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Publisher: Emerald   (Total: 355 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 356 Journals sorted alphabetically
A Life in the Day     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Academia Revista Latinoamericana de Administración     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.178, CiteScore: 1)
Accounting Auditing & Accountability J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32, SJR: 1.71, CiteScore: 3)
Accounting Research J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.144, CiteScore: 0)
Accounting, Auditing and Accountability J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 2.187, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Accounting Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.279, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Appreciative Inquiry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.451, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Autism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31, SJR: 0.222, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Dual Diagnosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47, SJR: 0.21, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Gender Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.16, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Intl. Marketing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 83, SJR: 0.296, CiteScore: 0)
Advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
African J. of Economic and Management Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.216, CiteScore: 1)
Agricultural Finance Review     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.406, CiteScore: 1)
Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 211, SJR: 0.354, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Annals in Social Responsibility     Full-text available via subscription  
Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.235, CiteScore: 1)
Arts and the Market     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Asia Pacific J. of Innovation and Entrepreneurship     Open Access  
Asia Pacific J. of Marketing and Logistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.425, CiteScore: 1)
Asia-Pacific J. of Business Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.234, CiteScore: 1)
Asian Association of Open Universities J.     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian Education and Development Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.233, CiteScore: 1)
Asian J. on Quality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Asian Review of Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.222, CiteScore: 1)
Aslib J. of Information Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 0.725, CiteScore: 2)
Aslib Proceedings     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 309)
Assembly Automation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.603, CiteScore: 2)
Baltic J. of Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.309, CiteScore: 1)
Benchmarking : An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.559, CiteScore: 2)
British Food J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.5, CiteScore: 2)
Built Environment Project and Asset Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.46, CiteScore: 1)
Business Process Re-engineering & Management J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Business Strategy Series     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Career Development Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.527, CiteScore: 2)
China Agricultural Economic Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.31, CiteScore: 1)
China Finance Review Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.245, CiteScore: 0)
Chinese Management Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.278, CiteScore: 1)
Circuit World     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.246, CiteScore: 1)
Collection and Curation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.296, CiteScore: 1)
COMPEL: The Intl. J. for Computation and Mathematics in Electrical and Electronic Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.22, CiteScore: 1)
Competitiveness Review : An Intl. Business J. incorporating J. of Global Competitiveness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.274, CiteScore: 1)
Construction Innovation: Information, Process, Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.731, CiteScore: 2)
Corporate Communications An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.453, CiteScore: 1)
Corporate Governance Intl. J. of Business in Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.336, CiteScore: 1)
Critical Perspectives on Intl. Business     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.378, CiteScore: 1)
Cross Cultural & Strategic Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.504, CiteScore: 2)
Data Technologies and Applications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 321, SJR: 0.355, CiteScore: 1)
Development and Learning in Organizations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.138, CiteScore: 0)
Digital Library Perspectives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.341, CiteScore: 1)
Direct Marketing An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Disaster Prevention and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.47, CiteScore: 1)
Drugs and Alcohol Today     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 140, SJR: 0.245, CiteScore: 1)
Education + Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Education, Business and Society : Contemporary Middle Eastern Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.707, CiteScore: 3)
Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Employee Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.551, CiteScore: 2)
Engineering Computations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.444, CiteScore: 1)
Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.653, CiteScore: 2)
English Teaching: Practice & Critique     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.417, CiteScore: 1)
Equal Opportunities Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Equality, Diversity and Inclusion : An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.5, CiteScore: 1)
EuroMed J. of Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.26, CiteScore: 1)
European Business Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.585, CiteScore: 3)
European J. of Innovation Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.454, CiteScore: 2)
European J. of Management and Business Economics     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.239, CiteScore: 1)
European J. of Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.971, CiteScore: 2)
European J. of Training and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.477, CiteScore: 1)
Evidence-based HRM     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.537, CiteScore: 1)
Facilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.503, CiteScore: 2)
Foresight     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.34, CiteScore: 1)
Gender in Management : An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.412, CiteScore: 1)
Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 975, SJR: 0.261, CiteScore: 1)
Grey Systems : Theory and Application     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Health Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.421, CiteScore: 1)
Higher Education Evaluation and Development     Open Access  
Higher Education, Skills and Work-based Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46, SJR: 0.426, CiteScore: 1)
History of Education Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.26, CiteScore: 0)
Housing, Care and Support     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.171, CiteScore: 0)
Human Resource Management Intl. Digest     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.129, CiteScore: 0)
IMP J.     Hybrid Journal  
Indian Growth and Development Review     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.174, CiteScore: 0)
Industrial and Commercial Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.301, CiteScore: 1)
Industrial Lubrication and Tribology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.334, CiteScore: 1)
Industrial Management & Data Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.904, CiteScore: 3)
Industrial Robot An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.318, CiteScore: 1)
Info     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Information and Computer Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.307, CiteScore: 1)
Information Technology & People     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45, SJR: 0.671, CiteScore: 2)
Innovation & Management Review     Open Access  
Interactive Technology and Smart Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.191, CiteScore: 1)
Interlending & Document Supply     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 61)
Internet Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36, SJR: 1.645, CiteScore: 5)
Intl. J. for Lesson and Learning Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.324, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. for Researcher Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Intl. J. of Accounting and Information Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.275, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Bank Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.654, CiteScore: 3)
Intl. J. of Climate Change Strategies and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.353, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Clothing Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.318, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Commerce and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Conflict Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.362, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Contemporary Hospitality Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.452, CiteScore: 4)
Intl. J. of Culture Tourism and Hospitality Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.339, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Development Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.139, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.387, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Educational Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.559, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Emergency Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.201, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Emerging Markets     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.474, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Energy Sector Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.349, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Entrepreneurial Behaviour & Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.629, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Ethics and Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.333, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Event and Festival Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.388, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Gender and Entrepreneurship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.445, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Health Care Quality Assurance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.358, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Health Governance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.247, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Housing Markets and Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.211, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Human Rights in Healthcare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.205, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Information and Learning Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.226, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Innovation Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.197, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Intelligent Computing and Cybernetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.214, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Intelligent Unmanned Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Islamic and Middle Eastern Finance and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.375, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Law and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.217, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Leadership in Public Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Intl. J. of Lean Six Sigma     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.802, CiteScore: 3)
Intl. J. of Logistics Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.71, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Managerial Finance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.203, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Managing Projects in Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.36, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Manpower     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.365, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Mentoring and Coaching in Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.426, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Migration, Health and Social Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.307, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Numerical Methods for Heat & Fluid Flow     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.697, CiteScore: 3)
Intl. J. of Operations & Production Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 2.052, CiteScore: 4)
Intl. J. of Organization Theory and Behavior     Hybrid Journal  
Intl. J. of Organizational Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.268, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Pervasive Computing and Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.138, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.25, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.821, CiteScore: 4)
Intl. J. of Prisoner Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.303, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Productivity and Performance Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.578, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Public Sector Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31, SJR: 0.438, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Quality & Reliability Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.492, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Quality and Service Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.309, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Retail & Distribution Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.742, CiteScore: 3)
Intl. J. of Service Industry Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Social Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.225, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Sociology and Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51, SJR: 0.3, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.269, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Structural Integrity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.228, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Sustainability in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.502, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Tourism Cities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.502, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Web Information Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.186, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Wine Business Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.562, CiteScore: 2)
Intl. J. of Workplace Health Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.303, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. Marketing Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.895, CiteScore: 3)
Irish J. of Occupational Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
ISRA Intl. J. of Islamic Finance     Open Access  
J. for Multicultural Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.237, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Accounting & Organizational Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.301, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Accounting in Emerging Economies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
J. of Adult Protection, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.314, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Advances in Management Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
J. of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44, SJR: 0.222, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.108, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Applied Accounting Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.227, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Applied Research in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49, SJR: 0.2, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Asia Business Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.245, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Assistive Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
J. of Business & Industrial Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.652, CiteScore: 2)
J. of Business Strategy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.333, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Capital Markets Studies     Open Access  
J. of Centrum Cathedra     Open Access  
J. of Children's Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.243, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Chinese Economic and Foreign Trade Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.2, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Chinese Entrepreneurship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
J. of Chinese Human Resource Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.173, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Communication Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.625, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Consumer Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.664, CiteScore: 2)
J. of Corporate Real Estate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.368, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Criminal Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 133, SJR: 0.268, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Criminological Research, Policy and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47, SJR: 0.254, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.257, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Defense Analytics and Logistics     Open Access  
J. of Documentation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 186, SJR: 0.613, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Economic and Administrative Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
J. of Economic Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.733, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Economics, Finance and Administrative Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.217, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Educational Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.252, CiteScore: 2)
J. of Enabling Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.369, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Engineering, Design and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.212, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Enterprise Information Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.827, CiteScore: 4)
J. of Enterprising Communities People and Places in the Global Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.281, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Entrepreneurship and Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.262, CiteScore: 1)
J. of European Industrial Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
J. of European Real Estate Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.268, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Facilities Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.33, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Family Business Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
J. of Fashion Marketing and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.608, CiteScore: 2)

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Journal Cover
Built Environment Project and Asset Management
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.46
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 15  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 2044-124X
Published by Emerald Homepage  [355 journals]
  • Pricing of highway infrastructure for transportation asset management
    • Abstract: Built Environment Project and Asset Management, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to present a methodology for estimating the “price,” or the not-to-loss value, of individual highway assets, which reflects not only the assets’ capital value but also economic productivity, by adopting a productivity-based asset valuation framework. The price tags can be used in prioritizing highway assets in support of transportation asset management processes. Design/methodology/approach The methodology adopts the utility theory to consider multiple performance measures reflecting the economic productivity generated by the assets, as well as their capital value. Key performance measures are first selected, and their values are retrieved from highway asset management databases. Next, the utility functions representing decision makers’ preferences convert the performance measures into utility values, which adjust the replacement cost (RC) of each highway asset to estimate price tags. To demonstrate its applicability, case studies were conducted for the highway networks of Texas and Washington State in the USA. Findings The methodology yielded price tags that better reflect the importance of highways’ roles in the economy in comparison to methods where only RCs are used. Furthermore, it was proven to be flexible enough to accommodate local conditions such as varying data availability. Originality/value The research provides a practical and reasonable way to prioritize critical highway assets in purport of maintenance and rehabilitation resource allocations, based on their economic productivity as well as physical condition and historical cost information, enhancing the overall efficiency and effectiveness of highway asset management.
      Citation: Built Environment Project and Asset Management
      PubDate: 2019-01-15T10:50:44Z
      DOI: 10.1108/BEPAM-05-2018-0083
       
  • Socially responsible procurement
    • Abstract: Built Environment Project and Asset Management, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose Socially responsible procurement (SRP) utilises government expenditure on construction procurement as a means of generating social value from construction activities. The paper proposes that SRP is a type of innovation delivering social value in the form of employment opportunities to local communities. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the use of SRP in Northern Ireland procurement and align the findings with existing literature. Design/methodology/approach A three-stage approach was employed, namely, first, a review of innovation and SRP literature; second, a survey of 50 Northern Ireland construction organisations to extract perceptions of SRP in practice; and third, qualitative analysis of the literature with the empirical insights. Findings Findings show that SRP is being driven by social legislation and being delivered by contractors as part of their contractual obligations. SRP represents a significant shift from standard construction practice which makes it challenging to implement using traditional processes and systems. It is found that SRP is generating social benefits through employment creation and the feedback from employees is largely positive. However, it is proposed that contractors need to adopt a more person-centric approach to the implementation of SRP to sustain the benefits being currently evidenced. Originality/value The study suggests that there is an urgent need for more holistic measurement of impacts and outcomes of SRP to ensure social targets are appropriate for the communities in which projects are being constructed.
      Citation: Built Environment Project and Asset Management
      PubDate: 2019-01-09T01:31:56Z
      DOI: 10.1108/BEPAM-02-2018-0049
       
  • Co-creation and co-destruction of experiential value: a service
           perspective
    • Abstract: Built Environment Project and Asset Management, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose One way in which to induce an advantageous position is to improve the value outcomes experienced from commissioned projects. The purpose of this paper is to consider project stakeholders, such as end-users, as active co-creators of value. This may be achieved by taking into account interactive capabilities and service design practices. This may influence experiential and financial value outcomes for a range of project stakeholders. Design/methodology/approach A single case displayed as a pilot study helps to establish the transferability of the co-creation and the service experience to the construction context. Findings Findings show that project managers pay insufficient attention to the service experience. The analysis demonstrates users are treated as destroyers of value, rather than as co-creators of value. In addition to this, the findings suggest contextual aspects, such as unethical behaviour, misalignment of values, power asymmetry and lack of contextual awareness, may ultimately affect the project outcomes. Practical implications The implication for the construction context is to create awareness of interactive capabilities and service design practices, which permit the enhancement of experimental value outcomes. Originality/value Service-dominant logic is used as a variant perspective to analyse the project usefulness and benefits for a range of stakeholders. The originality comes from the initial exploration of how benefits could be collaboratively configured through interactive capabilities and service design practices with a range of stakeholders.
      Citation: Built Environment Project and Asset Management
      PubDate: 2019-01-08T09:28:41Z
      DOI: 10.1108/BEPAM-02-2018-0052
       
  • Optimizing time, cost and quality in multi-mode resource-constrained
           project scheduling
    • Abstract: Built Environment Project and Asset Management, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to develop a framework to optimize time, cost and quality in a multi-mode resource-constrained project scheduling environment. Design/methodology/approach A case study approach identified the activity execution modes in building construction projects in India to support multi-mode resource-constrained project scheduling. The data required to compute time, cost and quality of each activity are compiled from real construction projects. A binary integer-programming model has been developed to perform multi-objective optimization and identify Pareto optimal solutions. The RR-PARETO3 algorithm was used to identify the best compromise trade-off solutions. The effectiveness of the proposed framework is demonstrated through sample case study projects. Findings Results show that good compromise solutions are obtained through multi-objective optimization of time, cost and quality. Research limitations/implications Case study data sets were collected only from eight building construction projects in India. Practical implications It is feasible to adopt multi-objective optimization in practical construction projects using time, cost and quality as the objectives; Pareto surfaces help to quantify relationships among time, cost and quality. It is shown that cost can be reduced by increasing the duration, and quality can be improved only by increasing the cost. Originality/value The use of different activity execution modes compiled from multiple projects in optimization is illustrated, and good compromise solutions for the multi-mode resource-constrained project scheduling problems using multi-objective optimization are identified.
      Citation: Built Environment Project and Asset Management
      PubDate: 2019-01-02T10:02:19Z
      DOI: 10.1108/BEPAM-04-2018-0075
       
  • Built environment sustainability: what’s new and what’s
           next'
    • Pages: 430 - 433
      Abstract: Built Environment Project and Asset Management, Volume 8, Issue 5, Page 430-433, November 2018.

      Citation: Built Environment Project and Asset Management
      PubDate: 2018-10-29T08:19:36Z
      DOI: 10.1108/BEPAM-11-2018-135
       
  • Service design and knowledge management in the construction supply chain
           for an infrastructure programme
    • Abstract: Built Environment Project and Asset Management, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to determine the extent to which service design (SD) is addressed by the client and its supply chain at a program level into one functional capability, knowledge management (KM), to share knowledge across projects and organizational actors. Design/methodology/approach The interpretative methodology employing two methods of engaged scholarship, namely, action research and engaged research, is applied. The data are analyzed using cognitive mapping to identify the extent of alignment of perceptions. Findings The findings show that the client and its supply chain are very transactional in their management minimizing investment in KM and program management. There is a lack of commitment and cultural leadership; hence, there is over-reliance on individuals to take responsibility for knowledge sharing and application. SD thinking can help develop a holistic approach to learning from projects. Research limitations/implications The study underlines the links between the concepts of SD and KM. The findings emphasize the importance of developing a holistic approach to KM through the lenses of SD. The organizations must view KM as a process and build capabilities at a program level to make knowledge sharing an integral part of the work culture across projects. Originality/value The study contributes to the subject of KM in the construction industry by mobilizing the concept of SD to examine how KM systems and procedures are embedded in the client and across its supply chain.
      Citation: Built Environment Project and Asset Management
      PubDate: 2018-12-17T03:36:02Z
      DOI: 10.1108/BEPAM-04-2018-0060
       
  • Analysis of BIM use for asset management in three public organizations in
           Québec, Canada
    • Abstract: Built Environment Project and Asset Management, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose Given the ongoing digital transformation, building information modeling (BIM) has great potential to create a collaborative environment in the whole lifecycle of the built asset, from inception to decommissioning. The paper aims to discuss this issue. Design/methodology/approach This paper relates current developments in Québec with regard to the use of BIM for asset management (AM). The steps taken by three public organizations to develop their capabilities and take advantage of new possibilities are presented. The main methodological approach is based on participant observation, through case studies complemented by a questionnaire. Findings This paper reports on results and analysis of an important module of a broader research project on the impact of new technologies and collaborative methods for projects and AM. The results of this first research module points to the importance of using pilot projects to develop a continuous improvement approach, where feedback loops from projects support the development of AM capabilities and culture. Another important finding is the importance of sharing experience for the three public organizations involved. Originality/value The main contributions of this paper are to document this overarching research program and to gain deeper insights by reflexively considering the steps taken and the ones ahead for the quest to enhance the transfer of information for built assets at the end of projects to the operations and maintenance phase and to use BIM for operation.
      Citation: Built Environment Project and Asset Management
      PubDate: 2018-12-05T09:12:33Z
      DOI: 10.1108/BEPAM-02-2018-0046
       
  • Exploring behavioural factors for information sharing in BIM projects in
           the Malaysian construction industry
    • Abstract: Built Environment Project and Asset Management, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose Despite the wave of enthusiasm for building information modelling (BIM) as a platform for information sharing, issues from the context of information-sharing behaviours still exist. The purpose of this paper is to explore the behavioural factors for successful information sharing in BIM projects in Malaysia. Design/methodology/approach Based on a literature review, a questionnaire was designed containing seven identified behavioural factors and their sub-elements. Data were collected through a questionnaire survey with 42 experienced BIM practitioners. In addition to that qualitative semi-structured interviews were conducted with nine construction practitioners in the Malaysian construction industry. Initially, a descriptive statistical analysis was adopted, followed by multivariate analysis that was employed to examine the possible effect of demographic attributes (i.e. nature of organisation and work experience in BIM) on the behavioural factors. Findings The analytical results indicated that communication, accountability and trust were the top three behavioural factors influencing successful information sharing. Additionally, the majority of the behavioural factors on information sharing were found to be not significantly dependent on both, the nature of organisations and the level of BIM experiences. Overall, the success of information sharing in the digital environment (i.e. BIM) depends on organisational behaviour supported by the collaborative constructs. Research limitations/implications Due to the fact that BIM implementation in Malaysia is still in its infancy, this study was limited to local context with small-scale BIM practitioners. Therefore, their views may not represent all BIM-related stakeholders in the industry. Practical implications The success of information sharing in BIM projects is a result of a combination of various factors, and this study provides construction practitioners with information on the behavioural factors, which could assist them in creating collective and collaborative information sharing in a digital environment. Originality/value Despite the fact that this study is country specific, the paper presents a new perspective on the behavioural context of information sharing in BIM projects. The findings further extend the current BIM literature by providing an insight into what it takes for project teams to reinforce their information sharing in the Malaysian digital environment through improvements in behaviours.
      Citation: Built Environment Project and Asset Management
      PubDate: 2018-12-05T08:36:51Z
      DOI: 10.1108/BEPAM-02-2018-0042
       
  • Public–private partnerships in Tanzanian affordable housing schemes
    • Abstract: Built Environment Project and Asset Management, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to identify and rank policy and regulatory framework factors and inherent pitfalls in the delivery of Tanzanian public–private partnerships (PPPs) affordable housing schemes. The strength of interactions between pitfalls is established, with practical solution proposals offered. Design/methodology/approach Primary data were collected from questionnaires administered to 28 Tanzanian stakeholders. Semi-structured interviews with public and private sector respondents then complemented survey findings with proposed solutions. The quantitative data were analysed using descriptive statistics, mean scores, parametric tests and correlation analyses. Directed content analysis was used for the interview transcripts. Findings Results show that “current PPP policy and guidelines need further improvement” and “Tanzania has a PPP policy and clear regulatory framework” were rated higher as policy and regulatory factors. In contrast, “poor planning skills and analytical capacity”, “high cost of building materials” and “inadequate access to housing finance” were the critical pitfalls. Most practical solutions were broadly financial in nature, or related to training, project management or PPP-enabling environment. Originality/value The paper provides solutions that can be tailored to international practitioners interested in understanding the effects of PPP policy, regulatory issues and pitfalls on Sub-Saharan Africa and other similar developing economies.
      Citation: Built Environment Project and Asset Management
      PubDate: 2018-12-04T03:47:20Z
      DOI: 10.1108/BEPAM-01-2018-0010
       
  • Service design for marketing in construction
    • Abstract: Built Environment Project and Asset Management, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose Project execution is dependent upon management support from the firm. The purpose of this paper is to examine the extent to which main contractors and supply chain members design their service provision in order to enhance the service experience. Marketing and service design (SD), theorized in terms of business development management, are examined to assess their effect upon service experience during project execution. Design/methodology/approach An interpretative methodology was used to identify patterns and significant factors perceived through the lens of business development managers in ten main contractors. Findings Main contractors provide a systems integration service, yet service provision was found to be limited and was frequently stated as “off the radar.” Clients are realizing sub-optimal value in service experience, and users and other societal stakeholders are realizing sub-optimal value in context during use. Research limitations/implications There is a need to address marketing and SD research to offer prescriptive guidance to practitioners, in particular using knowledge management as lever for improvement. Social implications Society is in receipt of sub-optimal facilities and therefore both socially falls short of meeting well-being and policy goals, and economically under-performs. Originality/value Contributions are made to the marketing and management theory on project markets where selling occurs ahead of provision. Scant support for construction marketing; a lack of the guidance on managing interactions in co-creating value; and the absence of SD among leading main contractors to deliver value had been reported.
      Citation: Built Environment Project and Asset Management
      PubDate: 2018-12-04T02:57:16Z
      DOI: 10.1108/BEPAM-04-2018-0061
       
  • BIM-based energy consumption assessment of the on-site construction of
           building structural systems
    • Abstract: Built Environment Project and Asset Management, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose Steel and reinforced concrete are among the most common structural materials used in the construction industry. Cost and the speed of construction have been usually the main criteria when selecting a building’s structural system, whereby the environmental impact of the structural material is sometimes ignored. Availability of an easy-to-use tool for environmental assessment of the structural alternatives could encourage this evaluation in the decision making. The purpose of this paper is to introduce an automated tool for the environmental assessment of the on-site construction processes of a building structural system, which calculates the energy consumption and carbon emissions of the structural system as a parameter for comparison. Design/methodology/approach This assessment tool is implemented using a building information modeling (BIM) platform to extract structural elements and their key attributes, such as type, geometrical and locational data. These data are processed together with a productivity database to calculate machine hours, and then predefined energy and carbon inventories are used to assess the energy consumption of the structural system in the erection/installation stage. Findings This assessment tool provides an automated and easy-to-use approach to estimate energy consumption and carbon emissions of different structural systems that are modeled in a BIM platform. The results of this tool were within the ranges reported by the available studies. Originality/value This research project presents a novel approach to use BIM-based attributes of the structural elements to calculate the required efforts, i.e. machine hours, and assess their energy consumption and carbon emissions during construction processes.
      Citation: Built Environment Project and Asset Management
      PubDate: 2018-11-15T03:27:41Z
      DOI: 10.1108/BEPAM-01-2018-0002
       
  • Exploratory factor analysis of skills requirement for PPP contract
           governance
    • Abstract: Built Environment Project and Asset Management, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to explore the skills required for effective contract management of public–private partnership (PPP) projects over their contract duration. The growing body of literature indicating the lack of expertise in managing PPP-related projects within the public sector prompted this study. Design/methodology/approach The study, being an exploratory one, relied on a survey of 207 survey responses from a sample of PPP experts across the globe. The data from the survey are a rich mix of responses from public policy experts, construction professionals, project finance experts, lawyers and academic researchers in PPP. Findings It was found through exploratory factor analysis that project management, financial engineering, negotiations, risk management, forecasting, stakeholder management and technical skills were very critical for successful contract management of PPP projects. It was also found that regional characteristics influence skills prioritisation. Research limitations/implications The results of this study can be validated on larger data sets in specific countries and across regions, sectors and variety of PPP projects. Currently, the authors conducted a general survey using convenience sampling. Practical implications The results send a clear signal to practitioners that infrastructure regulation training programs cannot be generalised. Training should be tailored to reflect regional and country-specific characteristics. Originality/value The increasing failures and remunicipalisations of privately financed infrastructures is a cause for concern. Little attention has been given to the complicity of PPP regulatory institutions responsible for contract governance of such projects. Studies are increasingly pointing to the absence of critical PPP skills among institutions responsible for managing PPP contracts. This lack of capacity has resulted in poor oversight of private companies providing public services resulting in poor services, and financial recklessness which threaten the sustainability of service provision.
      Citation: Built Environment Project and Asset Management
      PubDate: 2018-11-07T08:26:06Z
      DOI: 10.1108/BEPAM-01-2018-0011
       
  • Interdisciplinary design checklists for mechanical, electrical and
           plumbing coordination in building projects
    • Abstract: Built Environment Project and Asset Management, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to develop and assess interdisciplinary design checklists for mechanical, electrical and plumbing (MEP) systems’ coordination, for building projects, in Saudi Arabia. Design/methodology/approach Relevant documents were acquired including: heating, ventilation and air conditioning schedules; ductwork and chilled water pipes layout; and technical queries, among others, from residential and school projects. Next, factors influencing MEP systems’ coordination were extracted, and verified to ensure clarity and validity. They were formulated into design checklist items for MEP systems. Finally, the checklist items were assessed through a questionnaire based on a five-point Likert scale of importance. Respondents were comprised of mechanical, architectural, construction, electrical engineers, design coordinators and quality assurance managers. Data were then analyzed using the relative importance index. Findings This study presents 63 design checklist items. The items for each discipline were grouped under four categories, highlighting specific considerations. The findings revealed that careful consideration and communication between the mechanical, structural and architectural design teams was paramount in achieving proper mechanical coordination. Furthermore, it was found that constant communication between the electrical and the other design teams was necessary, to avoid electrical design conflicts. Finally, fire safety consideration was found to be most important in plumbing systems’ coordination. Originality/value The checklists for facilitating the MEP coordination process in building projects aim at minimizing waste in resources and enhancing the overall quality and productivity. In the absence of existing checklists, this paper provides a practical benefit to design professionals to alert them to devote more effort to the dominant category of checklist items.
      Citation: Built Environment Project and Asset Management
      PubDate: 2018-10-02T01:33:16Z
      DOI: 10.1108/BEPAM-01-2018-0009
       
  • The leading small group: an institutional innovation for PPP projects in
           China
    • Abstract: Built Environment Project and Asset Management, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose It is widely recognized that large-scale public–private partnership (PPP) projects require an effective coordination mechanism among various stakeholders throughout the project life cycle. The purpose of this paper is to provide an insight into how this may be achieved through the leading small group (LSG), which is a distinctive informal Chinese institution for coordination among various public agencies. Design/methodology/approach An in-depth case study using secondary data and five in-depth interviews with two staff members from the developer and three government officials involved is used to probe into how the LSG functions during the various development phases of the Yangzhou Teda Waste-to-Energy project. Findings The main finding is that, conditional on its capacity, the LSG coordinated various public agencies to promote fast project implementation and ensure its smooth operation by making high-level decisions, facilitating quick permits and approvals, and mitigating the risks. However, formalization and participation from other stakeholders are needed to ensure good governance. Research limitations/implications Because it is an exploratory case study, the findings cannot be readily generalized. Further research can be done to compare the performance of LSGs in different Chinese cities and PPP projects. Practical implications It is supposed that this paper can provide implications of designing effective coordination mechanisms for managing large-scale PPP projects. Originality/value This paper provides an account of the LSG as a distinctive Chinese coordination mechanism that has been rarely studied.
      Citation: Built Environment Project and Asset Management
      PubDate: 2018-09-19T12:44:50Z
      DOI: 10.1108/BEPAM-12-2017-0132
       
  • Public guarantees for mitigating interest rate risk in PPP projects
    • Abstract: Built Environment Project and Asset Management, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to deal with the maximum interest rate guarantees (MIRGs), and develop a methodology for setting the optimal value of the interest rate cap, namely the maximum interest rate above which the private investor will obtain reimbursement from the government, which balances the interests of the parties involved in the project. Design/methodology/approach The mechanism underlying the MIRG is modeled through real options. Monte Carlo simulation is employed as the option-pricing method. The resulting real option-based model is applied to the case of the “Camionale di Bari” toll road (Southern Italy). Findings The application provides some insights for the policy maker called to define the proper forms of guarantees. Furthermore, the results support the negotiation process, allowing the different actors to structure the guarantee in a way that satisfies all the parties and fairly allocates risks between them according to different operational and financial conditions. Originality/value The novelty of the contribution is triple. First, the authors advance the state of the art on government supports by focusing on the interest rate guarantee. Second, the authors enrich the existing studies on MIRG by proposing a quantitative model to set the guarantee in compliance with the public–private win-win principle. The developed real option-based model supports the decision maker in finding the optimal value of the interest rate cap, which is able to satisfy the interests of the parties involved in the project. Third, the authors consider not only the private sponsor and the government, as traditionally made by the models developed for other guarantees, but also the lender.
      Citation: Built Environment Project and Asset Management
      PubDate: 2018-09-19T01:29:02Z
      DOI: 10.1108/BEPAM-01-2018-0012
       
  • Method selection: a conceptual framework for public sector PPP selection
    • Abstract: Built Environment Project and Asset Management, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to establish a conceptual framework to assist decision makers in identifying an appropriate decision-supporting method (DSM) to evaluate public-private partnership (PPP) contract types in a disciplined and systematic manner. Design/methodology/approach A systematic literature review was conducted to compare and analyse DSMs in construction procurement processes, and explore the benefits and limitations of using DSMs. A conceptual framework is then developed to accommodate client characteristics when selecting DSM in a PPP context. An example was obtained to illustrate the implementation of the proposed framework. Findings DSMs employed in the procurement method selection are identified by using a systemic literature review. The benefits and limitations of each DSM are established and comparisons of DSMs are provided to fit the client characteristics and a conceptual framework is developed to assist decision makers in choosing DSM for contract selection. Originality/value This paper demonstrates a link between DSMs and PPP contracts which adds value at the stage of PPP contract evaluation. Also, the proposed framework sheds some light on an important aspect of the public sector to consider the improvement of current policies (PPP framework/guideline).
      Citation: Built Environment Project and Asset Management
      PubDate: 2018-09-13T12:35:01Z
      DOI: 10.1108/BEPAM-01-2018-0018
       
  • Developing a taxonomy of transportation waste in construction production
           processes
    • First page: 434
      Abstract: Built Environment Project and Asset Management, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to present a taxonomy of transportation waste in construction production processes based on lean construction (LC) principles. Design/methodology/approach The research methodology used is case study and the main stages for the identification of the transportation waste in two construction projects were: mapping physical flows; measurement of transportation time; and monitoring of transportation waste events; assessment of the taxonomy. Findings The main contribution of this paper is the proposition of a taxonomy of transportation waste in construction production processes through the understanding of the transportation waste causes and consequences. Research limitations/implications Although the literature reviewed addresses sources from different parts of the world, the case studies performed are limited to one country, Brazil. However, the studies were carried out in two different construction sites separated by more than 3,000 km. Practical implications All data collected during the taxonomy application can be organized in order to develop an improvement plan. Moreover, if data collected is disseminated, there is the potential to increase the efficiency and effectiveness of the construction sector. Social implications Although the paper does not explore in depth the impact of the study on society or policy, the theme of waste minimization is focused on cost reduction, and one way to do that is through the flow management for waste minimization. Originality/value The paper discusses the concept of transportation waste of production in construction based on LC philosophy, through the understanding of its causes and consequences.
      Citation: Built Environment Project and Asset Management
      PubDate: 2018-10-02T01:30:36Z
      DOI: 10.1108/BEPAM-04-2018-0062
       
  • Procurement of low carbon municipal solid waste infrastructure in India
           through public-private partnerships
    • First page: 449
      Abstract: Built Environment Project and Asset Management, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The Low carbon (LC) agenda has captured interest across governments and research communities. But such focus is not addressed so far in the operation of municipal solid waste (MSW) infrastructure in India. The purpose of this paper is to draw focus on the promotion of low carbon infrastructure by improving the procurement process of the public–private partnership (PPP) approach. Design/methodology/approach The current study employed a case study methodology. This paper develops and validates a “five-fold framework,” comprising of selection, financial, operational, standards and targets measures, for integrating LC principles in the procurement of infrastructure projects. Findings The public sector fails to understand the importance of the need to incorporate climate change mitigation strategies due to poor procurement competencies. With respect to the operationalization of the framework, funding of viability gap in operations instead of construction, allowing renegotiation clauses to cater possible future LC technological improvements and incorporating emission reduction targets at the local and national levels were highlighted. Research limitations/implications LC principles presented in this paper are not exhaustive and are verified using a single Indian PPP case. Future research endeavor can focus on the relevancy and operationalization of these principles using a more elaborate set of indicators and extend the study to other sectors and countries. Originality/value This paper seeks to act as guidelines for governments on how to create and improve LC MSW PPP infrastructure projects to facilitate simultaneous achievement of both climate change mitigation and infrastructure delivery goals. The current study could add value to the current emphasis on LC transitions by policymakers, government agencies and regulators.
      Citation: Built Environment Project and Asset Management
      PubDate: 2018-09-07T01:11:05Z
      DOI: 10.1108/BEPAM-10-2017-0087
       
  • Modelling the adoption of sustainable procurement in construction
           organisations
    • First page: 461
      Abstract: Built Environment Project and Asset Management, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The adoption of sustainable procurement in construction clients’ organisation remains a difficult concept. Current research of sustainable procurement adoption studies fails to focus on a multi-stage adoption process. The purpose of this paper is to develop an organisational adoption model in a multi-stage process for the adoption of sustainable procurement in construction. Design/methodology/approach The paper developed an organisational adoption model. The model was tested against data obtained from survey administered to 193 respondents of central and local government institutions with a response rate of 63.7 per cent. Structural equation modelling using the partial least squares was employed to determine and confirm the factor structure of the model, and to measure the relationships between the model constructs. Findings An organisational adoption model is developed, tested and is robust to aid the adoption decision process of sustainable procurement within construction organisations. Research limitations/implications The study is limited in scope affecting generalisation of the results. Future study should expand the scope to include consultants, contractors and suppliers. Practical implications The adoption model will assist policy makers and top managers to understand the adoption decision process and prioritise on the technological, organisational and environmental factors that significantly affect sustainable adoption decision process within construction organisations. Originality/value This study appears to be among the first to empirically develop an organisational adoption model to aid the adoption of sustainable procurement in construction.
      Citation: Built Environment Project and Asset Management
      PubDate: 2018-10-16T11:15:31Z
      DOI: 10.1108/BEPAM-10-2017-0108
       
  • A risk-responsive framework for green retrofit projects in Sri Lanka
    • First page: 477
      Abstract: Built Environment Project and Asset Management, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the risks associated with green retrofit projects in Sri Lanka in order to develop a risk responsive framework. Design/methodology/approach The survey method under the quantitative approach was selected as the research methodology as this research is required evaluating the risks associated with green retrofit projects. Both preliminary survey and the main questionnaire survey were conducted to collect the data. The survey data were evaluated and analysed by using mode value as a descriptive statistical analysis technique, and the risk rating matrix. Findings The overall results of risk assessment deliberated that there are ten “critical” risk factors, such as construction cost, inflation, energy saving uncertainty, warranty risk, delay in project completion, productivity and quality risks, requirement of permits and their approval, design changes, damage to structure or property and procurement delay influencing green retrofitting. Finally, a risk responsive framework was developed by proposing suitable strategies for mitigating the risks associated with green retrofitting. Practical implications The developed framework can be used as a basis to mitigate the risks associated with green retrofitting projects. An abundant upgrade of existing high-rise buildings into green can be reached. Originality/value A little attention paid on green retrofitting and the absence of proper risk management strategy for green retrofit projects in current practice have made this research a paramount need and a focal point.
      Citation: Built Environment Project and Asset Management
      PubDate: 2018-10-12T02:26:55Z
      DOI: 10.1108/BEPAM-10-2017-0088
       
  • A BIM–LCA integration technique to embodied carbon estimation applied on
           wall systems in Brazil
    • First page: 491
      Abstract: Built Environment Project and Asset Management, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose Aiming to simplify the extraction of embodied carbon data using a building information modeling (BIM) software, the purpose of this paper is to present a framework that integrates BIM and life cycle assessment (LCA), which are useful to the architecture, engineer and construction (AEC) industry. As a further purpose, this study also tests four different wall systems. Design/methodology/approach The study applies design science research and it presents a framework that integrates BIM and LCA. For analysis and validation, a case study features four different wall systems costs based on the Brazilian context. In the proposed framework, SimaPro8 accomplishes the LCA, while ArchiCAD 19 the modeling. Findings The first analysis covers embodied carbon and the second covers the total cost of each m² of wall. The proposed framework performs well, and it is effective in the Brazilian context. Concerning the walls, the wood frame system is the most sustainable option within this analysis and the most financially feasible option in Brazil. Originality/value The present study contributes to embodied carbon data analysis, ensuring that the best choice of elements and components is being used in the building project. This BIM–LCA integrated solution is valuable not only to the AEC industry and to professionals, but also to future researchers. This analysis is of great value to new ventures, since the society shows a great concern about reducing GHGs emissions.
      Citation: Built Environment Project and Asset Management
      PubDate: 2018-10-12T09:29:00Z
      DOI: 10.1108/BEPAM-10-2017-0093
       
  • Managing embodied carbon in buildings: a Pareto approach
    • First page: 504
      Abstract: Built Environment Project and Asset Management, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to identify the carbon intensive building elements or “carbon hotspots” of office buildings in order to maximise the carbon reduction potential during design stages. Design/methodology/approach Embodied carbon (EC) estimates of 28 office buildings in the UK were obtained and carbon hotspots of the sample (in accordance with the new rules of measurement (NRM) element classification) were identified using the 80:20 Pareto principle. Findings Frame, substructure, external walls, services and upper floors were identified as carbon hotspots of the selected sample. However, findings do not support the 80:20 ratio in this case but propose a ratio of 80:36. Stairs, internal walls and partitions, internal doors, wall finishes, ceiling finishes and fittings and furnishings were identified as carbon insignificant elements that have a lower EC reduction potential compared to the rest. Research limitations/implications The findings are applicable to office buildings in the UK but the methodology is adaptable to different types of buildings in other countries. Originality/value Findings unveil carbon intensive and carbon insignificant building elements of typical office buildings in the UK. This informs designers of the elements that could yield the highest potential EC savings via effective design choices. In addition, a logical design timeline is proposed for building elements based on their element hotspot category and design sequence to assist design decision making.
      Citation: Built Environment Project and Asset Management
      PubDate: 2018-08-13T11:16:38Z
      DOI: 10.1108/BEPAM-10-2017-0095
       
  • Mitigation of challenges in sustaining green certification in the Sri
           Lankan hotel sector
    • First page: 515
      Abstract: Built Environment Project and Asset Management, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The successful continuation of green certification in the Sri Lankan hotel sector is vital for tourism industry as well as the economy of the country as it balances the economic interests with social and environmental responsibilities. However, it has become an issue in the Sri Lankan hospitality and tourism industry to sustain green certification due to many challenges. The prevailing situation highlights the need of exploring long-term strategies to mitigate challenges in sustaining green certification which has not been researched to date. Thus, the purpose of this paper is to propose strategies to mitigate challenges in sustaining green certification in the hotel sector in Sri Lanka. Design/methodology/approach In total, 3 hotels were selected as cases of the study and 12 semi-structured interviews were conducted with engineers, maintenance managers and supervisors, who are responsible for sustaining green certificates at such hotels. The collected data were subjected to cross-case analysis to determine challenges in sustaining green certification. The findings were analysed with the support of the QSR.NVivo version 11.0 computer software. Findings Challenges were identified in detail under five main categories. They are technical, managerial, political and legal, environment and biological and social and cultural. Such challenges include design and construction defects, use of poor quality building and other materials, improper maintenance practices, incomplete and unclear construction documents, plans and specifications, resource limitations, insufficient budget allocations, government intervention, legal constraints, lack of user awareness and natural environmental conditions. Finally, strategies to mitigate such challenges are proposed based on empirical research findings. Research limitations/implications Only the Green Globe certified hotels in Sri Lanka were selected considering their need to renew certification annually. Further, interviewees were selected mainly focusing on the operational phase of a building. Hence, the findings were mostly limited to the perceptions and knowledge areas of selected interviewees. This can be highlighted as a primary limitation of the research, where a further study should be carried out on the perceptions of design stage professionals incorporating design stage challenges and strategies into the study. Originality/value The proposed strategies can be pursued by hoteliers to mitigate challenges in sustaining green certification, which will ultimately facilitate to balance economic interests with social and environmental responsibilities.
      Citation: Built Environment Project and Asset Management
      PubDate: 2018-10-17T01:52:51Z
      DOI: 10.1108/BEPAM-10-2017-0102
       
  • Economic sustainability of green buildings: a comparative analysis of
           green vs non-green
    • First page: 528
      Abstract: Built Environment Project and Asset Management, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose In Sri Lanka, a limited number of buildings have been certified for incorporation of green features and the reasons are attributed to green building investors who continue to perceive that green buildings are expensive. Further, the green building investors fail to appreciate the subsequent benefits received by those buildings during the operational phase. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to compare the life cycle cost (LCC) of green certified industrial manufacturing buildings with a similar form of the conventional buildings to establish the economic sustainability of green buildings. Design/methodology/approach The study involved a comparative case study analysis of two green buildings and a similar natured conventional building. The data required to perform the LCC analysis were extracted through documentary analysis. Findings The comparative analysis shows that the construction cost of a green industrial manufacturing building is 37 per cent higher than that of a similar natured conventional building while operation, maintenance and the end life cost of green buildings result in 28, 22 and 11 per cent savings, respectively. This results in an overall cost saving of 21 per cent in green buildings. Originality/value The current study provides an assessment of the total LCC of green industrial manufacturing buildings. In Sri Lanka, green industrial manufacturing buildings offer LCC saving of 21 per cent over its lifetime compared to similar natured conventional buildings. Thus, comparative analyses would enable green investors to make informed decisions before commissioning their investment in green facilities and thereby promote sustainable construction in Sri Lanka.
      Citation: Built Environment Project and Asset Management
      PubDate: 2018-10-02T01:34:36Z
      DOI: 10.1108/BEPAM-10-2017-0105
       
  • Gender mainstreaming as a strategy to achieve sustainable post-disaster
           reconstruction
    • First page: 544
      Abstract: Built Environment Project and Asset Management, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to discuss policy-relevant findings regarding strategies for mainstreaming gender in achieving sustainable post-disaster reconstruction (PDR). Design/methodology/approach An exploratory case study was used to explore the implementation of gender mainstreaming strategies and the link to sustainable PDR. The Bantul and Sleman regencies of Yogyakarta province provide a unique site for researching PDR as they are located in a region that is more strongly affected by earthquakes than nearly any other in Indonesia. Data were collected through interviews with 17 key stakeholders and 26 beneficiaries who were involved during and after the earthquake. To support the interview findings, surveys involving 50 policy makers and 150 beneficiaries were conducted. Content analysis and t-statistics were used in analyzing the data. Findings Gender mainstreaming strategies within sustainable reconstruction should incorporate strategies for protecting against gender vulnerabilities and for promoting gender capacities. Both are fundamental to the achievement of sustainable PDR. Originality/value The paper establishes comprehensive strategies for mainstreaming gender under three pillars (i.e. economic, social and environmental) of sustainable development. The findings benefit relevant policy makers by improving the policy performance of gender mainstreaming in the affected communities in enhancing sustainable PDR.
      Citation: Built Environment Project and Asset Management
      PubDate: 2018-06-22T08:08:11Z
      DOI: 10.1108/BEPAM-10-2017-0086
       
  • Nature of construction project cultures in the public sector: case studies
           in Sri Lanka
    • First page: 557
      Abstract: Built Environment Project and Asset Management, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose Cultural differences cause conflicts amongst construction project participants, deterring the success of projects. Understanding such different cultural manifestations could help the removal of the misunderstandings amongst sub-cultural groups and removal of formal irrationalities deterring the progress of construction projects. The purpose of this paper is to explore the nature of project cultures in the public sector construction projects. Design/methodology/approach An exploratory case study was selected as the research strategy to achieve the research aim. Three public sector building construction projects were used as case studies. Nine semi-structured interviews and observation of two progress review meetings per case were used for data collection. Findings As per the research findings, contractors believed that construction project culture emerged and transferred through continuous interactions and socialisations with time. Consultants believed that culture was emerged focusing on clearly defined project objectives. In addition, all members assumed that project members at high authority levels were contributing more for the emergence and transfer of cultural aspects. Levels of culture and power existed within the public sector project culture as clients with the highest power, consultants the next and contractors with the least power. Public sector project culture was not leader centred. Shared behavioural norms were not much popular in project culture. Highly differentiated behavioural norms, demonstrating clear professional sub-cultures for the client, contractor and consultant, were available. Originality/value The research findings are helpful to construction project managers to enhance the level of motivation, productivity, commitment, continuous interactions and socialisations of project participants and to avoid any negative outcomes in behaviours.
      Citation: Built Environment Project and Asset Management
      PubDate: 2018-09-13T11:25:31Z
      DOI: 10.1108/BEPAM-10-2017-0107
       
 
 
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