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Publisher: Emerald   (Total: 335 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 335 Journals sorted alphabetically
A Life in the Day     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Academia Revista Latinoamericana de Administraci√≥n     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.144, h-index: 4)
Accounting Auditing & Accountability J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Accounting Research J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.26, h-index: 7)
Accounting, Auditing and Accountability J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.88, h-index: 40)
Advances in Accounting Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.514, h-index: 5)
Advances in Appreciative Inquiry     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.124, h-index: 5)
Advances in Autism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Dual Diagnosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48, SJR: 0.228, h-index: 2)
Advances in Gender Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.229, h-index: 7)
Advances in Intl. Marketing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.123, h-index: 11)
Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60, SJR: 0.29, h-index: 5)
Advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
African J. of Economic and Management Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.125, h-index: 2)
Agricultural Finance Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 185, SJR: 0.391, h-index: 18)
American J. of Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Annals in Social Responsibility     Full-text available via subscription  
Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.215, h-index: 25)
Arts and the Market     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Asia Pacific J. of Marketing and Logistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.244, h-index: 15)
Asia-Pacific J. of Business Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.182, h-index: 7)
Asian Association of Open Universities J.     Open Access  
Asian Education and Development Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Asian J. on Quality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Asian Review of Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.29, h-index: 7)
Aslib J. of Information Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.65, h-index: 29)
Aslib Proceedings     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 269)
Assembly Automation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.657, h-index: 26)
Baltic J. of Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.354, h-index: 14)
Benchmarking : An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.556, h-index: 38)
British Food J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.329, h-index: 35)
Built Environment Project and Asset Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.232, h-index: 4)
Business Process Re-engineering & Management J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.614, h-index: 42)
Business Strategy Series     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.201, h-index: 6)
Career Development Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.686, h-index: 32)
China Agricultural Economic Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.238, h-index: 10)
China Finance Review Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Chinese Management Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.216, h-index: 12)
Circuit World     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.346, h-index: 17)
Collection Building     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.829, h-index: 10)
COMPEL: The Intl. J. for Computation and Mathematics in Electrical and Electronic Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.269, h-index: 22)
Competitiveness Review : An Intl. Business J. incorporating J. of Global Competitiveness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Construction Innovation: Information, Process, Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.508, h-index: 8)
Corporate Communications An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.703, h-index: 26)
Corporate Governance Intl. J. of Business in Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.309, h-index: 29)
Critical Perspectives on Intl. Business     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.32, h-index: 15)
Cross Cultural & Strategic Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.356, h-index: 13)
Development and Learning in Organizations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.138, h-index: 8)
Digital Library Perspectives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Direct Marketing An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Disaster Prevention and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.533, h-index: 32)
Drugs and Alcohol Today     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 136, SJR: 0.241, h-index: 4)
Education + Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.532, h-index: 30)
Education, Business and Society : Contemporary Middle Eastern Issues     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.141, h-index: 10)
Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Employee Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.435, h-index: 22)
Engineering Computations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.387, h-index: 39)
Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.541, h-index: 28)
Equal Opportunities Intl.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Equality, Diversity and Inclusion : An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.239, h-index: 9)
EuroMed J. of Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.145, h-index: 9)
European Business Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.481, h-index: 21)
European J. of Innovation Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.596, h-index: 30)
European J. of Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.933, h-index: 55)
European J. of Training and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.489, h-index: 23)
Evidence-based HRM     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Facilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.371, h-index: 18)
Foresight     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.486, h-index: 20)
Gender in Management : An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.359, h-index: 22)
Grey Systems : Theory and Application     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Health Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.383, h-index: 17)
Higher Education, Skills and Work-based Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46, SJR: 0.172, h-index: 4)
History of Education Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.141, h-index: 2)
Housing, Care and Support     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.174, h-index: 4)
Human Resource Management Intl. Digest     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.121, h-index: 6)
Humanomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.14, h-index: 4)
IMP J.     Hybrid Journal  
Indian Growth and Development Review     Hybrid Journal   (SJR: 0.163, h-index: 4)
Industrial and Commercial Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.217, h-index: 14)
Industrial Lubrication and Tribology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.322, h-index: 19)
Industrial Management & Data Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.63, h-index: 69)
Industrial Robot An Intl. J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.375, h-index: 32)
Info     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.25, h-index: 21)
Information and Computer Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Information Technology & People     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45, SJR: 0.576, h-index: 28)
Interactive Technology and Smart Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.112, h-index: 1)
Interlending & Document Supply     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 61, SJR: 0.48, h-index: 13)
Internet Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44, SJR: 1.746, h-index: 57)
Intl. J. for Lesson and Learning Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. for Researcher Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Intl. J. of Accounting and Information Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.304, h-index: 7)
Intl. J. of Bank Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.515, h-index: 38)
Intl. J. of Climate Change Strategies and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.416, h-index: 7)
Intl. J. of Clothing Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.279, h-index: 25)
Intl. J. of Commerce and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Conflict Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.763, h-index: 38)
Intl. J. of Contemporary Hospitality Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.329, h-index: 35)
Intl. J. of Culture Tourism and Hospitality Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.399, h-index: 5)
Intl. J. of Development Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Intl. J. of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.225, h-index: 7)
Intl. J. of Educational Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.424, h-index: 32)
Intl. J. of Emergency Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.179, h-index: 1)
Intl. J. of Emerging Markets     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.199, h-index: 5)
Intl. J. of Energy Sector Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.25, h-index: 12)
Intl. J. of Entrepreneurial Behaviour & Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.694, h-index: 28)
Intl. J. of Event and Festival Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.32, h-index: 8)
Intl. J. of Gender and Entrepreneurship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.638, h-index: 6)
Intl. J. of Health Care Quality Assurance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.352, h-index: 32)
Intl. J. of Health Governance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.277, h-index: 15)
Intl. J. of Housing Markets and Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.201, h-index: 5)
Intl. J. of Human Rights in Healthcare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.13, h-index: 2)
Intl. J. of Information and Learning Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Intl. J. of Innovation Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.173, h-index: 5)
Intl. J. of Intelligent Computing and Cybernetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.258, h-index: 10)
Intl. J. of Intelligent Unmanned Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.145, h-index: 2)
Intl. J. of Islamic and Middle Eastern Finance and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Intl. J. of Law and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.107, h-index: 2)
Intl. J. of Law in the Built Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.111, h-index: 2)
Intl. J. of Leadership in Public Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Intl. J. of Lean Six Sigma     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.562, h-index: 15)
Intl. J. of Logistics Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.998, h-index: 15)
Intl. J. of Managerial Finance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.212, h-index: 11)
Intl. J. of Managing Projects in Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Manpower     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.354, h-index: 37)
Intl. J. of Mentoring and Coaching in Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Intl. J. of Migration, Health and Social Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.261, h-index: 5)
Intl. J. of Numerical Methods for Heat & Fluid Flow     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.594, h-index: 32)
Intl. J. of Operations & Production Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 2.198, h-index: 94)
Intl. J. of Organizational Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.222, h-index: 11)
Intl. J. of Pervasive Computing and Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.165, h-index: 9)
Intl. J. of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.304, h-index: 12)
Intl. J. of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.694, h-index: 66)
Intl. J. of Prisoner Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.254, h-index: 10)
Intl. J. of Productivity and Performance Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.785, h-index: 31)
Intl. J. of Public Sector Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.272, h-index: 37)
Intl. J. of Quality & Reliability Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.544, h-index: 63)
Intl. J. of Quality and Service Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.133, h-index: 1)
Intl. J. of Retail & Distribution Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.543, h-index: 36)
Intl. J. of Service Industry Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Social Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.227, h-index: 25)
Intl. J. of Sociology and Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50, SJR: 0.361, h-index: 5)
Intl. J. of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Structural Integrity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.325, h-index: 8)
Intl. J. of Sustainability in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.616, h-index: 29)
Intl. J. of Tourism Cities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Web Information Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.208, h-index: 13)
Intl. J. of Wine Business Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.196, h-index: 12)
Intl. J. of Workplace Health Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.358, h-index: 8)
Intl. Marketing Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.076, h-index: 57)
J. for Multicultural Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.124, h-index: 11)
J. of Accounting & Organizational Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.346, h-index: 7)
J. of Accounting in Emerging Economies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
J. of Adult Protection, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.291, h-index: 7)
J. of Advances in Management Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
J. of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47, SJR: 0.177, h-index: 9)
J. of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
J. of Applied Accounting Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.22, h-index: 5)
J. of Applied Research in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
J. of Asia Business Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.115, h-index: 1)
J. of Assistive Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.215, h-index: 6)
J. of Business & Industrial Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.664, h-index: 48)
J. of Business Strategy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.381, h-index: 17)
J. of Centrum Cathedra     Open Access  
J. of Children's Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.167, h-index: 9)
J. of Chinese Economic and Foreign Trade Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.188, h-index: 4)
J. of Chinese Entrepreneurship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
J. of Chinese Human Resource Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.112, h-index: 3)
J. of Communication Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.735, h-index: 6)
J. of Consumer Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.613, h-index: 62)
J. of Corporate Real Estate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.633, h-index: 5)
J. of Criminal Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 123, SJR: 0.13, h-index: 1)
J. of Criminological Research, Policy and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
J. of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.109, h-index: 5)
J. of Documentation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 189, SJR: 0.936, h-index: 50)
J. of Economic and Administrative Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
J. of Economic Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.498, h-index: 26)
J. of Educational Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.848, h-index: 36)
J. of Engineering, Design and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.173, h-index: 10)
J. of Enterprise Information Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.433, h-index: 38)
J. of Enterprising Communities People and Places in the Global Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.212, h-index: 8)
J. of Entrepreneurship and Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
J. of European Industrial Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
J. of European Real Estate Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.52, h-index: 7)
J. of Facilities Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
J. of Family Business Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
J. of Fashion Marketing and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.529, h-index: 30)
J. of Financial Crime     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 358, SJR: 0.158, h-index: 5)
J. of Financial Economic Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
J. of Financial Management of Property and Construction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.234, h-index: 1)
J. of Financial Regulation and Compliance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
J. of Financial Reporting and Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
J. of Forensic Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50, SJR: 0.225, h-index: 8)
J. of Global Mobility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
J. of Global Responsibility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
J. of Health Organisation and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.67, h-index: 27)
J. of Historical Research in Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.376, h-index: 8)
J. of Hospitality and Tourism Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.672, h-index: 10)
J. of Human Resource Costing & Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
J. of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)

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Journal Cover Agricultural Finance Review
  [1 followers]  Follow
    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 0002-1466
   Published by Emerald Homepage  [335 journals]
  • Trade credit supply in African agro-food manufacturing industry:
           determinants and motives
    • Abstract: Agricultural Finance Review, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to examine the determinants and motives for supply of trade credit among agro-food manufacturing firms in African countries. Design/methodology/approach The paper uses a subsample of food manufacturing firms from World Bank Enterprise Survey in eight African countries in 2014. Two-limit Tobit models are specified for the determinants of trade credit supply (TCS) and the motives for TCS are inferred from the determinants. An instrumental variable two-limit Tobit model is estimated to check the endogeneity of trade credit received (TCR) in relation to trade credit supplied. Findings The level of TCS is significantly related with degree of product diversification, manager experience, level of TCR and overdraft availability. From the results, financing motives (particularly liquidity and redistribution) and commercial motives (particularly marketing and quality guarantee motives) for TCS are implied. Research limitations/implications The parameter estimates may contain both demand and supply effects as the two effects cannot be separated due to absence of information on firms’ customers in the data set. The results should be interpreted in this context. Originality/value The motives for TCS by agro-food firms is less understood in the agricultural finance literature and this paper makes an important contribution in this regard. In particular, the paper shows the degree of product diversification is directly associated with TCS, a relationship which has not been explored in the trade credit literature.
      Citation: Agricultural Finance Review
      PubDate: 2018-01-08T11:46:51Z
      DOI: 10.1108/AFR-03-2017-0017
       
  • Farm credit access, credit constraint and productivity in Ghana
    • Pages: 446 - 462
      Abstract: Agricultural Finance Review, Volume 77, Issue 4, Page 446-462, November 2017.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to examine farmers’ access to credit, credit constraint, and productivity in the Northern Savannah ecological zone of Ghana. Design/methodology/approach Secondary data from the Ghana Feed the Future baseline survey involving a total sample of 2,968 farm households were used. The conditional mixed process (CMP) framework was applied to estimate access to credit, credit constraint, and productivity simultaneously. As a system estimator the CMP corrects for possible heterogeneity and sample selection bias. Findings The results from the estimations revealed that age, literacy, farm non-mechanized equipment, and group membership were the variables influencing farmers’ access to credit. Credit constraint conditions were determined by household size, locality, group membership, and household durable assets. Finally, the results showed that productivity of farmers was dependent on marital status, household size, locality, farm size, commercialization, farm mechanized equipment, group membership, and household durable assets. Originality/value This paper is the first, to the best of the authors’ knowledge, to use the CMP framework to jointly estimate access to credit, credit constraint, and productivity. The results indicate that estimating credit access and constraint models separately would have yielded biased estimates. Thus, this paper informs future research on farmers’ credit access, credit constraint, and productivity for informed policymaking.
      Citation: Agricultural Finance Review
      PubDate: 2017-10-17T01:50:29Z
      DOI: 10.1108/AFR-10-2016-0078
       
  • Factors affecting household decision to allocate credit for livestock
           production
    • Pages: 463 - 483
      Abstract: Agricultural Finance Review, Volume 77, Issue 4, Page 463-483, November 2017.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to explore the factors that affect farmer’s decision to allocate credit for livestock production. The results are expected to contribute to the understanding of what motivates smallholders to allocate credit to agricultural production in general and livestock production in particular. A better understanding of the farmers’ behavior in allocating credit for livestock would provide useful information for project implementers and financial institutions that work with small-scale livestock producers. Design/methodology/approach A cross-section data set collected in 2014 from 5,000 households and 497 rural communities in the major highland regions of Ethiopia is examined. The authors developed a conceptual framework for credit allocation decision. Percentiles, means, and standard deviation as well as t, χ2 and Fisher’s exact tests for association and Cramer’s V measure for strength of association have been used to describe the status of farmer’s access to credit and analyze credit utilization, while a three-stage probit model with double sample selection is used to identify factors that affect household’s decision to allocate credit for livestock production. Findings After controlling for potential selection biases, sex and literacy status of household head, land size, wealth and access to livestock centered extension service are found to have a statistically significant effect on farmers’ decision to allocate credit to livestock production. The results showed female-headed households, wealthy farmers, farmers with small plot of land and farmers that have access to livestock centered extension services are more likely to allocate the credit for livestock production. The results suggest that policies aimed at improving access to credit together with access to livestock focused extension service are more effective in increasing livestock production. Research limitations/implications The study’s findings should be viewed with perspective and caution, as only households with excess demand for credit were the subject of the research. Originality/value The contribution of this paper is twofold. First, it is one of a very few empirical studies that try to identify factors that affect households credit allocation to livestock in systematic way that removed confounding effects using three-stage probit models. Given the emphasis on financial constraints in livestock development, new empirical insights on household credit allocation are essential to better inform development interventions. Second, the analysis relies on a comprehensive data set that represents the major agricultural system of the country.
      Citation: Agricultural Finance Review
      PubDate: 2017-10-17T01:50:25Z
      DOI: 10.1108/AFR-06-2016-0062
       
  • Impact of financial inclusion on technical efficiency of paddy farmers in
           Bangladesh
    • Pages: 484 - 505
      Abstract: Agricultural Finance Review, Volume 77, Issue 4, Page 484-505, November 2017.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of financial inclusion on the enhancement of paddy farmers’ technical efficiency (TE). The impact was evaluated rigorously from different dimensions which could be useful in the policy discussion for enhancing efficiency in utilizing productive resources. Design/methodology/approach A cross-sectional data of randomly selected 120 paddy farmers from Khulna district in the Southwest region of Bangladesh were collected for this study. Initially, a stochastic production frontier approach was used for estimating farmers’ TE. Thereafter, ordinary least squares and quantile regression models were applied for unveiling the existing relationship between TE and various dimensions of financial inclusion after controlling all other socio-economic characteristics. Findings The study findings revealed that farmers were around 86 percent technically efficient and amongst them, credit takers were more efficient than non-credit takers. A non-monotonic relationship between TE and amount of credit was observed where TE was maximized at amount around 20,000 Bangladeshi Taka (USD255), a medium credit in terms of its amount. In addition, credit literacy was identified as a significant factor for improving TE. Though difference in the choice of sources for accessing credit had little impact on mean TE, its effect was found significantly higher for low scored technically efficient farmers compared to high scored farmers. Practical implications The policy toward widening the coverage of financial inclusion would be more effective than providing larger amount of credit to a limited number of farmers for improving their TE. Originality/value Such an in-depth assessment of the impact of financial inclusion on TE is probably the first effort in the Khulna district of Bangladesh.
      Citation: Agricultural Finance Review
      PubDate: 2017-10-17T01:50:33Z
      DOI: 10.1108/AFR-06-2016-0058
       
  • Does ethanol production affect corn basis volatility'
    • Pages: 506 - 523
      Abstract: Agricultural Finance Review, Volume 77, Issue 4, Page 506-523, November 2017.
      Purpose South Dakota is ranked sixth nationally for corn and ethanol production (EP). The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between corn-EP and corn basis volatility using South Dakota data. Design/methodology/approach A mixed regression modeling approach was adopted to analyze state EP data, and quarterly corn production and price data for five crop reporting regions in South Dakota (1990-2014). Findings From 2004-Q4 to 2013-Q4, ethanol and corn production in South Dakota increased by 735.50 million gallons and 228.30 million bushel per year, respectively. Empirical estimates indicate that increased EP narrowed the corn basis by 6.16 cents per bushel, and increased corn basis absolute volatility by 2.25 cents. However, increased corn production widened the corn basis by 27.56 cents per bushel and decreased absolute basis volatility by 4.32 cents. On average, for this period, increased EP offset the effect of rapid corn production on average basis and basis volatility in the State of South Dakota. Empirical evidence presented clarifies how the relationship between EP and corn production variability effects the cash basis and basis volatility in local markets. Research limitations/implications Research limitations include the use of statewide EP due to the lack of regional data, and the use of aggregate price data rather than local cash market data. Practical implications During normal crop production years, corn production is a predominant driver for impacting corn basis and basis volatility. In this case, EP plays a secondary role and dampens the corn production effect by narrowing the cash basis and increasing volatility. However, when a negative corn production shock occurs, then EP amplifies the effect of reduced corn production. In this case, EP strengthens market forces that are narrowing the cash basis and amplifies the market forces that are increasing the volatility of the cash basis. Social implications Negative corn production shocks occurring in regions where corn production and corn-based EP are dominant agricultural activities will increase basis volatility, reducing hedging effectiveness. Expansion of the ethanol blending wall in the future may exacerbate the market forces that have evolved in local cash corn markets as EP renews its expansion in major corn production regions. As a result, producers and grain elevator managers need to be aware that traditional hedging strategies may become less effective as one consequence of a renewed expansion of EP in the USA. Originality/value The literature on the effect of corn-EP on corn basis volatility is limited. This is the first study to apply a mixed modeling approach to the issue of how EP affected corn basis and basis volatility.
      Citation: Agricultural Finance Review
      PubDate: 2017-10-17T01:50:23Z
      DOI: 10.1108/AFR-05-2016-0050
       
  • Financial inclusion and agricultural commercialization in Ghana: an
           empirical investigation
    • Pages: 524 - 544
      Abstract: Agricultural Finance Review, Volume 77, Issue 4, Page 524-544, November 2017.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to investigate the connections between financial inclusion and agricultural commercialization among farmers in Ghana. Design/methodology/approach In order to address endogeneity and sample selectivity bias, the study employs endogenous switching regressions (ESRs) to examine whether financially included and financially excluded maize farm households differ in their commercialization behavior and whether financial inclusion affects commercialization. The Heckman Treatment Effect (HTE) model is used to test for robustness of the results. The data used contain a random sample of 2,230 maize farmers across the ten regions of Ghana. Findings The results from the ESRs show that financial inclusion significantly fosters agricultural commercialization. Specifically, financially included households sell 13.25 percent more output than their financially excluded counterparts. In terms of the counterfactual, financially excluded households would have sold 5.04 percent more output if they were to have access to financial services. Results from the HTE model confirm that financial inclusion promotes agricultural commercialization. Practical implications Financial inclusion is low among maize farmers; this implies that there are more benefits to be gained by ensuring that farmers have access to a broad range of financial services. Social implications The findings imply that the quest for the integration of smallholder farmers into markets cannot overlook measures to ensure financial inclusion. Originality/value It represents the first attempt at linking financial inclusion to agricultural commercialization using econometric methodology. The study serves as a foundation paper and for that matter will serve as a guide to future research on the financial inclusion-agricultural commercialization nexus.
      Citation: Agricultural Finance Review
      PubDate: 2017-10-17T01:50:15Z
      DOI: 10.1108/AFR-02-2017-0007
       
  • US farmers’ insurance choices under budget heuristics
    • Abstract: Agricultural Finance Review, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose Regional differences in crop insurance uptake have persisted over time. To partly explain this phenomenon, the purpose of this paper is to propose and evaluate a budget constraint (heuristic) effect within the standard expected utility theory (EUT) framework through simulation methods. Design/methodology/approach Within the EUT framework, a standard simulation model is used to gain insights into farm insurance decisions when a budget constraint is in effect. The budget constraint is modeled as it has been revealed through the data on farmers’ insurance expenditures. In the simulation analysis, certainty equivalent values are used to rank farm options subject to the revealed budget constraint. Findings A budget constraint effect within the EUT framework stands out in explaining the observed regional differences. The proposed explanation is consistent with the historical trends on the ratio of crop insurance expenditure to expected crop value, higher premium rates in regions with lower crop insurance uptake, and the limited turnout for the 2014 Farm Bill’s supplemental area-based crop insurance products. Farmers’ crop insurance choices are found to be mostly constrained-optimal. Originality/value This appears to be the first study taking the revealed preferences approach to farmers’ crop insurance choices in a simulation analysis. Some policy implications are drawn and future research avenues are suggested. The findings should be of considerable value to policymakers, academics, bankers, and producers in regard to the design and use of risk management tools.
      Citation: Agricultural Finance Review
      PubDate: 2017-12-14T10:22:47Z
      DOI: 10.1108/AFR-02-2017-0009
       
  • Net income risk, crop insurance and hedging
    • Abstract: Agricultural Finance Review, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose At the beginning of the production year producers face a complex risk management decision environment given by risks specific to their operation, multiple crop insurance contracts and hedging opportunities. The purpose of this paper is to provide a producer-level framework for risk management decision making, focusing on the interaction between crop insurance and hedging. Design/methodology/approach The authors develop a Monte Carlo simulation model that generates a producer’s net income (NI) distribution that incorporates historical producer risk, price-yield correlation via a copula, price risk, and production costs. The authors evaluate the NI distribution through a modified Modern Portfolio Theory (MPT) decision framework. The authors use the modified MPT decision framework to explore tradeoffs between expected NI and farm ruin (defined as 1 or 5 percent expected shortfall) from different crop insurance contracts and pre-harvest hedging options. Findings Only revenue protection and the highest two levels of coverage level exist on the efficient frontier. The level of hedging on the efficient frontier ranges from 0 to 55 percent of Actual Production History. The authors find that increasing coverage level 5 percent (from 80 to 85 percent) negatively impacts the optimal hedging amount by 26 percentage points (from 35 to 9 percent). Originality/value The model provides the precise identification of financial benefits from different risk management strategies by incorporating producer-level historical yield data, using a copula to capture yield-price dependency structure and producer production cost in generating the NI distribution. This model can be applied to any producer’s characteristics and data.
      Citation: Agricultural Finance Review
      PubDate: 2017-12-08T10:42:46Z
      DOI: 10.1108/AFR-05-2017-0036
       
  • Can agricultural credit scoring for microfinance institutions be
           implemented and improved by weather data'
    • Abstract: Agricultural Finance Review, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose In recent years, the application of credit scoring in urban microfinance institutions (MFIs) became popular, while rural MFIs, which mainly lend to agricultural clients, are hesitating to adopt credit scoring. The purpose of this paper is to explore whether microfinance credit scoring models are suitable for agricultural clients, and if such models can be improved for agricultural clients by accounting for precipitation. Design/methodology/approach This study merges two data sets: 24,219 loan and client observations provided by the AccèsBanque Madagascar and daily precipitation data made available by CelsiusPro. An in- and out-of-sample splitting separates model building from model testing. Logistic regression is employed for the scoring models. Findings The credit scoring models perform equally well for agricultural and non-agricultural clients. Hence, credit scoring can be applied to the agricultural sector in microfinance. However, the prediction accuracy does not increase with the inclusion of precipitation in the agricultural model. Therefore, simple correlation analysis between weather events and loan repayment is insufficient for forecasting future repayment behavior. Research limitations/implications The results should be verified in different countries and climate contexts to enhance the robustness. Social implications By applying scoring models to agricultural clients as well, all clients can benefit from an improved risk assessment (e.g. faster decision making). Originality/value To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study investigating the potential of microfinance credit scoring for agricultural clients in general and for Madagascar in particular. Furthermore, this is the first study that incorporates a weather variable into a scoring model.
      Citation: Agricultural Finance Review
      PubDate: 2017-12-01T01:03:35Z
      DOI: 10.1108/AFR-11-2016-0082
       
  • Bounded rationality and the adoption of weather index insurance
    • Abstract: Agricultural Finance Review, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to check which role-bounded rationality might play as an explanation for farmers’ missing willingness to adopt weather index insurance (WII). WII is an innovative risk management instrument that causes low administration and regulation costs. Moreover, index insurance is plagued neither by moral hazard nor by adverse selection. Nonetheless, WII has been little used to date in agriculture. Design/methodology/approach An extra-laboratory experiment in the form of a multi-period, single-person business simulation game is conducted with farmers as experimental subjects to investigate the reasons for the low willingness to adopt WII. Findings First, the demand for WII decreases as the premium loading increases. Second, a transparent communication of the loading reduces demand, indicating that farmers refrain from transactions if they feel that the other party earns (too) much money. Third, communicating to farmers that the index insurance has been subsidized raises demand even though insurance costs in terms of loading are kept constant. This can be taken as an indication that farmers interpret subsidies as a signal for profitable action. Originality/value Using an experimental approach and going beyond observational research, this study investigates the prominent question of farmers’ risk management and innovation adoption behavior, and, in particular, the behavioral effect of subsidies. Using a randomized controlled trial, the real behavior of real subjects with real incentives is studied under controlled experimental conditions. Compared to prior studies, the external validity of the experiment is improved by recruiting farmers instead of a convenience group of students.
      Citation: Agricultural Finance Review
      PubDate: 2017-11-28T01:42:24Z
      DOI: 10.1108/AFR-02-2017-0008
       
  • Differences across farm typologies in capital investment during 1996-2013
    • Abstract: Agricultural Finance Review, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of changes in farm economic conditions and macroeconomic trends on US farm capital expenditures between 1996 and 2013. Design/methodology/approach A synthetic panel is constructed from Agricultural Resource Management Survey (ARMS) data. A dynamic system GMM regression model is estimated for farms as a whole and separately within farm typology categories. The use of farm typologies allows for comparison of the relative magnitudes of these estimates across farms by farm sales level and the operator’s primary occupation. Findings Changes in gross farm income levels, tax depreciation rates, and interest rates have a significant impact on crop farm investment, while changes in output prices, net cash farm income levels, tax depreciation rates, and farm specialization levels have significant impacts on livestock farm capital investment. The relative significance and magnitudes of these impacts differ within farm typologies. Significant differences include a greater responsiveness to change in tax policy variables for residential crop farms, greater responsiveness to changes in output prices and debt to asset ratios for intermediate livestock farms, and larger changes in commercial crop and livestock farm investment given equivalent changes in farm sales or the returns to investment. Research limitations/implications These findings are of interest to agricultural economists when constructing farm investment models and employing pseudo panel methods, to those in the agricultural equipment and manufacturing sector when constructing models to manage inventories and plan for production needs across regions and over time, to those involved in drafting tax policy and evaluating the potential impacts of tax changes on agricultural investment, and for those in the agricultural lending sector when designing and executing agricultural capital lending programs. Originality/value This study uniquely identifies differences in the level of investment and the magnitude of investment responsiveness to changes in farm economic conditions and macroeconomic trends given differences in income levels and primary operator occupation. In addition, this study is one of the few which utilizes ARMS data to study farm capital investment. Utilizing ARMS data provides a rich panel data set, covering producers across many different crop production types and regions. Finally, employing pseudo panel construction methods contributes to efforts to effectively employ cross-sectional data and dynamic models to study farm behavior across time.
      Citation: Agricultural Finance Review
      PubDate: 2017-11-24T12:34:53Z
      DOI: 10.1108/AFR-01-2017-0002
       
  • Salvaging mortgage loans and land title redemption with revolving funds in
           Thailand
    • Abstract: Agricultural Finance Review, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to investigate the performance of the revolving fund (RF) regarding the ability of smallholder debtors to retrieve land title deeds, and also to examine the factors influencing the outstanding debts and percentage of outstanding interest of the smallholders in the Central and Northeastern regions of Thailand. Design/methodology/approach Primary data were collected from 430 debtors in the Central and Northeastern regions of Thailand in order to compare the differences in livelihood assets as well as their opinions on benefits derived from the operation of the RF. Secondary data were also collected from the RF administration, in order to evaluate the effectiveness and efficiency of the fund. Heteroskedasticity-corrected ordinary least squares and Tobit regression models were employed to examine the factors influencing the outstanding debts and percentage of outstanding interest of the smallholders, respectively. Furthermore, the student’s t-test was used to examine the differences in the livelihood assets among debtors in the two regions; and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to examine differences in livelihood indicator scores among the three types of debtors. Findings The empirical results revealed that the RF is effective as the fund could provide loan to smallholders to enable them redeem their land title deeds from their previous creditors. The t-test results reveal significant differences in the livelihood assets among debtors in the two regions. One-way ANOVA indicates differences in livelihood indicator scores among the three types of debtors. The results of the heteroskedasticity-corrected ordinary least squares regression revealed that being married, low frequency of floods and less influence of third parties significantly reduced the outstanding debts. The results of the censored Tobit regression revealed that increased frequency of meeting with the RF administration, less influence of third parties, high land potential and interaction of age and experience significantly decreased the percentage of outstanding interest. Practical implications It is imperative to intensify information and education regarding the regulations, payment terms and modalities to clients in order to facilitate repayments of the loans disbursed. The organization of the RF should pay particular attention to the role of the committees involved, information administration and loan repayment monitoring. The RF should increase the frequency of meetings with smallholders, minimize the influence of third parties and give priority to old and experienced smallholders who possess land with high potential for earning incomes to enable them repay the loans. Originality/value To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study that examined the effectiveness of the RF to enable smallholders retrieve their land title deeds.
      Citation: Agricultural Finance Review
      PubDate: 2017-11-22T02:49:28Z
      DOI: 10.1108/AFR-12-2016-0090
       
  • Effect of input credit on smallholder farmers’ output and income
    • Abstract: Agricultural Finance Review, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of input credit on smallholder farmers’ output and income using Masara N’Arziki support project in Northern Ghana. Design/methodology/approach A cross-sectional primary data set was used to estimate the effect of project participation on farm output, yield and income using propensity score matching (PSM) methods. Findings The findings are that project participation is skewed towards experienced farmers with big-sized households and farms. The effect of project on outcomes is somewhat unsatisfactory in the sense that participation only raises output and yield, but not income. Research limitations/implications The paper only examined the project effect on farm outcomes among smallholder farmers participating in the programme in just one operational area in the Northern region. Future research should consider all the operational areas for an informed generalisation of findings. Practical implications Greater benefits to farmers from programme participation would require project management to review the contractual arrangement so that the high cost of input credit is significantly reduced. Originality/value The paper applied the PSM to estimate the effect of project participation on farm output, yield and income among smallholder farmers which is non-existent in the literature on the study area, at least as far as we know. This paper can inform future policy on the direction and nature of support for smallholder farmers in Northern Ghana.
      Citation: Agricultural Finance Review
      PubDate: 2017-11-20T03:29:20Z
      DOI: 10.1108/AFR-05-2017-0032
       
  • A quantile regression analysis of farmer cooperative performance
    • Abstract: Agricultural Finance Review, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose A financial perspective of farmer cooperative performance is assumed by conceptualizing the cooperative as an independent firm. The purpose of this paper is to explore variability in the financial performance of the largest 1,000 US farmer cooperatives with emphasis on efficiency, productivity, and leverage. Design/methodology/approach Cooperative performance is analyzed by means of the extended DuPont identity, an accounting tool which decomposes return on equity into five ratios of efficiency, productivity, and leverage. The extended DuPont identity is applied empirically with quantile regression, which allows estimation of the statistical interrelationship of the DuPont components across the full response distribution. Findings Per the results, variability in the financial performance of US farmer cooperatives is for the most part associated with the operating profit margin, which confirms prior findings of cost inefficiency in the empirical literature. Therefore, US farmer cooperatives may improve financial performance by emphasizing sales and operating costs. Specifically, recommendations include placing emphasis on bargaining power, product differentiation, and scale economies. Supply cooperatives may also consider issuing non-qualified equity and securing long-term debt access as additional possibilities to improve financial performance. Originality/value The empirical application of the extended DuPont identity with quantile regression facilitates a novel investigation of cooperative performance by placing emphasis on the efficiency, productivity, and leverage of cooperatives with various degrees of performance.
      Citation: Agricultural Finance Review
      PubDate: 2017-11-20T03:24:56Z
      DOI: 10.1108/AFR-05-2017-0031
       
  • Financial constraints and production efficiency
    • Abstract: Agricultural Finance Review, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to study the production and efficiency of rice growers in drought prone areas with special attention given to economic and financial factors. Design/methodology/approach The authors use a parametric stochastic frontier approach and a non-parametric data envelopment analysis. Findings The study found that financial and liquidity constraints negatively influence production efficiency while off-farm work positively influences efficiency in drought prone areas. Originality/value Many biotic and abiotic factors affect the production efficiency of rice growers. Among abiotic stress, drought is the strongest constraint affecting nearly one third of the total rice area in Asia and causing significant economic losses. Farmers’ economic conditions and financial constraints further exacerbate the situation. However, very few studies have analyzed the efficiency in drought prone areas and the influence of economic and financial factors. This study contributes to in this regard by augmenting economic and financial factors in the efficiency estimation of drought prone areas using parametric and non-parametric approach.
      Citation: Agricultural Finance Review
      PubDate: 2017-11-15T02:25:38Z
      DOI: 10.1108/AFR-07-2016-0068
       
 
 
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