comparison to urban masses. The rural India does not substantiate an equivalent growth to that of urban India, contrasting a perceptible increase in financial inclusion. The finding of this study will help the researchers and policymakers to understand the status of financial inclusion in the context of both rural and urban India. Furthermore, policymakers can take appropriate policy initiatives to fulfill the financial inclusion gap that exists between rural and urban people. Additionally, the proposed index is easy to compute and can be used to make comparison across countries for further studies. Originality/value The present paper attempts to include all possible dimensions (and indicators within a dimension) that have been considered so far by various authors. Therefore, the authors hope that this index will be more indicative and accurate than previous index. Again, the authors propose to use PCA for the first time to assign the weight of factors in the financial inclusion index for rural and urban India separately.
      Citation: Journal of Financial Economic Policy
      PubDate: 2018-06-29T08:29:39Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JFEP-11-2015-0065
       
  • Explaining the adoption of benefit corporation laws by the US states
    • Abstract: Journal of Financial Economic Policy, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose Over half of the US states have jettisoned an exclusive focus on profit maximization for shareholders and created new corporate structures, called “benefit corporations”, which give equal standing to the achievement of social and environmental objectives. This paper aims to examine the factors leading to adoption of legislation for the business formation of benefit corporations by the US states. Design/methodology/approach Event History Analysis (EHA), a time-series technique using panel data of non-repeatable events, is used to identify and understand economic, political and diffusion factors that affect the adoption of benefit corporation enabling legislation in the US states. Findings The results strongly indicate that politics matters – states in which the Democratic Party or liberal ideology controls governmental functions are more likely to pass these laws. There is also evidence that states that are more innovative in their approach to policy-making are more likely to adopt these laws. Otherwise, unemployment, tax burden, political culture, enacted constituency statutes and geographic diffusion have no discernible relationship with the adoption of benefit corporation laws. Practical implications The paper provides warning signs to firms considering expending costly resources on the establishment of or conversion to benefit corporation status and the related investment in developing skills for the preparation, review and assurance of required annual benefit corporation reporting. Originality/value The findings suggest future adoption of benefit corporation enabling laws may slow considerably.
      Citation: Journal of Financial Economic Policy
      PubDate: 2018-06-29T08:28:13Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JFEP-09-2017-0085
       
  • International coordination of financial supervision: why has it grown'
           Will it be sustained'
    • Abstract: Journal of Financial Economic Policy, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose This article reviews the history of international coordination in the supervision of financial institutions noting why cooperation developed first and has been most extensive in oversight of banks relative to securities firms and insurance companies. It also poses the question of whether the extent of international coordination can be sustained or may even diminish. Design/methodology/approach The history of international coordination is used to illustrate the hypotheses that cooperation is more likely: the broader the international consensus on policy objectives and the potential gains from cooperation, the wider the international consensus on policy objectives and the potential gains from cooperation, the deeper the international agreement on the probable consequences of policy alternatives, the stronger the international institutional infrastructure for decision-making and the greater the domestic influence of experts who share a common understanding of a problem and its solutions. Findings All five of these factors that have enabled deepening and broadening of international cooperation have diminished in strength so that international cooperation is not likely to expand and may even be in retreat. Originality/value This article clarifies the factors that facilitate international cooperation and highlights the key obstacles to sustaining international cooperation.
      Citation: Journal of Financial Economic Policy
      PubDate: 2018-06-29T08:21:34Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JFEP-10-2017-0098
       
  • Macro and micro financial liberalizations, savings and growth
    • Abstract: Journal of Financial Economic Policy, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose This paper aims to empirically and theoretically study the role of domestic savings behind the financial stability and growth effects of different financial liberalizations, when the government is not able to commit to enforce financial contracts. The following liberalizations are considered. Macro financial liberalizations target capital flow and interest rate liberalization, whereas micro financial liberalizations target competition in the financial sector. Simultaneous liberalizations target both micro and macro dimensions. Design/methodology/approach This study theoretically solves a new simple model of different types of financial liberalizations, micro, macro and simultaneous. The focus is on the crisis and growth effects of countries liberalizing only macro dimensions of financial policy, relative to both micro and macro dimensions together, and on how the level of savings determines these effects. The study empirically uses data on macro and micro financial liberalizations for 91 countries between 1973 and 2005 to provide a taxonomy of liberalization strategies, and empirically tests whether domestic savings are related to the success of different strategies. Capital accumulation, investment profile and the frequency of financial crises are also evaluated. Findings The findings show that, empirically, simultaneous liberalizations are associated with larger growth only if the savings rate is large. If the savings rate is low, growth is larger when liberalizations target macro dimensions. Capital accumulation increases more with macro liberalizations under low savings and simultaneous liberalizations with high savings. Simultaneous liberalizations with low savings increase risks related to contract viability and expropriation, profits repatriation and payment delays. Simultaneous liberalizations with high savings are associated with smaller probabilities of financial crises. These observations are consistent with the theoretical model, where reduced competition in the financial sector can improve financial stability and reduce financial crises when savings are low. Originality/value The contribution of this paper, relative to the vast literature on financial liberalizations, is to document how savings determine the crisis and growth effects of macro and micro liberalizations. It provides and tests empirically a new channel for the role of savings when governments cannot commit to enforce financial contracts. This is informative for policymakers and policy institutions facing different strategies of financial liberalizations.
      Citation: Journal of Financial Economic Policy
      PubDate: 2018-06-27T10:09:59Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JFEP-09-2017-0080
       
  • Raising bank loss absorption capacity through equity capital or bail-in
           debt
    • Abstract: Journal of Financial Economic Policy, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose Based upon recent statements made by the European Shadow Financial Regulatory Committee, a group of well-known professors coming from ten European countries, during the period 2012-2017, this paper aims to analyze from a European perspective the adequacy and credibility of the proposed framework. Design/methodology/approach This paper is a summary and interpretation of statements from the European Shadow Financial Regulatory Committee. Findings The authors argue that the credibility of the bail-in mechanism is likely to be limited. Because of this, unexpected losses may not be absorbed by unsecured debt holders. Therefore, there is still a need for relatively high equity capital buffers. Originality/value The issue of how to raise loss absorption capacity for banks is prominent on the international policy agenda. International regulators are aiming for a combination of equity capital, typically raised by issuing shares, retaining profits and issuing contingent convertible (CoCo) bonds and bail-in debt where unsecured creditors such as holders of subordinated and common bonds are supposed to take losses in case of a bankruptcy or restructuring of a bank.
      Citation: Journal of Financial Economic Policy
      PubDate: 2018-06-25T02:23:06Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JFEP-01-2018-0004
       
  • Capital regulation and systemic risk in the insurance sector
    • Abstract: Journal of Financial Economic Policy, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose This paper aims to analyze systemic risk in and the effect of capital regulation on the European insurance sector. In particular, the evolution of an exposure measure (SRISK) and a contribution measure (Delta CoVaR) are analyzed from 1985 to 2016. Design/methodology/approach With the help of multivariate regressions, the main drivers of systemic risk are identified. Findings The paper finds an increasing degree of interconnectedness between banks and insurance that correlates with systemic risk exposure. Interconnectedness peaks during periods of crisis but has a long-term influence also during normal times. Moreover, the paper finds that the insurance sector was greatly affected by spillovers from the process of capital regulation in banking. While European insurance companies initially at the start of the Basel process of capital regulation were well capitalized according to the SRISK measure, they started to become capital deficient after the implementation of the model-based approach in banking with increasing speed thereafter. Practical implications These findings are highly relevant for the ongoing global process of capital regulation in the insurance sector and potential reforms of Solvency II. Systemic risk is a leading threat to the stability of the global financial system and keeping it under control is a main challenge for policymakers and supervisors. Originality/value This paper provides novel tools for supervisors to monitor risk exposures in the insurance sector while taking into account systemic feedback from the financial system and the banking sector in particular. These tools also allow an evidence-based policy evaluation of regulatory measures such as Solvency II.
      Citation: Journal of Financial Economic Policy
      PubDate: 2018-06-19T07:50:08Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JFEP-11-2017-0105
       
  • The twin-deficit hypothesis: revisiting Indian economy in a nonlinear
           framework
    • Abstract: Journal of Financial Economic Policy, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose This paper aims to scrutinize the asymmetric interactions between current account deficit and gross fiscal deficit in case of a growing and dynamically integrated economy, namely, India featured with high inequality and liquidity constraints. Two additional variables, trade-openness and output growth, are also incorporated into the analysis to assess their likely impact on the current account balance. Design/methodology/approach The study uses a recently developed non-linear autoregressive distributed lag model given by Shin et al. (2014) in its empirical examination. In addition, non-linear cumulative dynamic multipliers are used to understand the route between disequilibrium position of short-run and subsequent long-run equilibrium of the system. Findings The study confirms the long-run co-movements of current account deficit and gross fiscal deficit and therefore refutes the Ricardian Equivalence proposition and validates the twin-deficit hypothesis. But instead of a linear relationship of the kind examined in the previous studies, the two variables share asymmetric linkages – both in the short run and in the long run. The asymmetry indicates that positive changes are more influential than their negative counterparts in the short run, whereas in the long run, only the positive changes are found to alter the external balance statistically. The asymmetric impact of fiscal deficits on the current account balance of a country may arise due to its asymmetric impact on aggregate demand through consumption inflexibility (ratchet effect) and the existence of liquidity constraints. The other control variables used in the study are also found to have cointegration with the current account deficit, but the relationship is symmetrical in the long run, even though it is asymmetrical in the short run. The study finally uses the asymmetric cumulative dynamic multipliers to examine the route of asymmetries and adjustments over the course of time. The dynamic multipliers also confirm the results documented in the earlier part and therefore demonstrate their robustness. Practical implications The asymmetric results obtained in the study provide strong grounds to devise the policies adaptive to changing arenas in domestic and external sectors. Output growth, export promotion and import substitution, increasing integration and fiscal austerity are seen as helpful in achieving a desired (and growth conducive) external balance together with macroeconomic stability. The need for a prudent fiscal policy and avoidance of profligacy is indicated based on the asymmetric results to ward off any unfavorable impact of fiscal deficits on external account. To conduct a sound fiscal policy, the government needs to cut down unproductive consumption expenditure, raise tax revenues and should pay attention to distribution and trickle-down effects to avoid the adversity of high inequality and liquidity constraints in the economy. Moreover, to ameliorate the current account balance, policies aimed at increasing the real competitiveness through control of domestic price fluctuations and improvement in the quality of tradable goods and services (such as productive investments and technological advancements) should be adopted. Originality/value Work reported in the present paper is motivated by the fact that there is no study conducted so far in the Indian context which has analyzed the two deficits in a nonlinear framework. The authors have used a well-articulated nonlinear asymmetric technique to examine the relationship between two deficits when asymmetry is incorporated. This paper will, therefore, enrich the existing literature along the lines of asymmetric linkages. Moreover, the traverse of asymmetries and adjustments over the course of time highlights the inherent dynamism of the relationship.
      Citation: Journal of Financial Economic Policy
      PubDate: 2018-06-08T02:07:05Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JFEP-09-2017-0082
       
  • Financial inclusion and economic growth linkage: some cross country
           evidence
    • Abstract: Journal of Financial Economic Policy, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to assess the dynamic impact of financial inclusion on economic growth for a large number of developed and developing countries. Design/methodology/approach This study uses some panel data models such as country-fixed effect, random effect and time fixed effect regressions, panel cointegration, and panel causality tests to examine the linkage between financial inclusion and economic growth. Panel cointegration is being used to test the long run association between financial inclusion and economic growth, whereas panel causality test is used to find the direction of causality between financial inclusion and economic growth. The data on financial inclusion are taken from Sarma (2012) for the period 2004-2010. Findings The empirical findings reveal that there is a positive and long run relationship between financial inclusion and economic growth across 31 countries in the world. Further, panel causality test shows a bi-directional causality between financial inclusion and economic growth Thus, the study confirms that financial inclusion is one of the main drivers of economic growth. Research limitations/implications This study has two limitations. First, this study considers only banking institutions in the analysis. Second, the period tested for the long run relationship is not long enough. Practical implications This study empirically measures the quantitative impact of financial inclusion policies pursued across the world. The study also suggests that policies emphasizing financial sector reforms in general and promoting financial inclusion in particular shall result in higher economic growth in the long run. Originality/value This study attempts to assess the long run relationship between financial inclusion and economic growth with the help of a multidimensional index of financial inclusion. Therefore, this can be a valuable contribution to the banks and policymakers.
      Citation: Journal of Financial Economic Policy
      PubDate: 2018-06-08T02:05:45Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JFEP-11-2016-0073
       
  • Real sector consequences of bank diversification: evidence across US
           industries and states
    • Abstract: Journal of Financial Economic Policy, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose This paper aims to examine the consequences of banks asset, funding and income diversification on regional economic stability in the USA by using data on all 50 states and Washington, DC for 17 industries and their disaggregated constituent categories. Design/methodology/approach By using a panel dataset across industries and states in the USA, the author explains sector-specific state-level variation in average GDP growth during 2008-2009 using the average bank diversification during 2006-2007, as well as pre-crisis level growth rates in GDP, multifactor productivity in each industry and pre-crisis period state-specific key banking conditions. Findings The author finds banks’ pre-crisis level of diversification to have a positively significant impact on sector-specific state-level GDP growth during the Great Recession. The positive impact of banks diversification activities on industry-specific output growth across states is most pronounced for funding diversification. Practical implications The results indicate that bank diversification activities could be used as a measure to resuscitate an ailing economy and enhance the resilience of the real sector to financial sector distress. The same applies for banks capitalization and profitability. Originality/value Although a burgeoning body of literature has examined different aspects of banks income diversification, focusing mainly on its effects on risk and returns, the real sector implications of bank diversification activities have been rarely studied, especially in the US context.
      Citation: Journal of Financial Economic Policy
      PubDate: 2018-05-30T08:52:25Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JFEP-07-2017-0067
       
  • Risk, uncertainty and stock returns predictability–a case of
           emerging equity markets
    • Abstract: Journal of Financial Economic Policy, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose This paper aims to investigate the predictability of stock returns under risk and uncertainty of a set of 11 emerging equity markets (EEMs) during the pre- and post-crash periods. Design/methodology/approach Listed indices are considered to serve the proxy of stock markets with a structural break in data for the period: 2000-2014. As preliminary results highlight the significant autocorrelations in stock returns, Threshold-GARCH (1,1) model is used to estimate the conditional volatility, which is further decomposed into expected and unexpected volatility. Findings Results highlight that the volatility has symmetric impact on stock returns during the pre-crash period and asymmetric impact during the post-crash period. While testing the relationship of stock returns, a significant positive (negative) relationship is found with expected volatility during the pre-crash (post-crash) periods. The stock returns are found positively related to unexpected volatility. Research limitations/implications Business, political and other market conditions of sample stock markets are fundamentally different. These economies were liberalized in different years, which may affect the degree of integration with international equity markets. Practical implications The findings highlight that investors consider the impact of expected volatility in forecasting of stock returns during the growth period. They realize returns in commensurate to risk of their portfolios. However, they significantly reduce their investments in response to expected volatility during the recession period. The positive relationship between stock returns and unexpected volatility highlights the fact that investors realize extra returns for exposing their portfolios to unexpected volatility. Originality/value Pioneer efforts are made by using T-GARCH (1,1) procedure to analyse the problem. Given the emergence of emerging equity markets, new insight in dynamics of stock returns provide interesting findings for portfolio diversification under risk and uncertainty.
      Citation: Journal of Financial Economic Policy
      PubDate: 2018-05-30T08:51:06Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JFEP-08-2017-0075
       
  • Impact of federal income tax rates and government borrowing on nominal
           interest rate yields on tax-free municipal bonds
    • Abstract: Journal of Financial Economic Policy, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose This study investigates the impact of federal income tax rates and budget deficits on the nominal interest rate yield on high-grade municipal tax-free bonds (municipals) in the US. The 58-year study period covers the years 1959 through 2016 and thus is very recent. Design/methodology/approach The study develops a loanable funds model that allows for various financial market factors. Once developed, the model is estimated by autoregressive two-stage least squares, with a Newey-West heteroskedasticity correction. Findings The nominal interest rate yield on municipals is a decreasing function of the maximum marginal federal personal income tax rate and an increasing function of the federal budget deficit (expressed as a per cent of GDP). This yield is also an increasing function of nominal interest rate yields on three- and ten-year treasury notes and expected inflation. Research limitations/implications When introducing additional interest rates such as treasury bills as explanatory variables, multi-collinearity becomes a serious problem. Practical implications This study indicates that lower maximum federal personal income tax rates and larger federal budget deficits, both act to raise borrowing costs for cities (of all sizes), counties and states across the country. Given the study period of 58 years, these relationships appear to be enduring ones that responsible policy-makers should not overlook. Social implications Tax reform and debt management need to be conducted in a very circumspect fashion. Originality/value No recent study investigating the impact of the two key policy variables in this study has been published.
      Citation: Journal of Financial Economic Policy
      PubDate: 2018-05-24T02:52:49Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JFEP-10-2017-0104
       
 
 
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