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Publisher: Emerald   (Total: 342 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 342 Journals sorted alphabetically
A Life in the Day     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Academia Revista Latinoamericana de Administraci√≥n     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.178, CiteScore: 1)
Accounting Auditing & Accountability J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31, SJR: 1.71, CiteScore: 3)
Accounting Research J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.144, CiteScore: 0)
Accounting, Auditing and Accountability J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 2.187, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Accounting Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.279, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Appreciative Inquiry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.451, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Autism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.222, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Dual Diagnosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47, SJR: 0.21, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Gender Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.16, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Intl. Marketing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 72, SJR: 0.296, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
African J. of Economic and Management Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.216, CiteScore: 1)
Agricultural Finance Review     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.406, CiteScore: 1)
Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 199, SJR: 0.354, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Annals in Social Responsibility     Full-text available via subscription  
Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.235, CiteScore: 1)
Arts and the Market     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Asia Pacific J. of Innovation and Entrepreneurship     Open Access  
Asia Pacific J. of Marketing and Logistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.425, CiteScore: 1)
Asia-Pacific J. of Business Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.234, CiteScore: 1)
Asian Association of Open Universities J.     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian Education and Development Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.233, CiteScore: 1)
Asian J. on Quality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Asian Review of Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.222, CiteScore: 1)
Aslib J. of Information Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.725, CiteScore: 2)
Aslib Proceedings     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 300)
Assembly Automation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.603, CiteScore: 2)
Baltic J. of Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.309, CiteScore: 1)
Benchmarking : An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.559, CiteScore: 2)
British Food J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.5, CiteScore: 2)
Built Environment Project and Asset Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.46, CiteScore: 1)
Business Process Re-engineering & Management J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Business Strategy Series     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Career Development Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.527, CiteScore: 2)
China Agricultural Economic Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.31, CiteScore: 1)
China Finance Review Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.245, CiteScore: 0)
Chinese Management Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.278, CiteScore: 1)
Circuit World     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.246, CiteScore: 1)
Collection Building     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.296, CiteScore: 1)
COMPEL: The Intl. J. for Computation and Mathematics in Electrical and Electronic Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.22, CiteScore: 1)
Competitiveness Review : An Intl. Business J. incorporating J. of Global Competitiveness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.274, CiteScore: 1)
Construction Innovation: Information, Process, Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.731, CiteScore: 2)
Corporate Communications An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.453, CiteScore: 1)
Corporate Governance Intl. J. of Business in Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.336, CiteScore: 1)
Critical Perspectives on Intl. Business     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.378, CiteScore: 1)
Cross Cultural & Strategic Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.504, CiteScore: 2)
Development and Learning in Organizations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.138, CiteScore: 0)
Digital Library Perspectives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.341, CiteScore: 1)
Direct Marketing An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Disaster Prevention and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.47, CiteScore: 1)
Drugs and Alcohol Today     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 135, SJR: 0.245, CiteScore: 1)
Education + Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Education, Business and Society : Contemporary Middle Eastern Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.707, CiteScore: 3)
Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Employee Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.551, CiteScore: 2)
Engineering Computations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.444, CiteScore: 1)
Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.653, CiteScore: 2)
English Teaching: Practice & Critique     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.417, CiteScore: 1)
Equal Opportunities Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Equality, Diversity and Inclusion : An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.5, CiteScore: 1)
EuroMed J. of Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.26, CiteScore: 1)
European Business Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.585, CiteScore: 3)
European J. of Innovation Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.454, CiteScore: 2)
European J. of Management and Business Economics     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.239, CiteScore: 1)
European J. of Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.971, CiteScore: 2)
European J. of Training and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.477, CiteScore: 1)
Evidence-based HRM     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.537, CiteScore: 1)
Facilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.503, CiteScore: 2)
Foresight     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.34, CiteScore: 1)
Gender in Management : An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.412, CiteScore: 1)
Grey Systems : Theory and Application     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Health Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.421, CiteScore: 1)
Higher Education, Skills and Work-based Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47, SJR: 0.426, CiteScore: 1)
History of Education Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.26, CiteScore: 0)
Housing, Care and Support     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.171, CiteScore: 0)
Human Resource Management Intl. Digest     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.129, CiteScore: 0)
Humanomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.333, CiteScore: 1)
IMP J.     Hybrid Journal  
Indian Growth and Development Review     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.174, CiteScore: 0)
Industrial and Commercial Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.301, CiteScore: 1)
Industrial Lubrication and Tribology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.334, CiteScore: 1)
Industrial Management & Data Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.904, CiteScore: 3)
Industrial Robot An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.318, CiteScore: 1)
Info     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Information and Computer Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.307, CiteScore: 1)
Information Technology & People     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44, SJR: 0.671, CiteScore: 2)
Interactive Technology and Smart Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.191, CiteScore: 1)
Interlending & Document Supply     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
Internet Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37, SJR: 1.645, CiteScore: 5)
Intl. J. for Lesson and Learning Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.324, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. for Researcher Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Intl. J. of Accounting and Information Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.275, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Bank Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.654, CiteScore: 3)
Intl. J. of Climate Change Strategies and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.353, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Clothing Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.318, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Commerce and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Conflict Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.362, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Contemporary Hospitality Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 1.452, CiteScore: 4)
Intl. J. of Culture Tourism and Hospitality Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.339, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Development Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.139, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.387, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Educational Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.559, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Emergency Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.201, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Emerging Markets     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.474, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Energy Sector Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.349, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Entrepreneurial Behaviour & Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.629, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Event and Festival Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.388, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Gender and Entrepreneurship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.445, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Health Care Quality Assurance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.358, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Health Governance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.247, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Housing Markets and Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.211, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Human Rights in Healthcare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.205, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Information and Learning Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.226, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Innovation Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.197, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Intelligent Computing and Cybernetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.214, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Intelligent Unmanned Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Islamic and Middle Eastern Finance and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.375, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Law and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.217, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Law in the Built Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.227, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Leadership in Public Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Intl. J. of Lean Six Sigma     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.802, CiteScore: 3)
Intl. J. of Logistics Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.71, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Managerial Finance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.203, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Managing Projects in Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.36, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Manpower     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.365, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Mentoring and Coaching in Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.426, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Migration, Health and Social Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.307, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Numerical Methods for Heat & Fluid Flow     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.697, CiteScore: 3)
Intl. J. of Operations & Production Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 2.052, CiteScore: 4)
Intl. J. of Organizational Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.268, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Pervasive Computing and Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.138, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.25, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.821, CiteScore: 4)
Intl. J. of Prisoner Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.303, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Productivity and Performance Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.578, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Public Sector Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.438, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Quality & Reliability Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.492, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Quality and Service Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.309, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Retail & Distribution Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.742, CiteScore: 3)
Intl. J. of Service Industry Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Social Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.225, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Sociology and Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49, SJR: 0.3, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.269, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Structural Integrity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.228, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Sustainability in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.502, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Tourism Cities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.502, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Web Information Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.186, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Wine Business Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.562, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Workplace Health Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.303, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. Marketing Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.895, CiteScore: 3)
Irish J. of Occupational Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
ISRA Intl. J. of Islamic Finance     Open Access  
J. for Multicultural Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.237, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Accounting & Organizational Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.301, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Accounting in Emerging Economies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
J. of Adult Protection, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.314, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Advances in Management Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
J. of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44, SJR: 0.222, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.108, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Applied Accounting Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.227, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Applied Research in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49, SJR: 0.2, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Asia Business Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.245, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Assistive Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
J. of Business & Industrial Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.652, CiteScore: 2)
J. of Business Strategy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.333, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Centrum Cathedra     Open Access  
J. of Children's Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.243, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Chinese Economic and Foreign Trade Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.2, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Chinese Entrepreneurship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
J. of Chinese Human Resource Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.173, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Communication Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.625, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Consumer Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.664, CiteScore: 2)
J. of Corporate Real Estate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.368, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Criminal Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 127, SJR: 0.268, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Criminological Research, Policy and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44, SJR: 0.254, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.257, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Documentation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 175, SJR: 0.613, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Economic and Administrative Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
J. of Economic Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.733, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Economics, Finance and Administrative Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.217, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Educational Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.252, CiteScore: 2)
J. of Enabling Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.369, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Engineering, Design and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.212, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Enterprise Information Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.827, CiteScore: 4)
J. of Enterprising Communities People and Places in the Global Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.281, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Entrepreneurship and Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.262, CiteScore: 1)
J. of European Industrial Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
J. of European Real Estate Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.268, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Facilities Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.33, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Family Business Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
J. of Fashion Marketing and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.608, CiteScore: 2)
J. of Financial Crime     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 368, SJR: 0.228, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Financial Economic Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.186, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Financial Management of Property and Construction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.309, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Financial Regulation and Compliance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.159, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Financial Reporting and Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
J. of Forensic Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57, SJR: 0.205, CiteScore: 1)

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Journal Cover
International Journal of Lean Six Sigma
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.802
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 6  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 2040-4166
Published by Emerald Homepage  [342 journals]
  • Annotated methodological review of Lean Six Sigma
    • Pages: 2 - 49
      Abstract: International Journal of Lean Six Sigma, Volume 9, Issue 1, Page 2-49, March 2018.
      Purpose Literature reviews are a pervasive aspect in research. An ever mounting field such as Lean Six Sigma requires a perpetual touch on the subject to accentuate insights that can be researched about. The purpose of this paper is to address the published literatures in the field of Lean Six Sigma through multiple criterion for an enhanced understanding of the subject matter through summarizing its current trends, uncovering existing literature gaps and revealing opportunities for future research in the field. Design/methodology/approach The literature review on Lean Six Sigma field spans around 17 years that includes peer-reviewed journals from management, business, engineering, healthcare, manufacturing, military among the many disciplines. The study uses a content analysis approach in which several dimensions of the literature were analysed: purpose or focus of study, years of publication, journal name or publications, methodologies, theories used, country of study, industry sub-sectors, active authors in the field, critical success factors, barriers and challenges and the most contribution of Lean Six Sigma papers by universities. Findings Eleven important findings from the analysis were summarized among them; the field of Lean Six Sigma had begun to grow significantly since the new millennium particularly after the 2004-2007 or 2008 period; standalone concepts of Lean and Six Sigma are highly researched compared to the integrated concepts; large proportion of perspective, conceptual and descriptive based studies; lack of empirical validity on the fusion between Lean and Six Sigma; lack of theoretical based studies, etc. Research limitations/implications The study is limited to 102 journals in commonly searched databases in the subject matter which produced 261 journal papers. This study seeks to broaden the summary of studies done under the keyword “Lean Six Sigma”. Originality/value The review analysis uses a content analysis approach in search of valuable gaps in existing research. The study found 261 papers from 102 journals that were published over the past seventeen years (2000-2016). This paper provides scholars, practitioners and managers with insights on the present trends and focus of Lean Six Sigma in addition to what else are lacking in the subject matter, which could pave the way for future research and practical endeavours.
      Citation: International Journal of Lean Six Sigma
      PubDate: 2018-02-07T11:28:41Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJLSS-04-2017-0028
       
  • Development of Six Sigma methodology to improve grinding processes
    • Pages: 50 - 63
      Abstract: International Journal of Lean Six Sigma, Volume 9, Issue 1, Page 50-63, March 2018.
      Purpose This paper aims to deploy the Six Sigma methodology to facilitate defect reduction and enhance the bottom-line results of an automotive industry. Design/methodology/approach Six Sigma is a business process improvement strategy widely used in manufacturing field for enhancing organizational performance. Six Sigma enables the attainment of defects reduction. In this study, the Six Sigma methodology has been developed with the integration of change management tools. Findings Six Sigma has been successfully implemented in the grinding process in automotive engine manufacturing organization. The proposed Six Sigma methodology has been applied to facilitate defect reduction. The developed methodology with linkage of DMAIC (define, measure, analyze, improve and control) and change management techniques reduces defects. Research limitations/implications The developed methodology has been implemented in an automotive industrial complex. In future, more number of studies could be conducted, i.e. for mistake proofing. Furthermore, advanced tools and techniques could be included in the methodology for increasing the effectiveness of change management. Practical implications The proposed Six Sigma methodology has been successfully implemented in a grinding process of automotive manufacturing organization; in future, the approach could be applied in different industrial sectors with addition of new tools and techniques for improving its effectiveness. Originality/value The Six Sigma methodology has been designed and implemented in the grinding process. Researchers have not treated Six Sigma in much detail in the automotive industry. Moreover, previous studies on Six Sigma have not dealt with the grinding process. Besides, most studies in the field of Six Sigma have focused only on DMAIC, but this study adds change management approach to DMAIC.
      Citation: International Journal of Lean Six Sigma
      PubDate: 2018-02-07T11:30:11Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJLSS-11-2016-0074
       
  • ISM and Fuzzy MICMAC application for analysis of Lean Six Sigma barriers
           with environmental considerations
    • Pages: 64 - 90
      Abstract: International Journal of Lean Six Sigma, Volume 9, Issue 1, Page 64-90, March 2018.
      Purpose The purpose of this study is to prioritize and analyze the barriers that affect Lean Six Sigma (LSS) adoption with environmental considerations. Design/methodology/approach To find interrelationships and mutual influences among the identified barriers, an integrated interpretive structural modeling (ISM) and Fuzzy MICMAC (Matrice d’Impacts Croisés Multiplication Appliqués à un Classement approach was applied). In total, 20 crucial barriers that affect LSS adoption with environmental considerations have been derived from the literature and in consultation with experts hailing from the industry and academia. Findings Based on the analysis, the most dominant and dependent barriers that affects LSS adoption with environmental considerations have been identified. The barriers, namely, “lack of top management commitment”, “lack of training and education” and “lack of funds for green projects”, occupy the base segment of the ISM hierarchy; the barriers, namely, “difficulty in adopting environmental strategies”, “stringent government policies”, “negative attitude towards sustainability concepts”, “improper communication” and “lack of defect monitoring analysis”, occupy the top level of the ISM hierarchy. Practical implications The analysis helped in identifying and prioritizing the barriers that affect LSS adoption with environmental considerations using a mathematical approach. This approach is also helpful for practitioners to focus on removing the key dominant barriers and to enable LSS adoption with environmental considerations smoothly. Originality/value The analysis helped in identifying and prioritizing the barriers that affect LSS adoption with environmental considerations using the Fuzzy MICMAC approach which has not been attempted in the past. The structural model is developed holistically based on the inputs gathered from practitioners and academicians to ensure practical validity. Also, this approach is helpful for practitioners to focus on removing the key dominant barriers and enabling them to deploy LSS concepts with environmental considerations smoothly.
      Citation: International Journal of Lean Six Sigma
      PubDate: 2018-02-07T11:30:15Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJLSS-11-2016-0071
       
  • A theoretical and statistical approach of Six Sigma differentiation from
           other quality systems
    • Pages: 91 - 112
      Abstract: International Journal of Lean Six Sigma, Volume 9, Issue 1, Page 91-112, March 2018.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to investigate in which management aspects could Six Sigma (SS) methodology help the organization that implements it. Another subject to be examined is the integration of SS and other quality management systems (QMSs) in practice and in a theoretical way. Design/methodology/approach A questionnaire was addressed to 146 Greek companies of all business sectors, with at least one QMS; here was ISO 9001:2008. It included questions concerning the importance of the critical success factors (CSFs) of QMSs and performance measures after the implementation of ISO 9001. Correspondence analysis was used for the analysis of the data. A theoretical investigation in literature was also accomplished to express the characteristic aspects of SS. Findings Companies implementing SS seemed to outperform the companies without it, in the importance given in most CSFs and equally in the performance measures. People-oriented factors distinguished as more important, and this is consistent with the literature concerning SS. Practical implications This paper provides information for practitioners and researchers about SS methodology and presents some of its advantages, deriving from its integration with ISO 9001 QMS. Originality/value It makes available a perspective of SS deployment in Greek organizations. It also clarifies points that demonstrate the differentiation of SS from other quality approaches and the case of integration with ISO 9001. It also presents the demographic profile of the companies that implement SS.
      Citation: International Journal of Lean Six Sigma
      PubDate: 2018-02-07T11:27:49Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJLSS-07-2016-0037
       
  • Help chain in companies undergoing a lean implementation
    • Pages: 113 - 132
      Abstract: International Journal of Lean Six Sigma, Volume 9, Issue 1, Page 113-132, March 2018.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to propose an instrument for assessing the relationships between the critical success factors (CSFs) that promote help chain, providing means to enhance overall equipment effectiveness (OEE) and quality performance in companies undergoing a lean implementation. Design/methodology/approach The aforementioned relationships were determined and validated through a survey carried out with 50 Brazilian manufacturers. The authors, thus, provide an empirically validated instrument for assessing help chain CSFs and their impact on key operational performance indicators with no parallel in the existing literature. Quality (incidence of scrap and rework in manufacturing processes) and OEE (overall equipment effectiveness measured in percentage) were chosen as performance indicators because of their recognized relevance in previous research related to help chain approach. Findings The results of this paper show that the size of the company and CSFs have a significant relationship with quality. However, for OEE, time of lean implementation seems to be significantly important to predict its performance. Originality/value Identifying relevant relationships between CSFs and performance indicators may contribute to specify the context in which problems are expected to occur. With that knowledge, manufacturers will be able to emphasize the development of such factors that tend to improve their operational performance. Therefore, possible correlations are investigated to obtain a clearer comprehension around the subject and enable a better understating over the boundary conditions that surround the problem.
      Citation: International Journal of Lean Six Sigma
      PubDate: 2018-02-07T11:30:03Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJLSS-08-2016-0039
       
  • Exploring the adoption of Lean principles in medical laboratory industry
    • Pages: 133 - 155
      Abstract: International Journal of Lean Six Sigma, Volume 9, Issue 1, Page 133-155, March 2018.
      Purpose As the demand for efficiency and quality in the health-care industry has increased over the past few years, adoption of Lean principles and tools in the medical laboratory industry has become increasingly crucial. The purpose of this study is to explore the level of adoption, barriers and enablers of Lean principles and tools in the Namibian medical laboratory industry. Design/methodology/approach A descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out to examine the level of usage, barriers and enablers, impact of Lean tools and to suggest appropriate strategies for adopting Lean in the Namibian medical laboratory services. Findings Research findings reveal that Lean tools are moderately implemented in most laboratories. Standard operating procedures, root cause analysis, overall equipment effectiveness and visual management are the important Lean tools used in the industry. Results of the survey also show that Lean tools had a positive impact on operational performance, employee motivation, turnaround time and cost reduction. Furthermore, top management involvement, adequate training and proper planning emerged as important enablers, while lack of support from the management, financial constraint and staff resistant to change are major barriers to the adoption of Lean principles in the Namibian medical laboratory industry. Research limitations/implications The paper has inherent limitations of survey research, which the authors will overcome by using case studies with medical laboratories. Practical implications The findings of the authors’ work will help in widening the application of Lean principles in more medical laboratories in Namibia and in other parts of the world. Originality/value The paper is based on numerous health-care studies on Lean. This is one of the few papers investigating the adoption of Lean principles, specifically in medical laboratories, from an emerging economy such as Namibia.
      Citation: International Journal of Lean Six Sigma
      PubDate: 2018-02-07T11:28:28Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJLSS-02-2017-0017
       
  • Six Sigma learning evaluation model using Bloom’s Taxonomy
    • Pages: 156 - 174
      Abstract: International Journal of Lean Six Sigma, Volume 9, Issue 1, Page 156-174, March 2018.
      Purpose This paper aims to propose a learning evaluation model for Green Belts and Black Belts at the training level. A question bank has been developed on the basis of Bloom’s learning classification and applied to a group of employees who were being trained in Six Sigma (SS). Their results were then used to decide on the students’ approval and to guide the instructor’s plan of teaching for the next classes. Design/methodology/approach An action research has been conducted to develop a question bank of 310 questions based on the revised Bloom’s Taxonomy, to implement the evaluation model, and to apply it during the SS training. Findings The evaluation model has been designed so that the students do not proceed unless they have acquired the conceptual knowledge at each step of the DMAIC (Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve and Control) roadmap. At the end of the evaluation process, the students’ results have been analyzed. The number of mistakes in all stages of DMAIC was equal, implying that the training was uniform the entire roadmap. However, the opposite happened in each of the Bloom’s Taxonomy levels, showing that some skills need to be better stimulated by the instructor than others. Research limitations/implications The learning evaluation model proposed in this paper has been applied to a group of 70 employees who were being trained in SS at a Brazilian aircraft manufacturer. The data have been analyzed using Microsoft Excel® and Minitab® 17 Statistical Software. Originality/value Despite the abundance of courses offering the SS Green Belt and Black Belt certifications, there is no standard evaluation to ensure the training quality. Thus, this paper proposes an innovative learning evaluation model.
      Citation: International Journal of Lean Six Sigma
      PubDate: 2018-02-07T11:28:31Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJLSS-01-2017-0006
       
  • Lean Six Sigma in developing countries: evidence from a large Brazilian
           manufacturing firm
    • Abstract: International Journal of Lean Six Sigma, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose Although the literature on Lean Six Sigma (LSS) implementation has evolved, a deeper understanding of the LSS practices applied in organisations in developing countries is needed. This paper aims to analyse LSS in a manufacturing company in the context of LSS implementation in an emerging economy. Design/methodology/approach This paper uses case-based research. Data collected in a large manufacturing company through multiple sources of evidence were triangulated to derive the findings. This paper analyses aspects related to the implementation of both programmes and their synergy, as well as some critical and failure factors. Findings The main results show that Lean and Six Sigma are applied separately in two different programmes. Some aspects that are necessary to increase the integration of both approaches were identified while considering each phase of the DMAIC and the current approach applied by the company. Although some positive results have been achieved, there are many critical and failure factors that may influence the implementation of both approaches, such as employee training and changes in the organisational environment. Finally, the comprehensive integration of both approaches needs to be undertaken by the company. Research limitations/implications The findings from this single case study cannot be generalised. Practical implications This paper may be used as a guiding reference for managers and consultants to help them when working towards more successful LSS implementation. Originality/value First, this paper investigates LSS in a manufacturing firm located in a developing country; this issue is still seldom addressed in the literature. Second, it may contribute to practitioners’ knowledge by delivering insights into a real context, as well as the relevant issues to be addressed when implementing LSS in similar contexts.
      Citation: International Journal of Lean Six Sigma
      PubDate: 2018-07-12T08:58:51Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJLSS-09-2016-0047
       
  • A systematic approach to root cause analysis using 3 × 5 why’s
           technique
    • Abstract: International Journal of Lean Six Sigma, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to go a step further from the traditional 5 Whys technique by adding three more legs during the root cause analysis stage – occurrence, human and systemic issues that contribute toward the problem, hence the term 3 × 5 Whys. Performing individual 5 Whys for these three components enables to identify deeper root cause(s) that may spawn across multiple groups within an organization. Design/methodology/approach Cause-and-effect analysis used during traditional root cause investigations within an 8D or Lean six sigma project is used as a theoretical foundation. Examples from different industries are presented showing the 3 × 5 Why’s framework and advantages it brings to the organization along with identifying shortcomings and suggestions to make it more effective. Findings If properly used this integrated methodology will reveal higher order systemic causes (e.g. policies or management decisions) stemming from lower lever symptoms (e.g. defective parts, procedural errors). Effective execution of this methodology can provide tremendous results in defect reduction, yield improvement, operational efficiency improvement and logistics management type of projects. Resolving higher level sources of problems allows an organization to evolve itself and maintain a competitive edge in the market. Research limitations/implications Adopting this quality management technique in start-up companies entails some challenges and other implications have been discussed with SWOT analysis. Practical implications Examples from various sectors using 3 × 5 Why approach have been presented that show that this methodology provides deeper insight into root causes which could be affecting multiple groups in an organization. Using this technique effectively is found to be beneficial to resolve issues in operations management, logistics, supply chain, purchasing, warehouse operations, manufacturing, etc. Social implications This methodology has a human component which often results in some sort of resistance as not all working professionals think alike when it comes to accountability and ownership of issues. This may hinder root cause analysis and subsequent corrective actions implementation. Originality/value This study is unique in its in-depth real-world case studies demonstrating the need for taking a deep dive approach to root cause analysis by understanding specific, system and human components responsible for causing the failure mode.
      Citation: International Journal of Lean Six Sigma
      PubDate: 2018-07-09T09:03:12Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJLSS-10-2017-0114
       
  • Blue ocean leadership in lean sustainability
    • Abstract: International Journal of Lean Six Sigma, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose Literature has shown that many companies fail lean implementation or is not able to sustain lean for a long time. Researchers have found that lean failures are associated with leadership, which is a key factor. However, it is not easy and a long time is needed to change the leadership, behaviour and traits. This study aims to introduce the Blue Ocean Leadership concept to address this issue. Design/methodology/approach A literature review is carried for articles related to critical success factors for Lean and Lean Six Sigma with a focus on leadership factors. Findings The Blue Ocean Leadership concept focuses on leaders’ acts and activities which can be changed with less effort and time. Seven categories of lean activities for leaders are identified. Research limitations/implications Leadership is one of the many factors for the success of lean implementation. This conceptual study focuses only on leadership and it needs further field study for validation. Practical implications Blue Ocean Leadership provides lean practitioners and academicians with a new perspective for successful lean implementation. Originality/value To the best knowledge of the researcher, there is no similar study in this area. Thus, the finding can form the basis for further research for the benefit of lean communities, especially the small- or medium-sized enterprises with less cost and time.
      Citation: International Journal of Lean Six Sigma
      PubDate: 2018-07-09T08:56:10Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJLSS-06-2016-0029
       
  • Selecting Six Sigma project: a comparative study of DEA and LDA techniques
    • Abstract: International Journal of Lean Six Sigma, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose Nowadays, most of the organizations have focused through the world on Six Sigma to reduce the costs, improve the productivity and enhance concerned individuals’ satisfaction, especially customers’ satisfaction. Annually, these organizations define and execute thousands of Six Sigma projects which involve a great deal of investments. But are all of these projects successful and do the organizations benefit from the above advantages' The purpose of this study is to proposing a methodology to to answer this question that: How can we reduce the risk of failure in Six Sigma projects' The first step to reduce the risk of failure in Six Sigma projects is selecting optimal ones which have the most profits and the least expected risks. Design/methodology/approach First, the effective criteria are recognized and defined in selecting Six Sigma projects. Then, a new data envelopment analysis (DEA) model is proposed for project selection process. A real example is resolved by the presented model. Finally, the authors use linear discriminate analysis (LDA) to examine the validity of obtained results from the proposed model. Findings The results show that the proposed model is a suitable tool for selecting Six Sigma Projects. The findings demonstrate that the selected projects by suggested integrated DEA model are those confirmed by LDA. Originality/value The paper, using a real case study, provides a mathematical model to enhance decision quality in Six Sigma project selection. Applying the specific DEA model is remarkable itself, which joined to a pioneering procedure to use LDA to validity evaluation of the results.
      Citation: International Journal of Lean Six Sigma
      PubDate: 2018-07-09T08:42:23Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJLSS-11-2016-0067
       
  • Prioritising solutions for Lean Six Sigma adoption barriers through fuzzy
           AHP-modified TOPSIS framework
    • Abstract: International Journal of Lean Six Sigma, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose This paper aims to guide about prioritisation and ranking of the solutions and overcoming barriers to facilitate the adoption of Lean Six Sigma (LSS) by using a hybrid framework. Design/methodology/approach It identifies LSS barriers and solutions to facilitate LSS adoption through literature review and by involving subject experts. The study makes use of fuzzy set theory and proposes a fuzzy analytical hierarchy process (AHP)-modified TOPSIS (technique for order preference by similarity to ideal solution) framework. It uses sensitivity analysis to establish framework robustness. Findings The key findings of this techno-managerial study are identification and prioritisation of 27 LSS barriers and 22 solutions to overcome adoption challenges, proposition and usage of fuzzy AHP-modified TOPSIS framework, guidance regarding where to focus for facilitating LSS adoption and ensuring robustness using sensitivity analysis, which establishes insignificant deviation in rankings when criteria weights are altered. Research limitations/implications Some biasness and subjectivity may exist during pairwise comparisons as human judgements are involved. Practical implications Handling a hybrid solution like LSS is never easy. It is expected that the study will help industry professionals to plan their LSS adoption attempts effectively. Guidance regarding LSS barriers will assist in observing necessary precautions to avoid failures. It will open up new research fronts for researchers also. Originality/value Literature is full of studies regarding LSS barriers and its rankings. It is very rare to witness a study like ours, which discusses the barriers and links with solutions and its prioritisation. Proposed hybrid framework for a hybrid techno-managerial approach such as LSS is unique and acts as the roadmap for smooth implementation.
      Citation: International Journal of Lean Six Sigma
      PubDate: 2018-07-09T08:39:25Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJLSS-06-2016-0023
       
  • Identification and modeling of process barriers
    • Abstract: International Journal of Lean Six Sigma, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The purpose of this study is to present factors associated with process barriers in implementing lean manufacturing within the small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). Design/methodology/approach This study was conducted to identify the process barriers in implementing lean manufacturing in SMEs. Moreover, by a thorough and detailed analysis, process barriers of high rejection rate, employee absenteeism and frequent breakdown with 29 associated variables were identified as the most critical process barriers and were used to develop the questionnaire. Structural equation modeling was used to build the measurement model by drawing on samples of 128 SMEs in Kerala, a state in India. Later, the model was validated using statistical estimates. Data analysis helps to determine whether to accept or reject the hypothesis on the basis of the measurement model. Findings Several process barriers that prevent the successful implementation of lean manufacturing within SMEs are identified. These are lack of a training program, lack of periodical maintenance, low-quality standard materials from suppliers, bad vendor inspection, wear and tear of machines, communication gap between supervisors and workers, non-maintenance of a good employee–employer relationship, boredom on the job, overrunning machines beyond the capability, carelessness in work, not replacing worn damage parts periodically, ignoring warning signals of the machine classified as the most critical process barrier among the high rejection rate, employee absenteeism, frequent breakdown factors. Research limitations/implications First, the sample size of the study was relatively small (128). Second, data collection was restricted to one geographical area in India, i.e. Kerala, a state in India, giving rise to operational constraints. Third, the study was cross-sectional; a longitudinal study must be performed to reinforce the findings. Practical implications The present study has explored an unfocused area of lean implementation in SMEs. The results are expected to help researchers, academics and professionals in the domain of lean manufacturing. Social implications Governments of many countries around the world are helping and encouraging the implementation and understanding of the lean manufacturing system by providing financial assistance for training professionals and establishing professional associations. However, many industries have not been successful in lean implementation. This research aims to develop a strategy to tackle process barriers for successful lean implementation. Originality/value Very little research has been carried out in exploring process barriers in implementing lean manufacturing in SMEs. This paper will provide value to academics, researchers and practitioners of lean by providing insight into significant process barriers for lean implementation, especially in Indian industries.
      Citation: International Journal of Lean Six Sigma
      PubDate: 2018-07-09T08:34:03Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJLSS-09-2016-0044
       
  • Exploration and prioritization of lean techniques in a hotel supply chain
    • Abstract: International Journal of Lean Six Sigma, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to develop a framework for identification, categorization and prioritization of lean techniques adopted in a hotel supply chain. Design/methodology/approach A survey tool is used for the identification of lean techniques that are relevant to a hotel supply chain. The targeted sample includes experts from 50 four- and five-star hotels in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) that confirmed experience in implementing lean practices across hotels supply chain. A Supplier-Inputs-Process-Outputs-Customers (SIPOC) chart and experts’ opinion are used to allocate and categorize the identified lean techniques across the construct of the hotel supply chain. Finally, analytical hierarchy process (AHP) is used to prioritize the criteria and sub-criteria of adopted lean techniques. Findings Study results have identified six main categories of lean practices and 19 specific lean techniques as relevant to a hotel supply chain. The identified categories include JIT, Kaizen, Quality, Inventory, Maintenance and Standardization. The study found that JIT and Kaizen take the top priority among the identified categories of lean practices. In line with that, on-time service to customers, effective improvement system and on-time delivery from suppliers were found to be the three most relevant lean techniques to a hotel supply chain. Research limitations/implications The study has targeted a representative sample of hotels with experience in implementing lean practices. Study findings have several implications to researchers and practitioners for effective adoption of lean techniques within a hotel supply chain. However, the accuracy and credibility of results obtained from this research including SIPOC allocation and lean categorization are highly dependent on the accuracy and credibility of collected empirical data from surveyed hotels within the study context. Results of AHP prioritization also depend on the credibility of judgements made by the hotels’ supply chain experts. Practical implications The study provides the hospitality industry with a structured approach that can help in a prioritized adoption of most relevant lean techniques across the hotel supply chain to reduce wastes, create value, increase efficiency and improve the service level. Study findings can be used by hotel management to direct and focus the effort of lean capacity building, resources allocation and implementation plans. Originality/value Limited research is available on lean management in the context of a hotel supply chain. Also, most of the previous research is focused on lean impacts, while academics and practitioners agree that the identification and prioritization of most relevant lean techniques is crucial to the successful implementation of lean management for waste reduction and value creation. This research addresses this important issue in hotel supply chains and proposes a structured approach for effective lean adoption.
      Citation: International Journal of Lean Six Sigma
      PubDate: 2018-07-06T09:29:46Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJLSS-10-2017-0119
       
  • Exploring the role of human factors in lean management
    • Abstract: International Journal of Lean Six Sigma, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose Although lean popularity is rapidly growing, its implementation is far from problem-free and companies may experience difficulties in sustaining long-term success. On this premises, the purpose of this paper is to understand to what extent human factors, affected by the implementation of both hard (defined as technical and analytical tools) and soft (concerning people and relations) lean practices, play a key role in achieving long-term superior performance. Design/methodology/approach The analysis of the relationships between lean practices implementation, human factors and operational performance is carried out in a single exploratory case study. A retrospective approach is adopted to trace the changes of human and operational performance before, during and after the introduction of lean management (LM) implementation. In particular, a mixed method concurrent design merging results of a qualitative analysis with data collected from a survey is selected to provide a more realistic benefit in the exploration of the proposed research questions. Findings The results show a short-term direct relationship between the implementation of lean practices (hard and soft) and physical work environment and job characteristics, directly connected to operational outcome. In the long term, operational performance is influenced by employee behaviour outcome and conditioned by physical work environment and job characteristics with the mediating effect of individual characteristics. Practical implications The proposed model supports the building of a roadmap for LM implementation, taking into account the role of the human factors to achieve superior operational performance. Moreover, it helps managers to implement a monitoring system to check how social and technical components of a LM system evolve over time. Finally, it supports the definition of specific training programs, tailored for specific workers’ types. Originality/value This paper extends theory in LM, highlighting how hard and soft lean practices have to interact to enable a successful LM implementation.
      Citation: International Journal of Lean Six Sigma
      PubDate: 2018-07-06T09:27:25Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJLSS-08-2017-0094
       
  • Where to direct research in lean six sigma'
    • Abstract: International Journal of Lean Six Sigma, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose Lean Six Sigma (LSS) is a continuous improvement methodology used to increase the efficiency and effectiveness of processes. Although there are several articles published, only two have analyzed the literature from a bibliometrics perspective. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the LSS literature by bibliometrics, identifying its state of the art, scientific gaps and research trends. Design/methodology/approach Articles published up to 2016 in the database Scopus were investigated to identify the most significant articles, authors, journals, institutions and countries based on citation counting as well as the most frequent keywords and subject areas on LSS. Articles published in 2014, 2015 and 2016 were analyzed to point out scientific gaps and to identify eight main research trends on LSS. Findings The research trends are: “LSS implementation”, “Healthcare”, “LSS tools”, “Human factors”, “Expansion of results”, “SME”, “LSS combined with other methodologies” and “Education”. The research outcomes also point out the most significant articles, authors, journals, institutions and countries in LSS literature. Practical implications This research contributes to develop the state of the art of LSS and helps professionals as well as researchers to identify which issues new studies should address. Originality/value The performance of the literature is measured based on the number of citations and not on the number of published papers, and the bibliometric analysis covers the highest number of articles so far (319 articles). Besides, the identification of the main research trends on LSS is exclusively based on the most recent studies.
      Citation: International Journal of Lean Six Sigma
      PubDate: 2018-07-06T09:23:45Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJLSS-05-2017-0052
       
  • Revealing research trends and themes in Lean Six Sigma: from 2000 to 2016
    • Abstract: International Journal of Lean Six Sigma, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to examine and introduce comprehensive insights into the field of Lean Six Sigma (LSS) by reviewing the existing literature and identifying the research gap. The state of LSS research is assessed by critically examining the field, along with a number of dimensions, including time horizon, year, journal and publisher, university, country, author, geographic analysis, research design, research affairs, research methods, tools/techniques used, focus industries, major research area, benefits gained by LSS, critical success factors and barriers of LSS implementation. Design/methodology/approach This paper is based on a systematic literature review of 190 articles containing the word LSS in their title, which are published in a well-known database, such as Elsevier ScienceDirect, Taylor and Francis, Emerald Full Text, Springer Link, Wiley InterScience and Inderscience from January 2000 to September 2016. Findings This analysis reveals 15 significant dimensions to identify the state of LSS research.
      Authors find a noticeable rise in the attention of LSS research in the available literature. Major findings show that, the empirical research holds greater credibility. Statistics prove that the case study method scores the highest among all the research methods used in the discipline. The largest number of studies have investigated research issues related to implementation and process of LSS. The LSS uses a wide range of tools/techniques/methodologies: the choice of tools is situation-specific. Manufacturing and health-care sectors have been the focus of LSS research, but LSS has also been adopted by other types of industries. The organizations following LSS have improved bottom-line results, improved company profitability and growth and enhanced customer satisfaction. In general the research is more interpretive in nature; there is still a lack of standard in the LSS implementation framework. Research limitations/implications This study is limited to reviewing those articles which contain the word LSS appeared in the title. Originality/value This study will help understand the current state of research on LSS, various trends in the field, its applicability and future prospects of investigation in the field.
      Citation: International Journal of Lean Six Sigma
      PubDate: 2018-07-06T09:19:45Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJLSS-03-2017-0021
       
  • Introducing lean six sigma to a German municipality: an action research
           report
    • Abstract: International Journal of Lean Six Sigma, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose This paper aims to expand the knowledge about lean six sigma (LSS) implementation in the public sector. By analyzing an LSS improvement initiative in a German municipality, examples of success, barriers and challenges are discussed. A comparison with literature regarding the production and service sectors unfolds similarities and differences. Design/methodology/approach The paper applies the action research method. Especially for the broad field of project management, methods focusing on actual experience from practice have been recommended by many researchers. Findings Implementations of LSS in the public sector seem to be particularly challenging and lengthy. Change and communication management have proved to be the most important aspects to successful acceptance, cooperation and improvement sustainability. In the analyzed cases, the needed volume of data could often not be procured. The applied Six Sigma methodology primarily included the DMAIC project phases as well as selected standard instruments. In contrast, the lean elements of LSS achieved more results and were appreciated by project team members. Originality/value The LSS application in this paper provides insights into practical implementation experience in a municipality, as well as lessons learned. Until now, most research addressed the single application of lean, continuous improvement or Six Sigma. This paper represents the first academic report of a LSS program in a German municipality and underlines the need for scientific support of those initiatives in further municipalities worldwide.
      Citation: International Journal of Lean Six Sigma
      PubDate: 2018-07-06T08:59:03Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJLSS-02-2017-0019
       
  • Development of leanness index for SMEs
    • Abstract: International Journal of Lean Six Sigma, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose This paper aims to discuss the concept of leanness and provide an effective assessment tool for measuring leanness of small and medium enterprises (SMEs). Design/methodology/approach A hybrid interpretive structural modelling–analytical network process (ISM-ANP) approach is used to develop leanness index for SMEs. The parameters for leanness are extracted from the literature survey, and the inter-relationships among them are identified through ISM approach. Further, the ANP tool is used to derive the weights of the parameters, and the leanness index is developed for SMEs. Findings A leanness assessment model is developed, which considers the interdependencies among leanness parameters. Continuous improvement, Just in Time and active management participation, respectively, get first, second and third ranks for leanness measurement in SMEs. Research limitations/implications This study is based on the expert’s opinion, and it may tend to be biased. However, future study will be performed as empirical research to catch more explicit concept and more insights of leanness in context of SME sector. Practical implications This paper provides guidelines to the managers of SMEs for measuring the leanness index and planning for future. This leanness index gives information regarding the degree of lean adoption in the organization. Originality/value The proposed model has been developed by the expert opinion of academicians and practitioners. The proposed model can provide guidelines and directions for managers for leanness assessment in SME context.
      Citation: International Journal of Lean Six Sigma
      PubDate: 2018-07-04T09:42:49Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJLSS-09-2017-0109
       
  • Top ten reasons for process improvement project failures
    • Abstract: International Journal of Lean Six Sigma, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to provide the top ten reasons of process improvement projects termination or failure to Lean and Six Sigma professionals and researchers. Design/methodology/approach The top ten reasons of process improvement projects termination or failure are based on literature, interaction of authors with Lean Six Sigma Master Black Belts, consultants, practitioners and trainers on various topics of Lean, Six Sigma, general quality management and continuous improvement along several years’ experience of the authors. Findings The top ten reasons in our opinion include lack of commitment and support from top management; poor communication practices; incompetent team; inadequate training and learning; faulty selection of process improvement methodology and its associated tools/techniques; inappropriate rewards and recognition system/culture; scope creepiness; sub-optimal team size and composition; inconsistent monitoring and control; and resistance to change. Research limitations/implications The top ten reasons mentioned in this study are based on only literature and authors’ opinion. The authors of this paper have been pursuing a global study to critically evaluate the reasons behind process improvement projects failure based on a case-study approach. Originality/value The chief operations officers and senior executives of various businesses can use these top ten reasons to develop project failure risk mitigation strategies and save significant cash-savings associated with such project terminations or failures in some other cases.
      Citation: International Journal of Lean Six Sigma
      PubDate: 2018-07-04T09:35:32Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJLSS-11-2017-0130
       
  • Experience of implementing lean thinking in an Indian healthcare
           institution
    • Abstract: International Journal of Lean Six Sigma, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The purpose of this study is to document the experience and impact of implementing lean thinking (LT) in an Indian healthcare institution. Design/methodology/approach A detailed review of literature documenting the experience of implementing LT in healthcare institutions is carried out. Review revealed that there is a dearth of documentation on implementation of LT in Indian healthcare institutions. To address this gap, the experience of implementing LT in an Indian case hospital is documented by adopting a single case study research methodology. Findings Lean practices adopted by the Indian case hospital are documented. Performance measures before and after implementation of lean practices in the case hospital are compared. Based on this experience, a framework for implementing LT is proposed for healthcare institutions. Research limitations/implications The current study documents the experience of an Indian case hospital, which is only at its initial stages of LT implementation. Future studies can be undertaken to assess the long-term impact of implementing LT in a healthcare institution. Similarly, the proposed framework for implementing LT can be validated by using the same in different healthcare institutions. Practical implications Review of lean principles, practices and performance measures discussed in the literature on implementing LT in healthcare institutions can act as a ready reckoner for practitioners. Framework proposed based on the experience of the case hospital is expected to guide healthcare practitioners in their lean journey. Originality/value This study is unique, as it documents the experience of implementing LT in an Indian healthcare institution and proposes a framework for implementing LT for future validation.
      Citation: International Journal of Lean Six Sigma
      PubDate: 2018-07-04T09:28:08Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJLSS-10-2016-0062
       
  • Impact of quality management practices on change readiness due to new
           quality implementations
    • Abstract: International Journal of Lean Six Sigma, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose Implementing new quality initiatives in organizations is challenging, as it requires managers and employees to adjust to new processes, methodologies and even mindsets. The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between quality management (QM) practices and readiness for change due to implementing new quality initiatives such as lean, six sigma and to determine which dimensions of QM are more important to change efficacy and change commitment. Design/methodology/approach The issues are examined in this study through the analysis of survey data obtained from US textile and apparel industry managers by using factor analysis, stepwise regression to construct path model and structural equation modeling. Findings This study identifies change readiness measures which are specific for quality implementations and establishes two constructs, namely, change commitment and change efficacy. The results indicate that as good Employee Relations increase, the level of organizational change commitment increases. If employees are engaged and empowered to provide excellent quality, then it is more likely that they will be committed to change due to implementing future quality initiatives. Moreover, a direct relationship between Customer Relationship Management and change efficacy is found. Companies with a strong customer orientation are more able to implement the quality initiatives that matter to their markets. Originality/value This study is unique in investigating the empirical relationship between QM practices and the dimensions of readiness for change due to implementing new quality initiatives via data from various organizations. This study empirically contributes to the QM literature with change readiness antecedents in quality implementation setting.
      Citation: International Journal of Lean Six Sigma
      PubDate: 2018-07-04T09:18:28Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJLSS-05-2017-0049
       
  • Modeling the lean barriers for successful lean implementation: TISM
           approach
    • Abstract: International Journal of Lean Six Sigma, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose Companies have been implementing lean manufacturing to improve their business performances. However, many of them have difficulties in the implementation because of various barriers, thus encountering failures. This paper aims to prioritize and analyze the lean barriers for better understanding and interpretation for successful lean implementation. Design/methodology/approach Extensive literature review has been carried out to identify the lean barriers. Subsequently, total interpretive structural modeling (TISM) has been adopted where lean experts’ inputs have been sought to obtain the self-interaction and reachability matrix. Further, driving power and dependence of lean barriers have been derived, and TISM-based lean barrier model has been developed. Findings Insufficient management time, insufficient supervisory skills and insufficient senior management skills are the significant barriers with highest driving power and lowest dependence. With low driving power, cost- and funding-related barriers such as cost of the investment, internal funding and external funding are found to be less important barriers. Practical implications This model provides a more realistic approach to the problems faced by practitioners during lean implementation. Thus, it provides a roadmap to implement lean by focusing on reducing or eliminating important barriers. Originality/value The paper not only provides a TISM-based model of contextual relationships among lean barriers but also describes the validation of this model.
      Citation: International Journal of Lean Six Sigma
      PubDate: 2018-06-28T09:47:44Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJLSS-10-2016-0063
       
  • Lean implementation and implications: experiences from Macedonia
    • Abstract: International Journal of Lean Six Sigma, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose This paper aims to explore the level of implementation of Lean tools in companies of metalworking and automotive industry in R. Macedonia compared with the global experiences and to explore the relationship between certain dimensions that determine the leanness and the company’s success. Design/methodology/approach Based on the analysis and synthesis of the literature, the theoretical research model was developed. Structured interview was used to collect data. The analysis of the first goal was performed using benchmarking with some prior global research and the analysis of the second goal was undertaken with multiple linear regression. Findings The distribution of the lean tools through ISO 9001 requirements in this sample generally follows the global experiences. However, most used tools in the companies with solely domestic capital are the basic Lean tools which show certain lack of understanding of the importance of Lean management and strategic commitment to Lean management, in such companies. Dimensions like customer satisfaction, teamwork and motivation, condition and maintenance of equipment and tools, supply chain integration and commitment to quality have significant positive correlation with the company’s success. Practical/implications The foreign investments can foster implementation of contemporary management approaches in developing countries. These countries have to find mechanisms to foster acceptance and implementation of Lean management. Originality/value This paper is one of the rare attempts to explore the implementation of Lean tools through ISO 9001 requirements and relationship of particular Lean dimensions and the company’s success, in metalworking companies in small developing countries, additionally exploring the differences in the Lean management acceptance considering the ownership of the companies.
      Citation: International Journal of Lean Six Sigma
      PubDate: 2018-06-26T09:17:50Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJLSS-10-2016-0057
       
  • Empirical analysis of existing lean service frameworks in a developing
           economy
    • Abstract: International Journal of Lean Six Sigma, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to do the reliability and validity analysis of existing frameworks in lean services through questionnaire survey. Furthermore, it explores the applicability of these frameworks in Indian service sector. Design/methodology/approach A questionnaire survey was floated to 423 lean/quality practitioners in four service sectors in India. The questionnaire has two parts where first part was for collecting the demographic information of respondents and the second part assesses the importance of initiatives identified by various scholars/consultants under different frameworks of lean services. The assessment was done on five-point Likert scale. Findings The results indicate that majority of services have adopted lean/process improvement methodology for enhancing operational excellence/performance and customer satisfaction. The study finds that all frameworks display a high level of reliability. Only nine out of eighteen lean service frameworks have displayed unidimensionality with respect to the construct, Lean. No generalised framework for lean services is available. Some essential elements such as servicescapes and change management are not present in any framework. Most of the frameworks are sector specific; thus, there is requirement for a suitable lean service framework. Research limitations/implications The data were collected only from four sectors in Indian service industry. Future researchers may test these frameworks for other service sectors and country. Originality/value This is the first paper empirically validating the lean service frameworks. The findings of the paper will be of value to lean service practitioners. It helps the quality professionals to recognise a suitable lean service framework to implement in their respective organisation.
      Citation: International Journal of Lean Six Sigma
      PubDate: 2018-06-26T09:13:50Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJLSS-03-2016-0013
       
  • Adoption and implementation potential of the lean concept in the petroleum
           industry: state-of-the-art
    • Abstract: International Journal of Lean Six Sigma, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose A systematic literature review is performed to reveal the state-of-the-art in the implementation of lean principles in the petroleum industry. This paper aims to generate a conceptual framework and reveal research gaps with respect to lean concept application in the petroleum industry. Design/methodology/approach After formulating research questions, the search strategy is generated, followed by data extraction, literature review and synthesis of the results. The search covers any studies in peer-reviewed scientific journals and conference proceedings in the period 1990-2017 that discuss the implementation of the lean concept in the petroleum industry. Findings The lean concept has been used to improve operational and technical aspects, contractor/supplier relationships, team organization and project management practice in the petroleum industry. Based on the literature review, a conceptual framework is generated comprising four main elements: leadership and commitment from management, employee involvement, cooperation and trust with contractors/suppliers and lean project management. These elements are the pillars that are founded on lean philosophy and principles to support technical/operational improvement in the organization. The types of literature identified indicate that the subject of the study is still immature. Research limitations/implications This study focuses only on the upstream sector of the petroleum industry, which restricts the generalizability of the results to midstream and downstream businesses. Practical implications This paper provides knowledge and information regarding the current state of lean implementation in the petroleum industry. The developed conceptual framework provides general guidance for practitioners regarding lean implementation in the petroleum industry, and is also expected to support research on theory building. Originality/value Few studies have discussed the application of the lean concept in the petroleum industry. This paper contributes a platform for researchers and practitioners to comprehend how the lean concept has been applied in the petroleum industry, and provides a foundation for further studies on lean implementation in the petroleum industry.
      Citation: International Journal of Lean Six Sigma
      PubDate: 2018-06-26T02:43:54Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJLSS-10-2016-0065
       
  • Application of Six-Sigma DMAIC methodology in plain yogurt production
           process
    • Abstract: International Journal of Lean Six Sigma, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose This study aims to concentrate on quality improvement in plain yogurt production process at company A through adjusting the factors affecting the acidity of the yogurt and determining the optimal level of these factors. Design/methodology/approach Six Sigma-based framework using define-measure-analyze-improve-control (DMAIC) methodology is adopted through the application of design of experiments tool to focus on customer’s requirements to improve the quality characteristic of plain yogurt production process in dairy products manufacturing company (company A) in Iran. Findings The results showed that incubation time and fat percentage were significant factors on pH values of yogurt and the optimum settings for these factors were defined as 12 h for the incubation time and 1.5 per cent for the fat percentage. Research limitations/implications This study focused solely on the plain yogurt production process in dairy products manufacturing company. Practical implications Simplicity of Six Sigma plays a leading role for enabling any dairy manufacturer to determine the problem and minimize its cause through a systematic approach. Social implications Six Sigma has been considered to be a systematic, powerful technique to continuously improve the processes and develop the new products by using effective analytical and statistical tools and methods. This paper presents a Six Sigma-based framework using DMAIC methodology to improve the quality characteristic of plain yogurt production process in dairy products manufacturing company. Originality/value This study contributes to show a potential area in which Six Sigma DMAIC approach can promote to improve the quality of yogurt production process. This case can prompt managers of the company to apply Six Sigma method to address complicated problems in other processes, where causes particularly are not clear.
      Citation: International Journal of Lean Six Sigma
      PubDate: 2018-06-26T02:38:09Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJLSS-11-2016-0069
       
  • State of art perspectives of lean and sustainable manufacturing
    • Abstract: International Journal of Lean Six Sigma, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The contemporary manufacturing organizations recognize the importance of lean manufacturing as a tool to eliminate wastes, streamline processes and improve value addition. On the other hand, such organizations also focus on the development of ecofriendly products and processes. In this context, lean manufacturing concepts provide a pathway for attaining sustainable benefits. This paper aims to present the state of art review on lean and sustainable manufacturing. Design/methodology/approach A total of 80 research papers on lean and sustainable manufacturing from various perspectives have been reviewed and their contributions are being presented. The perspectives include origin, definition, decision-making, performance measurement, product development and application for both lean and sustainable manufacturing. Findings Findings from the literature prove that both lean and sustainable manufacturing systems aim at improving the organizational performance and provide both operational and sustainable benefits. Also based on the studies, it has been found that integrated lean sustainable manufacturing system can be defined as a system that creates value for the customers by eliminating wastes consistently and adopting processes that are ecofriendly, economically viable and safe for the employees to produce green products that enhance the social performance. Research limitations/implications The present review considers the papers on lean and sustainable manufacturing based on certain perspectives. Peer-reviewed journal articles, and books are only being considered and reviewed. Articles and information from dissertation thesis, unpublished working papers and conference proceedings were excluded. In future, the study can be enhanced by considering more such perspectives that reflect the ideology and applicability of the selected themes. The practical perspectives of lean and sustainable manufacturing and their integration are also being presented. Originality/value This paper presents a review of lean and sustainable manufacturing and provides insights from different perspectives. The scope for their integration is also discussed. The contributions are original.
      Citation: International Journal of Lean Six Sigma
      PubDate: 2018-06-26T02:22:48Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJLSS-11-2016-0070
       
  • Do lean manufacturing practices have negative impact on job
           satisfaction'
    • Abstract: International Journal of Lean Six Sigma, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose Due to the increasing trend of global competitiveness, lean manufacturing has received much attention in the international literature. Although previous studies have indicated the positive effects of lean manufacturing on the performance of the manufacturing firms, the impact of lean practices on two aspects of “job”, namely, characteristics and satisfaction, as of yet remains unclear. As a result, this study aims to evaluate job characteristics to understand the effects of lean manufacturing on job satisfaction. Design/methodology/approach Data from a survey of 206 employees in lean manufacturing companies were gathered and analysed using the partial least squares technique. Findings The results indicate that customer relationship, human resources and product design practices had positive indirect effects on job satisfaction through job characteristics, whereas, process and equipment practices had a negative indirect effect. Practical implications The findings of the study will be useful for the companies that implement lean manufacturing practices. Companies could either adjust their lean initiatives or make a trade-off amongst job characteristics. Originality/value This study contributes to the advancement of knowledge on the effects of lean manufacturing practices on job satisfaction through job characteristics.
      Citation: International Journal of Lean Six Sigma
      PubDate: 2018-06-20T02:30:31Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJLSS-11-2016-0072
       
  • Lean six sigma and the Australian business excellence framework
    • Abstract: International Journal of Lean Six Sigma, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to examine a contextualized local government case study of the application of Lean Six Sigma (LSS) in conjunction with the Australian Business Excellence Framework (ABEF) to highlight the importance of a good strategic fit between LSS and organizational objectives before implementation. Design/methodology/approach A local government council is used in a case study-based approach. Organizational artefacts and documents were used for data collection in conjunction with interviews from senior executives within the organization. Findings Results indicate that when used in conjunction with the ABEF, LSS provides focus on organizational learning practices embedded within the implementation of continuous improvement. Research limitations/implications The purpose of this paper is to contribute to discourse regarding the effective application and implementation of LLS in local government. Practical implications LSS tools and techniques are known to local government, but are applied in isolation of the overarching LSS framework. This paper emphasizes the importance of comprehensive implementation of these tools, guided by the inclusion of an external contextualized framework (ABEF) in conjunction with the LSS to achieve sustainable continuous improvement. Originality/value Business excellence frameworks are widely used in the public sector as a reference/means for improvement. This paper highlights the importance of LSS in operationalizing strategic direction provided by such frameworks and providing the focus on learning practices critical for sustainable improvements.
      Citation: International Journal of Lean Six Sigma
      PubDate: 2018-06-15T06:57:18Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJLSS-01-2017-0010
       
  • Evaluating the supply chain information flow in Egyptian SMEs using six
           sigma
    • Abstract: International Journal of Lean Six Sigma, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose There is a great deal of concern among the Egyptian economy that small- and medium-sized enterprises’ (SMEs’) potentials are not fully used although they dominate it and contribute to its success. The question is what challenges are preventing those SMEs from performing efficiently. This research aims to focus on examining the issues regarding the supply chain of Egyptian SMEs, exploring the areas that need improvement and assessing the impact of technology in enhancing their performance and whether they afford applying it. Design/methodology/approach In this research, semi-structured interviews were conducted at 14 Egyptian SMEs. Then, the business process at six of the fourteen SMEs was observed. After that, a representative sampling was applied and a company was chosen as a representative case company. Moreover, the selected company’s documents were analyzed to capture the full image of the current supply chain performance in Egyptian SMEs. Finally, the Six Sigma DMAIC approach was used to assess the effectiveness of the current supply chain and identify the problems faced and how to deal with these deficiencies. Findings The current process of the supply chain was analyzed and the result shows the obstacles and constrains facing SMEs in Egypt. Despite the clear benefits of radio frequency identification (RFID) technology, Egyptian SMEs still do not use it to solve their problems due to its high cost and their low budgets. However, the investigation concludes that SMEs in particular can benefit from the RFID technology and will be able to pay back the cost of the system applied after a certain period of time that is measured by calculating the breakeven point of having the RFID system against the current situation. As a result, improvements were realized and recommended for the organization. Originality/value This research develops a model that suits SMEs in the Egyptian market. The use of a case study approach with a quality measurement tool, namely, the Six Sigma DMAIC approach, especially after surveying several SMEs, and observing the business process at some of them, makes this a thorough investigation which proves that even SMEs can use the RFID technology despite its high cost that hinders its utilization. Thus, this research helps decision-makers in Egyptian SMEs make better informed decisions and guides them to when will they be able to pay back the cost of the system applied.
      Citation: International Journal of Lean Six Sigma
      PubDate: 2018-06-14T10:02:51Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJLSS-10-2016-0066
       
  • The effect of contextual factors on quality improvement success in a
           lean-driven New Zealand healthcare environment
    • Abstract: International Journal of Lean Six Sigma, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose This paper aims to theorise and test a causal model of predominantly lean-driven quality improvement (QI) in the context of health-care clinical microsystems, examining the effects contextual factors in this setting have on improvement activity. Design/methodology/approach QI practitioners at a New Zealand District Health Board were surveyed on a range of contextual factors hypothesised to influence improvement outcomes. Survey responses were analysed via partial least squares path modelling to test the causal model that was designed to be consistent with the “model for understanding success in quality” (MUSIQ) model (Kaplan et al., 2012) adopted in health-care QI. Findings Defined variables for teamwork, respect for people, lean actions and negative motivating factors all demonstrated significant effects. These findings support the representation of the microsystem layer within the MUSIQ model. The final model predicted and explained perceived success well (adjusted R2 = 0.58). Research limitations/implications The sample was a non-probability sample and the sample size was small (n = 105), although power analysis indicated that we exceeded the minimum sample size (97 cases). Even though health-care processes have universality, this study was conducted in only one district in New Zealand. Practical implications The results support highly functional teamwork as the critical contextual factor in health-care QI outcomes and suggest lean-driven process improvement can be a valid mediating mechanism. The key recommendation for practitioners is to increase focus on human resource capability when initiating and supporting QI. Originality/value The originality is testing the robustness of the MUSIQ model specifically in a lean environment, which provides the context for QI. The paper provides a more detailed specification of contextual factors acting as exogenous variables that moderate the cause (lean actions) and the effect (perceived success).
      Citation: International Journal of Lean Six Sigma
      PubDate: 2018-06-12T07:56:43Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJLSS-03-2017-0022
       
  • An exploration of the extent of Lean Six Sigma implementation in the West
           of Ireland
    • Abstract: International Journal of Lean Six Sigma, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to explore the extent of Lean Six Sigma (LSS) implementation within manufacturing companies in the West of Ireland. It examines the key success and failure factors, benefits and quality tools influencing LSS projects deployment. Design/methodology/approach The study adopted a mixed research method (quantitative and qualitative approach). Research data were collected through a structured survey questionnaire to the target population followed by interview case studies with four manufacturing companies to gather additional insight. The targeted respondents were manufacturing engineers, quality engineers, process improvement managers, operations managers, R&D engineers, LSS experts and validation engineers. Findings LSS initiatives are still relatively unknown to many SMEs organisations, whereas large companies have adopted LSS for some time. Top management commitment, understanding the LSS methodology, tools and techniques, integrating LSS to business strategy, organisational cultural change and training and education were the topmost key success factors. Organisational strategy, lack of top management support, expensive cost for LSS projects, unclear prioritisation of LSS projects and cost effectiveness were the most important failure factors influencing LSS implementation. Originality/value This research is the original work provided by the author and is expected to address the shortcomings of both SMEs and large organisations in the West of Ireland. The recommendations and frameworks reported in this paper can be used by manufacturing and service companies in Ireland for efficiency, competitiveness and continuous improvement.
      Citation: International Journal of Lean Six Sigma
      PubDate: 2018-06-12T02:28:36Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJLSS-02-2017-0018
       
  • Lean production practices and bundles: a comparative analysis
    • Abstract: International Journal of Lean Six Sigma, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose Total productive maintenance and total quality management are two lean manufacturing initiatives that are used by manufacturing plant managers to improve operations capabilities. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effects of standalone lean practices and lean bundles on manufacturing business performance. Design/methodology/approach A quantitative approach was used. The survey data were drawn from 160 manufacturing organizations in India. The respondent companies were grouped on the basis of the duration of lean production in operation and then classified based on the profile of their operations strategy. The approach, based on comparative assessment between standalone lean practices and lean bundles, has been directed toward justification of lean bundles for its support to competitive manufacturing in the context of the Indian manufacturing sector. Findings The paper establishes the long-term effects of lean bundles in significantly improving manufacturing business performance as compared to standalone lean practices. Further findings of the study revealed the significance of the duration of lean production in operation in achieving higher levels of manufacturing business performance. Research limitations/implications The study is cross-sectional in nature. It would be interesting to test the analytical framework adopted for this study for more industries and in different countries. The use of subjective measures in survey questionnaire is also another limitation of the study. Practical implications This study offers clear implications for practitioners, proving that they should give higher emphasis on the implementation of lean bundles using total productive maintenance and total quality management practices together, to prioritize their product, production and business strategies, to achieve sustainable competitive advantage. Originality/value This paper empirically examines and evaluates the effect of lean practices and bundles in the context of medium- and large-sized manufacturing industries in India. Besides, there are very few studies that comparatively assess the differences in performance contribution of various lean operational strategies considering duration of implementation of lean. Also, the theoretical contribution of the study establishes the essence of integrating total productive management and total quality management for attaining world class manufacturing is of high value.
      Citation: International Journal of Lean Six Sigma
      PubDate: 2018-06-12T02:18:16Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJLSS-01-2017-0002
       
  • Development of a green lean six sigma model for public sectors
    • Abstract: International Journal of Lean Six Sigma, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to improve the operational excellence of public sector services such as construction, telecommunication and health care. To achieve this endeavor, the study explores the structural attributes and obstacles in the public services and develops a Green Lean Six Sigma (GLSS) model for the public sector. Design/methodology/approach The study involved two stages: first, structured literature reviews; second, a focus group study involving Black Belts and supply chain practitioners. Using the results from the literature reviews and focus group study, the researchers have developed a Green Lean Six Sigma (GLSS) model for the public sectors. Findings Black belts and supply chain practitioners have identified the success in deploying Lean Six Sigma with green supply chain management. This leads to eradicating the obstacles faced by the public sector, leading to process improvement. Practical implications This study proposed an approach for developing a GLSS model for the public services, which can be applicable for other public service organizations. Originality/value The current paper presents a predictive model for process improvement in the public sector by integrating green supply chain management with Lean Six Sigma.
      Citation: International Journal of Lean Six Sigma
      PubDate: 2018-06-04T12:37:53Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJLSS-02-2017-0020
       
  • Opportunities for lean six sigma in public sector municipalities
    • Abstract: International Journal of Lean Six Sigma, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The purpose of this study is to investigate awareness and opportunities for Lean Six Sigma in public sector municipalities striving to become more efficient and effective in the quality and delivery of services and goods leading to increased citizen satisfaction and budget savings. Design/methodology/approach Lean Six Sigma is a quality improvement methodology widely implemented in the for-profit sectors and, now, is expanding into the public sector. This study includes a literature review on Lean Six Sigma, supported by results from interviews with public sector officials, and includes recommendations for how public sector entities can utilize Lean Six Sigma. Findings Based on results from interviews with a sample of public sector officials, this study uncovered that overall there exists a keen interest in Lean Six Sigma and how it can be applied to streamline and improve organizational processes, produce cost-savings, improve organizational culture and improve the quality of goods and services. This study also discovers that there are plenty of opportunities for Lean Six Sigma in the public sector and municipalities can, in fact, incorporate its philosophy and methodology to streamline and improve organizational processes, produce cost-savings, improve organizational culture and improve the quality of goods and services. Originality/value Abundant literature exists on Lean Six Sigma and the private sector. This study includes a review of the literature supported by interview results of public sector officials and suggests techniques for how public sector municipalities can utilize the Lean Six Sigma methodology. In a twenty-first-century economy, public sector officials are looking for ways to maximize their tax dollars while increasing the quality of their goods and services; Lean Six Sigma is a framework that can make these objectives become a reality.
      Citation: International Journal of Lean Six Sigma
      PubDate: 2018-05-21T02:53:29Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJLSS-07-2017-0086
       
 
 
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