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Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies
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  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 2044-0839
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  • Key analysis of the dairy value chain in Vietnam: the case of Bavi
    • Pages: 222 - 233
      Abstract: Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, Volume 8, Issue 2, Page 222-233, June 2018.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to find out the distribution of benefits, costs, and value added among the actors and problems in the practical management in dairy milk value chain, especially in one of the most important dairy areas in Vietnam to see how they upgrade in the value chain. Design/methodology/approach A survey was carried out in Bavi, Hanoi where a large amount of fresh milk is produced annually. The content of the survey was built before conducting in Bavi with 160 questionnaires. The questionnaires were based on the criteria which reflect the main objectives of the paper such as the actor’s profits and costs, the relationship among these actors, and the advantages and disadvantages in the dairy milk’s value chain. Some part of results of the paper was evaluated by conducting interviews with the relevant target groups in the value chain of dairy milk. Data collected were aggregated and analyzed by SPSS20, Excel. The calculation of cost and profit margin of each actor in the chain was also be presented by a quantitative tool for value chain analysis. Findings This study pointed out the systemized problems in the value chain of one of the biggest dairy companies in Vietnam. This study revealed some wicked problems in the value chains of Vietnam under globalization. Research limitations/implications This study could not cover all of the detailed actors in the dairy value chain. Originality/value The value of income in the chain is distributed unequally. The benefits that farmers receive are inadequate with the costs they have to pay. This is a particular chain, in which the main factors boosting the chain are factories, and an increase in revenue also reflects the benefits of them. The result is that the value added in the chain is also biased toward the dairy plant. The paper also pointed out the shortcomings in the cost calculation of farmers. All the expenses, such as wages and the opportunity cost, are calculated in the total cost of the dairy plant, whereas dairy farmers do not mention these costs. Thus, in terms of benefits, farmers suffer more disadvantages, thus they should be received more value. In terms of management, Bavi’s authorities could not manage the output of milk in the perfect way. The lax management has led to a series of counterfeit goods that appear on the market today. These low-quality products are sold right on the highway and the Bavi’s tourist destination.
      Citation: Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies
      PubDate: 2018-06-04T03:01:23Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JADEE-06-2016-0041
       
  • Coordinating cereal farmers and buyers: evidence from Mali
    • Pages: 234 - 255
      Abstract: Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, Volume 8, Issue 2, Page 234-255, June 2018.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to examine how various transaction-cost characteristics influence the choice of vertical coordination (VC) structures (e.g. different contract types) and horizontal coordination (HC) structures (e.g. different farmer organization types) to link smallholder farmers efficiently with buyers. It analyzes the relationship between vertical and horizontal structures, and the economic sustainability of different structure combinations. Design/methodology/approach The paper develops a conceptual framework to predict coordination structures as a function of transaction-cost characteristics, compares predictions for the Malian cereals market to empirical evidence using 15 case studies, and then analyzes structure combinations. Findings Asymmetric scale between farmers and buyers; uncertainty in production, prices, policy, and contract enforcement; and quality and quantity debasement lead to selections of structures with high levels of control. Vertical and horizontal structures demonstrate a complementary relationship in certain core coordination roles, while exhibiting substitutability in the provision of other coordination activities. The marketing cooperative and marketing contract pairing is the most prevalent combination. Research limitations/implications The conceptual framework is useful for explaining the selection of coordination structures, and can be applied in other contexts to strengthen external validity. Originality/value The framework facilitates predictions and explanation of both VC and HC structures, with empirical application on a country and value chains receiving little attention in the literature.
      Citation: Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies
      PubDate: 2018-06-04T03:03:07Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JADEE-11-2016-0075
       
  • Chinese consumers’ willingness to pay for rice
    • Pages: 256 - 269
      Abstract: Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, Volume 8, Issue 2, Page 256-269, June 2018.
      Purpose China’s expanded rice imports offer a profitable business opportunity for both domestic and international grain marketers. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the impact of select variables on Chinese consumers’ rice choices, specifically focusing on country-of-origin, price, organic, brand, freshness, and taste. The study concludes with suggestions for domestic and international rice marketers to help them develop more efficient rice marketing plans. Design/methodology/approach This study developed a conditional logit model to analyze survey data gathered from Chongqing and Chengdu, two of China’s largest rice consumption cities. Findings Chinese consumers are price sensitive in their rice choices. Country-of-origin is the most imperative factor affecting rice selection for lower food expense consumers but branded rice attracts the attention of higher food expense consumers. Furthermore, these higher food expense consumers are willing to pay a small premium of $0.22 for a pound of organic rice. Research limitations/implications A general trend in demand for organic rice from higher food expense consumers was identified, and this trend predicts a profitable market for organic rice sellers. However, these research findings are geographically limited and may only represent a consumption trend from the two sampled cities rather than all of China. Originality/value The study concludes with meaningful recommendations to rice marketers to aid in developing profitable market entrance strategies to China.
      Citation: Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies
      PubDate: 2018-06-04T03:02:51Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JADEE-11-2016-0077
       
  • Factors encouraging complete adoption of agricultural technologies
    • Pages: 270 - 287
      Abstract: Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, Volume 8, Issue 2, Page 270-287, June 2018.
      Purpose Hybrid rice is considered as one of the technologies having the potential to push the production frontier to meet the growing demand for rice in India. The technology was introduced in India in 1994 but is yet to see widespread adoption. The purpose of this paper is to identify the factors that influence the partial/complete adoption of hybrid rice technology by the farmers in India. This study also assesses the factors behind difference in the share of land allocated to hybrid rice cultivation by farmers. Design/methodology/approach The study employs a Tobit model to evaluate the impact of factors related to technology, farmer, farm and geographical location on the decision to adopt hybrid rice. Data for this study are compiled from surveys of 441 hybrid rice growing farmers across 3 Indian states conducted during 2012-2013. Findings The paper finds that farmers with smaller landholdings, higher education and higher experience of growing hybrid rice are more likely to be complete adopters. Farmers reporting good demand for hybrid rice output and availability of subsidy on hybrid rice seeds also have higher probability of being complete adopters. However, the availability of hybrid rice seeds in government outlets and cultivating multiple kharif crops are negatively related to the extent of hybrid rice adoption. The results suggest insignificant impact of age, family size, ownership of cattle and machinery on the adoption level of hybrid rice by the farmers. Research limitations/implications Although the sample for this study has been collected from three states with different agro-climatic zones and productivity, the results cannot be generalized for other states. Originality/value There is a great potential to increase the area under hybrid rice cultivation in India. This study is one of the first attempts to look at the adoption levels of hybrid rice in India and determine the factors which might be hindering the complete adoption of the technology. Focusing on the factors positively related to complete adoption can help in enhancing the area under hybrid rice and similar approach can be used for other new agricultural technologies in the developing country context.
      Citation: Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies
      PubDate: 2018-06-04T03:01:36Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JADEE-05-2016-0037
       
  • Assessing competitive position of Uruguay’s beef sector
    • Pages: 288 - 302
      Abstract: Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, Volume 8, Issue 2, Page 288-302, June 2018.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to present an economic evaluation of Uruguay’s beef industry competitiveness to quantify the effects of public policies (taxes, subsidies, social charges) on the various links constituting the beef export chain and estimate the impact of transfers of resources between the beef industry and other sectors of the economy. Design/methodology/approach The Policy Analysis Matrix (PAM) techniques were employed to quantify the effects of public policies on the competitiveness of Uruguay’s beef industry. A series of PAM coefficients were calculated to assess the competitiveness of the beef export chain in 2010 and 2013 with comparison between the two years to make policy recommendations. Findings Beef sector returns captured by private agents decreased from 30 percent in 2010 to 10 percent in 2013. Competitiveness of the beef export chain deteriorated between 2010 and 2013 due primarily to higher prices paid for live cattle by the beef slaughtering, manufacturing, and packing sector. Uruguay’s beef industry transfers resources to the larger economy via social security payments and is penalized as a result of high capital costs. Research limitations/implications Although three different sources of resource transfers were identified, more effort is needed to improve the precision of estimations. Originality/value The competitiveness of export chains is critical to the economic and social wellbeing of small-economy countries. They must be efficient producing for the international markets at the time they constitute pillars of the whole economy.
      Citation: Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies
      PubDate: 2018-06-04T03:00:44Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JADEE-12-2016-0078
       
  • The impact of financial support from non-resident family members on the
           financial performance of newer agribusiness firms in India
    • Pages: 303 - 319
      Abstract: Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, Volume 8, Issue 2, Page 303-319, June 2018.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of financial support from non-resident family members (FSNRFM) on the financial performance of newer agribusiness firms in India. Design/methodology/approach Owners of newer agribusiness firms (five years old or less) from India were surveyed regarding the perceived impact of FSNRFM on the financial performance of newer agribusiness firms. Findings The results show that newer agribusiness firms with FSNRFM perform better than those without FSNRFM; and build higher levels of internal financing sources relative to the newer agribusiness firms without FSNRFM, which, in turn, improves their performance. Research limitations/implications This is a co-relational study that investigated the association between FSNRFM and financial performance of newer agribusiness firms. There is not necessarily a causal relationship between the two. The findings of this study may only be generalized to firms similar to those that were included in this research. Originality/value The study enriches the literature concerning newer agribusiness firms and the factors that improve their financial performance. The results of this study can be of great significance for owners of these firms, financial managers, farm management consultants, and other stakeholders to understand the impact of FSNRFM on financial performance of newer agribusiness firms.
      Citation: Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies
      PubDate: 2018-06-04T03:02:31Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JADEE-04-2016-0022
       
  • Investment strategies in the Latin American agri-business sub-sectors of
           agricultural commodities, biofuels and meat chains
    • Pages: 320 - 338
      Abstract: Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, Volume 8, Issue 2, Page 320-338, June 2018.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to review and examine the recent investment trends of firms operating in the food, feed and biofuel production and processing sectors in Latin America. The inter-related nature of these three sub-sectors and the great expansion they have gone through in the last decade showcases a series of socioeconomic and environmental policy challenges thus making it relevant to identify their different business models through a typology. Design/methodology/approach The paper first presents an unprecedented literature review based on field observations and media coverage of agri-business strategies of the food, feed and biofuel production in the region. It then moves to an in-depth analysis of investment operations that serve to classify such firms into a business model typology considering degree of internationalization and integration. The typology is a useful mechanism to enhance public policy analysis and uncover market or government incentives behind business decisions. Findings By focusing on investment strategies, the paper illustrates how both market and government incentives shape and affect the performance and consolidation of different players in the food, feed and biofuel sub-sectors in Latin America. The resulting effects have strong economic as well as social and environmental implications because such economic activities have an impact on global food and energy security. Research limitations/implications Limitations include a reliance on largely qualitative evidence and research methods due to unavailability of consistent numerical data in these specific agri-business sub-sectors. Originality/value This paper is unique in its focus on business models in a particularly relevant set of agri-business sub-sectors in Latin America and its implications to promote investment and innovation in value chain development while considering regional-specific challenges.
      Citation: Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies
      PubDate: 2018-06-04T03:02:45Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JADEE-09-2014-0036
       
  • Does technology transfer training concern for agriculture output in
           India' A critical study on a lateritic zone in West Bengal
    • Pages: 339 - 362
      Abstract: Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, Volume 8, Issue 2, Page 339-362, June 2018.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to explore and identify the indicators of institutional barriers hindering the technology transfer training (TTT) process behind the technology adoption lag affecting the agricultural output in India through development of a scale. Design/methodology/approach Quantitative technique has been followed for data collection through a close-ended questionnaire scored on the seven-point Likert scale. The sample size was considered as 161; target respondents were farmers and farmer-centric individuals. Data were analyzed using an exploratory factor analysis technique. Findings Factor analysis revealed that there are three significant factors related to TTT process, namely, comprehension, customization and generalization, which are liable for institutional barriers in technology adoption by farmers. Research limitations/implications The main limitation is biasness from both respondents’ end and interviewer’s end might exist during survey due to differences in perception. Social implications The key beneficiaries from this research are the small and marginal farming community in India. They can enhance their productivity through an appropriate training process. Corporates will show interest in investment through the mechanism of corporate social responsibility. Originality/value Under this study, the factors of the institutional barriers from the farmers’ perspective are being introduced as a new research contribution, especially for the resource crunch area of Jangalmahal and other similar places in India.
      Citation: Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies
      PubDate: 2018-06-04T03:01:42Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JADEE-04-2016-0023
       
  • Potential impacts of desiccant-based drying and hermetic storage on the
           value chain for onion seeds in Nepal
    • Pages: 363 - 390
      Abstract: Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, Volume 8, Issue 2, Page 363-390, June 2018.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to analyze the potential returns to value chain actors from employing desiccant bead drying and hermetic storage technology. Design/methodology/approach Information was collected from 175 different onion (Allium cepa L.) seed value chain actors in Nepal. Four different business models for the introduction of new bead drying and hermetic storage technology were compared to current practices through use of partial budgeting. Findings The increase in net income throughout the chain was quite similar in all four models, ranging from US$28.86 to 29.61 per kg of onion seed, making it difficult to say that any single model is best for all situations. However, there are differences in sharing of positive net income and negative net income for different actors in different models. Moreover, about US$5.85 million incremental return could be earned per year in Nepal from improved preservation of onion seed alone. Research limitations/implications This research assesses how to introduce a new technology, the dry chain concept to maintain seed quality, into the existing marketplace. Originality/value This paper focuses on the economics of a novel technology and compares different business models and scenarios.
      Citation: Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies
      PubDate: 2018-06-04T03:01:08Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JADEE-12-2015-0056
       
  • Determinants of response of street food entrepreneurs in Ghana to business
           management training
    • Pages: 391 - 405
      Abstract: Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, Volume 8, Issue 2, Page 391-405, June 2018.
      Purpose Considering the fact that business management training has the potential to improve performance of micro and small enterprises, it is surprising why participation rates in most freely offered management training courses remain low. The purpose of this paper is to explore factors that determine an invitee’s decision to participate in a capacity building management training for street food entrepreneurs in Ghana. Design/methodology/approach Using data from a baseline survey, the study invited 314 street food entrepreneurs, selected through a stratified random technique from a list of 516 eligible food entrepreneurs. Training participants were invited to the programme through official invitation letters which were hand-delivered. Data on reasons for non-participation were collected either through phone interviews or on-site visit when a vendor could not be reached on phone. Descriptive statistics were used to summarise characteristics of vendors and businesses as well as reasons for non-participation while probit model was used to estimate determinants of participation. Findings The study found that whereas vendors with higher formal education better appreciate the benefits of education and training, their counterparts with fewer years of schooling do not. The latter’s perceived knowledge deficiencies appear to explain the difference in participation rates. Also, total workforce does not necessarily increase the probability of participation, especially when there are no trusted workers in the business who will take over critical activities such as handling of finances in the absence of the owner. The study also found that distance between vending premises and training centres had significant negative effects on vendors’ participation in the training programme. Research limitations/implications The external validity of the study findings and conclusions may not be limited to all informal sectors of the developing economies due to high degree of heterogeneity of the informal economy. Originality/value The study focusses on an informal sector in developing country dominated by women. The study focusses on understanding informal entrepreneurs’ response to formal training.
      Citation: Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies
      PubDate: 2018-06-04T03:00:48Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JADEE-01-2016-0006
       
  • Analysis of pearl millet market structure and value chain in India
    • Pages: 406 - 424
      Abstract: Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, Volume 8, Issue 2, Page 406-424, June 2018.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to examine the market structure and value chain of pearl millet grain and fodder in India. There is a decline in demand for human consumption, with an increase in demand for non-food uses like cattle and poultry feed, raw material for starch and breweries industry. This paper explores alternative channels, uses and value chains of pearl millet grain and fodder. The paper examines in what ways small farmers can benefit from the evolving alternative uses for pearl millet grain in cattle and poultry feed industry, breweries and starch industry. The paper also analyses the impact of aggregators in increasing the efficiency of the value chain. Design/methodology/approach The study collected primary data from farmers, traders, commission agents and exporters and importers with innovative marketing channels with aggregators (Self-Help Groups) and without aggregators to analyze the prospects for improvements in marketing channels and value chain. Findings Given that the production of pearl millet is scattered and thin, there is a lot of scope for market aggregators to increase scale economies to reduce market costs to supply in bulk to food and industrial uses. Although there was some demand for human consumption high-quality grain, most of the future demand will come from cattle and poultry feed industry, breweries and starch industry. To tap these larger potentials, farmers need to aggregate their produce and ensure regular supply in bulk quantity at least to compete the cost with alternative grains like maize and broken rice. Research limitations/implications The research is based on the field-level data collection and observations obtained from Western India. This paper provides insights how the value chain of pearl millet is working and what improvements are needed to make value chain more efficient and inclusive. Although the results are applicable to similar neglected crops and area, more caution is needed. Social implications Through the formation of farmer aggregators, farmers can enhance their bargaining power vis-a-vis industry. Originality/value Till now, there is no study that explored the pearl millet value chain in detail in India, and the paper tries to fill this literature gap.
      Citation: Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies
      PubDate: 2018-06-04T03:03:25Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JADEE-02-2016-0007
       
 
 
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