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Interactive Technology and Smart Education
Number of Followers: 12  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1741-5659
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  • Teachers’ adoption of 1:1 iPad implementation in the classroom
    • Abstract: Interactive Technology and Smart Education, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose This study aims to examine teachers’ efficacy to use iPad for teaching, their perceived impact of 1:1 iPad implementation in the classroom and the role of both variables in predicting teachers’ adoption of the iPad. Design/methodology/approach This paper opted for multiple linear regression analysis of the data from a total of 91 teachers (44 male and 47 female). All participating teachers are from upper-middle-class private schools who have been using iPad in their classrooms for at least three months. All three variables being studied are measured using instruments developed by the researcher and self-rated by participating teachers: iPad-Teaching Efficacy (iTE), Perceived Impact of iPad in the Classroom (iPI) and iPad Actual Use for Teaching (iAU). All three instruments have good internal reliability and validity, with an alpha coefficient of 0.97, 0.92 and 0.93 respectively. Findings The paper provides empirical insights about factors contributing to teachers’ technology adoption (specifically iPad) in the classroom. It suggests that teachers’ efficacy significantly predicts their actual use of the iPad for teaching, but teachers’ perceived impact of the implementation does not. Practical implications These research findings play an important role in designing a program for technology adoption in schools, especially in Indonesia.
      Citation: Interactive Technology and Smart Education
      PubDate: 2019-06-24T02:48:25Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ITSE-06-2018-0041
       
  • Technological innovativeness and information quality as neoteric
           predictors of users’ acceptance of learning management system
    • Abstract: Interactive Technology and Smart Education, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose This study aims to expand the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT2) by exploring the effect of two new predictors: technological innovativeness and information quality, along with the learning value and the original determinants that influence faculty and students’ acceptance of the Moodle-Learning Management System. The modified model includes nine predictors: performance expectancy, effort expectancy, social influence, facilitating conditions, learning value, hedonic motivation, habit, technological innovativeness and information quality. Design/methodology/approach The study is based on a cross-sectional survey design. The target population was faculty and students of the University of Kufa in Iraq. An online questionnaire was used to collect 228 responses from faculty and 553 from students. Findings Results of the Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) Partial Least Squares (PLS) analysis revealed that factors which influence faculty acceptance were social influence, facilitating conditions, hedonic motivation, habit, technological innovativeness and information quality, while factors which influence student acceptance were performance expectancy, facilitating conditions, learning value, hedonic motivation, habit, technological innovativeness and information quality. Originality/value The theoretical and practical contribution of the present study lies in the expansion of the UTAUT2 model through adding neoteric predictors, which are technological innovativeness and information quality. This study provides insights and further understanding of the effect of predictors (original and additive) on users’ acceptance of e-learning management system. In addition, the findings of the current study enable decision-makers and those interested in developing Moodle-LMS to obtain in-depth information on these indicators, especially in the Iraqi higher education environment.
      Citation: Interactive Technology and Smart Education
      PubDate: 2019-06-19T12:49:06Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ITSE-09-2018-0065
       
  • Research trends in flipped classroom empirical evidence from 2017 to 2018
    • Abstract: Interactive Technology and Smart Education, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose This paper aims to analyze the trends and contents of flipped classroom research based on 48 selected empirical articles published during 2017 and 2018. Design/methodology/approach The inductive content analysis was used as a methodology to investigate the content of flipped classroom research, including subject-specific areas, methodological approaches, technology tools or platforms, the most frequently used trending searches, countries of research, positive impacts and challenges. Findings The results of the analysis were interpreted using descriptive analysis, percentages and frequencies. This analysis found that various subjects were implemented in flipped classroom learning, and some technological tools were also used to enhance teaching and learning. Analysis of the impact revealed that the flipped classroom yielded positive learning outcomes on students’ learning activities such as learning motivation and engagement, social interaction and self-directed learning skills. Meanwhile, the most significant challenges encountered by the instructor were the lack of students’ motivation to watch pre-recorded video lectures or to study the contents outside of the class time. Originality/value The findings suggest that the flipped classroom concept might be effective in promoting twenty-first-century learning skills and developing the technology and information literacy competency based on national standards.
      Citation: Interactive Technology and Smart Education
      PubDate: 2019-06-07T09:39:46Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ITSE-10-2018-0082
       
  • Matching serious games with museum’s educational roles: smart
           education in practice
    • Abstract: Interactive Technology and Smart Education, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose This study aims to present a meta-analysis of the use of serious educational games in museums. The analysis is based on a critical literature review that maps educational roles of museums against serious educational games used in support of those roles. The meta-analysis focuses on the specific context of informal learning in museums. Design/methodology/approach The research design presented in this study is based on a meta-analysis research design that consists of a critical literature review, a multi-matrix representation of findings of the literature review and a conceptual visualization of the multidisciplinary area of the usage of serious games in support of educational roles in museums. Findings Clear and detailed categorizations of educational roles and serious games types for informal learning are presented. These are followed by matching these educational roles with published reports of the use of serious games within museums. The study concludes with observations and a conceptual map of the design of serious games for museums. Originality/value This study presents the first meta-analysis of research in this emergent multidisciplinary field. It will help serious game designers, museum educators and educational practitioners to make decisions regarding the choice of game type, customization and content design to support informal learning in the specific context of museum educational activities.
      Citation: Interactive Technology and Smart Education
      PubDate: 2019-05-30T12:37:59Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ITSE-03-2019-0013
       
  • The educational impact of using mobile technology in a database course in
           college
    • Abstract: Interactive Technology and Smart Education, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose Nowadays, when mobile devices are actively evolving and penetrating the various spheres of human activity they have a potential to modernize and facilitate the sphere of IT education as well. This paper aims to test the hypothesis stating that introduction of mobile technology to the college-level database course for future IT specialists has a positive academic impact on students. Design/methodology/approach The main theoretical premises for the present study were the general findings of the surveys by Hinze et al. (2017) and Bowen and Pistilli (2012) indicating that: using mobile tools to work on classroom projects improves student’s academic success students, especially those from computing specialties, actively turn to mobile tools in their academic activity students favor the Android and iPhone platforms and prefer native mobile apps to Web-based mobile apps The key idea of the present study was to validate these general premises in the specific case of the college-level database class. Namely, the authors formulated a hypothesis that Android-based mobile devices have a positive impact on the IT students’ academic performance and interest in the subject at the college-level introductory database lessons. Throughout the study, the authors examined both quantitative (students’ scores and attendance rate) and qualitative aspects (students’ and teachers’ opinions) of the hypothesis. Findings Based on the experiment’s positive outcome resulting in students’ increased academic performance and interest in the subject, the authors conclude that in the context of the college-level database course mobile devices can successfully substitute traditional desktop computers and positively affect students’ academic activity. Originality/value Based on the experiment’s positive outcome resulting in students’ increased academic performance and interest in the subject, the authors conclude that in the context of the college-level database course mobile devices can successfully substitute traditional desktop computers and positively affect students’ academic activity.
      Citation: Interactive Technology and Smart Education
      PubDate: 2019-05-30T12:32:58Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ITSE-12-2018-0103
       
  • The writing performance of elementary students using a digital writing
           application
    • Abstract: Interactive Technology and Smart Education, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose This paper aims to investigate elementary students’ writing experiences using a digital writing application and compares the results to the findings and recommendations of a national survey on instructional practices in writing. Design/methodology/approach Mixed methods were used to assess the quantity and quality of P-5 public school students’ writing over time. Teacher, librarian and student perceptions and experiences were examined and compared to the results and recommendations from a national survey on writing. Findings This paper provides empirical insights into the use of a digital writing application in writing instruction. Findings showed the use of a digital writing application: significantly increased the quantity and improved the quality of student writing; excited and motivated students to write; extended the learning day so more time was spent on writing; and supported students of special populations. Comparison to the recommendations of the national survey showed five of seven recommendations were not met in this study. Research limitations/implications Because of the chosen research approach, the research results may lack generalizability. Therefore, researchers are encouraged to conduct further investigations. Practical implications The paper includes implications for writing instruction using digital applications for teachers, librarians and educators in pre-service teacher and school librarian preparation programs. Originality/value Considering limited growth in national writing scores and the transition to online writing assessments by 2019, this paper addresses the need to integrate technology into writing instruction and offers practical strategies for doing so.
      Citation: Interactive Technology and Smart Education
      PubDate: 2019-05-30T12:26:25Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ITSE-08-2018-0057
       
  • The effects of video game making within science content on student
           computational thinking skills and performance
    • Abstract: Interactive Technology and Smart Education, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose This study aims to explore the effects of an alternative learning environment, such as the video game making (VGM) within science content, on computational thinking (CT) skills development and student performance. Design/methodology/approach A didactic intervention was performed for five weeks. Two student groups were taught the same computational concepts in two ways. One group was taught by constructing a video game within science content to practice science and computing curriculum while the other group constructed appropriately designed projects to practice only the computing curriculum. Additionally, the students constructed a pretest project before the beginning of the intervention and a post-test project after its end. Results were based on quantitative and qualitative code analysis and interviews from the students. Findings VGM within science content resulted in projects with more CT skills and also supported students to effectively apply their acquired coding skills, after the end of the intervention. Practical implications The results of this study suggest an interdisciplinary environment, such as the VGM within science content, which can effectively support CT skills development and computing curriculum. Originality/value Although VGM has been successfully applied to teach science content, this study explored the potential influence of this learning environment on CT skills development and coding fluency. Such interdisciplinary educational environments could be applied in the typical school settings to promote a plethora of skills and academic contents.
      Citation: Interactive Technology and Smart Education
      PubDate: 2019-05-09T11:56:53Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ITSE-11-2018-0097
       
  • Automated generators of examples and problems for studying computer
           algorithms
    • Abstract: Interactive Technology and Smart Education, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The purpose of this study is to investigate students’ decisions in example-based instruction within a novel self-regulated learning context. The novelty was the use of automated generators of worked examples and problem-solving exercises instead of a few handcrafted ones. According to the cognitive load theory, when students are in control of their learning, they demonstrate different preferences in selecting worked examples or problem solving exercises for maximizing their learning. An unlimited supply of examples and exercises, however, offers unprecedented degree of flexibility that should alter the decisions of students in scheduling the instruction. Design/methodology/approach ASolver, an online learning environment augmented with such generators for studying computer algorithms in an operating systems course, was developed as the experimental platform. Students’ decisions related to choosing worked examples or problem-solving exercises were logged and analyzed. Findings Results show that students had a tendency to attempt many exercises and examples, especially when performance measurement events were impending. Strong students had greater appetite for both exercises and examples than weak students, and they were found to be more adventurous and less bothered by scaffolding. On the other hand, weak students were found to be more timid or unmotivated. They need support in the form of procedural scaffolding to guide the learning. Originality/value This study was one of the first to introduce automated example generators for studying an operating systems course and investigate students’ behaviors in such learning environments.
      Citation: Interactive Technology and Smart Education
      PubDate: 2019-05-09T11:56:24Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ITSE-10-2018-0091
       
  • University students’ intention to use e-learning systems
    • Abstract: Interactive Technology and Smart Education, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate the factors that might influence the intention and use behaviour of e-learning systems by students in state universities in Sri Lanka. Design/methodology/approach The theoretical model for this study was primarily drawn from unified theory of acceptance and Use of Technology 2 (UTAUT2). Exogenous variables included performance expectancy, effort expectancy, social influence, work life quality, hedonic motivation, internet experience and facilitating condition, and their influence on behavioural intention and use behaviour were studied. Instrument was developed using validated items from past literature. Data for this quantitative study were collected from undergraduate and postgraduate students from 15 Sri Lankan state universities by self-administering and Web-form during second quarter of 2018. Structural equation modelling was used to see the insights from the valid data using IBM’s SPSS 25 and AMOS 22. Findings Results of the confirmatory factor analysis and subsequent evaluation of the structural model confirmed the proposed hypotheses, and it was found that constructs of UTAUT2 have a significant impact on and play an important role in behavioural intention to use and use behaviour of e-learning system by state university students in Sri Lanka. Originality/value The adoption of an e-learning system in Sri Lankan state universities is fairly low. Hence, investigation of what determinants might be contributing for adoption is important to enhance the learning experience of students and help them improve their knowledge. This paper contributes by delineating the factors that influence the acceptance and use of e-learning systems by students of state universities in Sri Lanka.
      Citation: Interactive Technology and Smart Education
      PubDate: 2019-04-09T02:47:30Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ITSE-11-2018-0092
       
  • Learners’ attention preferences of information in online learning
    • Abstract: Interactive Technology and Smart Education, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose This study aims to use eye-tracking technology to conduct an empirical study about online learning process analysis, thus aiming to understand the attentional preferences and learning paths in online learners. Design/methodology/approach With eye movement tracking and data analysing technology, the Tobii X120 eye-tracking instrument, Tobii studio and online learning platform are used to record and visualise data of eye moving and learning steps during the real task-based online learning processes of 14 online learners. According to Barbara A. Soloman’s learning style classification framework, these learners’ learning style was presented in four dimensions. Based on data of eye moving, leaning style and operation in online course, the correlation about learners’ preferences of learning content, online learning paths and learning style were analysed based on according data. Findings The paper provides empirical insights about how change is brought about during online learning. It is found that there is no significant difference in attention preference between the students with the difference on the learning style of visual-verbal, although each person has a different attention preference on the learning content. Research limitations/implications The limitation of this study is that only one common type of video learning process is studied. The learning process of various types of instructional videos in online learning will be done in future research. Practical implications In this study, eye-movement tracking technology is used to understand students’ learning path and learning preference in the online learning process, which is helpful to optimise the online learning process and improve the efficiency of online learning. Social implications This research findings have been approved by relevant experts and have won the first prize in the school-level competition of South China Normal University in China. Originality/value In this study, the technology of psychology (eye-tracking technology) is introduced into the study of real task-based online learning process in the subject of educational technology, realising the integration of multi-disciplinary research techniques and methods.
      Citation: Interactive Technology and Smart Education
      PubDate: 2019-04-08T01:28:10Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ITSE-10-2018-0090
       
  • Effectiveness of e-learning portal from students’ perspective
    • First page: 94
      Abstract: Interactive Technology and Smart Education, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose E-learning has become an increasingly prevalent learning approach in higher educational institutions due to the fast growth of internet technologies in India. This paper aims to mainly focus on evaluating the effectiveness of the e-learning experience from students’ perceptive. Design/methodology/approach “Survey” method has been used to collect the data with the help of a structured questionnaire from the students who have registered on COURSERA (www.coursera.org/) website for e-learning. The questionnaire consisted of two sections e-learning system and e-learning effectiveness. E-learning system included items related to system quality, information quality and service quality. E-learning effectiveness dimension included user satisfaction and net benefits. The items in this section were measured on a five-point Likert scale ranging from strongly disagrees to strongly agree. The data collected have been analyzed using the SPSS version 17.0 and AMOS version 21.0. Findings Results show that system quality and service quality contribute more in e-learning system compared to information quality. Students perception may be that information available on the website may not be very useful as it’s a one-way mode of communication. The researcher also found that the three dimensions (system quality, service quality and information quality) of e-learning system contributes to user satisfaction and net benefits. Students are satisfied with e-learning websites and intent to continue to use it in future as well. They also found it beneficial as it helps them in career growth and making them employable. Originality/value This paper proposed a second-order model of e-learning system and a second-order model e-learning effectiveness. E-learning system has been defined by three first-order constructs: a system quality, service quality and information quality. E-learning effectiveness has been defined by two first-order constructs: a user satisfaction and net benefits. The predictability of the proposed model is high to explain the impact of e-learning system on e-learning effectiveness.
      Citation: Interactive Technology and Smart Education
      PubDate: 2019-03-14T10:50:01Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ITSE-05-2018-0027
       
  • Assessing the impact of students’ activities in e-courses on learning
           outcomes: a data mining approach
    • First page: 117
      Abstract: Interactive Technology and Smart Education, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose This paper aims to study the relationship between students’ activities in the e-classroom and grades for the final exam. The study was conducted at the Faculty of Administration, University of Ljubljana among first-year undergraduate students. In the e-classroom, students learn new content for individual self-study, and their knowledge is checked with quizzes. Design/methodology/approach In the empirical study, the relationship between performance in quizzes and at the final exam was studied from two perspectives. First, successful and unsuccessful students (in terms of quizzes) were compared. Second, the Orange data mining software was used for two predictive modelling tasks. The research question was based on a student’s quiz performances, is it possible to predict whether the student will pass an exam and will the student’s grade for the exam be good. Findings The empirical results indicate a very strong connection between a student’s performance in quizzes and their score for the final exam in the course. Significant differences in performance were found between students who had completed most quizzes and those who had not. Moreover, the results highlighted which quizzes, in other words topics, are most important for passing an exam or obtaining a better grade. Therefore, the quality of individual study in the e-classroom positively influences a student’s performance. Originality/value The paper is the first to assess the impact of students’ activities on learning outcomes in undergraduate public administration programmes by applying a data mining approach.
      Citation: Interactive Technology and Smart Education
      PubDate: 2019-03-21T02:42:15Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ITSE-09-2018-0069
       
  • Socially orientated digital storytelling among Saudi EFL learners
    • First page: 130
      Abstract: Interactive Technology and Smart Education, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The current research presents a 14-week experience of developing socially orientated narratives in a digital mode, which involved 60 female Saudi English as a foreign language (EFL) learners. Initially working together, they were later divided into groups of approximately eight members each. The purpose of this research is to determine the benefits and challenges facing EFL leaners who are engaged with socially orientated digital-storytelling tasks. It also explores the nature of creating language-related socially orientated digital-storytelling projects and the main features associated with such projects. This practice targets the use of a new form of educational technologies that promotes educators’ pedagogical strategies, as well as their social needs, by sharing learners’ personal thoughts with others and cooperating and coordinating with other team members. Design/methodology/approach The current research has been designed in line with qualitative analysis. A qualitative analysis approach was chosen as the study seeks to gain further understanding about the issue of socially orientated digital storytelling among EFL learners in Saudi Arabia. The two main research methods used for conducting this research were semi-structured interviews and analysis of the content produced by the participants. Both methods were selected to enable the participants to express their personal thoughts and feedback directly to the researcher. Findings The findings have shown several benefits of this method, as well as highlighted the challenges regarding the application of such a practice in English language classes at university. The findings have indicated that such a novel educational atmosphere would result in the role of social orientation as a culture for enhancing learners’ competence and willingness to share a co-learning experience being regarded more highly. In addition, the results have revealed how such group work can be constructed and the main aspects of content that exist in the digital stories produced. Research limitations/implications One limitation of the current research is that it only included a group of female EFL students. Therefore, it is recommended that the same research be conducted on male EFL students in Saudi Arabia so that a comparative analysis can be made regarding the effects of socially orientated digital storytelling on both genders. In addition, it is recommended that the research be carried out among more classes containing female and male EFL students to be able to analyse the data quantitatively. Lastly, there remains the issue of convincing administrators, parents and instructors opposed to these ideas to implement this kind of project in formal language education, which is often independently orientated. Practical implications The effect of such a practice is the improvements made to learners’ academic and digital literacies. Specifically, students’ academic-writing skills and abilities to tell stories are essential parts of this process that can be improved by learners during the online storytelling process. Originality/value The research presents an application of a promising pedagogy that integrates digital technologies into different learning settings, including the context of learning English as a foreign language.
      Citation: Interactive Technology and Smart Education
      PubDate: 2019-03-14T10:50:05Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ITSE-11-2018-0098
       
  • Embracing ambiguity
    • First page: 143
      Abstract: Interactive Technology and Smart Education, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose Embracing reflective practice and retrospection, with a goal of identifying commonalities, this paper aims to examine delivery of engineering subjects in both traditional higher education (THE) and technical and vocational education and training (TVET). Design/methodology/approach Reflections on actions and autoethnography were used to examine the teaching and learning experiences of three educators across two higher education (HE) institutions (HEIs) in the greater Chinese context. Literature reviews and historical contexts are outlined to support the approaches and insights identified. Findings This paper presents a number of common characteristics and challenges identified across both THE and TVET. Drawing on the successful embrace of ambiguity and change in recent software engineering (SE) development paradigms, recommendations are made for how the agile SE themes can be applied in a larger sense to address the wider challenges facing both THE and TVET. Originality/value To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first time that engineering education has been examined and contrasted in the contexts of THE and TVET. The similarities and common challenges may represent a new focus for related work, and the presented insights, from agile methodologies in SE, represent a new perspective for viewing future HE and TVET sustainability.
      Citation: Interactive Technology and Smart Education
      PubDate: 2019-03-21T02:46:35Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ITSE-10-2018-0088
       
  • The professional development needs for the use of educational technology
    • First page: 159
      Abstract: Interactive Technology and Smart Education, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose This study aimed to identify the professional development needs of academics in Hong Kong higher education for the use of educational technology. Design/methodology/approach An online survey was conducted in 2017, which involved 374 academics from Hong Kong higher education institutions. The survey covered their perception and use of educational technology for professional activities and their relevant professional development needs. Findings The results showed an overall positive perception by the academics of the usefulness of online learning with the aid of technology, which was regarded as an effective complement to face-to-face learning. However, their use of educational technology focused only on general online applications, such as document and video-sharing tools, and e-learning platforms. Among various professional development needs, those related to the use of specific educational software with sharing of practical examples were considered to be most highly desired by the academics. In addition, the academics working in lecturer positions tended to use more online applications and had a higher need for professional development, than those with more teaching experience. Originality/value The findings contribute to identifying the current status of the use of educational technology and the professional development needs among academics in Hong Kong, as well as the differences between academics in different job positions and with different amounts of teaching experience. The results help in designing suitable professional development activities which address the specific needs of academics.
      Citation: Interactive Technology and Smart Education
      PubDate: 2019-04-05T02:47:05Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ITSE-10-2018-0089
       
  • The relationship between social presence and cognitive load
    • First page: 172
      Abstract: Interactive Technology and Smart Education, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose As online learning has become more prevalent, how learners interact with each other in those learning environments has become more salient. To develop effective levels of interaction, students must feel comfortable to express their ideas and views. For this reason, this paper aims to look at how individual students’ levels of social presence affect germane cognitive load. Germane cognitive load is the amount that students are able to construct schema and can be seen as analogous to learning. Design/methodology/approach This study looks at the results of survey data (n = 433) that investigate the relationship between social presence and germane cognitive load. The students were surveyed from the Open Cyber University of Korea in the fall semester of 2018. Findings The present study found a statistically significant positive relationship between social presence and germane cognitive load. The study found a Spearman’s correlation coefficient of 0.595. Furthermore, the sample was divided into a high, medium and low grouping of social presence. Among these groupings, the high level social presence had the highest level of germane cognitive load, and the low level social presence had the lowest level of germane cognitive load. Originality/value This result shows the importance and value of developing levels of social presence in online environments. Some research has shown relationships between student interaction and learning, but the present study looks directly at social presence and germane cognitive load. From this research, the authors can see the value of encouraging higher levels of social interaction in online learning environments.
      Citation: Interactive Technology and Smart Education
      PubDate: 2019-04-09T02:42:50Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ITSE-12-2018-0107
       
 
 
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