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Publisher: Emerald   (Total: 335 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 335 Journals sorted alphabetically
A Life in the Day     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Academia Revista Latinoamericana de Administraci√≥n     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.144, h-index: 4)
Accounting Auditing & Accountability J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Accounting Research J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.26, h-index: 7)
Accounting, Auditing and Accountability J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.88, h-index: 40)
Advances in Accounting Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.514, h-index: 5)
Advances in Appreciative Inquiry     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.124, h-index: 5)
Advances in Autism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Dual Diagnosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47, SJR: 0.228, h-index: 2)
Advances in Gender Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.229, h-index: 7)
Advances in Intl. Marketing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.123, h-index: 11)
Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60, SJR: 0.29, h-index: 5)
Advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
African J. of Economic and Management Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.125, h-index: 2)
Agricultural Finance Review     Hybrid Journal  
Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 179, SJR: 0.391, h-index: 18)
American J. of Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Annals in Social Responsibility     Full-text available via subscription  
Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.215, h-index: 25)
Arts and the Market     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Asia Pacific J. of Marketing and Logistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.244, h-index: 15)
Asia-Pacific J. of Business Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.182, h-index: 7)
Asian Association of Open Universities J.     Open Access  
Asian Education and Development Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Asian J. on Quality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Asian Review of Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.29, h-index: 7)
Aslib J. of Information Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.65, h-index: 29)
Aslib Proceedings     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 254)
Assembly Automation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.657, h-index: 26)
Baltic J. of Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.354, h-index: 14)
Benchmarking : An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.556, h-index: 38)
British Food J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.329, h-index: 35)
Built Environment Project and Asset Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.232, h-index: 4)
Business Process Re-engineering & Management J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.614, h-index: 42)
Business Strategy Series     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.201, h-index: 6)
Career Development Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.686, h-index: 32)
China Agricultural Economic Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.238, h-index: 10)
China Finance Review Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Chinese Management Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.216, h-index: 12)
Circuit World     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.346, h-index: 17)
Collection Building     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.829, h-index: 10)
COMPEL: The Intl. J. for Computation and Mathematics in Electrical and Electronic Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.269, h-index: 22)
Competitiveness Review : An Intl. Business J. incorporating J. of Global Competitiveness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Construction Innovation: Information, Process, Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.508, h-index: 8)
Corporate Communications An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.703, h-index: 26)
Corporate Governance Intl. J. of Business in Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.309, h-index: 29)
Critical Perspectives on Intl. Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.32, h-index: 15)
Cross Cultural & Strategic Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.356, h-index: 13)
Development and Learning in Organizations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.138, h-index: 8)
Digital Library Perspectives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Direct Marketing An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Disaster Prevention and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.533, h-index: 32)
Drugs and Alcohol Today     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 129, SJR: 0.241, h-index: 4)
Education + Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.532, h-index: 30)
Education, Business and Society : Contemporary Middle Eastern Issues     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.141, h-index: 10)
Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Employee Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.435, h-index: 22)
Engineering Computations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.387, h-index: 39)
Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.541, h-index: 28)
Equal Opportunities Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Equality, Diversity and Inclusion : An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.239, h-index: 9)
EuroMed J. of Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.145, h-index: 9)
European Business Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.481, h-index: 21)
European J. of Innovation Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.596, h-index: 30)
European J. of Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.933, h-index: 55)
European J. of Training and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.489, h-index: 23)
Evidence-based HRM     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Facilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.371, h-index: 18)
Foresight     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.486, h-index: 20)
Gender in Management : An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.359, h-index: 22)
Grey Systems : Theory and Application     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Health Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.383, h-index: 17)
Higher Education, Skills and Work-based Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44, SJR: 0.172, h-index: 4)
History of Education Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.141, h-index: 2)
Housing, Care and Support     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.174, h-index: 4)
Human Resource Management Intl. Digest     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.121, h-index: 6)
Humanomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.14, h-index: 4)
IMP J.     Hybrid Journal  
Indian Growth and Development Review     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.163, h-index: 4)
Industrial and Commercial Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.217, h-index: 14)
Industrial Lubrication and Tribology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.322, h-index: 19)
Industrial Management & Data Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.63, h-index: 69)
Industrial Robot An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.375, h-index: 32)
Info     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.25, h-index: 21)
Information and Computer Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Information Technology & People     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45, SJR: 0.576, h-index: 28)
Interactive Technology and Smart Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.112, h-index: 1)
Interlending & Document Supply     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 62, SJR: 0.48, h-index: 13)
Internet Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42, SJR: 1.746, h-index: 57)
Intl. J. for Lesson and Learning Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. for Researcher Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Intl. J. of Accounting and Information Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.304, h-index: 7)
Intl. J. of Bank Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.515, h-index: 38)
Intl. J. of Climate Change Strategies and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.416, h-index: 7)
Intl. J. of Clothing Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.279, h-index: 25)
Intl. J. of Commerce and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Conflict Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.763, h-index: 38)
Intl. J. of Contemporary Hospitality Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.329, h-index: 35)
Intl. J. of Culture Tourism and Hospitality Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.399, h-index: 5)
Intl. J. of Development Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Intl. J. of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.225, h-index: 7)
Intl. J. of Educational Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.424, h-index: 32)
Intl. J. of Emergency Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.179, h-index: 1)
Intl. J. of Emerging Markets     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.199, h-index: 5)
Intl. J. of Energy Sector Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.25, h-index: 12)
Intl. J. of Entrepreneurial Behaviour & Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.694, h-index: 28)
Intl. J. of Event and Festival Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.32, h-index: 8)
Intl. J. of Gender and Entrepreneurship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.638, h-index: 6)
Intl. J. of Health Care Quality Assurance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.352, h-index: 32)
Intl. J. of Health Governance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.277, h-index: 15)
Intl. J. of Housing Markets and Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.201, h-index: 5)
Intl. J. of Human Rights in Healthcare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.13, h-index: 2)
Intl. J. of Information and Learning Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Intl. J. of Innovation Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.173, h-index: 5)
Intl. J. of Intelligent Computing and Cybernetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.258, h-index: 10)
Intl. J. of Intelligent Unmanned Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.145, h-index: 2)
Intl. J. of Islamic and Middle Eastern Finance and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Intl. J. of Law and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.107, h-index: 2)
Intl. J. of Law in the Built Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.111, h-index: 2)
Intl. J. of Leadership in Public Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Intl. J. of Lean Six Sigma     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.562, h-index: 15)
Intl. J. of Logistics Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.998, h-index: 15)
Intl. J. of Managerial Finance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.212, h-index: 11)
Intl. J. of Managing Projects in Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Manpower     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.354, h-index: 37)
Intl. J. of Mentoring and Coaching in Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Intl. J. of Migration, Health and Social Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.261, h-index: 5)
Intl. J. of Numerical Methods for Heat & Fluid Flow     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.594, h-index: 32)
Intl. J. of Operations & Production Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 2.198, h-index: 94)
Intl. J. of Organizational Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.222, h-index: 11)
Intl. J. of Pervasive Computing and Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.165, h-index: 9)
Intl. J. of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.304, h-index: 12)
Intl. J. of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.694, h-index: 66)
Intl. J. of Prisoner Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.254, h-index: 10)
Intl. J. of Productivity and Performance Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.785, h-index: 31)
Intl. J. of Public Sector Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.272, h-index: 37)
Intl. J. of Quality & Reliability Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.544, h-index: 63)
Intl. J. of Quality and Service Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.133, h-index: 1)
Intl. J. of Retail & Distribution Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.543, h-index: 36)
Intl. J. of Service Industry Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Social Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.227, h-index: 25)
Intl. J. of Sociology and Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48, SJR: 0.361, h-index: 5)
Intl. J. of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Structural Integrity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.325, h-index: 8)
Intl. J. of Sustainability in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.616, h-index: 29)
Intl. J. of Tourism Cities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Web Information Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.208, h-index: 13)
Intl. J. of Wine Business Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.196, h-index: 12)
Intl. J. of Workplace Health Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.358, h-index: 8)
Intl. Marketing Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.076, h-index: 57)
J. for Multicultural Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.124, h-index: 11)
J. of Accounting & Organizational Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.346, h-index: 7)
J. of Accounting in Emerging Economies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
J. of Adult Protection, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.291, h-index: 7)
J. of Advances in Management Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
J. of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48, SJR: 0.177, h-index: 9)
J. of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
J. of Applied Accounting Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.22, h-index: 5)
J. of Applied Research in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
J. of Asia Business Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.115, h-index: 1)
J. of Assistive Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.215, h-index: 6)
J. of Business & Industrial Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.664, h-index: 48)
J. of Business Strategy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.381, h-index: 17)
J. of Centrum Cathedra     Open Access  
J. of Children's Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.167, h-index: 9)
J. of Chinese Economic and Foreign Trade Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.188, h-index: 4)
J. of Chinese Entrepreneurship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
J. of Chinese Human Resource Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.112, h-index: 3)
J. of Communication Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.735, h-index: 6)
J. of Consumer Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.613, h-index: 62)
J. of Corporate Real Estate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.633, h-index: 5)
J. of Criminal Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 118, SJR: 0.13, h-index: 1)
J. of Criminological Research, Policy and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54)
J. of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.109, h-index: 5)
J. of Documentation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 184, SJR: 0.936, h-index: 50)
J. of Economic and Administrative Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
J. of Economic Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.498, h-index: 26)
J. of Educational Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.848, h-index: 36)
J. of Engineering, Design and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.173, h-index: 10)
J. of Enterprise Information Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.433, h-index: 38)
J. of Enterprising Communities People and Places in the Global Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.212, h-index: 8)
J. of Entrepreneurship and Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
J. of European Industrial Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
J. of European Real Estate Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.52, h-index: 7)
J. of Facilities Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
J. of Family Business Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
J. of Fashion Marketing and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.529, h-index: 30)
J. of Financial Crime     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 342, SJR: 0.158, h-index: 5)
J. of Financial Economic Policy     Hybrid Journal  
J. of Financial Management of Property and Construction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.234, h-index: 1)
J. of Financial Regulation and Compliance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
J. of Financial Reporting and Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
J. of Forensic Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49, SJR: 0.225, h-index: 8)
J. of Global Mobility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
J. of Global Responsibility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
J. of Health Organisation and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.67, h-index: 27)
J. of Historical Research in Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.376, h-index: 8)
J. of Hospitality and Tourism Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.672, h-index: 10)
J. of Human Resource Costing & Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
J. of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)

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Journal Cover International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management
  [SJR: 0.416]   [H-I: 7]   [14 followers]  Follow
    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 1756-8692
   Published by Emerald Homepage  [335 journals]
  • Publisher’s note
    • Pages: 864 - 864
      Abstract: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, Volume 9, Issue 6, Page 864-864, November 2017.

      Citation: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management
      PubDate: 2017-09-29T10:03:45Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCCSM-11-2017-176
       
  • Ecosystem services in adaptation projects in West Africa
    • Abstract: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to assess the extent to which adaptation projects have incorporated ecosystem services, as well as their redesigning options. The projects selected are listed under National Adaptation Programme of Action in West African region. Design/methodology/approach A desktop survey approach was used to review 168 projects from 13 countries across West Africa. The projects were categorized and analyzed according to their adaptation goal, thematic focus, their implementation duration and level of investment. Findings The adaptation initiatives are dominated by actions in the agricultural sector accounting for 32 per cent of the total. Further, they were characterized by small grants consideration with 63 per cent falling under US$1m budget, short-term implementation duration with 46 per cent having three years’ execution period. A large portion of projects (55 per cent) mentioned directly one or more ecosystem services, with provisioning services being referred to in 50 per cent of the cases. Originality/value Adaptation projects with ecosystem services components are more sustainable and beneficial to the community. Hence, more consideration of nature benefits during project design, more financial consideration and localizing of the projects to realize the global adaptation goal should be considered.
      Citation: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management
      PubDate: 2017-10-24T11:04:40Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCCSM-06-2017-0140
       
  • Perceptions of adaptation, resilience and climate knowledge in the Pacific
    • Abstract: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose While the South Pacific is often cited as highly vulnerable to the impacts of climate change, there is comparatively little known about how different groups perceive climate change. Understanding the gaps and differences between risk and perceived risk is a prerequisite to designing effective and sustainable adaptation strategies. Design/methodology/approach This research examined three key groups in Samoa, Fiji and Vanuatu: secondary school teachers, media personnel, and rural subsistence livelihood-based communities that live near or in conservation areas. This study deployed a dual methodology of participatory focus groups, paired with a national mobile phone based survey to gauge perceptions of climate change. This was the first time mobile technology had been used to gather perceptual data regarding the environment in the South Pacific. Findings The research findings highlighted a number of important differences and similarities in ways that these groups perceive climate change issues, solutions, personal vulnerability and comprehension of science among other factors. Practical implications These differences and similarities are neglected in large-scale top-down climate change adaptation strategies and have key implications for the design of disaster risk reduction and climate change adaptation and therefore sustainable development in the region. Originality/value The research was innovative in terms of its methods, as well as its distillation of the perceptions of climate change from teachers, media and rural communities.
      Citation: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management
      PubDate: 2017-10-24T10:58:59Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCCSM-03-2017-0060
       
  • Mainstreaming climate change into the EIA procedures: a perspective from
           China
    • Abstract: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose In the face of climate change, environmental impact assessment (EIA) and strategic environmental assessment (SEA) are expected to translate global or national mitigation and adaptation targets to project and plan levels of decision-making. This paper aims to examine how to transform China’s EIA procedures to accommodate consideration of climate change and what constraints might be for doing so. Design/methodology/approach The main methodology used in this paper is doctrinal research, which is the primary legal methodology to find the law and interpret and analyse the document. Theoretical research is applied to analyse the ideas and assumptions of the mainstreaming approach. Comparative research is done to consider relevant international experiences. Findings Despite well-founded rationale for the mainstreaming approach, entrenched institutional, legal and technical obstacles cannot be neglected in the context of China. Urgent needs to fix existing EIA/SEA loopholes and improve the general enabling environment are also highlighted as a fundamental aspect of mainstreaming. Originality/value The potential of mainstreaming climate change into China’s EIA procedures remains largely unexplored. As a ground-breaking work from China’s perspective, the findings of this paper can serve as an important foundation for future research from legal and other perspectives.
      Citation: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management
      PubDate: 2017-10-17T01:46:29Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCCSM-04-2016-0040
       
  • Pro-poor adaptation for the urban extreme poor in the context of climate
           change
    • Abstract: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to examine pro-poor urban asset adaptation to climate variability and change. It constructs a conceptual framework that explores the appropriate asset adaptation strategies for extreme poor households as well as the process of supporting these households and groups in accumulating these assets. Design/methodology/approach Qualitative data are obtained from life histories, key informant interviews (KIIs) and focus-group discussions (FGDs). These data are collected, coded and themed. Findings This research identifies that households among the urban extreme poor do their best to adapt to perceived climate changes; however, in the absence of savings, and access to credit and insurance, they are forced to adopt adverse coping strategies. Individual adaptation practices yield minimal results and are short lived and even harmful because the urban extreme poor are excluded from formal policies and institutions as they lack formal rights and entitlements. For the poorest, the process of facilitating and maintaining patron–client relationships is a central coping strategy. Social policy approaches are found to be effective in facilitating asset adaptation for the urban extreme poor because they contribute to greater resilience to climate change. Originality/value This study analyses the empirical evidence through the lens of a pro-poor asset-adaptation framework. It shows that the asset-transfer approach is an effective in building household-adaptation strategies. Equally important is the capacity to participate in and influence the institutions from which these people have previously been excluded.
      Citation: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management
      PubDate: 2017-10-17T01:34:49Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCCSM-08-2016-0117
       
  • Resource extractivism, health and climate change in small islands
    • Abstract: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The extraction of natural resources has long been part of economic development in small islands. The damage to environment and health is extensive, even rendering once productive islands virtually uninhabitable. Rather than providing long-term benefits to the population or to the environment, the culture of “extractivism” – a nonreciprocal approach where resources are removed and used with little care or regard to consequences – has instead left many in far more fragile circumstances, increasingly dependent on external income. The purpose of this paper is to show how continued extractivism in small islands is contributing to global climate change and increasing climate risks to the local communities. Design/methodology/approach Through a series of case studies, this paper examines the history of extractivism in small islands in Oceania, its contribution to environmental degradation locally and its impacts on health. Findings It examines how extractivism continues today, with local impacts on environment, health and wellbeing and its much more far-reaching consequences for global climate change and human health. At the same time, these island countries have heightened sensitivity to climate change due to their isolation, poverty and already variable climate, whereas the damage to natural resources, the disruption, economic dependence and adverse health impacts caused by extractivism impart reduced resilience to the new climate hazards in those communities. Practical implications This paper proposes alternatives to resource extractivism with options for climate compatible development in small islands that are health-promoting and build community resilience in the face of increasing threats from climate change. Originality/value Extractivism is a new concept that has not previously been applied to understanding health implications of resource exploitation thorough the conduit of climate change. Small-island countries are simultaneously exposed to widespread extractivism, including of materials contributing to global climate change, and are among the most vulnerable to the hazards that climate change brings.
      Citation: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management
      PubDate: 2017-10-17T01:30:08Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCCSM-03-2017-0068
       
  • Impacts of stratospheric aerosol geoengineering strategy on Caribbean
           coral reefs
    • Abstract: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose Currently, negotiation on global carbon emissions reduction is very difficult owing to lack of international willingness. In response, geoengineering (climate engineering) strategies are proposed to artificially cool the planet. Meanwhile, as the harbor around one-third of all described marine species, coral reefs are the most sensitive ecosystem on the planet to climate change. However, until now, there is no quantitative assessment on the impacts of geoengineering on coral reefs. This study aims to model the impacts of stratospheric aerosol geoengineering on coral reefs. Design/methodology/approach The HadGEM2-ES climate model is used to model and evaluate the impacts of stratospheric aerosol geoengineering on coral reefs. Findings This study shows that (1) stratospheric aerosol geoengineering could significantly mitigate future coral bleaching throughout the Caribbean Sea; (2) Changes in downward solar irradiation, sea level rise and sea surface temperature caused by geoengineering implementation should have very little impacts on coral reefs; (3) Although geoengineering would prolong the return period of future hurricanes, this may still be too short to ensure coral recruitment and survival after hurricane damage. Originality/value This is the first time internationally to quantitatively assess the impacts of geoengineering on coral reefs.
      Citation: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management
      PubDate: 2017-10-09T12:18:14Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCCSM-05-2017-0104
       
  • Effect of climate variability on crop income and indigenous adaptation
           strategies of households
    • Abstract: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose This study aims to examine the effect of climate variability on smallholders’ crop income and the determinants of indigenous adaptation strategies in three districts (Mieso, Goba-koricha and Doba) of West Hararghe Zone of Ethiopia. These three districts are located in high-moisture-stress areas because of crop season rainfall variability. Design/methodology/approach Primary data collected from 400 sample households were used for identifying factors that affect households’ crop income. The study used ordinary least square (OLS) regression to examine the effect of climate variability. Given this, binary logit model was used to assess smallholders’ adaptation behavior. Finally, the study used multinomial logistic regression to identify determinants of smallholders’ indigenous adaptation strategies. Findings The OLS regression result shows that variability in rainfall during the cropping season has a significant and negative effect, and cropland and livestock level have a positive effect on farmers’ crop income. The multinomial logistic regression result reveals that households adopt hybrid crops (maize and sorghum) and dry-sowing adaptation strategies if there is shortage during the cropping season. Variability in rainfall at the time of sowing and the growing are main factors in the area’s crop production. Cropland increment has positive and significant effect on employing each adaptation strategy. The probability of adopting techniques such as water harvesting, hybrid seeds and dry sowing significantly reduces if a household has a large livestock. Originality/value The three districts are remote and accessibility is difficult without due support from institutions. Thus, this study was conducted on the basis of the primary data collected by the researchers after securing grant from Swedish International Development Agency (SIDA).
      Citation: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management
      PubDate: 2017-10-04T12:09:30Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCCSM-04-2016-0039
       
  • Increasing vulnerability to floods in new development areas: evidence from
           Ho Chi Minh City
    • Abstract: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose Flooding is an emerging problem in Ho Chi Minh City (HCMC), Vietnam, and is fast becoming a major barrier to its ongoing development. While flooding is presently of nuisance value, there is a growing concern that a combination of rapid urban expansion and climate changes will significantly exacerbate the problem. There has been a trend of population being rapidly accommodated in new urban areas, which are considered highly vulnerable to floods, while the development strategy by the local government still attracts more property investments into the three new districts on the right side of Saigon River. This paper aims to discuss the increase in the number of residences vulnerable to flooding, to underline the need for more appropriate future spatial development. For the vision, an application of compact and resilient theories to strategic planning and management of this city is proposed to reduce vulnerability. This paper also highlights the need to better understand growing vulnerability to floods related to urban expansion over low-lying former wetlands and the more important role of planning spatial development accompanied with transportation investment which can contribute to flooding resilience. Design/methodology/approach This research uses combined-methods geographical information system (GIS) analysis based on secondary data of flood records, population distributions, property development (with the details of 270 housing projects compiled as part of this research) and flooding simulation. This allows an integrated approach to the theories of urban resilience and compactness to discuss the implication of spatial planning and management in relevance to flooding vulnerability. Findings The flooding situation in HCMC is an evidence of inappropriate urban expansion leading to increase in flooding vulnerability. Although climate change impacts are obvious, the rapid population growth and associated accommodation development are believed to be the key cause which has not been solved. It was found that the three new emerging districts (District 2, 9 and ThuDuc) are highly vulnerable to floods, but the local government still implements the plan for attracted investments in housing without an integrated flooding management. This is also in line with the development pattern of many coastal cities in Southeast Asia, as economic development can be seen as a driving factor. Research limitations/implications The data of property development are diversified from different sources which have been compiled by this research from the basic map of housing investments from a governmental body, the Department of Construction. The number of projects was limited to 270 per over 500 projects, but this still sufficiently supports the evidence of increasing accommodation in new development districts. Practical implications HCMC needs neater strategies for planning and management of spatial development to minimize the areas vulnerable to floods: creating more compact spaces in the central areas (Zone 1) protected by the current flooding management system, and offering more resilient spaces for new development areas (Zone 2), by improving the resilience of transportation system. Nevertheless, a similar combination of compact spaces and resilient spaces in emerging districts could also be incorporated into the existing developments, and sustainable drainage systems or underground water storage in buildings could also be included in the design to compensate for the former wetlands lost. Social implications This paper highlights the need to better understand growing vulnerability to floods related to urban expansion over low-lying former wetlands and emphasizes the more important role of planning spatial development accompanied with transportation investment which can contribute to flooding resilience. Coastal cities in southeast countries need to utilize the former-land, whereas feasibility of new land for urban expansion needs to be thoroughly considered under risk of natural disasters. Originality/value A combination of compact spaces with improved urban resilience is an alternative approach to decrease the flooding risk beyond that of traditional resistant systems and underlines the increasingly important role of urban planning and management to combat the future impacts of floods.
      Citation: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management
      PubDate: 2017-09-29T12:34:20Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCCSM-12-2016-0169
       
  • Understanding climate-human interactions in Small Island Developing States
           (SIDS)
    • Abstract: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose Climate change poses diverse, often fundamental, challenges to livelihoods of island peoples. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate that these challenges must be better understood before effective and sustainable adaptation is possible. Design/methodology/approach Understanding past livelihood impacts from climate change can help design and operationalize future interventions. In addition, globalization has had uneven effects on island countries/jurisdictions, producing situations especially in archipelagoes where there are significant differences between core and peripheral communities. This approach overcomes the problems that have characterized many recent interventions for climate-change adaptation in island contexts which have resulted in uneven and at best only marginal livelihood improvements in preparedness for future climate change. Findings Island contexts have a range of unique vulnerability and resilience characteristics that help explain recent and proposed responses to climate change. These include the sensitivity of coastal fringes to climate-environmental changes: and in island societies, the comparatively high degrees of social coherence, closeness to nature and spirituality that are uncommon in western contexts. Research limitations/implications Enhanced understanding of island environmental and social contexts, as well as insights from past climate impacts and peripherality, all contribute to more effective and sustainable future interventions for adaptation. Originality/value The need for more effective and sustainable adaptation in island contexts is becoming ever more exigent as the pace of twenty-first-century climate change increases.
      Citation: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management
      PubDate: 2017-09-25T03:21:49Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCCSM-01-2017-0012
       
  • Seizing history: development and non-climate change in Small Island
           Developing States
    • Abstract: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose This paper offers a critical review of climate change related initiatives in small island states, including Small Island Developing States (SIDS), which can end up as ontological traps: fuelled and supported by external donor agencies, thwarting out-migration and shifting scarce and finite resources away from other, shorter-term and locally spawned development trajectories and objectives. Design/methodology/approach This paper is based on a selective literature review. It clusters important themes found in published research and policy documents. Findings The results identify a burgeoning critical voice in regards to resilience and its legitimation of climate change driven projects in SIDS. This paper recommends a more nuanced approach which also privileges migration. Originality/value This paper provided a critical overview and synthesis of the immobility implicit in much climate change related work, through the critical lens of island studies and post-colonial studies.
      Citation: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management
      PubDate: 2017-09-25T03:11:09Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCCSM-02-2017-0037
       
  • The study of potential evapotranspiration in future periods due to climate
           change in west of Iran
    • Abstract: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose This study aims to present the climate change effect on potential evapotranspiration (ETP) in future periods. Design/methodology/approach Daily minimum and maximum temperature, solar radiation and precipitation weather parameters have been downscaled by global circulation model (GCM) and Lars-WG outputs. Weather data have been estimated according to the Had-CM3 GCM and by A1B, A2 and B1 scenarios in three periods: 2011-2030, 2045-2046 and 2080-2099. To select the more suitable method for ETP estimation, the Hargreaves-Samani (H-S) method and the Priestly–Taylor (P-T) method have been compared with the Penman-Monteith (P-M) method. Regarding the fact that the H-S method has been in better accordance with the P-M method, ETP in future periods has been estimated by this method for different scenarios. Findings In all five stations, in all three scenarios and in all three periods, ETP will increase. The highest ETP increase will occur in the A1B scenario and then in the A1 scenario. The lowest increase will occur in the B1 scenario. In the 2020 decade, the highest ETP increase in three scenarios will occur in Khorramabad and then Hamedan. Kermanshah, Sanandaj and Ilam stations come at third to fifth place, respectively, with a close increase in amount. In the 2050 decade, ETP increase percentages in all scenarios are close to each other in all the five stations. In the 2080 decade, ETP increase percentages in all scenarios will be close to each other in four stations, namely, Kermanshah, Sanandaj, Khorramabad and Hamedan, and Ilam station will have a higher increase compared with the other four stations. Originality/value Meanwhile, the highest ETP increase will occur in hot months of the year, which are significant with regard to irrigation and water resources.
      Citation: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management
      PubDate: 2017-09-25T02:47:08Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCCSM-01-2017-0008
       
  • Meteorological drought assessment in north east highlands of Ethiopia
    • Abstract: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to investigate the patterns and trends of drought incidence in north east highlands of Ethiopia using monthly rainfall record for the period 1984-2014. Design/methodology/approach Standard precipitation index and Mann – Kendal test were used to analyze drought incident and trends of drought occurrences, respectively. The spatial extent of droughts in the study area has been interpolated by inverse distance weighted method using the spatial analyst tool of ArcGIS. Findings Most of the studied stations experienced drought episodes in 1984, 1987/1988, 1992/1993, 1999, 2003/2004 and 2007/2008 which were among the worst drought years in the history of Ethiopia. The year 1984 was the most drastic and distinct-wide extreme drought episode in all studied stations. The Mann–Kendal test shows an increasing tendencies of drought at three-month (spring) timescale at all stations though significant (p < 0.05) only at Mekaneselam and decreasing tendencies at three-month (summer) and 12-month timescales at all stations. The frequency of total drought was the highest in central and north parts of the region in all study seasons. Originality/value This detail drought characterization can be used as bench mark to take comprehensive drought management measures such as early warning system, preparation and contingency planning, climate change adaptation programs.
      Citation: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management
      PubDate: 2017-09-25T02:42:46Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCCSM-12-2016-0179
       
  • Migrants’ remittances
    • Abstract: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The much-trumpeted Green Climate Fund and several other official financial mechanisms for financing adaptation to climate change under the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change have fallen short in meeting adaptation needs. Many poorer people are still grappling with the scourge of climate change impacts. Consequently, there has been a dominant research focus on climate change financing emanating from official development assistance (ODA), Adaptation Fund, public expenditure and private sector support. However, there has been little attempt to examine how migrants’ remittances can close adaptation financing gaps at the local level, ostensibly creating a large research gap. This paper aims to argue that migrants’ remittances provide a unique complementary opportunity for financing adaptation and have a wider impact on those who are extremely vulnerable to climate change. Design/methodology/approach The paper is aligned to the qualitative research approach. Both secondary and primary data acquired through interviews and focus group discussions were used for the study. Multiple sampling methods were also used to select the respondents. Findings The findings show that remittances are used to finance both incremental costs of households’ infrastructure and consumption needs, as well as additional investment needs to be occasioned by ongoing or expected changes in climate. Originality/value In the wake of dwindling government/public revenue, ODA and poor commitment of Annex II countries to fulfil their financial obligations, the study makes the following recommendations: First, the financial infrastructure underpinning money transfers in both sending and recipient countries should be improved to make transfers attractive. Second, significant steps should be taken to reduce the fees on remittance services, especially for the small transfers typically made by poor migrants. Finally, adequate climatic information should be made available to local people to ensure that remittances are applied to the right adaptation option to avoid maladaptation.
      Citation: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management
      PubDate: 2017-09-25T02:24:41Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCCSM-03-2017-0054
       
  • Policies and mechanisms to address climate-induced migration and
           displacement in Pacific and Caribbean small island developing states
    • Abstract: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose This study aims to assess policies and mechanisms in Caribbean and Pacific small island developing states (SIDS) that address climate-induced migration and displacement. The migration of communities away from vulnerable regions is highly likely to be an adaptation strategy used in low-elevation SIDS, as the impacts of climate change are likely to result in significant loss and damage, threatening their very territorial existence. SIDS must ensure that residents relocate to less vulnerable locations and may need to consider international movement of residents. Ad hoc approaches to migration and displacement may result in increased vulnerability of residents, making the development and enforcement of comprehensive national policies that address these issues a necessity. Design/methodology/approach Interviews with United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) negotiators for SIDS as well as analysis of secondary data, including Intended Nationally Determined Contributions, are utilized to determine policies and mechanisms in place that focus on climate-induced migration and displacement. Findings While climate change is acknowledged as an existential threat, few SIDS have policies or mechanisms in place to guide climate-induced migration and displacement. Potential exists for migration and displacement to be included in policies that integrate disaster risk reduction and climate change adaptation along with national sustainable development plans. Regional bodies are beneficial to providing guidance to SIDS in the development of nationally appropriate frameworks to address climate-induced migration and displacement. Originality/value Existing gaps in policies and mechanisms and challenges faced by SIDS in developing strategies to address climate-induced migration and displacement are explored. Best practices and recommendations for strategies for SIDS to address migration and displacement are provided.
      Citation: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management
      PubDate: 2017-09-25T02:21:23Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCCSM-03-2017-0055
       
  • Displacement and climate change: improving planning policy and increasing
           community resilience
    • Abstract: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to present the major gaps in the field of planning policy and its implementation regarding climate change and disaster risk reduction (DRR), with special reference to the displacement of people, together with the knowledge needed to increase community resilience. The researched relations are illustrated by the example of Serbia. The Republic of Serbia has been faced with increasingly visible impacts of climate change in recent years – floods, heat waves, droughts and others. During the floods that hit Serbia in 2014, over 30,000 people experienced displacement. These events have triggered numerous efforts, both to repair the incurred damage and to analyze opportunities for prevention. Design/methodology/approach This research has used document analysis to investigate contemporary approaches defined by policies, programs and research reports regarding climate change and DRR, with special reference to the displacement of people. An analytical framework has been used to evaluate to what extent the planning policy framework in Serbia addresses these issues in the context of achieving resilient development. Secondary analysis of research data has been used to recognize the gaps and identify needs for increasing community resilience. Findings Based on the growing trends in projections of climate change as a result of induced natural disasters for the region in the future and international trends in coping with these issues, this paper argues that it is necessary to improve the implementation of the planning policy framework and the capacities of professionals and citizens, to reduce future displacement and increase community resilience to climate change. The key weaknesses found within DRR and the emergency management system in Serbia were the lack of an appropriate information base of the cadastre of risk zones and the lack of information and coordination of actors on the local to the national level. During the “pre-disaster” period, findings stress a weak partnership and capacity development practice at the local level, as well as between local responsible bodies and regional/national entities in charge of emergency management and DRR. The paper singles out the main preconditions for achieving effective resilient planning, so that such a plan can move “people away from marginal areas” and provide living conditions that are resilient. Originality/value This paper provides a comprehensive insight analysis of the relations between climate change and DRR, with special reference to the planning policy. Using the lessons learned from the recent climate-induced disaster with its implications on displacement, the paper identifies needs for strengthening capacities to establish more resilient communities in Serbia. The gaps and needs identified, as well as the recommendations provided, may be of value for neighboring countries as well, who face similar challenges in climate change adaptation and who need to increase disaster risk resilience.
      Citation: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management
      PubDate: 2017-09-25T02:17:41Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCCSM-05-2017-0103
       
  • Human mobility in the context of climate change and disasters: a South
           American approach
    • Abstract: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose This paper aims to assess to what extent South American countries have integrated recommendations of the international agenda to address human mobility in the context of disasters and climate change in their national laws and policies. Design/methodology/approach This research sought to find the level of discussions around human mobility in disaster laws, NDCs and National Adaptation Plans (NAPs) by looking for a range of search terms connected to human mobility in the context of disasters and climate change, followed by the content analysis of these terms. Findings Some advances with regards to human mobility are already confirmed in the domestic level of South American countries through humanitarian visas to disaster displaced persons and the inclusion of the topic in the DRR, climate change laws, NAPs and INDCs/NDCs. But they have not developed specific strategies with regards to it. Hence, their advances still require that national norms and policies are harmonized with the international guidelines. This will enable to fill the protection gap of people in context of disasters and climate change. Originality/value The results assess the level of harmonization above-mentioned between international instruments with national policies on human mobility in the context of disasters and climate change in South America.
      Citation: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management
      PubDate: 2017-09-21T08:04:49Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCCSM-03-2017-0069
       
  • Who takes responsibility for the climate refugees'
    • Abstract: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose “No climate change, no climate refugees”. On the basis of this theme, this paper aims to propose a method for undertaking the responsibility for climate refugees literally uprooted by liable climate polluting countries. It also considers the historical past, culture, geopolitics, imposed wars, economic oppression and fragile governance to understand the holistic scenario of vulnerability to climate change. Design/methodology/approach This paper is organized around three distinct aspects of dealing with extreme climatic events – vulnerability as part of making the preparedness and response process fragile (past), climate change as a hazard driver (present) and rehabilitating the climate refugees (future). Bangladesh is used as an example that represents a top victim country to climatic extreme events from many countries with similar baseline characteristics. The top 20 countries accounting for approximately 82 per cent of the total global carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions are considered for model development by analysing the parameters – per capita CO2 emissions, ecological footprint, gross national income and human development index. Findings Results suggest that under present circumstances, Australia and the USA each should take responsibility of 9 per cent each of the overall global share of climate refugees, followed by Canada and Saudi Arabia (9 per cent), South Korea (7 per cent) and Russia, Germany and Japan (6 per cent each). As there is no international convention for protecting climate refugees yet, the victims either end up in detention camps or are refused shelter in safer places or countries. There is a dire need to address the climate refugee crisis as these people face greater political risks. Originality/value This paper provides a critical overview of accommodating the climate refugees (those who have no means for bouncing back) by the liable countries. It proposes an innovative method by considering the status of climate pollution, resource consumption, economy and human development rankings to address the problem by bringing humanitarian justice to the ultimate climate refugees.
      Citation: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management
      PubDate: 2017-09-21T07:58:49Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCCSM-10-2016-0149
       
  • Migration as adaptation strategy to cope with climate change
    • Abstract: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose This study aims to evaluate the link between climate/weather change and farmer migration in Bihar, India. The influence of cognitive conditions and climate-related stress on farmer migration decisions and the socioeconomic characteristics of migrating and non-migrating farm households are analysed. The focus is the role of migration in access to climate and agricultural extension services and the contribution of migration to enhanced farmer coping capacity. Design/methodology/approach A primary survey was conducted of farm households in seven districts of Bihar, India. Farmer perceptions of climate change were analysed using the mental map technique. The role of socioeconomic characteristics in farm household migration was evaluated using binary logistic regression, and the influence of migration on access to climate and agricultural extension services and the adaptive capacity of migrating households was investigated using descriptive statistics. Findings Climate-induced livelihood risk factors are one of the major drivers of farmer’s migration. The farmers’ perception on climate change influences migration along with the socioeconomic characteristics. There is a significant difference between migrating and non-migrating farm households in the utilization of instructions, knowledge and technology based climate and agriculture extension services. Benefits from receipt of remittance, knowledge and social networks from the host region enhances migrating households’ adaptive capacity. Originality/value This study provides micro-evidence of the contribution of migration to farmer adaptive capacity and access to climate and agricultural extension services, which will benefit analyses of climate-induced migration in other developing countries with higher agricultural dependence. In addition, valuable insights are delivered on policy requirements to reduce farmer vulnerability to climate change.
      Citation: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management
      PubDate: 2017-09-19T02:39:10Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCCSM-03-2017-0059
       
  • Guest editorial
    • Abstract: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management
      PubDate: 2017-09-19T02:26:03Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCCSM-08-2017-0165
       
  • Social protection as a strategy to address climate-induced migration
    • Abstract: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose This paper aims to discuss the roles of social protection in reducing and facilitating climate-induced migration. Social protection gained attention in the international climate negotiations with the establishment of the Warsaw International Mechanism for Loss and Damage. Yet, its potential to address migration, considered as a key issue in the loss and damage debate, has not been sufficiently explored. This paper aims at identifying key characteristics of social protection schemes which could effectively address climate-induced migration and attempts to derive recommendations for policy design. Design/methodology/approach Based on the existing literature, the paper links empirical evidence on the effects of social protection to climate-related drivers of migration and the needs of vulnerable populations. This approach allows conceptually identifying characteristics of effective social protection policies. Findings Findings indicate that social protection can be part of a proactive approach to managing climate-induced migration both in rural and urban areas. In particular, public work programmes offer solutions to different migration outcomes, from no to permanent migration. Benefits are achieved when programmes explicitly integrate climate change impacts into their design. Social protection can provide temporary support to facilitate migration, in situ adaptation or integration and adaptation in destination areas. It is no substitution for but can help trigger sustainable adaptation solutions. Originality/value The paper helps close research gaps regarding the potential roles and channels of social protection for addressing and facilitating climate-induced migration and providing public support in destination, mostly in urban areas.
      Citation: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management
      PubDate: 2017-09-19T02:03:50Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCCSM-01-2017-0019
       
  • Does FDI affect carbon intensity' New evidence from dynamic panel
           analysis
    • Abstract: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose This paper aims to clarify the relationship between foreign direct investment (FDI) and carbon intensity. This study uses the dynamic panel data model to study and provide fresh evidence for the issue. Design/methodology/approach This study first uses the dynamic panel data model to consider the endogeneity problem, and applies a system-generalized method of moments estimator to study the effect of FDI on carbon intensity using the panel data of 188 countries during 1990-2013. Findings The result shows that FDI has a significant negative impact on carbon intensity of the host country. After considering the other factors, including share of fossil fuels, industrial intensity, urbanization level and trade openness, the impact of FDI on carbon intensity is still significantly positive. In addition, FDI also has a significant negative impact on carbon intensity of high-income countries and middle- and low-income countries. Originality/value This paper offers two contributions to the literature on the effect of FDI on carbon intensity. From a methodological perspective, this paper is the first to apply a dynamic panel data model to study the effect of FDI on carbon intensity using worldwide panel data. Second, this paper is the first to analyze the effect of FDI on carbon intensity in different countries with different income levels separately.
      Citation: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management
      PubDate: 2017-09-19T01:46:08Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCCSM-03-2017-0062
       
  • Understanding climate change vulnerability, adaptation and risk
           perceptions at household level in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan
    • Abstract: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose This study aims to investigate risks associated with climate change vulnerability and in response the adaptation methods used by farming communities to reduce its negative impacts on agriculture in Pakistan. Design/methodology/approach The study used the household survey method of to collect data collected in Charsadda district of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province, involving 116 randomly selected respondents. Findings Prevalent crops diseases, water scarcity, soil fertility loss and poor socio-economic conditions were main contributing factors of climate change vulnerability. The results further showed that changing crops type and cultivation pattern, improved seed varieties, planting shaded trees and the provision of excessive fertilizers are the measures adapted to improve agricultural productivity, which may reduce the climate change vulnerability at a household level. Research limitations/implications The major limitation of this study was the exclusion of women from the survey due to religious and cultural barriers of in Pashtun society, wherein women and men do not mingle. Practical implications Reducing climate change vulnerability and developing more effective adaptation techniques require assistance from the government. This help can be in the form of providing basic resources, such as access to good quality agricultural inputs, access to information and extension services on climate change adaptation and modern technologies. Consultation with other key stakeholder is also required to create awareness and to build the capacity of the locals toward reducing climate change vulnerability and facilitating timely and effective adaptation. Originality/value This original research work provides evidence about farm-level vulnerability, adaptation strategies and risk perceptions on dealing with climate-change-induced natural disasters in Pakistan. This paper enriches existing knowledge of climate change vulnerability and adaptation in this resource-limited country so that effective measures can be taken to reduce vulnerability of farming communities, and enhance their adaptive capability.
      Citation: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management
      PubDate: 2017-09-18T03:22:01Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCCSM-02-2017-0038
       
  • Regional response to climate change and management: an analysis of
           Africa’s capacity
    • First page: 730
      Abstract: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The mainstream climate change community has primarily concerned itself with mitigation and adaptation strategies, both of which require monitoring and prediction. These four inter-connected response actions (mitigation, adaptation, monitoring and prediction) constitute the main strategies for managing climate change. This paper aims to weigh in on policies and societal coordination for effective management of the earth’s climate with respect to these four elements in Africa because of its socioeconomic peculiarities. Design/methodology/approach The Delphi experts’ method backed by questionnaires was used to obtain relevant data for the study. The questionnaires were distributed to professionals dealing with issues related to climate change response and sustainability in various parts of the world, with a focus on Africa. Findings With respect to the strategies that are most needed for effective climate change actions in Africa, government’s policies, activities and decisions rank highest at 1.20 with a p-value of < 0.001, and financing is next at 0.93, mitigation is 0.83, prediction is 0.76 and adaptation is 0.68 (p = 0.048), at the 5 per cent cutoff. Also, for the most appropriate approaches to managing climate change across Africa, regional efforts are at least 8 times more effective than country-wide approaches, followed by continental efforts at 6.51 times, international cooperation at 3.99 times and inaction at 0.00 times. Originality/value The paper concludes that a holistic climate change management approach is important in Africa to contain the impacts of climate change in the continent.
      Citation: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management
      PubDate: 2017-09-19T12:53:08Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCCSM-02-2017-0033
       
  • Key sectors in carbon footprint responsibility at the city level: a case
           study of Beijing
    • First page: 749
      Abstract: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose This paper aims to identify key sectors in carbon footprint responsibility, an introduced concept depicting CO2 responsibilities allocated through the supply chain containing sectoral activities and interactions. In detail, various key sectors could be identified according to comparative advantages in trade, sectoral linkage and sectoral synergy within the supply chain. Design/methodology/approach A semi-closed input–output model is used to make the household income–expenditure relationship endogenous through the supply chain where sectoral CO2 emissions are calculated, and the production-based responsibility (PR) principle is evaluated. Thus, according to “carbon footprint responsibility”, modified hypothetical extraction method is applied to decompose sectoral CO2 in terms of comparative advantages in trade, sectoral linkage and synergy. Finally, key sectors are identified via sectoral shares and associated decompositions in carbon footprint responsibility. Findings Compared to 2005, in 2012, the PR principle failed to track sectoral CO2 flow, and embodied CO2 in import and interprovincial export increased, with manufacturing contributing the most; manufacturing should take more carbon responsibilities in the internal linkage, and tertiary sectors in the net forward and backward linkage, with sectors enjoying low carbonization in the mixed linkage; inward net CO2 flows of manufacturing and service sectors were more complicated than their outward ones in terms of involved sectors and economic drivers; and residential effects on CO2 emissions of traditional sectors increased, urban effects remained larger than rural ones and manufacturing and tertiary sectors received the largest residential effects. Originality/value The value of this paper is as follows: the household income–expenditure relationship got endogenous in intermediate supply and demand, corresponding to the rapid urbanization in megacities; key sectors were observed to change flexibly according to real sectoral activities and interaction; and the evaluation of the PR principle was completed ahead of using a certain CO2 accounting principle at the city level.
      Citation: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management
      PubDate: 2017-09-19T01:17:00Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCCSM-01-2017-0009
       
  • Contextual vulnerability of rainfed crop-based farming communities in
           semi-arid Zimbabwe
    • First page: 777
      Abstract: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to assess smallholder farmers’ vulnerability to climate change and variability based on the socioeconomic and biophysical characteristics of Chiredzi District, a region that is susceptible to the adverse effects of climate change and variability. Design/methodology/approach Vulnerability was assessed using the Vulnerability to Resilience and the Climate Vulnerability and Capacity frameworks. Findings The major indicators and drivers of vulnerability were identified as droughts, flash floods, poor soil fertility and out-migration leaving female- and child-headed households. From sensitivity analysis, it was shown that different areas within the district considered different biophysical and socioeconomic indicators to climate change and variability. They also considered different vulnerability indicators to influence the decisions for adaptation to climate change and variability. Originality/value The results of this study indicate that the area and cropping systems are greatly exposed and are sensitive to climatic change stimuli, as shown by the decline in main cereal grain yield. These results also showed that there is a need to define and map local area vulnerability as a basis to recommend coping and adaptation measures to counter climate change hazards.
      Citation: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management
      PubDate: 2017-09-18T03:12:44Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCCSM-03-2017-0070
       
  • Sustainable adaptation for resolving climate displacement issues of south
           eastern islands in Bangladesh
    • First page: 790
      Abstract: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose Climate change is affecting people displacement in Bangladesh by both sudden environmental events and gradual environmental change. This paper aims to assess the sustainable adaptation measures for resolving the displacement problem induced by climate change considering the socioeconomic differences between the past and the present location of living places for island dwellers of the south-eastern coast of Bangladesh. Design/methodology/approach Both qualitative and quantitative approaches were adopted for conducting the study. The main tool of the household survey was a questionnaire survey. In addition to the estimate of displacement, the authors have used hazard impact analysis, weightage analysis and sustainable adaptation analysis with various ranking. Meaningful data were analyzed through SPSS software and presented through statistical techniques. Findings Climate change-induced different natural disasters, such as cyclone, tidal surge, tidal flood and coastal erosion, were frequent in the study areas and responsible for mass displacement. After displacement, people lost not only their identity but also social and cultural harmony and faced different economic and environmental crises. However, nearly 20 types of adaptation options were identified for protection from the displacement of coastal people. Practical implications The study prescribed 11 specific criteria and 4 principles of sustainable adaptation options for resolving the climate displacement problem. Moreover, seven adaptation practices showed high sustainability, ten showed medium sustainability and five showed low sustainability in terms of effectiveness, efficiency and implementation ability. Originality/value The study would help to establish sustainable adaptation measures through the combination of environment, economic and social harmony with regard to the Sustainable Development Goals.
      Citation: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management
      PubDate: 2017-09-18T03:17:14Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCCSM-02-2017-0026
       
  • Climate corridors for strategic adaptation planning
    • First page: 811
      Abstract: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose Although the importance of climate change is generally acknowledged, its impacts are often not taken into account explicitly when planning development projects. This being due to limited resources, among others, this paper aims to propose a simple and low-cost approach to assess the viability of human activities under climate change. Design/methodology/approach Many human activities are feasible only within a narrow range of climatic conditions. Comparing such “climate corridors” with future climate projections provides an intuitive yet quantitative means for assessing needs for, and the viability of, adaptation activities under climate change. Findings The approach was tested within development projects in Pakistan, Peru and Tajikistan. The approach was shown to work well for forestry and agriculture, indicating positive/negative prospects for wheat in two districts in Pakistan, temperature constraints for maize in Peru and widening elevation ranges for walnut trees in Tajikistan. Practical implications Climate corridor analyses feed into the preparation of Local Adaptation Plans of Action in Pakistan. Originality/value The simplicity and robustness of climate corridor analysis allow for efficient analysis and communication of climate change impacts. It works when data availability is limited, but it can as well accommodate a wide range of complexities. It has proven to be an effective vehicle for mainstreaming climate change into adaptation planning.
      Citation: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management
      PubDate: 2017-09-20T09:33:24Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCCSM-12-2016-0183
       
  • Climate change adaptation-disaster risk reduction nexus: case study from
           Ethiopia
    • First page: 829
      Abstract: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The recently released fifth IPCC report indicates a high agreement among global actors on the need to integrate climate change adaptation (CCA) and disaster risk reduction (DRR). However, there remains little local level evidence on how DRR and CCA could be linked, the sorts of adjustments that are required for the two concepts to be integrated and the challenges ahead. This paper aims to provide an empirical insight on the possible links and departures between DRR and CCA. Design/methodology/approach The study used a qualitative case study approach to excavate lessons from an existing DRR intervention for CCA using a local-level adaptive capacity assessment framework as a normative criteria. Data was collected both from primary and secondary sources. The primary data collection involved the use of participatory rural appraisal techniques with village communities in Chifra District, Afar Regional State, Ethiopia. Findings The findings showed that the DRR interventions studied addressed parts of the elements of adaptive capacity at the local level. The findings also showed the limitation of the DRR intervention, which could be attributed to both the nature of the DRR interventions in general and implementation problems of the case study intervention in particular. The limitations show cases where full integration of DRR with CCA could be challenging. Originality/value The paper argues why the two approaches may not be integrated fully and also shows the need to focus on the design of DRR interventions in achieving both short-term (reducing disaster risks) and long-term objectives (enhancing adaptive capacity).
      Citation: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management
      PubDate: 2017-09-19T01:41:48Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCCSM-01-2016-0006
       
  • Evaluating planting date and variety management strategies for adapting
           winter wheat to climate change impacts in arid regions
    • First page: 846
      Abstract: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The purpose of this study is to simulate the climate change impacts on winter wheat production and evaluate the possibilities of using various varieties and shifting planting date as two climate change adaptation strategies in Kerman Province, Iran. Design/methodology/approach Two types of global circulation model and three scenarios for three periods were used. Daily climatic parameters were generated by LARS-WG (Long Ashton Research Station-Weather Generator). The CERES-wheat model was used to simulate future winter wheat growth, development and production. Findings The results showed that CO2 had no effect on the phenology of winter wheat, and the negative impact of temperature on the grain yield was higher than the positive effect of CO2 enrichment. The length of the reproductive growth period of the winter wheat was significantly shortened as affected by the negative impacts of rise in temperature. The simulated results indicated that the grain yield of common (medium maturing) variety of winter wheat will decline, ranging from −0.27 to −18.71 per cent according to future climate changes. Adaptation strategies showed that the early maturing variety had a higher and more stable grain yield under climate change conditions than medium and delayed maturing varieties. Earlier planting date (20 October) increased wheat grain yield under future climatic conditions than common (November 5) planting date. In reverse, later planting (November 20) would accelerate harmful effects of climate change on wheat grain yield. Originality/value The results highlighted the potential of early maturing variety and early planting date as the appropriate agronomical approaches for mitigating harmful impacts of climate change on winter wheat production in arid regions.
      Citation: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management
      PubDate: 2017-09-14T08:29:02Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJCCSM-02-2017-0030
       
 
 
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