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Publisher: Emerald   (Total: 341 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 341 Journals sorted alphabetically
A Life in the Day     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Academia Revista Latinoamericana de Administración     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.178, CiteScore: 1)
Accounting Auditing & Accountability J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31, SJR: 1.71, CiteScore: 3)
Accounting Research J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.144, CiteScore: 0)
Accounting, Auditing and Accountability J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 2.187, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Accounting Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.279, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Appreciative Inquiry     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.451, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Autism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.222, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Dual Diagnosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46, SJR: 0.21, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Gender Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.16, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Intl. Marketing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 71, SJR: 0.296, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
African J. of Economic and Management Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.216, CiteScore: 1)
Agricultural Finance Review     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.406, CiteScore: 1)
Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 198, SJR: 0.354, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Annals in Social Responsibility     Full-text available via subscription  
Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.235, CiteScore: 1)
Arts and the Market     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Asia Pacific J. of Innovation and Entrepreneurship     Open Access  
Asia Pacific J. of Marketing and Logistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.425, CiteScore: 1)
Asia-Pacific J. of Business Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.234, CiteScore: 1)
Asian Association of Open Universities J.     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian Education and Development Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.233, CiteScore: 1)
Asian J. on Quality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Asian Review of Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.222, CiteScore: 1)
Aslib J. of Information Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.725, CiteScore: 2)
Aslib Proceedings     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 296)
Assembly Automation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.603, CiteScore: 2)
Baltic J. of Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.309, CiteScore: 1)
Benchmarking : An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.559, CiteScore: 2)
British Food J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.5, CiteScore: 2)
Built Environment Project and Asset Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.46, CiteScore: 1)
Business Process Re-engineering & Management J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Business Strategy Series     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Career Development Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.527, CiteScore: 2)
China Agricultural Economic Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.31, CiteScore: 1)
China Finance Review Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.245, CiteScore: 0)
Chinese Management Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.278, CiteScore: 1)
Circuit World     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.246, CiteScore: 1)
Collection Building     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.296, CiteScore: 1)
COMPEL: The Intl. J. for Computation and Mathematics in Electrical and Electronic Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.22, CiteScore: 1)
Competitiveness Review : An Intl. Business J. incorporating J. of Global Competitiveness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.274, CiteScore: 1)
Construction Innovation: Information, Process, Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.731, CiteScore: 2)
Corporate Communications An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.453, CiteScore: 1)
Corporate Governance Intl. J. of Business in Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.336, CiteScore: 1)
Critical Perspectives on Intl. Business     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.378, CiteScore: 1)
Cross Cultural & Strategic Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.504, CiteScore: 2)
Development and Learning in Organizations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.138, CiteScore: 0)
Digital Library Perspectives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.341, CiteScore: 1)
Direct Marketing An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Disaster Prevention and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.47, CiteScore: 1)
Drugs and Alcohol Today     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 131, SJR: 0.245, CiteScore: 1)
Education + Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Education, Business and Society : Contemporary Middle Eastern Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.707, CiteScore: 3)
Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Employee Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.551, CiteScore: 2)
Engineering Computations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.444, CiteScore: 1)
Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.653, CiteScore: 2)
English Teaching: Practice & Critique     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.417, CiteScore: 1)
Equal Opportunities Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Equality, Diversity and Inclusion : An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.5, CiteScore: 1)
EuroMed J. of Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.26, CiteScore: 1)
European Business Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.585, CiteScore: 3)
European J. of Innovation Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.454, CiteScore: 2)
European J. of Management and Business Economics     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.239, CiteScore: 1)
European J. of Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.971, CiteScore: 2)
European J. of Training and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.477, CiteScore: 1)
Evidence-based HRM     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.537, CiteScore: 1)
Facilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.503, CiteScore: 2)
Foresight     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.34, CiteScore: 1)
Gender in Management : An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.412, CiteScore: 1)
Grey Systems : Theory and Application     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Health Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.421, CiteScore: 1)
Higher Education, Skills and Work-based Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46, SJR: 0.426, CiteScore: 1)
History of Education Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.26, CiteScore: 0)
Housing, Care and Support     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.171, CiteScore: 0)
Human Resource Management Intl. Digest     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.129, CiteScore: 0)
Humanomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.333, CiteScore: 1)
IMP J.     Hybrid Journal  
Indian Growth and Development Review     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.174, CiteScore: 0)
Industrial and Commercial Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.301, CiteScore: 1)
Industrial Lubrication and Tribology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.334, CiteScore: 1)
Industrial Management & Data Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.904, CiteScore: 3)
Industrial Robot An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.318, CiteScore: 1)
Info     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Information and Computer Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.307, CiteScore: 1)
Information Technology & People     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43, SJR: 0.671, CiteScore: 2)
Interactive Technology and Smart Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.191, CiteScore: 1)
Interlending & Document Supply     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
Internet Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37, SJR: 1.645, CiteScore: 5)
Intl. J. for Lesson and Learning Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.324, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. for Researcher Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Intl. J. of Accounting and Information Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.275, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Bank Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.654, CiteScore: 3)
Intl. J. of Climate Change Strategies and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.353, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Clothing Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.318, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Commerce and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Conflict Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.362, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Contemporary Hospitality Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 1.452, CiteScore: 4)
Intl. J. of Culture Tourism and Hospitality Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.339, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Development Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.139, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.387, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Educational Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.559, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Emergency Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.201, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Emerging Markets     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.474, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Energy Sector Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.349, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Entrepreneurial Behaviour & Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.629, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Event and Festival Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.388, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Gender and Entrepreneurship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.445, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Health Care Quality Assurance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.358, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Health Governance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.247, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Housing Markets and Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.211, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Human Rights in Healthcare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.205, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Information and Learning Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.226, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Innovation Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.197, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Intelligent Computing and Cybernetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.214, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Intelligent Unmanned Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Islamic and Middle Eastern Finance and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.375, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Law and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.217, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Law in the Built Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.227, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Leadership in Public Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Intl. J. of Lean Six Sigma     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.802, CiteScore: 3)
Intl. J. of Logistics Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.71, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Managerial Finance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.203, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Managing Projects in Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.36, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Manpower     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.365, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Mentoring and Coaching in Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.426, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Migration, Health and Social Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.307, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Numerical Methods for Heat & Fluid Flow     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.697, CiteScore: 3)
Intl. J. of Operations & Production Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 2.052, CiteScore: 4)
Intl. J. of Organizational Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.268, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Pervasive Computing and Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.138, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.25, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.821, CiteScore: 4)
Intl. J. of Prisoner Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.303, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Productivity and Performance Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.578, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Public Sector Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.438, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Quality & Reliability Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.492, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Quality and Service Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.309, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Retail & Distribution Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.742, CiteScore: 3)
Intl. J. of Service Industry Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Social Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.225, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Sociology and Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49, SJR: 0.3, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.269, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Structural Integrity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.228, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Sustainability in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.502, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Tourism Cities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.502, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Web Information Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.186, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Wine Business Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.562, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Workplace Health Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.303, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. Marketing Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.895, CiteScore: 3)
Irish J. of Occupational Therapy     Open Access  
ISRA Intl. J. of Islamic Finance     Open Access  
J. for Multicultural Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.237, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Accounting & Organizational Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.301, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Accounting in Emerging Economies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
J. of Adult Protection, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.314, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Advances in Management Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
J. of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44, SJR: 0.222, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.108, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Applied Accounting Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.227, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Applied Research in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48, SJR: 0.2, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Asia Business Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.245, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Assistive Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
J. of Business & Industrial Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.652, CiteScore: 2)
J. of Business Strategy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.333, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Centrum Cathedra     Open Access  
J. of Children's Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.243, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Chinese Economic and Foreign Trade Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.2, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Chinese Entrepreneurship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
J. of Chinese Human Resource Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.173, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Communication Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.625, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Consumer Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.664, CiteScore: 2)
J. of Corporate Real Estate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.368, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Criminal Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 119, SJR: 0.268, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Criminological Research, Policy and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46, SJR: 0.254, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.257, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Documentation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 171, SJR: 0.613, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Economic and Administrative Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
J. of Economic Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.733, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Educational Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.252, CiteScore: 2)
J. of Enabling Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.369, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Engineering, Design and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.212, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Enterprise Information Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.827, CiteScore: 4)
J. of Enterprising Communities People and Places in the Global Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.281, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Entrepreneurship and Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.262, CiteScore: 1)
J. of European Industrial Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
J. of European Real Estate Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.268, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Facilities Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.33, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Family Business Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
J. of Fashion Marketing and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.608, CiteScore: 2)
J. of Financial Crime     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 366, SJR: 0.228, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Financial Economic Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.186, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Financial Management of Property and Construction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.309, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Financial Regulation and Compliance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.159, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Financial Reporting and Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
J. of Forensic Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56, SJR: 0.205, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Global Mobility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.377, CiteScore: 1)

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Journal Cover
Interactive Technology and Smart Education
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.191
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 11  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1741-5659
Published by Emerald Homepage  [341 journals]
  • Offering a framework for value co-creation in virtual academic learning
           environments
    • Pages: 2 - 27
      Abstract: Interactive Technology and Smart Education, Volume 15, Issue 1, Page 2-27, March 2018.
      Purpose This research aims to convert the traditional teacher–student models, in which teachers determine the learning resources, into a flexible structure and an active learning environment so that students can participate in the educational processes and value co-creation in virtual academic learning environments (VALEs). Design/methodology/approach Mixed-methods (qualitative–quantitative) approach has been used. First, to develop the primary framework, papers were content-analyzed. Then, to validate the results of the content analysis, responses of the questionnaires distributed among students and teachers at five virtual universities in Iran were analyzed. Findings VALEs have the value co-creation potential. The students and teachers in this sample identified and confirmed three dimensions including partnership requirements (including organizational capabilities, structural requirement, individual competencies, motivational factors and resources), collaborative learning services (including IT infrastructure, common services and educational services) and social networks. The foundation of value co-creation is a partnership requirement. Collaborative learning services are flexible services that redesign methods and curriculum and promote deep learning among students. In addition, the wide use of social networks enables dialogue, communication, participation and establishment of virtual learning groups. Practical implications By means of the suggested framework, it is possible to achieve value co-creation in VALEs. Originality/value The paper presents outcomes of the research that is focused on technical, human and organizational aspects for value co-creation in VALEs that have not been much discussed previously.
      Citation: Interactive Technology and Smart Education
      PubDate: 2018-03-13T10:47:11Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ITSE-08-2017-0040
       
  • A gamification design for the classroom
    • Pages: 28 - 45
      Abstract: Interactive Technology and Smart Education, Volume 15, Issue 1, Page 28-45, March 2018.
      Purpose The research described here presents an approach to gamification for the classroom. The purpose of this paper is to determine whether students would perceive the gamification activities in a positive light. Previous research has contended that students need a positive mental attitude for effective learning. The core question was to examine student attitudes to gamification, not the success of the gamification itself. Design/methodology/approach Based on a survey of the gamification literature, and particularly drawing on the work of Groh (2012), this system is designed with three key principles in mind: relatedness, competence and autonomy. Classroom activities and associated software were designed and implemented. Almost 200 students were surveyed to determine their attitude to the gamification. The survey included both Likert-scale and qualitative responses. Findings A majority of the students reported that they found the gamification useful and enjoyable, only a minority of students (around 15 per cent) disagreeing with such statements. However, only a minority of students perceived a relationship between the gamification activities and games. The authors conclude that well-designed gamification systems can be well-received by students and suggest that the success of gamification projects may not lie in their ability to recreate the experience of a video game, but in the strength of the relatedness, competence and autonomy of the student experience. Research limitations/implications The research is limited by the nature of the participants, who were drawn from videogame and media units and who may be predisposed to game-like activities. Originality/value This research demonstrates that students are able to perceive value in gamification in the classroom.
      Citation: Interactive Technology and Smart Education
      PubDate: 2018-03-13T10:47:07Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ITSE-05-2017-0028
       
  • New technology in health education
    • Pages: 46 - 58
      Abstract: Interactive Technology and Smart Education, Volume 15, Issue 1, Page 46-58, March 2018.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to investigate undergraduate nursing students’ use of mobile learning (m-learning) and the factors contributing to their use of m-learning. Design/methodology/approach In total, 586 nursing students from three universities in Ghana participated in this study. Survey questionnaires were used to collect data. Descriptive statistics, sample t-test and multiple regression were used to analyze the data. Findings The research found that most students owned smartphones. Mobile technology was mainly used for doing homework. The result indicates that gender differences exist in terms of perceived usefulness of m-learning. In addition, age differences exist with regard to the perceived ease of use of m-learning. Furthermore, students showed positive attitudes toward the use of technology. Finally, perceived usefulness and attitudes toward the use of technology predicted students’ intention to use m-learning. Originality/value Despite the abundance of research on nursing education in other countries, there is a lack of research on nursing students’ use of m-learning and factors influencing their implementation of m-learning in higher learning institutions in Ghana. This study is important because it provides a clear description of nursing students’ use of m-learning and factors affecting their use in schools. Also, the author suggests that information from this study assists school administrators and nursing educators to understand students’ positions regarding m-learning in classroom.
      Citation: Interactive Technology and Smart Education
      PubDate: 2018-03-13T10:47:36Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ITSE-09-2016-0039
       
  • Assessing e-learning system in higher education institutes
    • Pages: 59 - 78
      Abstract: Interactive Technology and Smart Education, Volume 15, Issue 1, Page 59-78, March 2018.
      Purpose This study aims to examine university students’ acceptance of e-learning systems in Pakistan. A Web-based learning system is a new form of utilizing technological features. Although, developed countries have initiated and established the concept for e-learning, developing countries require empirical support to implement e-learning. Design/methodology/approach This paper further explains a conceptual model that is based on the technology acceptance model (TAM). Earlier theories such as the theory of reasoned action (TRA), theory of planned behaviour (TPB) and decomposed theory of planned behaviour (DTPB) have been conducted on user behavioural intention (BI). TAM is considered as the most relevant framework in a Web-based context. To analyse the present study’s hypothesized model, structural equation modelling (SEM) has been used to statistically analyse self-reported sample data from 424 university students. Findings The results revealed that TAM, with the combination of new constructs, explains university students’ acceptance of the e-learning system reasonably well. Additionally, work life quality (WLQ) and facilitating conditions (FC) have a greater influence on the BI and the actual use (AU) of the e-learning system, respectively. Originality/value The study has also provided valuable implications for academics and practitioners for ways to enhance the acceptance of the e-learning system in the higher education of Pakistan.
      Citation: Interactive Technology and Smart Education
      PubDate: 2018-03-13T10:47:25Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ITSE-02-2017-0012
       
  • Learner ownership of technology-enhanced learning
    • Pages: 79 - 86
      Abstract: Interactive Technology and Smart Education, Volume 15, Issue 1, Page 79-86, March 2018.
      Purpose This paper aims to examine the different ways in which learners may have ownership over technology-enhanced learning by reflecting on technical, legal and psychological ownership. Design/methodology/approach The paper uses a variety of examples of technology-enhanced learning ranging from open-source software to cloud storage to discuss the three types of ownership. Findings It is suggested that learners do not yet own technology-enhanced learning and that, at present, there are different degrees of learner ownership depending on whether technical, legal or psychological ownership are considered. Originality/value The discussion presented here is the first to consider all three types of ownership of technology-enhanced learning and demonstrates the complexity of the issue when this broad view is considered.
      Citation: Interactive Technology and Smart Education
      PubDate: 2018-03-13T10:47:09Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ITSE-08-2017-0042
       
  • Using mobile devices to support cognitive apprenticeship in clinical
           nursing practice – a case study
    • Abstract: Interactive Technology and Smart Education, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose This paper aims to illustrate how mobile devices could be applied to substantiate cognitive apprenticeship model to optimize nursing students’ learning experiences in clinical settings. Design/methodology/approach Eight female students from a nursing college in Taiwan were recruited in this study. They enrolled in a three-week nursing clinical practicum session in the area of psychiatric nursing. Findings Analysis of interview data from students and instructor showed that use of the mobile technology could promote the effectiveness of cognitive apprenticeship model, especially for processes of reflection, coaching, scaffolding and articulation. Originality/value The present study intended to bridge the gap between mobile technologies and cognitive apprenticeship. This study explores students’ experiences and expectations of using mobile technology in clinical nursing courses and clarifies how the cognitive apprenticeship model fits students’ experiences during using mobile technology in the clinical nursing course.
      Citation: Interactive Technology and Smart Education
      PubDate: 2018-07-12T10:56:55Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ITSE-02-2018-0008
       
  • A hierarchical model for developing e-textbook to transform teaching and
           learning
    • Abstract: Interactive Technology and Smart Education, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to outline a hierarchical model for developing essential e-textbook functionality and to offer important insight for e-textbook designers. Design/methodology/approach Guided by the SAMR model, five hierarchical functional layers are proposed in the development process for e-textbook to enable more effective and efficient teaching and learning. Findings Moving up from the substitution to transformation level, each layer extends the functionality of the underlying layers to unveil new features that support the learning processes and gradually transform e-textbooks from a self-directed informal learning tool to become a formal learning platform. Originality/value The hierarchical model provides e-textbook designers and developers with a guideline on how to surpass the present state of e-textbooks and offer additional value-added features for learners. The required technologies for each layer are also discussed.
      Citation: Interactive Technology and Smart Education
      PubDate: 2018-07-06T09:11:26Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ITSE-12-2017-0063
       
  • Lessons from adopting a maker approach to teaching operating systems with
           Raspberry Pi
    • Abstract: Interactive Technology and Smart Education, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose This paper aims to propose a maker’s approach to teaching an operating systems (OSs) course in which students apply knowledge of OSs to making a toy robot by focusing on input/outputs, hardware devices and system programming. Design/methodology/approach Classroom action research is involved in this study. Findings After the course was taught in this maker’s approach in two consecutive school years, some observations were reported. Students were enthusiastic in doing a series of assignments leading to the completion of a toy robot that follows a black line on the ground. In addition to enjoying the learning process by making tangible products, the students were excited to be able to demonstrate the skills and knowledge they learned with the robots they made. Research limitations/implications The research results were based mainly on the instructor’s observations during the lectures and labs. Practical implications Lessons from this study can inspire other instructors to turn traditional engineering courses into maker courses to attract students who enjoy making. Industry should welcome engineering graduates to join the companies with more hands-on experiences they have gained from maker courses. Social implications Although the maker movement has attracted much attention in K12 education, there is little research that studies how this maker spirit can be incorporated in traditional engineering courses that focus mainly on theories or software. Originality/value Including electronics and mechanical components in programming assignments would bring surprising effects on students’ motivation in learning.
      Citation: Interactive Technology and Smart Education
      PubDate: 2018-07-02T03:40:02Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ITSE-12-2017-0064
       
  • Students’ perceptions of changes to the learning environments of
           undergraduate physics laboratories
    • Abstract: Interactive Technology and Smart Education, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The purpose of this study was to explore students’ perceptions to changes to the learning environment of their undergraduate physics laboratories, in which their scientific inquiry processes were stimulated. Design/methodology/approach The activities students engaged in were redesigned to reflect a guided inquiry approach and to acknowledge modern-day advances in science and technology. Further, enhanced guidance was provided for laboratory instructors regarding the nature of scientific inquiry and how to structure students’ inquiry experiences during laboratory sessions. Students’ views were sought regarding their perceptions of the impact of the reforms on the laboratory learning environments, their thinking processes in those environments and their views regarding the reform’s value and appropriateness. Findings Analyses of quantitative and qualitative data suggested that students responded positively to the reforms implemented. Large effect sizes of between 0.70 and 1.20 suggested significant positive shifts in students’ perceptions of dimensions of their laboratory learning environments. In interviews, students expressed that they had engaged in the cognitive processes of scientific inquiry and suggested that the reforms had stimulated such “inquiry” thinking. However, their perceptions of the value and appropriateness of such inquiry-oriented laboratory learning environments were mixed. Originality/value Concerns persist in higher education in relation to the extent of students’ inquiry processes in undergraduate physics laboratories. Reforms to both the activities that students engage in and to instructional strategies are necessary. Raising awareness of the views expressed by students might help inform future reforms that accommodate those views to further enhance similar reforms.
      Citation: Interactive Technology and Smart Education
      PubDate: 2018-07-02T01:46:23Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ITSE-10-2017-0045
       
  • An empirical study on the adoption of M-learning apps among IT/ITeS
           employees
    • Abstract: Interactive Technology and Smart Education, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose This study aims to use the novel approach of applying the behavioural reasoning theory (BRT) to understand the relative influence of reason for and reason against the adoption of mobile learning applications (M-learning apps) among information technology (IT) and information technology enabled services (ITeS) employees. Design/methodology/approach This study surveys 680 employees of IT and ITeS companies in India to examine the adoption of M-learning apps for learning using the BRT and the primary data analysis was done using the partial least squares-structural equation modelling technique. Findings It is found that the context-specific adoption factors for M-learning apps are hedonic motivation, self-efficacy, learning autonomy, ubiquitous and relative advantage, whereas the reasons against adoption of the M-learning apps are traditional barrier, usage barrier and image barrier. It is also found that values of openness to change positively affect the reasons for adoption and do not significantly affect reasons against adoption of M-learning. Values of openness to change affect the attitude towards M-learning apps and attitude affects the adoption intention of M-learning apps for learning. Research/limitations/implications This cross-sectional study was conducted only in the Indian IT/ITeS firms and future research can be conducted in other sectors and countries to generalize the results. Practical implications This research uniquely highlights the adoption factors both for and against, which should be considered while developing marketing strategies for M-learning apps’ adoption. It is imperative for training managers to consider these factors during the selection of M-learning apps and for designers while designing the M-learning apps. Originality/value This study provides new insights towards the use of mobile apps for learning with the employees’ perspective using the BRT theory and it highlights the reason for adoption and reason against adoption of M-learning apps.
      Citation: Interactive Technology and Smart Education
      PubDate: 2018-07-02T01:43:44Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ITSE-01-2018-0002
       
  • A multi-modal study into students’ timing and learning regulation:
           time is ticking
    • Abstract: Interactive Technology and Smart Education, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose This empirical study aims to demonstrate how the combination of trace data derived from technology-enhanced learning environments and self-response survey data can contribute to the investigation of self-regulated learning processes. Design/methodology/approach Using a showcase based on 1,027 students’ learning in a blended introductory quantitative course, the authors analysed the learning regulation and especially the timing of learning by trace data. Next, the authors connected these learning patterns with self-reports based on multiple contemporary social-cognitive theories. Findings The authors found that several behavioural facets of maladaptive learning orientations, such as lack of regulation, self-sabotage or disengagement negatively impacted the amount of practising, as well as timely practising. On the adaptive side of learning dispositions, the picture was less clear. Where some adaptive dispositions, such as the willingness to invest efforts in learning and self-perceived planning skills, positively impacted learning regulation and timing of learning, other dispositions such as valuing school or academic buoyancy lacked the expected positive effects. Research limitations/implications Due to the blended design, there is a strong asymmetry between what one can observe on learning in both modes. Practical implications This study demonstrates that in a blended setup, one needs to distinguish the grand effect on learning from the partial effect on learning in the digital mode: the most adaptive students might be less dependent for their learning on the use of the digital learning mode. Originality/value The paper presents an application of embodied motivation in the context of blended learning.
      Citation: Interactive Technology and Smart Education
      PubDate: 2018-07-01T12:20:09Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ITSE-02-2018-0015
       
  • The relationship between system-provided learner control and maintained
           situational interest within e-learning courses
    • Abstract: Interactive Technology and Smart Education, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose Due to the autonomous nature of e-learning, learner control options should be provided to allow students to be more selective of content based on learning needs. Maintaining students’ situational interest should also be a goal in e-learning, as research shows that doing so leads to a greater chance of success. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between learner control and maintained situational interest in hopes of promoting better engagement through content selection based on learning needs. Design/methodology/approach This study analyzed survey responses from university students (n = 2,173) participating in a variety of massive online courses in South Korea to investigate the correlation between system-provided learner control and maintained situational interest. Additionally, the correlation between learner control and maintained situational interest was examined among demographic subsets including gender, age and grade level. Findings Results show a positive relationship between learner control and maintained situational interest, as well as a positive relationship between learner control and maintained situational interest among each demographic subset. Originality/value These results add to the current literature by promoting a practical way of maintaining students’ situational interest by providing them with the ability to control aspects of their own learning processes.
      Citation: Interactive Technology and Smart Education
      PubDate: 2018-06-26T08:53:11Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ITSE-12-2017-0062
       
  • Course design investigation and trial on the subject of self-regulated
           learning using video content and online report submission
    • Abstract: Interactive Technology and Smart Education, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose This study aims to propose and evaluate a course design to promote university students’ understanding and intentional use of the concept and strategy of self-regulated learning (SRL). Design/methodology/approach The course is designed on the basis of the experiential learning model. It is intended that the students reflect and conceptualize their own learning experience and prior knowledge by combining them with SRL theory. The course design exploits TV documentaries describing junior high school students struggling to achieve good results, as well as online essay submissions with which university students are expected to interpret the documentaries from the viewpoint of SRL theory. All the submitted essays are distributed to students to give them a chance to compare their own ideas with those in the essays written by other students to deepen their thoughts. Findings The course was taken by first-year university students. The results of a questionnaire administered to 112 students indicate that the students could associate their own experience with SRL theory and deepen their understanding on SRL. Originality/value Compared with previous intervention procedures, the course design activating student’s own leaning experience through TV documentary viewing and essay submission would be an effective, efficient and practical way especially for university and adult students to make them aware of and able to use SRL theory.
      Citation: Interactive Technology and Smart Education
      PubDate: 2018-06-15T10:25:03Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ITSE-10-2017-0050
       
 
 
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