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Publisher: Emerald   (Total: 356 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 356 Journals sorted alphabetically
A Life in the Day     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Academia Revista Latinoamericana de Administración     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.178, CiteScore: 1)
Accounting Auditing & Accountability J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33, SJR: 1.71, CiteScore: 3)
Accounting Research J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.144, CiteScore: 0)
Accounting, Auditing and Accountability J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 2.187, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Accounting Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.279, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Appreciative Inquiry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.451, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Autism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33, SJR: 0.222, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Dual Diagnosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46, SJR: 0.21, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Gender Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.16, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Intl. Marketing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 83, SJR: 0.296, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
African J. of Economic and Management Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.216, CiteScore: 1)
Agricultural Finance Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.406, CiteScore: 1)
Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 218, SJR: 0.354, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Annals in Social Responsibility     Full-text available via subscription  
Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.235, CiteScore: 1)
Arts and the Market     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Asia Pacific J. of Innovation and Entrepreneurship     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asia Pacific J. of Marketing and Logistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.425, CiteScore: 1)
Asia-Pacific J. of Business Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.234, CiteScore: 1)
Asian Association of Open Universities J.     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian Education and Development Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.233, CiteScore: 1)
Asian J. on Quality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Asian Review of Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.222, CiteScore: 1)
Aslib J. of Information Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32, SJR: 0.725, CiteScore: 2)
Aslib Proceedings     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 312)
Assembly Automation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.603, CiteScore: 2)
Baltic J. of Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.309, CiteScore: 1)
Benchmarking : An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.559, CiteScore: 2)
British Food J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.5, CiteScore: 2)
Built Environment Project and Asset Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.46, CiteScore: 1)
Business Process Re-engineering & Management J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Business Strategy Series     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Career Development Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.527, CiteScore: 2)
China Agricultural Economic Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.31, CiteScore: 1)
China Finance Review Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.245, CiteScore: 0)
Chinese Management Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.278, CiteScore: 1)
Circuit World     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.246, CiteScore: 1)
Collection and Curation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.296, CiteScore: 1)
COMPEL: The Intl. J. for Computation and Mathematics in Electrical and Electronic Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.22, CiteScore: 1)
Competitiveness Review : An Intl. Business J. incorporating J. of Global Competitiveness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.274, CiteScore: 1)
Construction Innovation: Information, Process, Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.731, CiteScore: 2)
Corporate Communications An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.453, CiteScore: 1)
Corporate Governance Intl. J. of Business in Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.336, CiteScore: 1)
Critical Perspectives on Intl. Business     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.378, CiteScore: 1)
Cross Cultural & Strategic Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.504, CiteScore: 2)
Data Technologies and Applications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 330, SJR: 0.355, CiteScore: 1)
Development and Learning in Organizations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.138, CiteScore: 0)
Digital Library Perspectives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33, SJR: 0.341, CiteScore: 1)
Direct Marketing An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Disaster Prevention and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.47, CiteScore: 1)
Drugs and Alcohol Today     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 148, SJR: 0.245, CiteScore: 1)
Education + Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Education, Business and Society : Contemporary Middle Eastern Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.707, CiteScore: 3)
Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Employee Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.551, CiteScore: 2)
Engineering Computations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.444, CiteScore: 1)
Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.653, CiteScore: 2)
English Teaching: Practice & Critique     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.417, CiteScore: 1)
Equal Opportunities Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Equality, Diversity and Inclusion : An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.5, CiteScore: 1)
EuroMed J. of Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.26, CiteScore: 1)
European Business Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.585, CiteScore: 3)
European J. of Innovation Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.454, CiteScore: 2)
European J. of Management and Business Economics     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.239, CiteScore: 1)
European J. of Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.971, CiteScore: 2)
European J. of Training and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.477, CiteScore: 1)
Evidence-based HRM     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.537, CiteScore: 1)
Facilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.503, CiteScore: 2)
Foresight     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.34, CiteScore: 1)
Gender in Management : An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.412, CiteScore: 1)
Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 995, SJR: 0.261, CiteScore: 1)
Grey Systems : Theory and Application     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Health Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.421, CiteScore: 1)
Higher Education Evaluation and Development     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Higher Education, Skills and Work-based Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50, SJR: 0.426, CiteScore: 1)
History of Education Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.26, CiteScore: 0)
Housing, Care and Support     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.171, CiteScore: 0)
Human Resource Management Intl. Digest     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.129, CiteScore: 0)
IMP J.     Hybrid Journal  
Indian Growth and Development Review     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.174, CiteScore: 0)
Industrial and Commercial Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.301, CiteScore: 1)
Industrial Lubrication and Tribology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.334, CiteScore: 1)
Industrial Management & Data Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.904, CiteScore: 3)
Industrial Robot An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.318, CiteScore: 1)
Info     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Information and Computer Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.307, CiteScore: 1)
Information Technology & People     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45, SJR: 0.671, CiteScore: 2)
Innovation & Management Review     Open Access  
Interactive Technology and Smart Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.191, CiteScore: 1)
Interlending & Document Supply     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 61)
Internet Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37, SJR: 1.645, CiteScore: 5)
Intl. J. for Lesson and Learning Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.324, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. for Researcher Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Intl. J. of Accounting and Information Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.275, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Bank Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.654, CiteScore: 3)
Intl. J. of Climate Change Strategies and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.353, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Clothing Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.318, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Commerce and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Conflict Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.362, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Contemporary Hospitality Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.452, CiteScore: 4)
Intl. J. of Culture Tourism and Hospitality Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.339, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Development Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.139, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.387, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Educational Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.559, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Emergency Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.201, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Emerging Markets     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.474, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Energy Sector Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.349, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Entrepreneurial Behaviour & Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.629, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Ethics and Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.333, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Event and Festival Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.388, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Gender and Entrepreneurship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.445, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Health Care Quality Assurance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.358, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Health Governance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.247, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Housing Markets and Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.211, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Human Rights in Healthcare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.205, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Information and Learning Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.226, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Innovation Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.197, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Intelligent Computing and Cybernetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.214, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Intelligent Unmanned Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Islamic and Middle Eastern Finance and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.375, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Law and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.217, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Leadership in Public Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Intl. J. of Lean Six Sigma     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.802, CiteScore: 3)
Intl. J. of Logistics Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.71, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Managerial Finance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.203, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Managing Projects in Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.36, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Manpower     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.365, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Mentoring and Coaching in Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.426, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Migration, Health and Social Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.307, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Numerical Methods for Heat & Fluid Flow     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.697, CiteScore: 3)
Intl. J. of Operations & Production Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 2.052, CiteScore: 4)
Intl. J. of Organization Theory and Behavior     Hybrid Journal  
Intl. J. of Organizational Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.268, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Pervasive Computing and Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.138, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.25, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.821, CiteScore: 4)
Intl. J. of Prisoner Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.303, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Productivity and Performance Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.578, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Public Sector Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31, SJR: 0.438, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Quality & Reliability Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.492, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Quality and Service Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.309, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Retail & Distribution Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.742, CiteScore: 3)
Intl. J. of Service Industry Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Social Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.225, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Sociology and Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54, SJR: 0.3, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.269, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Structural Integrity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.228, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Sustainability in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.502, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Tourism Cities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.502, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Web Information Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.186, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Wine Business Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.562, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Workplace Health Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.303, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. Marketing Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.895, CiteScore: 3)
Irish J. of Occupational Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
ISRA Intl. J. of Islamic Finance     Open Access  
J. for Multicultural Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.237, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Accounting & Organizational Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.301, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Accounting in Emerging Economies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
J. of Adult Protection, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.314, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Advances in Management Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
J. of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46, SJR: 0.222, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.108, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Applied Accounting Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.227, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Applied Research in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50, SJR: 0.2, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Asia Business Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.245, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Assistive Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
J. of Business & Industrial Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.652, CiteScore: 2)
J. of Business Strategy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.333, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Capital Markets Studies     Open Access  
J. of Centrum Cathedra     Open Access  
J. of Children's Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.243, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Chinese Economic and Foreign Trade Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.2, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Chinese Entrepreneurship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
J. of Chinese Human Resource Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.173, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Communication Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.625, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Consumer Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.664, CiteScore: 2)
J. of Corporate Real Estate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.368, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Criminal Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 140, SJR: 0.268, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Criminological Research, Policy and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49, SJR: 0.254, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.257, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Defense Analytics and Logistics     Open Access  
J. of Documentation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 199, SJR: 0.613, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Economic and Administrative Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
J. of Economic Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.733, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Economics, Finance and Administrative Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.217, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Educational Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.252, CiteScore: 2)
J. of Enabling Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.369, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Engineering, Design and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.212, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Enterprise Information Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.827, CiteScore: 4)
J. of Enterprising Communities People and Places in the Global Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.281, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Entrepreneurship and Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.262, CiteScore: 1)
J. of European Industrial Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
J. of European Real Estate Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.268, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Facilities Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.33, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Family Business Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
J. of Fashion Marketing and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.608, CiteScore: 2)

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Interactive Technology and Smart Education
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.191
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 12  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1741-5659
Published by Emerald Homepage  [356 journals]
  • The effects of video game making within science content on student
           computational thinking skills and performance
    • Abstract: Interactive Technology and Smart Education, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose This study aims to explore the effects of an alternative learning environment, such as the video game making (VGM) within science content, on computational thinking (CT) skills development and student performance. Design/methodology/approach A didactic intervention was performed for five weeks. Two student groups were taught the same computational concepts in two ways. One group was taught by constructing a video game within science content to practice science and computing curriculum while the other group constructed appropriately designed projects to practice only the computing curriculum. Additionally, the students constructed a pretest project before the beginning of the intervention and a post-test project after its end. Results were based on quantitative and qualitative code analysis and interviews from the students. Findings VGM within science content resulted in projects with more CT skills and also supported students to effectively apply their acquired coding skills, after the end of the intervention. Practical implications The results of this study suggest an interdisciplinary environment, such as the VGM within science content, which can effectively support CT skills development and computing curriculum. Originality/value Although VGM has been successfully applied to teach science content, this study explored the potential influence of this learning environment on CT skills development and coding fluency. Such interdisciplinary educational environments could be applied in the typical school settings to promote a plethora of skills and academic contents.
      Citation: Interactive Technology and Smart Education
      PubDate: 2019-05-09T11:56:53Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ITSE-11-2018-0097
       
  • Automated generators of examples and problems for studying computer
           algorithms
    • Abstract: Interactive Technology and Smart Education, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The purpose of this study is to investigate students’ decisions in example-based instruction within a novel self-regulated learning context. The novelty was the use of automated generators of worked examples and problem-solving exercises instead of a few handcrafted ones. According to the cognitive load theory, when students are in control of their learning, they demonstrate different preferences in selecting worked examples or problem solving exercises for maximizing their learning. An unlimited supply of examples and exercises, however, offers unprecedented degree of flexibility that should alter the decisions of students in scheduling the instruction. Design/methodology/approach ASolver, an online learning environment augmented with such generators for studying computer algorithms in an operating systems course, was developed as the experimental platform. Students’ decisions related to choosing worked examples or problem-solving exercises were logged and analyzed. Findings Results show that students had a tendency to attempt many exercises and examples, especially when performance measurement events were impending. Strong students had greater appetite for both exercises and examples than weak students, and they were found to be more adventurous and less bothered by scaffolding. On the other hand, weak students were found to be more timid or unmotivated. They need support in the form of procedural scaffolding to guide the learning. Originality/value This study was one of the first to introduce automated example generators for studying an operating systems course and investigate students’ behaviors in such learning environments.
      Citation: Interactive Technology and Smart Education
      PubDate: 2019-05-09T11:56:24Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ITSE-10-2018-0091
       
  • University students’ intention to use e-learning systems
    • Abstract: Interactive Technology and Smart Education, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate the factors that might influence the intention and use behaviour of e-learning systems by students in state universities in Sri Lanka. Design/methodology/approach The theoretical model for this study was primarily drawn from unified theory of acceptance and Use of Technology 2 (UTAUT2). Exogenous variables included performance expectancy, effort expectancy, social influence, work life quality, hedonic motivation, internet experience and facilitating condition, and their influence on behavioural intention and use behaviour were studied. Instrument was developed using validated items from past literature. Data for this quantitative study were collected from undergraduate and postgraduate students from 15 Sri Lankan state universities by self-administering and Web-form during second quarter of 2018. Structural equation modelling was used to see the insights from the valid data using IBM’s SPSS 25 and AMOS 22. Findings Results of the confirmatory factor analysis and subsequent evaluation of the structural model confirmed the proposed hypotheses, and it was found that constructs of UTAUT2 have a significant impact on and play an important role in behavioural intention to use and use behaviour of e-learning system by state university students in Sri Lanka. Originality/value The adoption of an e-learning system in Sri Lankan state universities is fairly low. Hence, investigation of what determinants might be contributing for adoption is important to enhance the learning experience of students and help them improve their knowledge. This paper contributes by delineating the factors that influence the acceptance and use of e-learning systems by students of state universities in Sri Lanka.
      Citation: Interactive Technology and Smart Education
      PubDate: 2019-04-09T02:47:30Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ITSE-11-2018-0092
       
  • The relationship between social presence and cognitive load
    • Abstract: Interactive Technology and Smart Education, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose As online learning has become more prevalent, how learners interact with each other in those learning environments has become more salient. To develop effective levels of interaction, students must feel comfortable to express their ideas and views. For this reason, this paper aims to look at how individual students’ levels of social presence affect germane cognitive load. Germane cognitive load is the amount that students are able to construct schema and can be seen as analogous to learning. Design/methodology/approach This study looks at the results of survey data (n = 433) that investigate the relationship between social presence and germane cognitive load. The students were surveyed from the Open Cyber University of Korea in the fall semester of 2018. Findings The present study found a statistically significant positive relationship between social presence and germane cognitive load. The study found a Spearman’s correlation coefficient of 0.595. Furthermore, the sample was divided into a high, medium and low grouping of social presence. Among these groupings, the high level social presence had the highest level of germane cognitive load, and the low level social presence had the lowest level of germane cognitive load. Originality/value This result shows the importance and value of developing levels of social presence in online environments. Some research has shown relationships between student interaction and learning, but the present study looks directly at social presence and germane cognitive load. From this research, the authors can see the value of encouraging higher levels of social interaction in online learning environments.
      Citation: Interactive Technology and Smart Education
      PubDate: 2019-04-09T02:42:50Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ITSE-12-2018-0107
       
  • Learners’ attention preferences of information in online learning
    • Abstract: Interactive Technology and Smart Education, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose This study aims to use eye-tracking technology to conduct an empirical study about online learning process analysis, thus aiming to understand the attentional preferences and learning paths in online learners. Design/methodology/approach With eye movement tracking and data analysing technology, the Tobii X120 eye-tracking instrument, Tobii studio and online learning platform are used to record and visualise data of eye moving and learning steps during the real task-based online learning processes of 14 online learners. According to Barbara A. Soloman’s learning style classification framework, these learners’ learning style was presented in four dimensions. Based on data of eye moving, leaning style and operation in online course, the correlation about learners’ preferences of learning content, online learning paths and learning style were analysed based on according data. Findings The paper provides empirical insights about how change is brought about during online learning. It is found that there is no significant difference in attention preference between the students with the difference on the learning style of visual-verbal, although each person has a different attention preference on the learning content. Research limitations/implications The limitation of this study is that only one common type of video learning process is studied. The learning process of various types of instructional videos in online learning will be done in future research. Practical implications In this study, eye-movement tracking technology is used to understand students’ learning path and learning preference in the online learning process, which is helpful to optimise the online learning process and improve the efficiency of online learning. Social implications This research findings have been approved by relevant experts and have won the first prize in the school-level competition of South China Normal University in China. Originality/value In this study, the technology of psychology (eye-tracking technology) is introduced into the study of real task-based online learning process in the subject of educational technology, realising the integration of multi-disciplinary research techniques and methods.
      Citation: Interactive Technology and Smart Education
      PubDate: 2019-04-08T01:28:10Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ITSE-10-2018-0090
       
  • The professional development needs for the use of educational technology
    • Abstract: Interactive Technology and Smart Education, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose This study aimed to identify the professional development needs of academics in Hong Kong higher education for the use of educational technology. Design/methodology/approach An online survey was conducted in 2017, which involved 374 academics from Hong Kong higher education institutions. The survey covered their perception and use of educational technology for professional activities and their relevant professional development needs. Findings The results showed an overall positive perception by the academics of the usefulness of online learning with the aid of technology, which was regarded as an effective complement to face-to-face learning. However, their use of educational technology focused only on general online applications, such as document and video-sharing tools, and e-learning platforms. Among various professional development needs, those related to the use of specific educational software with sharing of practical examples were considered to be most highly desired by the academics. In addition, the academics working in lecturer positions tended to use more online applications and had a higher need for professional development, than those with more teaching experience. Originality/value The findings contribute to identifying the current status of the use of educational technology and the professional development needs among academics in Hong Kong, as well as the differences between academics in different job positions and with different amounts of teaching experience. The results help in designing suitable professional development activities which address the specific needs of academics.
      Citation: Interactive Technology and Smart Education
      PubDate: 2019-04-05T02:47:05Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ITSE-10-2018-0089
       
  • Embracing ambiguity
    • Abstract: Interactive Technology and Smart Education, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose Embracing reflective practice and retrospection, with a goal of identifying commonalities, this paper aims to examine delivery of engineering subjects in both traditional higher education (THE) and technical and vocational education and training (TVET). Design/methodology/approach Reflections on actions and autoethnography were used to examine the teaching and learning experiences of three educators across two higher education (HE) institutions (HEIs) in the greater Chinese context. Literature reviews and historical contexts are outlined to support the approaches and insights identified. Findings This paper presents a number of common characteristics and challenges identified across both THE and TVET. Drawing on the successful embrace of ambiguity and change in recent software engineering (SE) development paradigms, recommendations are made for how the agile SE themes can be applied in a larger sense to address the wider challenges facing both THE and TVET. Originality/value To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first time that engineering education has been examined and contrasted in the contexts of THE and TVET. The similarities and common challenges may represent a new focus for related work, and the presented insights, from agile methodologies in SE, represent a new perspective for viewing future HE and TVET sustainability.
      Citation: Interactive Technology and Smart Education
      PubDate: 2019-03-21T02:46:35Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ITSE-10-2018-0088
       
  • Assessing the impact of students’ activities in e-courses on learning
           outcomes: a data mining approach
    • Abstract: Interactive Technology and Smart Education, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose This paper aims to study the relationship between students’ activities in the e-classroom and grades for the final exam. The study was conducted at the Faculty of Administration, University of Ljubljana among first-year undergraduate students. In the e-classroom, students learn new content for individual self-study, and their knowledge is checked with quizzes. Design/methodology/approach In the empirical study, the relationship between performance in quizzes and at the final exam was studied from two perspectives. First, successful and unsuccessful students (in terms of quizzes) were compared. Second, the Orange data mining software was used for two predictive modelling tasks. The research question was based on a student’s quiz performances, is it possible to predict whether the student will pass an exam and will the student’s grade for the exam be good. Findings The empirical results indicate a very strong connection between a student’s performance in quizzes and their score for the final exam in the course. Significant differences in performance were found between students who had completed most quizzes and those who had not. Moreover, the results highlighted which quizzes, in other words topics, are most important for passing an exam or obtaining a better grade. Therefore, the quality of individual study in the e-classroom positively influences a student’s performance. Originality/value The paper is the first to assess the impact of students’ activities on learning outcomes in undergraduate public administration programmes by applying a data mining approach.
      Citation: Interactive Technology and Smart Education
      PubDate: 2019-03-21T02:42:15Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ITSE-09-2018-0069
       
  • Socially orientated digital storytelling among Saudi EFL learners
    • Abstract: Interactive Technology and Smart Education, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The current research presents a 14-week experience of developing socially orientated narratives in a digital mode, which involved 60 female Saudi English as a foreign language (EFL) learners. Initially working together, they were later divided into groups of approximately eight members each. The purpose of this research is to determine the benefits and challenges facing EFL leaners who are engaged with socially orientated digital-storytelling tasks. It also explores the nature of creating language-related socially orientated digital-storytelling projects and the main features associated with such projects. This practice targets the use of a new form of educational technologies that promotes educators’ pedagogical strategies, as well as their social needs, by sharing learners’ personal thoughts with others and cooperating and coordinating with other team members. Design/methodology/approach The current research has been designed in line with qualitative analysis. A qualitative analysis approach was chosen as the study seeks to gain further understanding about the issue of socially orientated digital storytelling among EFL learners in Saudi Arabia. The two main research methods used for conducting this research were semi-structured interviews and analysis of the content produced by the participants. Both methods were selected to enable the participants to express their personal thoughts and feedback directly to the researcher. Findings The findings have shown several benefits of this method, as well as highlighted the challenges regarding the application of such a practice in English language classes at university. The findings have indicated that such a novel educational atmosphere would result in the role of social orientation as a culture for enhancing learners’ competence and willingness to share a co-learning experience being regarded more highly. In addition, the results have revealed how such group work can be constructed and the main aspects of content that exist in the digital stories produced. Research limitations/implications One limitation of the current research is that it only included a group of female EFL students. Therefore, it is recommended that the same research be conducted on male EFL students in Saudi Arabia so that a comparative analysis can be made regarding the effects of socially orientated digital storytelling on both genders. In addition, it is recommended that the research be carried out among more classes containing female and male EFL students to be able to analyse the data quantitatively. Lastly, there remains the issue of convincing administrators, parents and instructors opposed to these ideas to implement this kind of project in formal language education, which is often independently orientated. Practical implications The effect of such a practice is the improvements made to learners’ academic and digital literacies. Specifically, students’ academic-writing skills and abilities to tell stories are essential parts of this process that can be improved by learners during the online storytelling process. Originality/value The research presents an application of a promising pedagogy that integrates digital technologies into different learning settings, including the context of learning English as a foreign language.
      Citation: Interactive Technology and Smart Education
      PubDate: 2019-03-14T10:50:05Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ITSE-11-2018-0098
       
  • Effectiveness of e-learning portal from students’ perspective
    • Abstract: Interactive Technology and Smart Education, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose E-learning has become an increasingly prevalent learning approach in higher educational institutions due to the fast growth of internet technologies in India. This paper aims to mainly focus on evaluating the effectiveness of the e-learning experience from students’ perceptive. Design/methodology/approach “Survey” method has been used to collect the data with the help of a structured questionnaire from the students who have registered on COURSERA (www.coursera.org/) website for e-learning. The questionnaire consisted of two sections e-learning system and e-learning effectiveness. E-learning system included items related to system quality, information quality and service quality. E-learning effectiveness dimension included user satisfaction and net benefits. The items in this section were measured on a five-point Likert scale ranging from strongly disagrees to strongly agree. The data collected have been analyzed using the SPSS version 17.0 and AMOS version 21.0. Findings Results show that system quality and service quality contribute more in e-learning system compared to information quality. Students perception may be that information available on the website may not be very useful as it’s a one-way mode of communication. The researcher also found that the three dimensions (system quality, service quality and information quality) of e-learning system contributes to user satisfaction and net benefits. Students are satisfied with e-learning websites and intent to continue to use it in future as well. They also found it beneficial as it helps them in career growth and making them employable. Originality/value This paper proposed a second-order model of e-learning system and a second-order model e-learning effectiveness. E-learning system has been defined by three first-order constructs: a system quality, service quality and information quality. E-learning effectiveness has been defined by two first-order constructs: a user satisfaction and net benefits. The predictability of the proposed model is high to explain the impact of e-learning system on e-learning effectiveness.
      Citation: Interactive Technology and Smart Education
      PubDate: 2019-03-14T10:50:01Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ITSE-05-2018-0027
       
  • Justifying students’ performance
    • First page: 18
      Abstract: Interactive Technology and Smart Education, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The purpose of this study is to compare students and instructors’ perspectives on students’ performance based on unified theory of acceptance and use of technology (UTAUT) framework. This study also aims to propose additional variables that might be used to extend the UTAUT model to make it more appropriate for the educational setting. Design/methodology/approach The study was carried out using a three-pronged methodology, namely, literature review, expert interviews and self-administered survey of 430 students and 55 information and communication technology (ICT) instructors from tertiary institutions in Akwa Ibom State, Nigeria. Validity analysis were conducted using IBM SPSS version 24 and two structural equation models were finally obtained using AMOS version 24. Findings This study finds UTAUT constructs including social influence, facilitating condition and voluntariness of use to have direct and significant impact on students’ performance from the students and the instructors’ perspective. The result of the instructors’ perspective shows that ICT use behaviour of students have direct and significant impact on students’ performance, but the students’ result shows an insignificant direct effect of use behaviour on students’ performance. From the students and the instructors’ perspective, gender, age and experience have statistically significantly direct impact on performance expectancy in this study. The result also shows that additional variables including ICT instructors’ characteristics, motivation and personal environment directly affect students’ performance from the students’ perspective, but the result of the instructors’ perspective shows that the influence of ICT instructors’ characteristics, motivation and personal environment does not directly and significantly affect students’ performance. Research limitations/implications This study was limited to tertiary institutions in Akwa Ibom State, Nigeria. Consequently, the findings of this study are limited to Akwa Ibom State, Nigeria, and may not be generalised to cover other countries. Originality/value This research shows that the students and instructors have different views on variables that impact on students’ performance. This study finds empirical evidence to support the direct impact of use behaviour on students’ performance from the instructors’ perspective, while the students disagree but indicated an empirical evidence to show that instructors’ characteristics, environment and motivation contribute a greater impact on students’ performance. From the students and the instructors’ perspective, gender, age and experience have statistically significantly direct impact on performance expectancy in this study. This adds to the findings in the original UTAUT that indicated that performance expectancy is moderated by gender and age.
      Citation: Interactive Technology and Smart Education
      PubDate: 2019-01-29T11:27:01Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ITSE-05-2018-0028
       
  • Comparison of students in an undergraduate university degree offered both
           in presence and online
    • First page: 36
      Abstract: Interactive Technology and Smart Education, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose This paper aims to compare the students enrolled to a three-year undergraduate, bachelor degree on Security of Computer Systems and Networks, offered in traditional, classroom fashion as well as online at the University of Milan (Italy). Its main purposes are to estimate the main characteristics of the two different student populations addressed (i.e. online vs classroom students) to understand if an online version of an already existing traditional university degree allows to extend the enrollment of students; and to evaluate the effectiveness of the e-learning approach adopted, comparing performance of the two student populations. The study aims to supply a significant case study, based on a real experience more than 10 years long. Design/methodology/approach The paper is based on the statistical interpretation of a huge amount of data, collected during the overall life of Sicurezza dei Sistemi e delle Reti Informatiche (SSRI) online, regarding student age, income, grades obtained in exams and after final dissertation and graduation time. Findings The paper allows to conclude that the online student population has very limited overlap with the classroom one, which means that the online version of an already existing degree can definitely enlarge the student enrollment and reach older students; and a carefully designed e-learning environment allows committed online students to obtain results comparable when not better than the ones of classroom students. Research limitations/implications The study refers to a single, specific degree in computer science and technology; thus, it may lack generalizability. Similar experiences in other areas could be useful. Originality/value This paper fulfills an identified need to study how e-learning can be successfully applied to already existing traditional university degrees.
      Citation: Interactive Technology and Smart Education
      PubDate: 2019-02-06T01:57:45Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ITSE-09-2018-0067
       
  • Examining predictive factors and effects of in-class multitasking with
           mobile phones
    • First page: 49
      Abstract: Interactive Technology and Smart Education, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The study aims to give a descriptive account of university students’ engagement with non-learning-related activities during class time and explore the relationship between off-task multitasking and learning. The predictive factors for off-task multitasking from individual, social and class-related dimensions are also examined. Design/methodology/approach Contextualized in a comprehensive university in Hong Kong, the study adopts a survey design and involves 79 samples. Findings The data show that Hong Kong university students are avid users of mobile phones and heavily engage with digital devices. Off-task multitasking with mobile phones is a common phenomenon, yet not related to learning performance. Among the various media and apps on mobile phones, instant messenger stands out as the most frequently used app on a daily basis and inside the classroom. The individual device-use habit and classroom engagement are significant predictors for off-task multitasking during class time. Practical implications This paper will allow teachers and students to be more aware of the causes and effects of off-task multitasking behaviors during class time and derive practical guidance and strategies to pay heed to and resist the disruptive influence of technologies on learning. Originality/value The existing scholarly work show a mixed and incomplete picture regarding the effects and determining factors of students’ multitasking. This study includes three variables from individual, social and teaching/learning dimensions and seeks to evaluate their predictive strengths. The results of the study will deepen our understanding of the patterns of off-task multitasking.
      Citation: Interactive Technology and Smart Education
      PubDate: 2019-01-25T08:32:04Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ITSE-08-2018-0056
       
  • Multiple choice questions: answering correctly and knowing the answer
    • First page: 59
      Abstract: Interactive Technology and Smart Education, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose This paper aims to examine whether multiple choice questions (MCQs) can be answered correctly without knowing the answer and whether constructed response questions (CRQs) offer more reliable assessment. Design/methodology/approach The paper presents a critical review of existing research on MCQs, then reports on an experimental study where two objective tests (using MCQs and CRQs) were set for an introductory undergraduate course. To maximise completion, tests were kept short; consequently, differences between individuals’ scores across both tests are examined rather than overall averages and pass rates. Findings Most students who excelled in the MCQ test did not do so in the CRQ test. Students could do well without necessarily understanding the principles being tested. Research limitations/implications Conclusions are limited by the small number of questions in each test and by delivery of the tests at different times. This meant that statistical average data would be too coarse to use, and that some students took one test but not the other. Conclusions concerning CRQs are limited to disciplines where numerical answers or short and constrained text answers are appropriate. Practical implications MCQs, while useful in formative assessment, are best avoided for summative assessments. Where appropriate, CRQs should be used instead. Social implications MCQs are commonplace as summative assessments in education and training. Increasing the use of CRQs in place of MCQs should increase the reliability of tests, including those administered in safety-critical areas. Originality/value While others have recommended that MCQs should not be used (Hinchliffe 2014, Srivastava et al., 2004) because they are vulnerable to guessing, this paper presents an experimental study designed to demonstrate whether this hypothesis is correct.
      Citation: Interactive Technology and Smart Education
      PubDate: 2019-02-06T01:57:32Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ITSE-09-2018-0071
       
  • MOOCS for teacher professional development: exploring teachers’
           perceptions and achievements
    • First page: 74
      Abstract: Interactive Technology and Smart Education, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose This paper aims to report on a study concerning a Massive Open Online Course (MOOC), designed to support Greek-language teachers in secondary-education schools in implementing collaborative writing activities with Google Docs (GDs) in their classrooms. Data recorded from a post-survey were used to investigate teachers’ views and perceptions about MOOC design features, their personal achievements and the overall outcomes for their professional work and development. Design/methodology/approach The design framework of the particular teacher professional development MOOC was determined by the connectivist principles and addressed three main dimensions of teachers’ active participation: a) individual engagement; b) peer interaction and mutual support; and c) collaborative creation of educational scenarios and artefacts. The analysis used a mixed method that combines data from teachers’ active engagement through the MOOC platform records and quantitative and qualitative data from their responses to a post-survey questionnaire. Findings The analysis of the research data provided supportive evidence that the design framework was effective towards promoting teachers’ active engagement, peer interaction and support and development of learning design abilities to integrate collaborative writing with GDs in their classrooms. The findings showed that the majority of participants conceptualized this MOOC as an efficient environment to enhance their pedagogical knowledge and classroom practices and to support continuous professional development. Research limitations/implications The findings of this study may be limited by the specific sample and the context of implementation. Future research is expected to critically analyse existing results in combination with qualitative data from detailed interviews of participants in this teacher professional development MOOC. Practical implications The results provided supportive evidence that successful MOOCs for teacher professional development are determined by four key design features: a) connecting course content and teacher learning practices to the educational reality of the classroom; b) defining concrete learning objectives of the course; c) promoting teachers’ collaborative learning; and d) creating a learning community among peers. Originality/value This paper presents a systematic analysis of teachers’ engagement in a teacher professional development MOOC, designed to support collaborative and self-directed learning. The results are expected to be significant and valuable for wider educational contexts, as MOOCs for teacher professional development is a new, ambitious topic for both research and educational policies.
      Citation: Interactive Technology and Smart Education
      PubDate: 2019-01-25T08:36:04Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ITSE-10-2018-0081
       
  • Enhancing reading skills through adaptive e-learning
    • First page: 2
      Abstract: Interactive Technology and Smart Education, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose E-learning is part of instructional design and has opened a whole world of new possibilities in terms of learning and teaching. The purpose of this paper is to develop an adaptive e-learning platform that enhances skills from primary school to university learners. Two purposes converge here: a pedagogical one – offering new possibilities, especially in terms of teaching scenarios (blended learning); and a research one – confirming the effectiveness of an adaptive e-learning tool in the case of individualized cross-disciplinary competences, such as comprehension of implicit information in written texts (French). Design/methodology/approach The case study presented here concerns primary-school learners using the Implicit module of TACIT adaptive e-learning tool over the 2016-2017 academic year. Findings This paper gives a first positive answer to the effectiveness of such a tool in this specific context. This pedagogical effectiveness is more pronounced for low-level pupils, especially for girls and for older pupils (CM1/CM2, respectively, fourth/fifth grade). Originality/value In this case study, the module comes from an existing platform, created by the TACIT research group. The adaptive environment was created by using the Item Response Theory models and, more precisely, the Rasch model.
      Citation: Interactive Technology and Smart Education
      PubDate: 2018-10-26T01:19:21Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ITSE-07-2018-0047
       
 
 
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